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THE 


EAST  ANGLIAN; 

/ 

OR, 

ann  (iPluertc^ 

OM  AUBJRCTS  COHNSCTKD  WITH  THE  O0UNTIR8  OP 


SUFFOLK,  CAMBRIDGE,  ESSEX,  &  NORFOLK. 


EDITED  BY 

C.  H.  EVELYN  WHITE,  f.s.a., 

Rtctor  of  I^mpton,  CamimBst. 

UATK  VICAR  OP  CHRIST  CHURCH,  CHESHAM  ;  FORMERLY  CURATE  OP  ST  HELEN, 

ST.  CLEMENT,  AND  ST.  MARGARET’S,  IPSWICH; 

FOUNDER.  HON.  SBC.  AND  BDITOK,  CaMBS.  AND  HUNTS.  ARCHiCOLOGICAL  SOCIETY; 

HON.  MEMBER  (LATE  HON.  SBC.)  SUFFOLK  INSTITUTE  OP  ARCHiFOLOGY  AND  NATURAL  HISTORY; 
CORRESPONDING  MEMBER  OF  THE  NEW  ENGLAND  HISTORIC  AND  GENEALOGICAL  SOCIETY, 

ETC. 


NEW  SERIES.  VOL  X. 


NORWICH  : 

GOOSE  &  SON,  RAMPANT  HORSE  STREET. 

LONDON : 

ELLIOT  STOCK.  62.  PATERNO.STER  ROW.  E  C. 

IPSWICH:  W.  E.  H.AkRlSON,  ANCIENT  HOUSE. 

BURY  ST.  EDMUND’S:  F.  T.  GROOM.  BECCLES :  C.  CHASE. 

CAMBRIDGE:  MACMILLAN  &  BOWES.  CHELMSFORD:  TINDALL  &  JARROLD. 
ELY:  G.  H.  TYND.ALL,  Minstkk  Plack. 


1903—1904. 


XUM 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN; 

OE, 

i^otts  auir  ©utrtts 

ON  SUBJECTS  CONNECTED  WITH  THE  COUNTIES  OF 
SUFFOLK,  CAMBRIDGE,  ESSEX  AND  NORFOLK. 


THIRD  SERIES.  VOL.  X. 


THE  TU8CULAN  SCHOOL  OR  SOCIETY  OF  NORWICH 
(toI.  ix.,  p.  180). 

Mr.  G.  W.  G.  Barnard  of  Norwich  has  in  his  possession  the  first 
volume  of  the  Proceedings  of  this  Society,  which  records  its  objects 
and  discussions  for  a  period  of  six  months.  It  is  a  4to.  book  bound 
in  green  vellum,  the  paper  bearing  as  part  of  its  watermark  the  name 
“J.  Coles.”  The  first  page  begins  “Willm.  Ward,  Willm.  Firth, 
John  Watson,  Willm.  Watson,  and  John  Pitchford  being  assembled 
at  the  house  of  John  Watson,  Jan.  2nd,  1793,  it  was  unanimously 
resolved  to  organize  themselves  into  a  Society  which,  actuated  by  those 
principles  of  free  Enquiry  which  give  birth  to  the  noblest  energies  of 
which  the  human  mind  is  capable — principles  alike  calculated  to 
encourage  the  projecting  spirit  of  the  Mechanic,  to  stimulate  the 
indefatigable  investigations  of  the  Philosopher — agree  to  be  subject 
^  to  such  regulations  as  may  be  thought  necessary  to  attain  a  methodical 
and  determinate  system  of  Discussion. 

^  ”  And  because  this  Society  are  of  opinion  that  it  is  the  attribute 

^  of  weak  and  timid  minds  to  pursue  a  partial  and  hesitating  mode  of 
Enquiry,  subject  to  the  restraints  of  religious  prejudice,  of  political 
prepossession,  and  being  determined  to  pursue  what  may  appear  to 
?  them  to  be  the  Truth,  however  it  may  clash  with  received  Opinions, 
^  they  come  to  the  Resolution  of  admitting  a  free  and  unlimited 
e  discussion  of  every  subject  proposed  by  any  member. 

'•  “And  further,  because  this  Society  wish  to  avoid  the  incon¬ 
veniences  inseparable  from  the  ordinary  mode  of  conversation,  whether 
arising  from  the  restraint  of  a  partial  and  mixed  company,  or  from 
the  desultory  and  inconclusive  manner  in  which  questions  are  usually 
>  agitated,  submit  themselves,  and  expect  future  members  to  conform, 
to  the  regulations  which  follow.” 

B 

178084 

♦ 

i 


XUM 


2 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


The  Rules  enjoin  that  the  Society  shall  be  called  the  Tusculan 
School ;  that  a  moderator  be  appointed  to  superintend  each  evening’s 
debate,  the  office  falling  to  each  member  in  rotation ;  that  a  meeting 
be  lield  every  Wednesday  afternoon,  at  the  house  of  tbe  moderator  for 
the  day,  at  six  o'clock,  absent  members  to  forfeit  one  shilling ;  that 
the  book  in  which  the  proceedings  are  to  be  entered  shall  be  called 
the  Tusculanuin.  John  Pitchford  was  appointed  Secretary,  and  the 
first  list  of  members  comprises  the  names  of  William  Firth,  William 
Watson,  John  Watson,  W.  Ward  (seceded  May  Ist,  1803),  Ollyett 
Woodlioiise,  Charles  Marsh,  Sami.  C.  Barnard;  and  the  following 
also  joined  the  same  year — Edward  Dowling,  jun.,  John  Stuart  Taylor, 
Charles  Rogers  Bund,  William  Taylor,  John  Houghton,  Augustine 
Beevor,  and  Edward  Rigby.  Among  the  visitors  or  members  for  a 
short  time  only  were  Robert  and  John  Woodhouse,  James  Alderson, 
Pendlelmry  Houghton,  John  Fransham,  Henry  Kett,  Hart,  Linley, 
and  Marsh,  sen. 

A  John  Pitchford  was  of  Tom  bland  and  26,  St.  Giles’  Broad 
Street,  surgeon,  and  he  had  a  sou  John,  who  was  educated  at  St.  Omer. 
This  son  is  said,  in  The  Gurneys  of  Earlham,  to  have  been  an  intimate 
friend  of  that  family,  and  that  he  afterwards  carried  on  chemical 
works  at  Bow.  There  was  a  firm  of  Firth  and  Watson,  merchants,  at 
No.  68.  Gildengate.  A  William  Firth  was  >teward  of  Norwich  in 
1803.  William  Ward,  gent.,  lived  at  Eaton.  A  John  Watson  lived 
at  No.  1,  St.  Swithin’s  Lane,  and  this  ma)’  be  the  house  in  which  the 
Society  started.  A  John  Watson  was  the  responsible  clerk  at  the 
Norwich  Post  Office,  under  Mr.  Elisha  De  Hague.  Charles  Marsh 
was  treasurer  to  the  Bethel  Hospital.  Samuel  C.  Barnard  was  jiossibly 
one  of  the  firm  of  merchants  at  1 9,  Botolph  Street,  or  at  9,  Muspole 
Street.  James  Alder^on  was  surgeon,  at  No.  39,  St.  George  Colegate, 
Norwich,  dying  there  in  18-18  ;  while  another  of  the  same  name  was  a 
schoolmaster,  at  No.  2,  Unthank’s  Court,  Rampant  Horse  Lane. 
Ollyett  Woodhouse  was  of  the  Temple,  Barrister-at-Law,  Judge 
Advocate  in  Bombay,  his  mother  being  si-ster  to  Robert  Alderson, 
Esq  ,  Recorder  of  Norwich.  Dr.  Edward  Rigby,  surgeon,  was  Mayor 
in  1805.  Pendlebury  Houghton  was  minister  of  the  Octagon  Chapel. 
John  Fransham’s  epitaph  is  last  fading  from  the  northern  buttress  of 
St.  John  Maddermarket  Church  tower.  Linley  or  Lindle}’  is  spelt  both 
ways  in  the  Proceedings,  so  that  it  might  be  either  a  Rev.  Mr.  Linley, 
a  resident  clergyman  at  that  time  ;  or  George  Lindlej’  of  the  Nursery, 
(  atton,  ancestor  of  Lord  Lindley.  One  lady,  Sarah  Marsh,  occasion* 
ally  took  part  in  the  discussions. 

The  book  contains  reports  of  the  discussions,  either  very  fully 
reported  or  long  digests;  some  of  the  subjects  being — “Would  the 
inclosing  of  Waste  Lands  be  beneficial  to  the  Poor  of  the  Country?”  ; 
“Which  is  the  most  incompatible  with  the  happiness  of  a  Country — 
Irreligion  or  Superstition  ?  ”  ;  “  Whether  matter  and  mind  be  coeval  ? 
if  not,  which  is  of  greater  antiquity?”;  “After  Colonies  are  in  a 
productive  state,  is  it  not  the  Interest  of  the  Mother  Country  to  leave 
them  entirely  at  their  own  disposal?”;  “Is  the  clerical  profession 
consistent  with  morality?”;  “Do  animals  jiossess  reason,  and  will 


NOX£S  A^'U  QUiailES,  ETC.  3 

they,  equally  with  man,  exist  in  a  future  state  ?  ” ;  “  Is  suicide  either 
criminal  or  immoral?”  Seventeen  meetings  were  held  in  the  time 
covered  by  the  book,  and  the  foregoing  list  of  subjects  gives  one  an 
idea  that  this  discussion  Society  had  much  courage  to  take  up  such 
extreme  topics.  Mr.  Firth  was  the  greatest  extremist,  his  utterances 
being  of  a  very  forcible  nature.  At  the  close  of  each  discussion  a  vote 
was  taken,  and  the  names  are  recorded  as  being  for  or  against  the 
opener’s  proposition. 

The  Society  or  School  went  on  for  some  time,  and  there  must  have 
been  several  minute  books  recording  the  after  proceedings,  which 
are  probably  in  private  possession.  It  would  be  interesting  to  learn 
from  them  when  and  how  the  Society  foundered.  A  E  R 

Xoncich.  _ 

Another  Yeoman  Brass  (vol.  viii.  p.  367). — The  Rev.  E.  Farrer, 
Rector  of  Hinderclay,  has  given  me  a  rubbing  of  a  brass  now 
(13  Nov.,  1902)  lying  on  the  floor  of  the  nave  of  Cavenham  Church, 
Suffolk,  affixed  to  its  slab  of  blue  stone.  It  measures  1 by  4  inches, 
and  bears  the  following  inscription : — 

Here  l^eth  bnr^eh  the  bohge  of  John 
^Hmunt  ^eomatt  inho  beceaaeb  in  the 
fagth  of  flDhvist  the  bage  of 

lauuarge  .  ^uno  .  §omtnt  .  1588  0.  F. 

Bell  Acre. — In  the  vestry  at  Hinderclay  Church,  Suffolk,  hangs 
a  printed  terrier  of  14  Dec.,  1870.  The  glebe  includes  “  One  piece  of 

Land,  called  ‘Bell  Acre,’  abutting  on  the  Churchyard” . “Two 

bell  ropes  yearly  to  be  found  out  of  this  piece.”  C.  P. 


Folk-lore:  Sympathetic  Cure. — According  to  a  local  news¬ 
paper  of  13th  Nov.,  1902,  an  ancient  superstition  is  still  current  in 
Essex.  At  the  Essex  Autumn  Assizes,  opened  at  Chelmsford  on 
12th  Nov.,  a  man  was  prosecuted  for  stabbing  another  man  through 
the  fingers  and  on  the  arm  with  a  knife,  at  Great  Clacton,  “  and 
according  to  a  curious  superstition  in  the  district,  it  was  believed  as 
necessary  for  the  recovery  of  the  wound  that  the  knife  should  be 
greased  and  laid  across  the  bed  whereon  the  prosecutor  [stabbed  with 
the  knife]  lay.  Tliis  was  done,  and  it  certainly  happened  that  no 
serious  results  followed. 

Scott  alludes  to  this  mode  of  cure  in  “  The  Lay  of  the  Last 
Minstrel,”  canto  3,  stanza  23,  where  the  wounded  Deloraine  is  tended 
by  the  Lady  of  Branksome  Tower  : — 

“  But  she  has  ta’en  the  broken  lance. 

And  wash’d  it  from  the  clotted  gore. 

And  salved  the  splinter  o’er  and  o’er. 

William  of  Deloraine,  in  trance, 

Whene’er  she  turn’d  it  round  and  round. 

Twisted  as  if  she  gall’d  his  wound.” 

Scott  added  some  interesting  notes  in  his  appendix  to  the  poem. 

B  2 


XUM 


4 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAN;  OK, 


FOWLMERE  NOTES.— SOME  FORGOTTEN  WAYS. 

There  are  still  some  ways  in  the  parish  almost  wholly  obliterated 
and  forgotten,  wliich  deserve  attention.  They  are  all  marked  on  the 
Enclosure  Award  Map,  and  are  dimly  remembered  by  some  old 
inhabitants :  otherwise,  the  plough  has  done  its  work,  and  the  coming 
generation  will  know  nothing  about  them.  Of  these,  two  crossed  the 
Brauditch  at  the  same  point,  some  quarter-mile  distant  from  the  head 
of  the  old  Moor.  This  probably  connotes  that  one  was  much  more 
recent  than  the  other,  and  crossed  the  ditch,  at  the  passage  already 
made  by  the  other  through  its  steep  vallum.  One  of  them  is,  if  not 
Roman,  at  least  ancient.  This  we  will  consider  first. 

(1)  The  “Old  Walden  Way.” 

So-called  on  Enclosure  Map.  This  way,  entering  the  parish  at 
the  point  above  indicated,  passed  south-eastwards  round  the  head  of 
the  little  “  Moor,”  formed  by  Fowlmere  brook  in  Fowlmere  dene.  As 
it  rose  to  the  further  Crowley  hills  it  bore  more  easterly,  and  crossed  old 
Norwich  Way  (Icknield  Streef)  close  to  the  Harborough  Hill  tumulus, 
ill  sight  of  Chrishall  Grange.  Along  this  stretch  it  is  quite  obliterated, 
but  its  course  is  preserved  by  the  boundary  of  the  parish  from  the 
Heydon  junction  along  the  Chrishall  frontier.  It  then  passed,  as  the 
present  road,  along  the  Grange  Spinney  into  Diixford  parish.  It 
possibly  thereafter  bifurcated,  one  branch,  possibly  the  main,  going 
throiiuh  Ickleton  to  Stump  Cross,  and  so  to  Walden ;  the  other, 
possibly  by  Strethall  and  Littlebury  to  the  same  town.  The  fact  that 
it  was  chosen  as  a  boundary  line  for  the  parish,  sufficiently  indicates 
its  antiquity.  If,  as  I  believe,  it,  or  a  branch  of  it,  passed  through 
Ickleton.  some  explanation  is  afforded  of  the  confusion  as  to  Icknield 
Way,  for  which  its  line  would  be  easily  mistaken.  At  any  rate, 
whether  it  so  passed,  chiefly  or  in  part,  it  is  apparently  the  road  which 
Babington  notes  as  coming  from  Ickleton  to  Stump  Cross.*  The  fact 
that  it  went  to  Walden,  a  connecting  link  and  probable  station  in 
touch  with  {’olchester  and  Chelmsford,  suggests  this  road  as  a  Roman 
military  way.  This  suggestion  is  corroborated  by  the  fact  that  its 
extension  to  the  west  of  Branditch  brings  it  up  against  the  Roman 
camp,  which  Beldam  visited  and  described,  f  on  the  Port  Way  at 
Melbourn.  This  camp,  from  Beldam’s  description,  must  have  been  a 
large  one;  and  its  situation  only  half-a-mile  from  Branditch.  and 
commanding  the  Ashwell  Street,  which  skirted  it,  as  now  the  Port 
Way,  with  its  ford  acrttss  our  “river”  near  the  mill,  not  only  marks 
its  importance,  but  suggests  that  it  may  even  have  been  the  site  of 
Ostorius  Scapula’s  camp  on  the  eve  of  his  victory  over  the  Iceni. 

My  own  conclusions,  as  set  forth  in  previous  papers,  are : — 

1.  That  the  Britith  way  was  Ashwell  Street. 

2.  That  Ashwell  Street  crossed  our  river  at  the  mill. 

3.  That  it  was  not  protected  by  a  vallum,  unless  the  old  baulk 
100  yards  within  the  “river”  boundary  were  such. 


Ancient  Cambridgechire. 


t  Arefiaological  Journal,  vol.  xxv.  p.  31. 


XOT*9  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


5 


4.  That  Braiiditch,  from  the  Moor  head  to  Heydon  Hill,  was  not 
pierced  by  any  Britith  road,  but  presented  a  solid  front. 

5.  That  the  Icknield  Street  was  the  Roman  road,  and  was  made 
subsequent  to  the  conquest  of  the  Iceni  by  the  Romans. 

6.  That  the  British  inhabitants  did  not  have  villages  on  the  duns 
or  downs,  but  resided  in  the  “round  moats.”  as  seen  to-day  at  Shepreth 
and  Fowlmere.  If  these  conclusions  be  correct,  then  Ostorius  Scapula 
had  no  other  line  of  advance  open,  eastward  of  the  Chilterns,  save 
Ashwell  Street,  or  the  open  downs. 

Presuming  that  he  chose  Ashwell  Street  as  being  the  “road,”  and 
commanding  a  water  supply  such  as  could  not  be  found  on  the  chalk 
downs,  he  would  find  himself  confronted  by — (i)  the  river;  (2)  the 
moor;  (3)  on  his  right  flank  the  steep  and  uncompromising  rampart 
of  Branditch ;  (4)  on  his  left  flank  the  swampy  ground  on  the  river 
bank,  right  down  to  the  Rhea.  He  would  naturally  camp  and  entrench 
himself  while  refreshing  his  troops,  wearied  by  his  forced  marches, 
and  to  view  the  disposition  of  the  enemy.  At  the  same  time,  he  would 
endeavour  to  conceal  his  own  nrovements  from  the  enemy.  No  better 
place  than  the  site  of  this  Melbourn  camp  could  be  desired.  It  was 
sufficiently  far  back  to  allow  of  circumventing  the  Moor  on  firm  ground ; 
sufficiently  near  the  ford  to  allow  of  his  hurling  his  forces  upon  it ; 
and  sufficiently  screened  from  the  enemy,  by  a  slight  elevation  of  the 
ground,  to  allow  of  his  making  his  own  dispositions  unobserved.  His 
infantry  would  be,  no  doubt,  detached  to  make  the  attack  against 
Bran-ditch  on  his  right  flank.  The  Moor  and  the  left-flank  swamps 
would  need  no  disposition  of  his  troops,  save  that  of  covering  parties 
to  guard  against  the  onset  of  his  amphibious  enemy.  His  cavalry 
assault  would  be  on  the  ford. 

The  site  of  the  battle  is  unknown,  and  consequently  there  are 
diversities  of  opinions  as  to  the  locality,  some  inclining  to  Brent  or 
Pampisford  Ditch,  because  it  is  the  shortest ;  others  to  Fleam  Dyke, 
as  being  the  penultimate,  and  the  “  hedging  in  ”  of  the  enemy  by  their 
own  defences  necessitates,  on  the  dyke  theory,  one  other  in  their  rear. 
The  obliterated  Bran-ditch,  with  its  puludine  extensions,  is  scarcely 
considered  in  the  discussion.  It  will,  however,  be  allowed,  I  think, 
that  this  forgotten  ford  on  Ashwell  Street  can  put  in  a  claim  for  con¬ 
sideration.  It  is  doubtful,  if  any  of  the  ditches  be  the  scene,  whether 
a  better  case  can  be  made  out  for  any  other  locality.  I  throw  out 
this  as  no  more  than  a  bare  possibility :  but  at  least  the  circumstances 
admirably  tally  with  and  illustrate  the  Annals  of  Tacitus,  brief  and 
crabbed  as  they  are : — 

Hisque  [7wni‘«]  auctorihus  circxmjeetce  nationes  locum  pugna  delegere 
septum  aggresti  aggere.  [Bran-ditch,  with  its  one,  two,  or  more  field 
banks,  answers  this  as  well  as  any  other.] 

et  aditu  angusfn,  ne  perutus  equiti  foret.  ['I’he  ford,  flanked  by 
swamps,  is  a  narrow  entrance,  more  probable,  though  not  quite  so  dis¬ 
advantageous  for  cavalry  as  would  be  a  gateway  in  a  vallum.  And  it 
would  give  Ostorius,  who  had  no  chariots,  just  the  advantage  he 
required.] 

ea  munimenta  dtuc  Romanus . perrumpere  aggreditur,  et  distrihutis 


6 


THB  KAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


cohortihut  tumuu  quoqu$  peditum  ad  munia  aecingit.  [The  cavalry,  useless 
in  front  of  the  long  vallum,  would  essay  the  ford  :  while  the  infantry 
breast  the  glacis.] 

tunc  data  tigno  perfringunt  aggerem.  [If  the  cavalry  forced  the 
ford,  and  so  turned  the  flank  of  the  enemy,  the  infantry,  no  matter 
how  “  steep  ”  the  ditch  and  vallum,  would  be  relieved  of  pressure,  and 
so  be  able  to  scale  the  rampart.  The  tigno  data  seems  to  imply  au 
extended  line.] 

tuitque  elautlrit  impeditos  turhant.  atque  illi  ....  ohieptit  effugiis, 
multa  et  elara  facinora  fecere.  [The  usual  opinion  is  that  the  fugitives 
were  hedged  in  by  the  dykes  in  their  rear.  Now,  Brent-ditch  is  some 
5^  miles,  as  the  crow  flies,  from  Bran-ditch  ;  Fleam  Dyke  some  4^ 
miles  beyond  ;  and  the  Devil’s  Dyke  about  6^^  miles  beyond  that.  In 
these  intervals  the  cavalry  would  have  ridden  down  flying  footmen 
long  before  they  reached  the  next  barrier,  and  those  who  were  not  so 
ridden  down  need  not  have  jammed  themselves  through  the  gateways, 
but  could  have  scrambled  up  the  glacis  to  their  friends  on  the  tup ; 
for,  if  caught  by  cavalry  on  the  edge  of  the  fosse,  an  active  Briton, 
unless  the  cavalry  were  armed  with  bows  and  arrows,  could  soon  have 
placed  himself  out  of  reach  of  danger.  It  seems  to  me  more  reason¬ 
able  that  those  tuit  claustrit  impediti  ....  ohseptit  ejjugiit  were  not 
baffled  by  any  rearward  agger  aggrettis,  but  by  the  ramparts  of  their 
“  round  moats,”  to  which  they  would,  from  their  propinquity,  more 
readily  betake  themselves.  These  camps,  probably  fortified  by  a 
stockade  on  the  top  of  the  vallum,  *  would  compel  a  congestion  of 
fugitives  in  the  gateways.  Possibly  Tacitus  himself  suggests  such 
contingency  by  the  use  of  the  word  clauttra,  which  was  a  military 
word  connoting  the  key  of  a  position  ] 

“  But  no  traces  of  the  battle,  no  relics  of  the  slaughter  are  known.” 
That  argument,  of  course,  acts  as  much  against  the  venue  of  any  of 
the  dykes  as  against  this.  But,  again,  we  may  look  at  facts.  From 
Bran  to  Devil’s  Ditch  the  ground,  with  the  apparent  exception  of  part 
of  Duxford  Field,  has  been  enclosed  only  within  the  last  century. 
Yet,  although  chalk  is  a  great  preservative  of  remains,  none  have  been 
turned  up  by  the  plough.  In  the  locality  which  I  suggest  as  possible, 
there  was  the  Great  Moor  with  its  extended  swamps,  as  well  as  the 
swamps  along  Fowlmere  brook,  only  half-a-mile  beyond,  to  swallow  the 
dead  and  to  rot  the  relics  of  battle.  Further,  with  small  exceptions,! 
the  scene  of  conflict,  if  it  were  fought  here,  has  unbroken  surface ; 
the  greater  part  of  the  Moor,  though  drained,  is  uncultivated  ;  from 
the  Moor  to  the  “round  moats’’  lies  a  stretch  of  immemorial  pasture. 
This  was  undoubtedly  the  pratum  of  Domesday :  and,  if  then,  no 
doubt  it  was  pasture  through  most,  or  all,  of  the  Saxon  occupation. 
There  are  possibilities,  I  can  call  them  no  more,  under  our  Fowlmere 
turf.  The  other  ways  must  be  explored  another  time. 

Foxclmtre  Rectory.  A.  C.  YoHKE. 

*  See  Kemble’s  Setxone  in  England. 

t  One  of  these  exceptions,  a  patch  of  ground  on  the  edge  of  the  Moor  and  Copt 
Hill,  yielded,  a  few  years  ago,  a  number  of  bones,  “apparently  human  leg  bones  ” 
the  tenant  told  me.  Further,  a  top  of  Farthing  (Fawdon)  Hill  is  a  trench  of  darker 
mould  than  that  of  the  field.  Some  years  ago  it  was  tested  by  the  owner  for  a  short 
distance.  A  few  bits  of  bone  were,  I  understand,  discovered ;  nothing  else. 


NOTES  AND  QUEKIK8,  ETC. 


7 


SOME  SUFFOLK  CHURCH  NOTES.  No.  LI. 

St.  Mary  at  the  Tower,  Ipswich. 

This,  the  principal  church  in  the  town,  was  almost  entirely  rebuilt 
about  1870  in  a  handsome  and  costly  manner,  at  the  expense  of  O.  C. 
E.  Bacon,'  Esq.,  an  Ipswich  banker,  who  lies  buried  under  a  handsome 
tomb  on  the  north  side  of  the  churchyard. 

It  now  comprises  chancel  with  aisles,  and  north  vestry,  clerestoried 
nave,  aisles,  and  lofty  south-west  tower,  surmounted  by  a  handsome 
spire.  The  tower  contains  a  good  peal  of  twelve  bells,  and  its  lowest 
storj’  forms  the  principal  entrance  to  the  building,  though  there  is  a 
richly-carved  western  doorway  to  the  nave. 

Very  little  of  the  old  work  remains,  except  the  arcnding  of  the 
aisles,  and  the  architectural  style  is  mainly  Perpendicular,  with  some 
admixture  of  Decorated.  The  chancel  is  enclosed  by  a  modern  carved 
oak  rood-screen  and  double  parcloses,  part  of  the  latter  being  ancient, 
and  in  them  the  old  stalls  with  carved  miserere*  have  been  refixed. 
The  walls  of  the  sacrarium  are  panelled  with  carved  oak,  and  the 
reredos  is  a  picture  of  the  Crucifixion  with  adoring  angels,  all  set  in 
richly  carved  canopy  work,  painted  and  gilt.  The  stone  canopies  of 
the  sedilia  on  the  south  have  also  been  coloured  to  harmonize.  There 
is  a  handsomely-carved  octa^^onal  oak  pulpit,  attributed  to  Grinling 
Gibbons,  on  the  north  side  of  the  nave.  Near  the  tower  doorway 
stands  the  ancient  Perpendicular  stone  font,  with  panels  sunk  in  its 
eight  sides,  each  having  a  carved  lion  passant,  the  mouldings  being 
adorned  with  little  quartrefoils.  At  the  angles  of  the  bowl  are  little 
pinnacles  rising  from  male  and  female  heads  sculptured  at  the  lower 
corners,  the  underside  being  carved  with  grapes  and  foliage.  Lions 
sejant  are  placed  at  four  corners  of  the  shaft,  with  pinnacled  buttresses 
between.  The  font  is  raised  on  three  steps,  the  risers  of  two  of  them 
panelled  with  quatrefoils,  and  it  is  furnished  with  a  crocheted 
canopied  cover. 

Two  bench  ends  at  the  west  ei>d  of  the  church  have  ancient  carvings 
at  their  elbows — two  dragon-like  creatures  and  two  seated  figures  of 
tonsured  clerics  vested  in  alb  and  dalmatic,  reading  from  books  open 
upon  their  knees. 

There  is  an  old  carved  chest  in  the  church,  behind  the  font,  now 
used  to  contain  the  bread  for  a  parish  dole  On  the  ends  of  the 
modern  Corporation  benches  are  carved  the  borough  crest  and 
supporters,  and  the  Ipswich  arms  are  emblazoned  on  a  shield  below 
the  wrought-iron  holders  for  the  mace,  &c. 

Well-intentioned  as  the  work  of  “  restoration  ”  in  this  church  has 
been,  one  could  wish  that  it  had  been  carried  out  in  a  less  sweeping 
manner.  Scarcely  a  monument  remains  in  its  original  place,  and 
almost  all  the  ledger  slabs  have  been  cast  out  into  the  churchyard,  to 
be  replaced  by  a  tile  pavement— even  the  brasses  have  been  relaid  or 
fastened  in  the  walls. 

There  are  four  stones  in  the  chancel  whose  brasses  may  be  thus 
described : — 

1.  A  notary  {e.  1475,  engraved  in  Boutell’s  Monumental  Brasses), 


8 


THB  EAST  ANQLIAM  ;  OR. 


He  is  in  a  gown  that  reaches  nearly  to  the  ankle,  the  sleeves  loose, 
and  his  hands  joined  in  prayer.  The  gown  is  confined  at  the  waist  by 
a  belt,  from  which  on  his  right  side  are  suspended  his  pencase  and 
ink  bottle.  A  long  scarf  fastened  at  his  left  shoulder,  and  reaching 
in  front  nearly  to  the  ground,  is  attached  to  a  stiff-looking  roundle  of 
cloth  on  the  shoulder,  from  which  the  cloth  hood  hung  down  behind. 
He  is  clean  shaven,  and  the  hair  removed  from  the  forehead  level 
with  the  ears  in  a  semicircle,  while  it  is  cropped  all  round  just  below 
the  ears.  On  his  breast  is  a  scroll ;  — 

Eeposita  est  hec  spes  mea  i  sinu  meo 
Sea  trinitas  vn’de’  miserere  mei. 

He  wears  low  shoes  laced  on  the  inside,  and  stands  amid  scattered 
human  bones. 

2.  A  man  with  his  two  wives  (c.  1500).  He  is  in  a  gown 
reaching  to  his  feet,  with  wide  border  of  fur  in  front,  and  a  broad 
edging  of  the  same  on  his  very  full  sleeves.  His  face  is  shaven,  and 
his  hair,  parted  in  the  middle,  is  cut  straight  across  the  forehead,  aud 
falls  nearly  to  the  shoulders.  His  hands  are  in  prayer,  showing  a 
tight  sleeve  at  the  wrist,  and  his  shoes  are  broad-toed. 

His  wives,  on  each  side,  are  turned  inwards  toward  him,  and  are 
habited  exactly  alike,  in  dresses  fitting  close  to  the  body,  but  with 
ample  skirts  arranged  in  folds  around  their  feet  with  a  narrow  fur 
bordering.  Deep  cuffs  of  the  same  material  are  reflexed  upon  their 
closely-cut  sleeves.  Each  has  a  loose  girdle  fastened  with  three  rose¬ 
shaped  clasps,  from  which  a  pendant  hangs  by  a  long  double  chain. 
They  wear  the  kennel  headgear,  with  long  lappets  reaching  to  the 
shoulders.  Hands  in  prayer. 

(The  broken  matrix  of  this  brass  in  the  north  churchyard  shows 
that  it  had  a  border  inscription,  and  two  shields  in  the  top  corners  of 
the  stone). 

3.  A  lady  with  her  two  husbands  and  family.  She  stands  in  a 
prayerful  attitude  in  the  centre,  robed  in  a  plain  gown  with  tight 
sleeves  and  fur  cuffs,  a  girdle  round  her  waist,  one  end  of  which, 
passed  through  a  large  buckle  and  embellished  with  an  ornamental 
chape,  hangs  nearly  to  the  ground.  She  wears  a  neat  head-dress  of 
folded  drapery,  reaching  to  the  shoulder.  From  her  mouth  proceeds 
a  prayer  "scroll : — Sps  sete  deus  miserere  nobis. 

Her  first  husband,  a  notary,  on  her  left  hand,  wears  a  long  wide¬ 
sleeved  gown  reaching  to  his  heels,  lined  and  collared  with  fur.  From 
the  left  side  of  his  belt  hang  his  penner  aud  inkpot,  and  on  the  other 
side  his  gipsire  is  attached.  His  face  is  shaven,  and  his  hair  brushed 
down  and  cut  across  the  forehead,  descending  at  the  sides  to  his 
shoulders.  The  figure  is  turned  somewhat  inward  towards  his  wife, 
his  hands  in  prayer.  The  shoes  are  large  aud  broad.  His  prayer  is : — 
Fili  redemtor  mudi . s. 

The  second  husband’s  figure  is  very  similar,  but  it  is,  of  course, 
turned  in  the  opposite  direction.  His  gown  sleeves  are  lined  and 
bordered  with  fur,  and  appear  to  be  slit  in  the  upper  arm.  He  wears 
simply  a  gipsire  suspended  at  his  belt  in  front.  His  ejaculatory 
scroll  is  Seta  trinitas  vnus  d . 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


9 


Below  the  figure  runs  this  inscription,  in  Gothic  type : — 

Of  youre  charite  pray  for  the  soull  of  Alys  late  the  wyfe  of 
Thomas  Baldry  Marchaut  sumtyme  |  the  wyfe  of  Master  Robert 
Wymbyll  Notari  which  Alys  decessid  the  iiij"'  day  of  August  the 
yere  of  oure  |  Ijord  one  thoussand  ccccc  vj  on  whose  soul  ihu  haue 
mercy  and  on  all  cristin  soullis  amen.  | 

Under  the  lady  are  ranged  a  group  of  five  daughters,  standing 
in  prayer  arranged  like  their  mother,  but  without  girdles,  four  bare¬ 
headed  with  hair  unbound,  and  the  eldest  in  a  stiflF  “  penthouse  ”  head¬ 
dress  ;  their  faces  towards  their  four  brothers,  who  are  engraved  on  a 
separate  plate  beneath  Robert  Wymbyll.  Like  their  father  they  wear 
long  gowns,  but  without  belt  and  appendages.  Below  Baldry’s  figure 
is  another  plate,  with  the  arms  of  the  Mercer' »  Company  impaling  his 
own  merchant’s  mark. 

4.  A  man  and  two  wives  (c.  1518)  standing  upon  a  mutilated 
bracket.  Ue  is  in  a  long  wide  gown  with  capacious  sleeves,  having 
openings  in  the  upper  arm.  A  gipsire  or  purse  hangs  from  his  waist 
in  front,  and  his  low  shoes  have  no  heels,  and  are  fastened  by  a  strap 
across  the  instep.  He  is  shaven,  and  wears  his  hair  reaching  to  the 
shoulders. 

The  wife  on  his  right  side  is  habited  in  a  gown  cut  close  to  the 
body,  but  with  amply  folded  skirts.  Her  bodice  is  cut  square  at  the 
neck  and  laced  up  the  front,  the  elbows  are  set  out  from  the  body,  the 
wrists  finished  off  with  wide  cuffs.  Her  waist  is  encircled  by  a  girdle 
of  some  pliable  material  fastened  in  front  with  a  trefoil  clasp,  from 
which  hangs  a  pincushiou  (perhaps  a  pomander  box)  of  circular  form. 
Her  head  is  lost. 

The  other  wife,  a  similar  figure,  also  turned  inward  towards  her 
husband,  has  her  bodice  not  laced,  but  fastened  up  the  front.  Her 
girdle  is  apparently  of  engraved  metal,  and  has  an  ornamental  lozenge¬ 
shaped  clasp  enclosing  a  quatrefoil.  She  wears  a  “  penthouse”  hood 
witli  long  lappets,  and  a  large  embroidered  caul  behind. 

Ill  the  centre  of  the  ciisped  bracket,  on  which  they  stand,  is  a 
circle  containing  a  quatrefoil,  within  which  is  a  shield  displaying  a 
merchant’s  mark.  The  lower  part  of  the  bracket  is  lost,  but  it  rose 
from  an  inscription  plate,  now  also  lost,  upon  which  were  plates  still 
remaining.  On  the  right  hand  are  two  sons  dressed  like  their  father, 
save  for  tiieir  girdle  and  purse,  the  younger  with  hands  raised,  but 
not  joined.  On  the  other  plate  are  three  daughters,  habited  like  the 
ladies,  standing  on  a  tiled  pavement.  Their  girdle  pendants  are  all  of 
different  patterns,  and  the  elder  girl  wears  a  pedimental  head-dress. 
The  next  has  her  hair  loose,  flowing  down  her  back,  with  no  covering 
to  be  seen,  while  the  youngest  wears  a  short  hood  without  any  lappets 
over  her  streaming  hair,  and  her  hands  are  raised,  but  not  joined,  in 
devotion.  At  the  top  of  the  stone  is  a  plate  with  a  different  rendering 
of  the  Ipswich  arms  from  tliat  usually  seen,  thus : — three  lions  passant, 
dimidiated  with  three  hulls  of  ships,  as  in  the  arms  of  Winehelsea. 
This  is  believed  to  be  the  monument  of  Thomas  Urayles,  merchant, 
and  his  brass  was  originally  on  the  same  stone  (before  mentioned  as 
being  now  in  the  churchyard),  side  by  side  with  Wymbyll’s. 


XUM 


10 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OK, 


There  appears  to  have  been  a  close  intimacy,  or  perhaps  relation-  y« 
ship  between  the  two  families,  as  Robert  Wymbyll  the  notary,  his  1 

wife  Alice  and  her  boys,  especially  her  son  John,  are  mentioned  in  the 
will  of  John,  father  of  Thomas  Drayles.  ^ 

In  1899  the  writer  restored  to  this  church  a  small  brass  shield  (a  y< 


cross  compony  impaling  a  saltire)  that  he  obtained  from  a  curiosity 
shop  in  Norwich,  and  which  he  had  reason  to  suppose  came  originally 
from  St.  Mary  le  Tower,  on  the  understanding  that  it  should  be 
replaced  in  the  church.  With  it  was  also  a  broken  half-shield  of 
later  date. 

H.  W.  Birch. 

( To  he  continued). 


MONUMENTAL  INSCRIPTIONS  FROM  OTHER  COUNTIES 
RELATING  TO  EAST  ANGLIA. 

St.  Nicholas  Church,  Brighton  (the  Cemetery  to 
THE  West  of  the  Church). 

(1)  Raised  tlah. — William  Haggard  Esq'  |  of  Bi  adenham  Hall  I 
Norfolk  I  Died  at  Brighton  j  30“"  March  A.l).  1843  |  Aged  59  years  | 

(2)  Ileadstone. — Sacred  |  to  the  memory  of  |  Clara  Ann  |  the 
beloved  daughter  of  |  William  Frederick  |  and  Catherine  Brown  |  of 
Leytonstone  Essex  |  who  departed  this  life  |  June  28“'  1830  |  aged  3 
years  and  3  months  | 

(3)  Headstone. — Sacred  j  to  the  memory  of  |  Lucy  Eliza  |  widow 
of  I  Alexander  George  Mackay  Esq'  |  late  of  Bagthorpe  Hall  Norfolk 

I  only  daughter  of  John  Jones  Esq"  |  and  Lucy  Fowler  his  wife  | 
eldest  daughter  and  co-heiress  of  [  Sir  William  Fowler  Bart.  |  of 
Harnaye  Grange  Shropshire  |  who  both  lie  interred  in  the  |  old 
Church  of  this  Parish  |  She  died  at  S‘  Leonards  on  Sea  |  November  16“' 
1842  Aged  86  years  |  most  deeply  and  deservedly'  lamented  |  by  her 
sorrowing  family  |  and  a  large  circle  of  friends  |  She  fell  asleep  in  the 
arms  |  of  her  children  |  Blessed  are  the  dead  which  die  in  the  Lord  j 

(4)  Headstone. — Sacred  |  to  the  memory  of  |  Joanna  wife  of  | 
William  King  [  born  at  Lowestoft  |  on  the  3'“  of  March  1806  |  Died 
at  Brighton  |  on  the  16“'  of  December  1848  | 

(5)  Headstone. — Sacred  |  to  the  memory  of  1  the  Rev^  Alfred 
Spalding  |  late  of  Trinity  College  Cambridge  |  who  departed  this 
life  May  26“'  1846  |  in  the  32"'*  year  of  Ins  age  after  a  long  |  and 
painful  illness  which  he  bore  with  |  exemplary  patience  and  re-^ig- 
nation  |  Alfred  Bailey  Bevan  Spalding  |  Son  of  the  above  died 
suddenly  at  the  age  |  of  12  months  May  29‘*‘  1846. three  days  |  after 
his  Father,  leaving  the  distressed  widow  |  to  mourn  the  loss  of  her 
husband  and  her  |  only  child  |  They  were  lovely  and  pleasant  in  their 

I  lives  and  in  their  deaths  they  were  not  divided  | 

(6)  Altar  slab. — In  memory  of  M'  James  Gall  |  late  of  Epping 
Forest  |  who  died  in  Brighton  |  on  the  23'“  of  August  1819  |  aged  79 


XUM 


NOTES  AND  QUEUIK8.  ETC. 


11 


years  |  (a  quotation  i»  now  ilUgihU)  \  And  of  Anne  |  Belict  of  the  above 
I  who  died  ‘23''*  November  1832  |  aged  7K  years  | 

(7)  Headstone. — Sacred  |  to  the  memory  of  ]  Isabella  Simpson  |  of 
Wood  House  East  Ham  Essex  |  Died  9^  February  1842  |  aged  17 


years  | 

(8)  Altar  slab. — To  |  the  memory  of  |  Emma  |  youngest  daughter 
of  I  the  late  M'  John  Turner  |  of  Walthamstow  Essex  (  who  died  | 
the  23"*  day  of  January  1844  ]  aged  48  years  |  Also  of  |  M'  John 
Barnard  Turner  |  of  Walthamstow  |  Brother  of  the  above  |  who  died 

I  the  18**“  of  December  1850  |  aged  69  years  | 

(9)  Altar  slab. — Sacred  |  to  the  memory  of  ]  William  Manbey 
Esq'  I  late  of  Stratford  Grove  Essex  |  who  departed  this  life  Decem¬ 
ber  20***  I  1846  I  in  the  73^^  year  of  his  age  (  Also  of  Sarah  I  widow 
of  the  above  |  who  departed  this  life  February  21'*  |  1862  |  in  the 
79***  year  of  her  age  | 

(10)  Altar  slab. — To  the  memory  of  |  Sarah  Sewell  I  the  eldest 
daughter  of  the  late  |  M'  Robert  Sewell  |  of  Bury  S*  Edmunds  | 
formerly  of  Wymondham  |  Norfolk  |  Born  12**’  May  1794  |  Died  7*** 


June  1817  | 


J.  Lottth  Cleuence. 


Lowestoft. 


ACCOUNT  BOOKS  OF  ST.  STEPHEN’S  CHURCH  &  PARISH, 
NORWICH.  Continued  from  p.  386. 

1792,  June  2l8t,  the  vicar  appointed  John  English,  a  member  of  the  Established 
Church  and  a  parishioner,  to  be  clerk.  He  was  afterwards  approved  by  the  church¬ 
wardens  and  others,  and  he  agreed  to  pay  the  widow  of  the  late  clerk  2i.  6d.  per 
week  for  the  remainder  of  her  life.  John  South  Horse  *  with  others  signed  the 
accounts  for  1790-91. 

June  nth,  1793,  it  was  agreed  to  ask  the  Lord  Bishop  to  consecrate  the  piece 
of  ground  lately  added  to  the  graveyard,  and  in  October  it  was  agreed  to  erect  a 
temporary  building  on  the  south  side  of  the  new  piece  of  ground  next  the  wall 
dividing  it  from  the  ground  in  the  possession  of  Mr.  Samuel  Colkett,  for  the 
reception  of  the  Lord  Bishop  and  his  requisite  attendants,  at  the  consecration 
ceremony. 

1794,  June  27th,  £135.  13«.  8(f.,  then  in  the  Bank  of  Messrs.  Harvey  and 
Hudson,  was  ordered  to  be  paid  as  part  of  the  purchase-money  of  the  addition  to 
the  churchyard.  This  the  vendors  declined  to  accept,  and  at  a  farther  meeting  on 
August  7th,  1794,  Mr.  Hardy’s  offer  to  lend  the  remainder  of  the  principal  and 
interest  then  due  was  received,  and  the  receipt  of  the  principal  and  interest, 
£364.  lit.  is  attested  by  Messrs.  Foster,  Son,  &  XJnthank.  The  vestry  agreed  to 
pay  Mr.  Hardy  £5  per  cent,  per  annum  for  the  loan. 

1796-7.  General  De  Lancey  was  responsible  for  the  barracks  in  this  parish, 
which  were  then  empty. 

1797,  Jan.  25th,  Mr.  Wm.  "Wells  is  vestry  clerk,  and  the  vestry  directs  that  he 
be  paid  two  guineas  per  year,  instead  of  one  ;  and  that  a  gratuity  of  one  guinea  be 
given  Mr.  Robert  I’arraman,  one  of  the  constables  of  the  parish,  for  his  extra¬ 
ordinary  care  in  obtaining  information  as  to  removals  of  the  parishioners. 

•  Morse,  Oent.,  was  a  ratepayer  in  St.  Stephen's  previous  to  1770 ;  Anne  Morse,  widow,  paid 
in  1777 ;  and  J.  South  Morse  began  to  pay  in  1782,  be  then  living  at  14,  Surrey  Street.  John  South 
Morse  of  Bracondale  died  in  1816.  His  son  was  named  South  Morse,  and  his  grandson  John  South 
Morse.  The  latter’s  son  is  the  Rev.  Anthony  South  Morse.  Rector  of  Caistor  and  Rural  Dean  of 
the  western  division  of  Brooke  Deanery.  John  Morse  lived  in  Upper  Surrey  Street,  and  was  an 
alderman.  In  All  Saints’  Church  there  is  a  memorial  tablet  to  John  Morse,  £^.,  who  died 
Nov.  29th,  1887,  aged  92 ;  also  to  Sarah  his  wife,  who  died  June  24tb,  1^,  aged  06. 


12 


THE  EAST  ANOUAH;  OR. 


“  1799,  Sunday,  Nov.  .Ird.  Be  it  remembered  that  William  Stevenson,  Esq., 
one  of  the  present  sheriffs  of  the  city  of  Norwich,  and  an  inhabitant  of  this  parish, 
has  made  the  parish  a  present  of  the  elegant  painting  work  on  glass,  representing 
the  figure  of  Saint  Stephen  under  a  Gothic  canopy,  with  a  base  of  the  same,  which 
is  fixed  into  the  centre  of  the  east  window  of  the  church  of  the  said  parish  of 
St.  Stephen.”  Signed,  Henry  Carrington,  vicar;  Sami.  Crakanthorp,  Thos.  Barber, 
churchwardens. 

1799,  Watchmen’s  great  coats  cost  £5.  1*.,  and  Mr.  Gaze  was  paid  6*.  for 

binding  a  prayer-book.  The  glazier's  bill  was  £16.  5i.  £30  was  paid  Mr.  Hardy 

off  his  loan  of  £130,  borrowed  to  buy  the  addition  to  the  churchyard.  Mr.  Wells 
was  also  paid  £16  on  account  of  the  parish  watch. 

1800,  17th  Oct.  The  last  £10  of  Mr.  John  Bowde’s  legacy  was  lent  to  Francis 
Smith  of  this  parish,  cooper ;  his  surety  being  Mr.  William  Webster  of  St.  Simon's 
parish,  innkeeper.  Lent  for  five  years  without  interest.  1806  is  written  in  pencil 
Mneath  the  memorandum,  but  it  is  not  said  there  that  the  money  was  repaid. 

1800- 1.  Lieut.  White.  13th  Light  l)rag;oon  Guards,  was  rated  for  a  stable. 
Colonel  Browne,  Captain  James  Brownson,  Captain  Marriott,  and  Lieut.  White 
refused  to  pay  parochial  rates.  In  several  of  the  years  alwut  this  time  there  was  a 
great  massing  of  troops  in  the  eastern  counties. 

1801,  Jan.  7th.  A  wall  separating  the  churchyard  from  property  of  Mr.  Stephen 
tioore  on  the  west,  having  partly  fallen  down,  Messrs.  Sewell  &  Blake,  solicitors, 
made  application  to  the  churchwardens  to  reinstate  it.  Mr.  Moore  said  the  parish 
had  whitewashed  it,  as  if  it  were  theirs,  but  in  the  end  he  accepted  the  responsibility 
of  rebuilding  it. 

1801.  “  Be  it  remembered  that  on  Tuesday,  March  lOth,  in  pursuance  of  an 

Act  of  Parliament  for  the  express  purpose  of  taking  an  exact  numerical  account  of 
the  population  of  the  United  Kingdom,  the  churchwardens  and  overseers  of  this 
parish  proceeded  to  number  the  inhabitants,  &c.,  according  to  such  Act,  and  the 
total  amount  of  their  respective  returns  were  found  to  be  as  follows,  viz. : — 

'*  Inhabited  houses,  509  ;  uninhabited  ditto,  32  ;  total,  541  ;  which  were  occupied 
by  673  families,  amounting  to  2211  persons,  whereof  were  911  males  and  1300 
females,  being  at  the  rate  of  4|  persons  to  each  house,  of  which  number  of  persons, 
8  were  employed  in  agriculture,  1453  in  trade,  manufactures,  and  handicrafts;  and 
700  not  comprised  in  any  of  those  classes.  “  Ja*  Goodwin  Overseer  ” 

1801,  March  30th,  new  feoffees  were  appointed  for  the  parish  property,  viz., 
the  Mill  Close,  without  St.  Stephen's  Gates,  in  the  occupation  of  William  Botwright 
and  others,  certain  houses  in  Surrey  Street,  in  the  occupation  of  Mrs.  Mary  Ives 
and  others,  and  the  .Alms  Houses  near  St.  Stephen’s  Gates,  in  the  occupation  of 
William  Beevor  and  others.  The  twelve  feoffees  (old  and  new)  being  John  Patteson, 
William  Taylor,  Daniel  Fromanteel.  Robert  Harvey  the  younger.  Esqrs. ;  John 
Staniforth  Patteson,  Gent.  ;  Wm.  Wells,  Gent. ;  Henry  Francis,  Gent. ;  Thos. 
Barber,  Gent. ;  James  Hardy,  grocer ;  George  Hardy,  g;rocer ;  John  Norgate, 
grocer;  and  James  Adams,  coachmaker. 

1801- 2.  Paid  Balls’s  bill  for  breakfasts,  dinners,  &c.,  on  going  round  the  parish 
to  be  informed  who  would  bear  arms,  £2.  16*. 

1803- 4.  Of  Miss  Silke  and  Mr.  Watts  an  annual  payment  of  6<f.  each  for 
liberty  of  passage  through  their  private  gates  into  the  churchyard.  Matthews, 
glazier,  took  £22.  10*.  6<<. ;  and  Lyng,  bricklayer,  £16.  13*.  3d.  Paid  Mr.  Georg;e 
Hardy  the  balance  due  to  him  on  account  of  the  army  of  reserve,  £1.  10«.  lOd. 

1804- 5.  Harper  paid  for  procuring  a  man  for  Army  of  Reserve  and  sundries, 
£7.  16*. 

1805,  Feb.  18th.*  The  clergy  having  applied  to  Parliament  for  a  general 
assessment  on  the  city,  a  vestry’  meeting  was  held,  and  it  was  resolved,  “  That  it  is 
the  opinion  of  this  meeting  that  such  application  is  precipitate  and  unfounded,” 
and  **  That  this  city,  burthened  with  the  maintenance  of  a  numerous  and  un¬ 
employed  poor,  is  unable  to  endure  any  further  local  imposition.”  This  was 
witnessed  by  nearly  fifty  parishioners. 

*  The  poverty  of  the  city  clergy  was  felt  to  be  a  grreat  grievance  then  aa  now. 


NOTES  AND  QUEHIES,  ETC. 


13 


1806.  July  8th.  A  meeting  was  held  to  elect  two  Commissioners,  in  pursuance 
of  an  Act  of  Parliament  passed  in  the  46th  year  of  the  reign  of  Geo.  III.,  entitled 
**  An  act  for  better  paving,  lighting,  cleansing,  watching,  and  otherwise  improving 
the  city  of  Norwich.”  The  two  elected  were  Messrs.  Geo.  Hardy  and  Mr.  Thos. 
Barber.  The  signatures  to  this  are : — 

John  Barwell  Daniel  Coppin 

Cha*  Kasham  W“*  Norgate 

W™  Harper,  jun'  John  Aldis 

Sam'  Dye  J.  Davis 

Robert  Harvey,  jun'  Jn°  Matthews 

Ja*  Edw*!  Smith  •  Sara'  Crakanthorpe 

Hen.  Francis  Fra*  Newson 

W"»  Wells 

At  the  same  meeting  thanks  were  voted  to  Mr.  Taylor  and  the  Watch  Com¬ 
mittee,  over  which  he  presided,  for  his  and  their  care  and  attention  in  the  due 
watching  of  this  parish  for  many  years  past. 

1806-7.  Woodward,  for  teaching  the  singing  boys  and  sundries,  £5.  6«. 
Singing  men  also  paid. 

1807.  Messrs.  George  Hardy  and  Thomas  Barber  were  re-appointed  Com¬ 
missioners  under  the  Paving  Act.  And  John  English  was  voted  £2  per  annum 
increase  of  salary  in  compensation  for  monies  formerly  received  at  the  celebration 
of  the  sacrament.  This  addition  to  cease  on  the  death  of  Mrs.  Leach,  widow  of  the 
late  clerk  of  this  parish. 

1808.  Mr.  Athow  was  presented  with  Ten  Guineas  as  a  mark  of  the  very  high 
esteem  which  the  parishioners  held  him  in  his  discharge  of  the  office  of  curate,  and 
was  Continued  from  year  to  year  till  181 1,  when  the  parishioners  petitioned  the  Dean 
and  Chapter  to  appoint  him  Vicar,  but  he  was  not  so  appointed. 

1811.  The  churchwardens  were  authorised  to  take  counsel’s  opinion  as  to 
proceeding  against  Mr.  William  Wells  for  the  recovery  of  his  rent  of  the  Mill  Close. 
Mr.  Henry  Francis  was  elected  Vestry  Clerk. 

1811.  An  Act  of  Parliament  having  been  passed  to  compel  each  parish  to 
contribute  men  to  the  liocal  Militia,  or  to  pay  sulwtitutes,  and  the  number  for 
this  parish  being  31,  it  was  agreed  to  levy  a  rate  of  12  pence  in  the  £,  fur  the 
payment  of  the  substitutes ;  but  afterwards  it  was  determined  that  as  some  were 
personally  liable  to  serve  (on  account  of  being  able  bodied,  &c.),  they  should  pay 
fur  the  exemption,  and  62  persons  paid  10*.  each,  among  whom  were  8  ladies. 
Afterwards  it  was  found  that  the  cost  of  31  substitutes  was  £72.  17*.,  and  a  rate  of 
It.  in  the  £  was  levied  on  the  rental  of  the  parish. 

1812.  A  lease  of  the  land  at  Thuxton  was  granted  to  Daniel  Reynolds  for 
twelve  years,  at  the  yearly  rent  of  £6,  there  being  just  three  acres,  then  lately 
allotted  under  the  'rhuxton  Allotment  Act.  The  churchwardens  were  also  directed 
to  enquire  into  the  extent  of  the  parish,  and  as  to  the  parish  property  in  general. 

1813.  At  a  special  vestry  meeting  it  was  resolved  to  erect  a  gallery  in  the 
church  for  an  organ,  and  that  an  instrument  offered  by  Mr.  England  of  London 
fur  270  guineas  be  bought.  Mr.  Edward  Taylor  f  was  one  of  those  commissioned  to 
buy.  Mr.  Alfred  Pettet  was  appointed  the  first  organist  in  1814,  in  which  year  a 
faculty  was  asked  for  from  the  Lord  Bishop  for  the  erection  of  a  gallery  at  the  west 
end  of  the  church.  It  was  also  resolved  that  the  organist  should  be  elected  annually 
at  the  Easter  vestry. 

1814.  It  was  resolved  that  no  new  graves  should  be  dug  within  10  ft.  of  the 
church,  as  the  church  and  chancel  were  in  danger,  without  the  new  grave  was  well 
arched  over.  A  special  rate  had  also  to  be  raised  to  meet  losses  incurred  by  the 
bankruptcy  of  Mr.  Harmer.  It  was  also  agreed  to  relieve  Mr.  English  of  the  pay¬ 
ment  to  the  widow  of  the  former  clerk,  and  to  make  it  a  parish  payment. 

In  celebration  of  the  peace  lately  made,  £80  was  rais^  in  the  parish,  and  U.  6<f. 
given  to  each  grown-up  poor  person,  and  1*.  to  each  pour  child,  on  July  16th,  the 
day  before  the  General  Thanksgiving  Day. 

*  Dr.  James  Edward  Smith,  the  botanist.  President  of  the  Lionean  Society,  to  whom  there  is 
a  tablet  in  St.  Peter  Mancroft  Church. 

t  Dr.  Edward  Taylor,  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Triennial  Norwich  Musical  Festival.  He 
lived  at  the  comer  of  Rampant  Horse  Street  and  Bed  Lion  Street. 


YIIM 


14 


THE  EAST  AHOLIAK;  OR, 


1815.  £70  was  raised  and  sent  to  the  County  Treasurer  of  the  Fund  for  the 
Relief  of  the  Sufferers  in  the  Battle  of  Waterloo.  In  February  and  March  fifty 
chaldrons  of  coals  were  sold  to  the  poor  of  the  parish  at  It.  per  bushel,  a  parishioner 
having  given  £25  in  aid  (Hudson  Gurney,  Esq.,  was  the  donor).  Mrs.  Rebecca 
Harward  also  left  a  legacy  of  £20  to  be  distribute  the  next  year.  A  rate  of  3d.  in 
the  £  was  made  to  defray  the  expenses  of  paying  five  men  for  the  Local  Militia. 

1816.  Sixty-eight  housekeepers  of  the  parish  of  St.  Stephen  offered  their 
personal  services  to  the  magistrates  to  preserve  the  peace. 

And  a  special  vote  of  thanks  was  given  Mr.  George  Stacy  for  his  vigilant 
conduct  as  churchwarden.  There  had  Wn  an  outrage  in  the  churchyard,  and  the 
offenders  were  directed  to  pay  £10  and  all  expenses,  and  sign  a  proper  acknowledg¬ 
ment  of  their  fault,  in  order  that  the  same  might  be  inserted  in  the  provincial 
papers.  William  Reeve,  gardener,  was  directed  to  pay  6d.  per  year  for  the  use  of  a 
gateway  into  the  churchyard.  Others  having  gardens  are  directed  not  to  throw 
rubbish  into  the  churchyard.  loiter  in  same  }'ear  £5  was  accepted  from  the  per¬ 
petrators  of  the  outrage,  they  being  poor.  April  2nd  of  the  same  year  it  was  agreed 
that  the  allowances  for  the  dinner  on  Easter  Monday  and  for  the  auditor’s  supper 
be  abolished ;  and  that  the  superintendent  of  the  watch  in  this  parish  be  discharged. 
Also  in  the  same  year  it  was  resolved  to  oppose  a  new  valuation  of  property  proposed 
to  be  made  by  the  Court  of  Guardians,  which  was  described  as  being  a  most 
improper  attempt. 

1818.  Benjamin  Garthon,  worstead  weaver,  was  elected  sexton  in  the  room  of 
John  Cobb. 

1820.  On  Tuesday,  the  9th  of  May,  being  Rogation  Week,  the  vicar,  church¬ 
wardens,  and  six  others  proceeded  from  the  vestry  and  went  the  bounds  of  the 
parish.  A  faculty  was  procured  for  blocking  up  the  west  door,  putting  a  window 
in  its  place,  and  placing  new  seats  in  the  space  under  the  organ  loft.  The  assess¬ 
ment  question  also  came  up  again,  the  churchwardens,  Charles  Bedford,  jun.,  and 
R.  Stebbing,  together  with  .Adam  Taylor*  and  John  Norgate,  were  appointed  to  attest 
the  valuation  ;  and  on  the  2nd  October  the  new  assessment  for  the  relief  of  the  poor 
was  adopted  by  the  vestry,  and  Messrs.  Saver,  Jephs,  Yallop,  Davey,  and  Sayer 
were  declared  owners  of  property  assessed  at  an  increase  of  £123  rental. 

1821.  A  new  feoffment  of  Atkyns’s  Close  was  made  to  John  Staniforth 
Patteson,  Henry  Francis,  John  Norgate  the  younger,  Isaac  Preston,  Samuel  Bignold, 
Seth  William  Stevenson,  Edward  Barth  (f),  John  Harwell,  Charles  Hardy,  Charles 
Bedford,  George  Seppings,  and  Charles  John  West.  6<f.  in  the  £  was  raised  for 
paying  a  private  watch.  Mr.  Francis  Smith  was  requested  to  repay  a  loan  of  £10 
advanced  to  him  by  the  parish  in  1806. 

1823.  It  was  agreed  to  give  Mr.  English,  the  singers,  and  the  organist,  a 
g^tuity  of  £8.  8s.  between  them.  It  was  also  agreed  to  obtain  a  faculty  to  allot 
the  seats  in  the  church  so  ns  to  meet  the  want  of  sittings  then  needed  for  the 
parishioners.  At  another  meeting  it  was  resolved  not  to  alter  the  pews ;  directions 
were  given  to  the  sexton  to  shew  persons  into  all  pews  not  occupied  after  the 
Psalter  was  read  ;  and  that  all  locks  and  bars  to  pews  should  be  removed. 

1824.  An  indictment  was  preferred  against  the  parish  for  a  “  certain  ruinous 
and  defective  highway  in  the  said  parish.”  And  at  the  Quarter  Sessions  held  on 
the  19th  October  it  was  determine  that  St.  Stephen’s  Back  Street  was  a  private 
street,  and  not  a  highway,  and  that  the  parish  was  not  liable  to  repair  it.  The 
inhabitants  of  the  said  street  must  make  their  own  repairs. 

1825.  John  English,  turner,  was  appointed  clerk  in  the  room  of  John  English, 
his  father,  deceased. 

Kofvneh.  _  A.  E.  E. 

Lord  Kitchener’s  Ancestors. — In  Lakenbeath  churchyard, 
Suffolk,  on  the  south  side  of  the  chancel,  stand  eleven  headstones  in 
two  rows,  lately  cleaned  and  repainted,  and  said  to  commemorate  Lord 
Kitchener’s  ancestors.  'Ihere  are  also  two  footstones.  the  headstones 
*  Then  a  prominent  lawyer  and  dtiren. 


NOTES  AND  QUKBIES,  ETC. 


15 


of  which  are  gone.  They  begin  with  that  of  a  Thomas  Kitchener, 
born  1665-66 : — “  Here  lyeth  tiie  Body  of  |  Thomas  Kitchener  |  who 
came  from  Miiisted  |  in  Hampshire  in  the  year  |  1693  an  Agent  to  y* 
Hon**^'  I  S'  Nicholas  Stuart  Bur*  |  and  dep.  this  life  April  y*  5"*  |  1731 
Aged  65  years.”  The  other  stones  are  for  his  children,  grandchildren, 
and  one  great-grandchild — Martha,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Martha 
Kitchener,  1780,  aged  9  years.  The  latest  is  for  Hannah,  relict  of 
William  Stimpson  [relict]  also  of  Bobert  Kitchener,  1824,  aged  84. 

A  tablet  inside  the  tower,  on  the  north  wall,  is  inscribed: — 
“This  Fourth  Bell  |  Was  Founded  in  |  Jan  1697  John:  pars'*?  |  Uicar 
gaue  22*;  |  Edm  Hoper:  Tho  |  Kitchener:  Church  |  Wardens:  w* 
[weight]  1309''”'"'*.” 

Adjoining  the  west  side  of  the  tower  is  a  two-storied  building 
used  formerly  as  a  school.  A  former  free  school  for  eleven  boys  was 
endowed  by  “  Mr.  Evans  and  Mr.  Kitchener.” 

Charles  Partridge,  Jdn. 

Stowmarket,  Suffolk.  _ 


QUERIES. 

In-bkead. — On  the  south  wall  of  the  nave  of  Worlington  Church, 
Suffolk,  is  fixed  a  wooden  board,  on  which  are  painted  particulars  of 
several  “  Benefactions.”  The  first  paragraph  runs  as  follows : — 
“Twenty  four  shillings  yearly  for  ever,  by  the  will  of  Thomas 
Blackerby  of  Stowmarket,  in  the  County  of  Suffolk,  Esq*’,  in  1688,  to 
buy  six  loaves  of  bread  weeklj'  {the  in-hread  included)  to  be  distributed 
to  six  poor  Protestants  that  constantly  come  to  cliurch.”  What  is 
“  in-bread  ”  ? 

[In  the  churchyard,  south  of  the  chancel,  is  the  base  of  an  ancient 
stone  cross]. 

Charles  Partridge,  Jun. 

Stoumarket,  Suffolk.  _ 


Perdidge. —  Sir  Francis  Colepepper  or  Culpepper  of  Holling- 
bourue,  Kent,  married  Joane  Perdidge  (about  1580?).  From  them 
was  descended  Elizabeth  Freke,  who  married  her  cousin  Percy  Freke 
of  Bilney,  Norfolk  (about  1690?).  Can  Mr.  (''harles  Partridge,  Jun., 
or  any  other  of  your  readers  inform  me  as  to  the  identity  of  this  Joane 
Perdidge  ?  Her  son.  Sir  Thomas  Colepepper,  married  Elizabeth 
Cheney  of  Sussex.  Who  was  the  latter  ? 

L.  M.  Biden. 


Ralph  de  Diceto. — In  his  introduction  to  the  works  of  Ralph  de 
Diceto,  Bishop  Stubbs  discusses  the  origin  of  the  patronymic,  and 
suggests  the  name  may  still  lurk  in  “  some  remote  Shropshire  or  Essex 
Manor.”  Diss  in  Norfolk  is  improbable,  as  it  appears  in  Domesday 
book  as  Dice,  and  is  not  known  to  be  latinized  like  Dicetum.  Can 
anyone  suggest  the  place  ?  Biden. 

38,  Farnnby  Road, 

Shor Hands.  Kent. 


16 


THK  KA8T  ANGLIAN  ;  OR. 


REPLIES* 


Bouen-bridge  (vol.  ix.,  p.  355). — There  can  be  no  doubt  as  to  the 
identity  of  the  place.  It  was  the  bridge  over  the  Linton  bourn,  on  the 
Newmarket  road.  Ogilvie’s  Britannia  marks  “  Bum-bridge,”  and  the 
Eoyston  deviation  of  the  road  is  always  styled  “the  Bourabridge 
road.”  The  village  of  Bourn,  far  away  on  the  north-west,  is*  the 
source  of  a  brook  called  “  Bourn-brook  ”  :  but  its  only  bridge  of  con¬ 
sequence  is  Lori's  Bridge,  which  gives  its  name  to  the  L.N.W.E. 
railway  station.  The  cottages  by  Bourn-bridge  are  said  to  be  built  of 
the  materials  of  the  old  inn,  the  bad  reputation  of  which  caused  its 

A.0.T0.M. 

Fotclmere,  Cambt. 


Barrington  of  Great  Bentley,  Essex,  and  Henry  Barrington, 
M.P.  FOR  Colchester  (vol.  ix.,  p.  48). — I  have  now  discovered  that  i 
the  Henry  Harrington  of  Great  Bentley,  referred  to  in  my  query,  was  1 1 
the  son  of  William  Bentley  of  Tendring,  3’eoman  (will  proved  i  | 
25  April,  1645,  Arch.  Colchester),  and  the  grandson  of  Robert  Bentley  | ' 
of  St.  Osyth,  “Hmebnrner”  (will  proved  13  Nov.,  1597,  Com.  of  I 
London  for  Essex  and  Herts).  The  relationship  (if  an)’)  between  the 
M.P.  and  the  Great  Bentley  family  must  therefore  have  been  rather 
remote,  hut  it  is  perhaps  worthy  of  notice  that  Robert  Bentley  of 
St.  Osvth  had,  amongst  other  children,  a  son  named  Henry. 

I  have  found  truces  of  other  families  of  the  name  living  at  Orsett 
and  Maldon  {circa  1530 — 1630).  S 

T.  H.  K. 

Tunbridge  Welle.  _  j 


Jack's  Pit  (vol.  ix.,  pp.  356,  388). — In  the  great  pasture  which,  j 
before  Norwich  was  walled  in,  stretched  to  the  south  from  Ber  Street 
to  Eaton,  there  were,  it  is  evident,  many  depressions  or  holes  or  ponds, 
in  which  water  could  be  found  all  the  year  round.  Of  these,  ‘  Beare’s  j 

Pond,”  next  Newmarket  Road,  is  disappearing ;  another  in  the  meadow 
facing  the  Grove,  on  Ipswich  Road,  is  the  best  specimen  now  existing, 
while  a  considerable  pond  near  St.  Stephen's  Gates  dried  up  nearly  a 
century  ago.  Though  Jack’s  Pit  disappeared  before  any  of  these,  it  i 
was,  from  its  proximity  to  the  city,  of  greater  consequence.  Situate 
by  the  side  of  a  road  which  led  to  the  Swine  Market,  in  early  days,  it  [ 
enjoyed  a  clean  existence,  but  as  the  population  grew  it  gradually  lost  t  j 
that  condition  ;  and  there  are  some  who  think  it  got  its  name — “  Jack  ”  I ! 
or  “Jake” — from  the  rubbish  which  accumulated  in  it,  and  made  it  an  j 
eyesore.  Others  invested  the  name  with  something  less  prosaic,  and  ; 
imagined  that  “Jake”  was  the  name  of  an  unfortunate  who  spent  j 
most  of  his  time  on  its  borders,  or  was  drowned  in  it,  though  it  must 
have  been  long  ago  since  there  was  sufficient  water  in  it  to  drown  a  | 
person.  A.  E.  R.  j 

M>r$cieh.  i 


NOTES  AND  QUEBIBS,  BTC. 


17 


CAMBRIDGESHIRE  CHURCH  GOODS.  No.  XLVH. 

Miscellaneous  books,  Augmentation  Office,  No.  172,  entitled 
Inventories  of  Monasteries  in  Warwick,  Stafford,  &c.,  temp.  Hen.  VIII. 
[Excerpt]. 

Fo.  92^ 

The  late  pory  of  Barnewell  in  the  Countye  of  Crambryge. 

Herafter  foloweth  all  suche  pcelles  of  Implements . Ornamentes' 

of  the  Churche  &  suche  otherlyke  found  wyth  in  late  moh  at  tyme  of 
the  dissolucSn  therof  sould  by  the  seid  Commissiono's  to  John  lacy 
fermor  ther  the  vij  day  of  Octob'  in  the  xxx  yere  of  o'  soSaigne  lorde 
Kyng  Henry  the  Tii]***. 

The  Churche. 

ffyrst  at  the  hygh  alter  ij  Images  of  Wood,  ij  laumpes  of  latten, 
j  sacryng  bell,  ij  great  candlestykes  of  laten,  j  payr  of  organis — 
xxvj*  viij"*. 

It’  iiij  grates  of  leron  in  the  same  quere,  j  ould  clocke  &  the 
stales  in  the  quere  ar  sould  for — vj'*  xiij*  iiij'*. 

It’  at  seint  Johns  alter  j  table  of  alebaster  &  the  pticion  of  tymbr 
sould  for — V*. 

It’  in  seint  Thomas  Chapell  certein  ould  Images  of  Alebaster  & 
the  pticion  of  wood  sould  for — iij*  iiij^. 

It’  in  seint  Nicholas  Chapell  j  table  of  alebaster  and  the  pticion 
of  tymbr  sould  for — ij*. 

It’  in  o'  lady  Chaple  j  table  of  alebaster,  j  Image  of  o'  ladye,  ij 
braunches  of  leron,  ij  litell  Candlestyckes  of  latten,  j  lytell  ould  chest, 
j  lytell  galery  of  tymbr  &  the  pticion  of  tymbr  and  ij  tumbes  of 
marble  sould  for — Iiij*  iiij"*. 

It’  at  Seint  Eateryns  alter  j  table  of  alebaster,  ij  Imagis,  j  grate 
of  leron,  ij  laumpes  of  latten  sould  for — iij*  iiij*. 

It’  in  the  lytell  Chapell  of  o'  lady  j  table  of  alebaster  &  the  alter 
of  woode  sould  for — xvj*.  (Total)  xvj**  xj*  iiij*. 

The  Cloyster. 

It’  ther  the  Roffe  &  certein  ould  seates,  j  lytell  ould  lauer  of 
brasse,  the  pauement  &  certein  leron  in  the  new  wall  sould  for — xl*. 

It’  j  lauer  of  laye  mettell  whyche  as  yett . Rem. 

The  Chapter  House. 

It’  the  Roffe,  glasse,  leron  &  pauement  ar  sould  for — xvj*  viij*. 

The  Vestry. 

It’  j  Bute  of  grene  baudkyn  &  j  Cope  to  the  same,  j  sute  of  redd 
baudkyu  &  j  Cope  to  the  same,  j  sute  of  blue  baudkyn  &  j  Cope  to 
the  same,  j  sute  of  sylke  w'  lyons  &  a  Cope  to  the  same,  j  sute  of 
Counterfett  baudkyn  Copes  of  dyuerse  sort**,  ij  ould  single  Vestmentes, 
Y  frunttes  for  alters,  j  Crosse  of  Copper,  j  holy  water  stoke  of  brasse 
&  j  sprynkull,  ij  ould  alter  clothes,  j  sence'  of  latten.  j  shypp, 
j  standerd  of  leron  to  sett  a  fier  pann  in,  ij  Chestes  &  the  tryangle 
for  the  same  ornamentes  to  be  hengyd  in  &  ij  latten  Candlestykes 
sould  for— iiij^  xviij*. 

0 


18 


THB  SIBT  AirOUAir:  OR, 


Gtylte  plate. 

It’  one  salte  &  ij  Chaleses  g^ylte  weyeng — xxxij  oz. 

[Inventories  of  nousehold  goods  and  list  of  monks  Ac.,  follow]. 

King’s  Hemembrancer,  Church  Ooods,  No.  . 

Com.  Cant. 

The  Certificate  of  Willm  Leigh  Esquire  A  Thom  Mildmay  the 
Kynges  Officers  of  his  Courte  of  Thaugmentacion  of  the  Reuennues  of 
his  Crowne  w4n  the  Countie  aforesaide  concemynge  the  state,  value  A 
Condicion  of  sundry  howsses  of  Religion  of  the  Orders  of  ffryers  nowe 
beinge  in  the  Kynges  handes  by  wey  of  Surrender  &  of  late  Dissolued 
&  Suppressed  by  the  Kynges  Visitors  therunto  by  his  Highnes 
assigned.  And  by  the  same  Officers  in  this  ther  pograce  by  the 
Comaundement  of  S'  Rychard  Ryche  Knyght,  Chauncello'  of  the 
Courte  afforesaid  viewed  seen  A  surveyed  at  diu’s  &  sundry  dayes  A 
tymes  in  the  Monyth  of  November  the  xxx*^  yere  of  the  Kynges 
Moste  noble  Reigne,  like  as  hereaft'  Breffely  it  shall  tmpere. 

The  late  Howsse  of  Greye  ffryers  wfin  the  Towne  of  Cam- 
brydge  dissolued  by  the  Kynges  Visitors  is  of  the  clere  yerly  value  in 
landes  &  possessions — iiij"  xiij*  iiij''.  The  possessions  of  which  howsse 
remayth  in  thandes  of  Docto'  Buckemaster  Yic  chauncello'  of  Cam- 
bryedge  to  the  Kynges  vse. 

The  Religious  psons  A  luntes  at  o'  comynge  we  Sounds  dyspsed 
A  gone. 

The  Leade  remaynige  opon  the  churche  A  other  edificions  ther, 
by  estimac  amount  to  the  nombre  of  ciiij  Sodders. 

Belles  in  the  Stepell  yet  remaynge  to  the  Kynges  vse — iij — 
weyinge  by  est — viij. 

The  moveable  Goodes,  Ornamentes,  Juelles  A  plate  taken  awey 
by  the  visito'  to  the  Kynges  vse  before  o'  comynge. 

The  Tome  glasse  A  stone  done  yet  remayne  vnsold  A  the  housse 
vndefaced  vntyll  the  Kynges  pleasure  be  further  knowen. 

The  dettes  owynge  by  the  Howsse  ben  payed  by  the  visito'  as  we 
ben  enformyd. 

Woodes — nuB. 

The  late  Howsse  of  Blaz  ffryers  wyth  in  the  Towne  of  Cam- 
brydge  dissolued  by  the  Kynges  visito'  is  of  the  clere  yerly  value  in 
landes  &  possessiones — xx*.  The  possession  of  which  house  remayth 
in  thandes  of  Willm  Standysshe  p’ncipall  of  seynt  Nicholas  Ostell  to 
the  Kynges  vse. 

The  Religious  psons  A  Sunt”  at  o'  comynge  we  ffounde  dispsid 
and  gone. 

The  leade  remaynge  opon  the  churche  A  other  buyldynges  ther 
amountytts  by  estimacion  to  the  nomber  of  Ixx  ffodders. 

Belles  in  the  stepell  yet  remaynynge  to  the  Kynges  vse  Weyinge 
by  estimac  CC. 

The  moveable  goodes  ornamentes  Juelles  &  plate  ben  taken 
away  by  the  visito'  to  the  Kynges  vse  before  o'  comynge. 

The  yorne  glasse  &  stone  done  yet  remayne  vnsolde  &  the  housse 
vndefaced  vntill  the  Kynges  pleasure  be  Surther  knowen. 


C 

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NOTIS  AXJ)  QTTEBIBfl,  XTO. 


19 


The  detts  owjnge  by  the  howsse  ben  payed  by  the  rieito'  as  wee 
ben  infonnyed. 

Woodes — null. 

Thi  latx  House  of  AuousTnrx  ffbtkbs  w4n  the  Towne  of 
Cambrydge  aforesaid  dissolved  by  the  Kynges  visito*  is  of  the  clere 
yerly  value  in  landes  Sc  possessiones — Ixiiij.  The  possession  wherof 
remaynyth  in  the  custody  of  Dooto'  Hardyman  late  por  their  to  the 
Kynges  vse. 

The  Religious  psons  Sc  their  Suntes  we  founde  att  o'  comynge 
dispsed  and  gone. 

The  leade  remaynige  their  to  the  K3mge8  vse  di  ffodder. 

The  Belles  ther  were  sold  by  the  said  visito'  to  the  Kynges  vse. 

The  moveabel  goodes,  omamentes  Jewelles  &  plate  sold  by  the 
said  visito'  before  o'  comynge. 

The  yorne  glasse  Sc  stone  done  yett  remayne  vnsold  &  the  housse 
vndefaced  vntill  the  Kynges  pleasure  be  ffurther  knowen. 

The  dettes  owynge  by  the  howsse  ben  payed  by  the  visito'  as  we 
been  Informed. 

Woodes — nuU. 

The  late  House  of  White  ffrtres  wMn  the  Towne  afforesaid 
dissolved  by  the  Kynges  visito'  hath  no  landes  ne  possessions  butte 
the  scite  which  is  worth  to  be  letten  by  yere  for  xz*.  And  the  same 
comytted  to  the  masters  &  ffellowes  of  the  Quene’s  College  to  the 
Kynges  vse. 

The  Religious  psons  Sc  other  luntes  we  founde  att  o'  comynge 
dispsed  Sc  gone. 

Leade  ther  remaynige  to  the  Kynges  vse — null. 

Belles — null. 

The  moveable  goodes,  omamentes  Juelles  Sc  plate  soldo  by  the 
visito'  before  o'  comynge. 

Yorae,  Glasse  Sr  stone  yett  remaynig  vnsold  Sc  the  house  not 
defaced. 

The  dettes  owynge  by  the  house  ben  payed  by  the  visito'  as  we 
been  informyd. 

Woodes — null.  J.  J.  Muskett. 


FOWLMERE  NOTES.— SOME  FORGOTTEN  WATS. 

(2)  Roystow  Jomr  Wat. 

When  speaking  of  the  Round  Moat  I  described  its  approach  by 
Lynch  Lane.  That  lane  still  exists.  Having  crossed  the  brook  to  the 
hither  side,  at  a  point  between  the  Round  Moat  and  Crow’s  Parlour, 
it  bifurcated.  The  right-hand  branch  remains  to-day  as  Chapel  Lane. 
The  left-hand  branch  passed  southerly  for  a  short  distance,  and  was 
called  Ryecroft  Lane — idiomatically,  “  Rye-cro’es  ” — and  can  still  be 
traced  by  the  line  of  trees  through  the  meadow.  Then,  across  the 
top  of  Dodd’s  Close,  it  swung  at  right-angles  to  the  right,  coining  out 


IIM 


20 


THE  BAST  ANOUAN;  OK, 


into  London  Eoad  just  where  it  too  bore  to  the  right,  at  a  point  where 
now  is  Severah  Lane.  A  quarter-of-a-mile  beyond  this,  at  the  west 
end  of  “Fowlmere  Hedges,”  there  turned  off  the  road  I  am  now  to 
speak  of — Royttvn  Joint  W'ay. 

I  have  thus  connected  this  way  with  the  lane,  because  old  folk 
tell  me  that  Triplow  people,  Eoystonward  bound,  used  thus  to  pass  to 
the  “joint,”  without  passing;,  as  now  they  must,  through  Fowlmere 
village  at  all.  So  that  the  “Eoyston  joint,”  as  they  term  it,  wae 
practically  a  continuation  of  Eyecroft  Lane. 

Once  it  touched  the  “open  field”  on  Farthing  (Fawdon)  Hill,  the 
Joint  Way  kept  straight  for  the  Walden  Way  gap  in  Branditch, 
forming,  as  it  went,  the  approach  and  boundary  to  the  various  shotta 
and  furlongs  on  either  hand.  This,  and  not  any  modern  newfangle- 
ness,  was  the  Royston  Way  of  the  old  Field-hook  (1639).  That  which, 
in  consequence  of  modern  connections,  we  latter-day  folk  weakly  call 
the  Eoyston  Eoad,  was  then,  as  it  really  is  still,  London  Way ;  of 
which,  more  anon. 

Having  crossed  Branditch,  it  rose  the  slopes  of  Lord  Braybrooke’s 
“  Five  Barrowfield,”  in  sight  of  Melboum  village.  From  this  point 
there  is  the  prettiest  view  of  Fowlmere  parish  that  I  know.  The 
gradient  of  the  road  was  far  easier  than  that  of  the  present  road  over 
Burloe’s  Hill,  and  ahead  Eoyston  is  seen  snugly  nestling  below.  It 
is  matter  for  regret  that  turnpike  exigencies  closed  our  Joint  Way  for 
ever  and  a  day.  The  crest  of  the  ridge  with  its  five  harrows  lay  on 
the  left.  If  King  James  ever  came  a  hawking  on  the  Great  Moor, 
this  must  have  been  bis  most  direct  route. 

Of  the  two  ways  crossing  Branditch  at  the  same  point,  which  was 
the  older  ?  As  I  cannot  believe  that  the  British  would  weaken  any 
dyke  by  piercing  it  with  a  road,  I  am  disposed  to  say  that  the  Eoman 
Walden  Way  is  the  more  ancient.  I  am  disposed  to  regard  access  to 
the  Shotts,  on  either  hand,  as  the  prime  cause'bf  Eoyston  Joint,  and 
if  the  Barrows  are  assumed  as  evidence  to  the  contrary,  there  are 
lanes  thitherward  from  Melboum  which  nearly  approached  them.  If 
any  certainty  is  to  he  obtained,  the  spade  must  reveal  it. 

(3)  Harborough  Hill  Joint  Way. 

.This  way,  starting  as  our  present  Chrishall  Eoad,  from  London¬ 
way,  at  its  right-hand  bend,  turned  off  at  the  present  chinch  pit,  and 
bore  across  the  open  field,  crossing  the  brook  just  below  its  Little 
Moor,  straight  for  tiie  present  outfall  of  Heydon  Eoad  into  Boura- 
bridge  Eoad.  This.  I  opine,  clearly  marks  the  rising  ground  on  the 
right  bank  of  the  brook  as  being  Harborough  Hill.  Here  it  was 
witliin  the  heath;  Triplow  Heath  as  it  was  called,  though  well  within 
Fowlmere  parish.  It  was  evidently  the  road  to  Heydon. 

(4)  Chrishall  Eoad. 

Starting  as  above  mentioned,  this  road  did  not  lie  wholly  along 
its  present  course.  At  present  it  bears  straight  on  until,  close  to 
Chrishall  Grange,  it  falls  into,  and  follows  for  some  distance,  the 


XI 


NOTES  AND  QTTEHIE8.  ETC. 


21 


“Old  Walden  Way.”  The  old  way,  where  Boumbridge  Way  inter¬ 
sects.  bore  more  to  the  right,  apparently  up  a  little  dene,  by  way  of 
the  Heath  Farm,  and  thence  apparently  straight  on  into  Essex.  I  say 
apparently,  for  it  is  impossible  to  account  for  the  western  boundary  of 
the  long  Fowlmere  fang,  which  bites  into  Chrishall,  unless  it  be  the 
alignment  of  the  old  way.  Nor,  indeed,  for  the  eastern  edge  of  that 
fang,  unless  it  be  the  alignment  of  an  old  way,  now  diverted  into  the 
present  road.  The  parish  boundary  here  is  like  a  W,  the  midmost 
and  lower  indentation  representing  Essex,  wherein  stands  Chrishall 
Grange.  I  should  imagine  these  were  the  old  British  tracks  through 
the  forest  of  Essex.  It  is  close  to  the  more  westerly  that  Lord  Bray- 
brooke  found  indications  of  a  bronze  age  smithy. 

(5)  The  Melboxtrn  Path. 

This,  as  it  crosses  Branditch  just  where  the  fosse  plunges  into  the 
moor,  is  no  doubt  the  track  which  liabington  mistook  for  Ashwell 
Street.  It  remains  as  a  small  footpath  for  part  of  the  distance,  but 
was.  in  former  times,  a  means  of  access  to  the  Shotts  in  Barr  Ijane 
Field  on  Farthing  (Fawdon)  Hill,  which  it  enters  by  Barr  Lane.  In 
the  Field  it  was  known  as  tbe  Finch  Way.  Beyond  Branditch  it  must 
have  fallen  into  Old  Walden  Way.  and  so  to  Melbourn.  Old  men. 
now  in  Fowlmere,  used  it  in  their  childhood  as  the  way  to  the  superior 
school  in  Melbourn.  It  was  longer,  no  doubt,  than  the  way  along 
Ashwell  Street  by  the  mill ;  but  its  point  of  intersection  with  Bran¬ 
ditch  seems  to  me  to  dispose  of  any  claims  Babington  made  for  it  as 
a  pre-Boman  way.  As  will  be  shown  by  and  by,  it  may  perhaps  have 
been  a  prolongation  of  the  Cambridge  road. 

(6)  Bournbridoe  Boad. 

This  is  the  road  from  Koyston  to  Newmarket,  falling  into  Icknield 
Way  at  Boumbridge.  Hence  its  name.  Presumably,  it  was  originally 
King  James’  road  from  Boyston  Palace  to  that  at  Newmarket.  Ito 
course  was  determined  ( 1 )  by  desire  to  avoid  Icknield  Street,  which 
was  too  much  to  the  right ;  (2)  by  the  deflection  of  the  latter  to  cross 
the  Granta  at  Widford  (now  Whittlesford)  Bridge.  Between  the  foot 
of  Burloe’s  Hill  and  the  Widford  Bridge  Boad,  the  distance  would  be 
barely  four  miles,  of  which  nearly  two  miles  are  direct  across  t'owl- 
mere  parish.  In  this  course  it  skirted  the  impingement  of  Triplow 
Heath  (in  this  parish)  upon  the  Little  Moor  of  Fowlmere  brook. 
Probably  it  was  along  this  road,  and  therefore,  as  will  be  shown  in 
another  paper,  through  the  heart  of  the  Ironsides’  encampment,  that 
the  luckless  Charles  was  haled  from  Newmarket  to  Boyston,  en  route 
for  Bichmond. 

It  was,  undoubtedly,  at  this  Boumbridge  that  there  stood  the 
famous,  or  infamous,  hostelry,  about  which  a  question  was  recently 
asked  in  The  Ead  Anglian.  Then  the  traffic  over  the  bridge  was  that 
of  London  to  Norwich  and  London  to  Newmarket.  The  latter 
probably  accounts  for  the  bad  tone  of  the  place. 


22 


THS  SA8T  ANGLIAN  ;  OR. 


THE  ROADS  INTERSECTING  IN  THE  VILLAGE. 


(1)  Parsonage,  or  Moule’s,  Lane. 

This  is  but  a  short  loop  lane,  starting  from  the  main  road,  opposite 
the  churchyard  gate,  and  running  past  the  parsonage  glebe-house  and 
garden,  and  past  “Parsonage  Close” — a  pasture  which  bore  that 
name  centuries  before  any  part  of  it  was  given  (1845)  as  a  glebe 
meadow — into  “Long  Lane,”  which  is  now  the  Shepreth  Road. 

Its  name  “Parsonage”  is  thus  of  plain  derivation.  Moule,  who 
gave  it  the  alternative  name,  was  a  resident  in  the  village  in  the 
seventeenth  century.  I  find  in  the  registers  only  one  entry  of  his 
name — “  Henry,  son  of  Henry  Moule  and  Joan  his  wife,  was  baptized 
October  19,  1662.”  Possibly  he  it  was  who  built  or  first  occupied  the 
long  quasi  farm-house  that  is  still  standing.  The  late  Rector  was  of 
opinion  that  the  names  designated  the  two  portions  of  this  curving 
thoroughfare — the  one  past  the  parsonage ;  the  other  past  this  old 
homestead. 

From  its  apparent  antiquity — from  its  debouchment  from  the  main 
road,  being  opposite  to  and  only  some  200  yards  distant  from  the 
vallum  gateway  of  the  “Round  Moat” — I  am  of  opinion  that  this 
lane  is  the  survival  of  the  ancient  outlet  therefrom  to  Ashwell  Street 
and  the  exits  of  “  Long  Lane.” 

It  is  worth  noting  that  just  by  Parsonage  Close  the  lane  passes 
by  what  appears  to  be  the  ditch  and  vallum  of  another  “round  moat.” 
The  old  folk  call  it  “  the  moat.” 

(2)  Long  Lane  :  the  present  Shepreth  Road. 

I  have  already  spoken  of  the  Chrishall  Road.  I  refer  to  it  now 
because  it  seems  most  probable  that  it  never  was,  as  it  now  appears  to 
be,  a  separate  and  independent  road.  It  is  a  moral  certainty  that  it 
is  the  extension  of  Long  Lane — the  present  Shepreth  Road.  It  is 
only  since  enclosure  that  this  lane  has  been  dignified  with  the  name  of 
road.  “  Lor’  bless  you,  sir,  the  water  were  alius  a  running  down  it. 
It  wor  wet  as  wet  could  be.  You  could  hardly  walk  along  it.” 

This  road  intersects  the  main  or  London  road,  ad  caput  villee,  at 
right  angles ;  and  the  whole  significance  of  it  has  been  swallowed  up 
by  the  modern  importance  of  the  London  Road,  which  from  caput  villa 
to  the  Chrishall  sign-post  runs  along  it,  and  as  it  were  overlays  it. 
There  are  reasons  for  believing  that  not  the  London  Road,  but  this 
Long  Lane,  was  once  upon  a  time  the  important  thoroughfare.  It 
certainly  must  be  a  “lane”  of  such  venerable  antiquity  that  the 
memory  of  man  runneth  not  to  the  contrary. 

For  along  this  lane  lie  many  little  crofts,  farmsteads,  and  cotter 
tenements— some  being  copyhold;  the  houses  to-day  being  of  con¬ 
siderable  age,  to  all  of  which  the  lane  is  the  frontal  boundary.  This 
applies  to  the  tenements  and  messuages  on  either  hand  of  its  inter¬ 
section  with  London  Way.  It  is  also  evident  that  as  there  was  no 
natural  impediment  to  the  course  of  London  Way  straight  over  the 
open  field  to  its  point  of  exit  from  the  parish,  it  could  only  have  been 
the  superior  importance  of  Long  Lane  that  caused  the  barring  of  this 


ai 

CO 


XUM 


oo 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


23 


course  by  the  obstruction  of  the  Manor  Farm  with  its  holt,  “  gardin," 
and  terra  bar*  (surriying  in  Bar  Lane  and  Barfield)  right  athwart  the 
course. 

I  am,  therefore,  of  opinion  that  Long  Lane  is  coeval  with,  if  not 
anterior  to,  the  foundation  of  the  manor ;  that  it  was  of  superior 
importance,  in  primitive  times,  to  London  Way ;  and,  unless  1  am 
grievously  mistaken,  I  am  of  opinion  that  the  Ordnance  Map  suggests 
this  importance  as  the  result  of  the  thoroughfare  being  the  track  from 
Chatteris  and  the  north>west  of  the  fens  into  Essex  vid  Chrishall 
Grange,  where  we  have  seen  it  as  the  boundary  of  the  county 
(vol.  X.,  p.  4,  East  Anglian). 

(3)  London  Wat. 

Of  the  relative  importance  in  early  times  of  Long  Lane  and 
London  Way  enough  has  been  said.  With  the  growth  of  Cambridge, 
Ely,  and  Lynn,  the  road  grew  in  importance.  The  rise  of  the 
University  must  have  done  no  little  to  this  advancement.  Dons  and 
undergraduates  must,  term  by  term,  have  blackened  the  road.  The 
mighty  bishops  of  Ely,  often  the  Cancellarii  of  the  King,  must  have 
ridden  along  this  road  with  their  brilliant  retinues.  At  a  later  date, 
when  politics  rather  than  statecraft  called  his  lordship  to  London,  the 
episcopal  coach  and  six  must  have  lumbered  on  its  leather  braces 
through  the  quiet  village  street.  Events  of  momentous  importance 
left  their  trail  along  it.  William’s  squadrons  of  knights  and  mer¬ 
cenaries  may  perhaps  have  made  their  way  to  the  conquest  of  “  the 
Isle,”  and  “the  last  of  the  Saxons”  probably  passed  along  this  road. 
Cranmer,  big  with  the  Arragon  divorce,  must  have  ridden  this  way  to 
his  parley  with  the  Cambridge  canonists.  The  Virgin  Queen  probably 
visited  the  University,  to  whom  she  owed  her  legitimacy  and  her  crown, 
by  way  of  this  high  road  ;  and  by  this  road  it  is  most  likely  the  haughty 
Tudor  queen  sent  to  Wisbech  Castle  the  Abbot  of  Westminster  and 
the  two  Bishops  of  Lincoln  as  prisoners  of  State.  In  the  seventeenth 
century  many  a  notable  man  must  have  passed  thereby,  although  the 
fussy  and  self-important  Mr.  Pepys  seems  to  be  almost  the  only 
chronicler  of  his  journey.  He  “  lay  at  the  Chequers  ”  one  February 
night,  I6f^.  In  the  eighteenth  century,  teste  Ogilvie’s  Britannia,  it 
was  the  stage  route  to  Cambridge,  Ely,  and  Lynn.  Old  folk  in  the 
village  well  remember  how,  prior  to  the  railway,  they  jodrneyed 
through  the  night  to  London  in  the  straw  of  the  express  waggons. 
“Well,  sir,  if  we  left  Fulmer  at  har’  past  four  in  the  arternoon,  we’d 
get  to  London  ”  (42  miles)  “maybe  at  five  o’clock  the  next  morning.” 
And^the  fare  was  5*.,  besides  their  food. 

Cambridge  lies  to  the  north-east  nine  miles — by  the  old  reckoning 

•  I*  terra  har  an  equiyalent  to  the  west  country — Barton  ?  We  have  a  Barton 
village  near  at  hand  in  Cambs,  which  Skeat  {Place-namei}  gives  as  “  prov.  E  ’’  for  a 
“  farmyard.”  Spelman  {Olotsarium)  says  of  Barton,  as  a  “  demain  ”  term,  “  prsedium 
dominium,  vel  terre  quas  vocant  Dominicales,  hoc  est,  quas  in  distributione  Manerii, 
dominus  non  elocavit  hasreditorie,  sed  alendse  sute  familiae  causd,  propriis  manibus 
reservavit  ”  Or  does  terra  bar  signify  simply  terra  Baroniee  f  The  village  of  Barley, 
Herts,  is  hard  by.  Does  terra  bar  ^  the  barley  land  ?  See  Skeat  ut  eupr. 


XUM 


24 


THB  BAST  AWOLIAN;  OR, 


of  long  miles,  six  miles  distant.  The  road  forms  the  main  street  of  i 

the  village,  swings  round  to  the  left  for  about  a  quarter-of-a-mile  ) 

along  the  line  of  the  Shepreth-Chrishall  Eoad,  and  then,  turning  to  1 

the  right  along  Fowlmere  Dene,  traverses  “  the  field  ”  for  two  miles,  i 

where,  after  crossing  Brauditch  (“  a  green  bank  called  Fulmere  bank,”  i 

says  Ogilvie),  passtfs  out  of  the  parish,  and  so,  fi'd  Barley,  Barkway,  ’ 

and  Braughing  to  Puckeridge,  where  it  falls  into  Ermine  Street — the  t 

old  North  Road. 

The  road  is,  I  fancy,  quite  as  old  as  I^ong  Lane,*  for  both  in  the  : 
village  and  in  “the  field’’  it  forms  the  boundary  of  copyholds  and 
furlongs  or  shotts.  For  instance,  in  the  village  the  messuages  belong¬ 
ing  to  tlie  Rectory  Manor  lie  wholly  on  one  side  of  it,  and  never 
encroach  one  inch  on  the  other  side.  In  “the  field”  the  shotts  abut 
upon  either  hand,  thus  showing  that  the  road,  if  not  anterior  to,  is  at 
least  cotemporaneous  with  the  manor  and  the  “open  field”  system. 

This  has  an  important  and  quite  unavoidable  significance  in  determin¬ 
ing  the  question  whether  this  was  a  Roman  road  or  not. 

Stiikeley,  according  to  Babington,f  says  it  was  a  Roman  road, 
affirming  that  he  “  could  discern  many  traces  of  it,  as  particularly 
beyond  Barley,”  and  that  he  “  observed  several  milestones,  particularly 
a  little  beyond  Hare  Street.”  J  As,  however.  Barley  and  Hare  Street 
lie  well  beyond  Fowlmere,  the  learned  antiquary's  statement  has  no 
bearing  upon  the  road  in  that  parish.  Nor  need  Babington’s  assump¬ 
tion  that  the  Roman  road  to  Cambridge  went  by  Chesterford  to 
Streetley,  Pond  Street,  and  Hare  Street  to  Braughing  disturb  us. 

This  road  through  Fowlmere  is  either — (1)  Pre-Roman,  in  which  case 
it  may  have  been  used  by  the  Romans;  or  (2)  it  is  Roman,  made 
and  constructed  for  military  purposes,  especially  we  may  suppose  to 
connect  the  great  camp  at  Braughing  with  those  at  Qrantchester  and 
Arbury;  or  (3)  it  is  post-Roman,  either  Saxon,  Danish,  or  Norman, 
or  wholly  modern. 

The  answer  to  the  debates  of  its  pre-Roman  or  post-Roman  date 
belongs  to  those  who  have  studied  the  origin  of  the  manorial  system. 

As  I  have  shewn,  the  alignment  of  the  road  is  indissolubly  joined  to 
the  copyhold  tenures  and  the  open  fields  of  the  folk  land.  If  those 
territorial  systems  were  British,  then  the  road  must  be  pre- Roman. 

If  they  were  Saxon,  then  the  road  must  be  post-Roman.  But  I  will 
add  this,  that  if  it  be  British,  then  there  was  a  British  road  driven 
through  Branditch,  just  at  its  weakest  point,  close  to  the  passage  of 
the  brook.  And  if  the  so-called  Ickuield  Way  was  also  British,  then 
there  was  a  second  road  driven  through  that  defence  only  some  half- 
mile  from  the  first.  That  such  should  be  the  case  1  cannot  bring 

*  In  the  Hundred  Rolls,  7  Edw.  I.,  1279,  is  mentioned  one  Johanntt  ad  Pontem  ; 
which  pont  is  for  certain  that  which  carries  this  road  over  Fowlmere  brook  at  the 
lower  end  of  the  village. 

t  Ancient  Cambridgethire,  p.  51.  He  says  Stukeley’s  statement  is  in  his 
Metallic  Hut.  of  Carauttue,  vol.  li.,  p.  144. 

^  Babington  says,  “  it  is  impossible  to  say  what  Stukeley’s  milestones  may 
have  been.  No  traces  of  them  now  exist.”  But  Bahingtou  disdains  to  give  any 
evidence  against  Stukeley’s  assumption,  as  likewise  any  in  support  of  his  own. 


XUM 


!»0TK8  AWB  QTTRRrFS.  ETC. 


25 


mjself  to  believe  I  am,  therefore,  of  opiuiou  that  the  road,  ax  we 
have  it,  was  not  pre-Roman ;  though  of  course  I  do  not  pretend  by 
that  conclusion  to  have  solved  the  date  of  the  mam  trial  and  open  field 
systems.  Hut  let  me  add,  if  in  any  way  the  road  be  British,  then  it 
must  have  slipped  by  the  Manor  Farm  along  Bar  Lane,  which  aligns 
with  our  main  street,  and  along  the  Melboum  path,  and  so  out  into 
the  field.  But  then,  somewhere,  it  must  have  pierced  Branditch. 
And  as  Manor  Farm  does  not  “give”  on  to  it,  I  do  not  think  this 
merits  further  consideration. 

On  the  other  hand,  if  the  open  field  system  and  manorial  demesne 
be  Saxon  in  origin,  it  is  possible  that  the  road  may  be  Roman,  and 
that  the  Saxon  surveyors  laid  out  their  fields  and  furlongs  with  regard 
to  its  frontier.  But  it  seems  to  me  the  evidence  is  against  its  Roman 
origin.  The  Romans  were  not  the  men  to  consider  the  poor  barley  fields 
of  any  British  occupiers.  If  they  wanted  a  road  they  would  make  it, 
and  in  the  must  suitable  course.  They  would  for  certain  have  brought 
the  road  out  direct  from  Branditch  to  the  caput  villee,  on  the  good  firm 
ground  of  Fawdon  hillside.  Nor,  for  another  reason,  does  it  appear 
even  necessary  for  them  to  have  made  a  road  through  Fowlmere  to 
Cambridge.  It  is  quite  probable  that  they  had  a  road  thither,  to 
Arbury,  from  Braughing,  where  there  was  a  large  and  well-known 
station ;  and  it  is  quite  possible  that  Stukeley  rightly  identified  this 
road  in  the  vicinity  of  Rare  Street  and  Barley.  But  between  the 
Hertfordshire  Hills  and  Arbury  they  had  two  large  camps — one  a 
noted  station  to  reach — Melbourn  and  Grantchester.  It  appears 
wholly  probable  that  the  Roman  road  deviated  to  the  left  of  the 
present  road,  just  this  side  of  Barley,  where  now  is  a  lane,  and  ran 
down  to  Melboum  by  the  present  roadway  below  Melbourn  Grange; 
and  from  Melbourn  down  through  Shepreth,  Barrington,  and  Hasling- 
field,  along  which  course  lanes,  driftways,  and  village  streets  appear 
in  fair  alignment,  to  Grantchester  and  so  to  Arbury.  This  route  is 
more  direct,  and  I  am  of  opinion  better  answers  the  Roman  purpose 
than  any  road  through  Fowlmere  and  Trumpington. 

This  I  write  after  having  first  been  fascinated  by  the  assumption 
of  our  London  Road  being  a  Roman  way.  My  change  of  opinion  has 
been  the  result  of  a  strenuous  endeavour  to  balance  aright  the 
evidence  of  facts. 

At  the  risk  of  self-assertive  prosiness,  I  will  hazard  just  one 
other  wild  surmise.  The  present  road  between  Fowlmere  and  Cam¬ 
bridge  I  believe  to  be  largely  of  comparatively  modem  alignment. 
My  reasons  are  briefiy  these  : — 

1.  Just  after  passing  the  end  of  Fowlmere  village  and  crossing 
Ash  well  Street,  the  road,  quite  unnecessarily  for  a  road  over  un¬ 
enclosed  country,  deviates  to  the  left. 

2.  In  passing  Newton,  it  does  not  go  through  it.  Newton 
stands  on  de  eac,  though  once  it  must  have  been  on  an  important 
thoroughfare. 

3.  It  again  deviates  to  the  left,  leaving  Hauxton  on  a  by  road, 
and  falling  into  the  Harston  Road,  well  away  from  that  village  also. 

4.  It  has  to  make  a  bend  to  enter  Trumpington  village,  though 


XUM 


a  THB  BAST  AWOLIAW;  OB, 

the  probability  is  that  that  village  is  on  the  alignment  of  the  original 
road. 

I  am,  therefore,  of  opinion  that  the  road,  after  leaving  Fowlmere, 
originally  passed  straight  on,  forming  the  boundary  between  Newton 
and  Whittlesford  parishes,  and  thence  through  Hauxton  to  Trumping- 
ton.  This,  however,  is  only  a  surmise,  as  I  have  not  yet  had  an 
opportunity  to  work  it  out. 

A.  0.  Yobkb. 

Fotclmer*  Rtetory,  Roytton. 


ACCOUNT  BOOKS  OF  ST.  STEPHEN’S  CHURCH  &  PARISH,  |i 
NORWICH.  Continued  from  p.  14.  j  l 

1826.  The  g^tuity  of  £10  was  continued  to  Rev.  W.  Collett,  curate,  as  a  h 
mark  of  the  parishioners'  esteem  ;  the  Rev.  Canon  W.  F.  Drake,  the  vicar,  living  in  \ 
the  Close.  A  gravestone  was  ordered  to  be  erected  to  the  memory  of  the  late  clerk,  j’: 
at  the  expense  of  the  parish ;  and  a  gratuity  of  £10  was  ordered  to  be  paid  towards  |  j 
paving  the  Back  Street. 

1827.  An  election  for  Guardians  took  place  under  the  amended  Act  for  the  1  i 

Maintenance  of  the  Poor;  at  the  close  of  the  poll,  at  three  o’clock,  155  votes  had  ! 
been  given  for  Mr.  Charles  Middleton,  116  for  Mr.  John  Munday,  and  64  for 
Mr.  Thomas  Brightwell ;  two  only  elected.  6<.  3d.  in  the  £  on  the  rental  was 
ordered  to  be  collected  for  the  Poor  Rate.  Among  the  names  signing  were  John 
Middleton,  W.  J.  Robberds,  and  John  Youngs.  A  County  Rate  of  lOd.  in  the  £ 
was  also  made.  In  August  it  was  resolved  to  close  the  gates  of  the  churchyard  by 
day  as  well  as  by  night,  and  that  keys  should  be  given  to  all  parishioners  who  asked 
for  one.  In  September,  6«.  Id.  in  the  £  Poor  ^te,  and  U.  8d.  in  the  £  County  H 
Rate  was  order^  to  be  levied ;  and  that  £2.  1I«.  6d.  be  paid  for  the  erection  of  the  u 
seats  at  the  north-west  side  of  the  church,  for  the  accommodation  of  the  district  '  j 
school.  Samuel  Bignold  and  John  Beevor,  sen.,  sign  this.  j  i 

1828.  The  old  assessment  reverted  to  in  consequence  of  a  resolution  passed  by  |  i 
the  veetry.  Thomas  Moore  Keith  appears  as  Guardian.  Those  who  signed  the  ; : 
minute  book  were  W.  F.  Drake,  vicar ;  J.  Middleton,  W.  J.  Robberds,  Chaa. 
Middleton,  Jno.  Barwell,  John  Norgate,  George  Mayhew,  John  Youngs,  Jno. 
Munday,  Joeiah  Roope,  Coleby,  Hewitt,  VV.  F.  Banner, Willm.  Hardy,  B.  Boardman, 
and  H.  King.  The  coroner  made  a  charge  for  an  inquest  held  on  a  person  who  had  ; 
died  in  the  hospital,  which  the  vestry  directed  should  be  resisted.  The  organ  was 

to  be  repaired  at  a  cost  not  exceeding  £40. 

1829.  George  Hooper  and  Eagle  Willett  elected  overseers  on  2nd  April,  and 
on  the  20th  there  was  a  contested  election  for  Guardians,  when  Messrs.  C.  Middleton 
and  B.  Boardman  were  elected,  the  nominee  of  Messrs.  8.  Bignold  and  Adam  Taylor 
(Mr.  T.  Brightwell)  being  rejected.  In  the  year  1829-30  the  Poor  Rate,  raised  in 
four  instalments,  was  20*.  5d.  in  the  £,  and  the  County  Rate  4(.  3d. ;  and  the  next 
year  was  heavier  still. 

1831.  The  Vestry  determined  to  oppose  a  new  Guardians  Bill,  the  one  then  in  > 
force  having  cost  the  city  £1400  to  obtain,  and  it  had  not  yet  been  four  years  in 
existence.  Matthew  Squire  was  a  churchwarden.  In  July  it  was  determined  to  ' 
appropriate  those  seats  now  used  by  strangers  and  servants  for  those  parishioners 
who  had  not  sittings,  and  to  move  the  pulpit  and  reading  desk  to  the  third  pillar  on 
the  south  side  towards  the  west.  A  new  Act  of  Parliameut  was  passed  on  the 
23rd  August,  and  four  Guardians  had  to  be  elected.  On  September  12th  the  election 
took  place.  The  poll  was  first  closed  at  3  o'clock,  then  re-opened  till  5  o’clock, 
when  it  was  found  that  8.  Bignold  had  126  votes,  C.  Middleton  130,  Bn.  Boardman 


XUI 


W0TS8  Airi)  QTrmniB,  rrc. 


27 


125,  J.  N.  V.  Cooper  115,  T.  Brightwell  30.  It  was  ordered  that  the  sound 
board  and  the  brass  branch  be  reatored  to  their  proper  positions. 

1832.  Robert  Colman  an  overseer ;  Mr.  Henry  Beloe  was  an  overseer  in  1833. 

1833.  In  September  the  Mayor  (Samnel  Bii<nold),  T.  Brightwell,  Chas.  John 
West,  William  Hinsby,  John  Middleton,  John  Blake,  and  William  Butcher  were 
appointed  a  Committee  for  equalizing  the  assessment  of  the  parish. 

1834.  The  thanks  of  the  Vestry  were  given  to  Mr.  Alderman  Newton  for  his 
firmness  at  a  time  when  much  opposition  was  made  in  the  parish  against  the  payment 
of  the  church  rates.  A  perambulation  of  the  parish  took  place  on  the  6th  of  May. 
A  new  terrier  was  made  and  signed  previous  to  the  Bishop’s  Visitation.  Mr.  Arthur 
Bayfield  having  resigned  as  a  duardian,  Mr.  Alderman  Newton,  Mr.  John  Middleton, 
Mr.  Benjamin  Boardman,  and  Mr.  John  Norton  Valentine  Cooper  were  elected 
Quardians  unopposed. 

1835.  A  school-room  in  Baldrey’s  Court,  occupied  by  Mr.  Phillips,  was 
assessed  at  £1.  Mr.  Boardman  became  ineligible  to  serve  as  a  Guardian. 

1836.  A  Committee  was  ^pointed  to  improve  the  singing. 

In  June,  1836,  the  Rev.  Wm.  Fitt  Drake,  the  vicar,  who  was  also  the  Bishop’s 
chaplain,  was  presented  to  the  living  of  West  Halton  in  Lincolnshire.  The 
parishioners  subscribed  £86  and  bought  him  a  tea  service. 

1837.  Benjamin  Garthon  elected  sexton  in  room  of  his  father,  Benjamin 
Garthon.  Rates  were  made  for  the  maintenance  of  the  poor,  a  Borough  Rate,  and 
a  Watch  Rate.  Mr.  James  Harcourt  of  the  parish  of  8t.  Margaret  was  elected  organist 
in  the  place  of  Mr.  Alfred  Pettett,  deceased.  A  committee  was  appointed  to  consider 
the  cleansing  and  whitewashing  of  the  church,  repair  of  the  east  window,  and  the 
proper  appropriation  of  the  pews. 

1838.  Application  made  to  Mr.  Kitson  for  leave  to  remove  the  south  porch, 
which  was  in  a  dangerous  state,  without  a  faculty. 

1839.  Mr.  Harbord  Fiddey  Boardman  was  appointed  orgpanist. 

1840.  The  total  Poor  Rate,  raised  in  four  quarterly  instalments,  was  17t.  8d. ; 
the  Church  Rate,  Is.  9d.,  in  two  instalments  ;  and  for  repair  of  the  road  from  the 
Lame  Dog  to  York  Place,  2d.  in  the  £  was  raised  in  1841. 

1841.  Mr.  James  Cupper  was  elected  road  surveyor  for  a  year,  at  a  salary  of 
four  guineas.  A  committee  was  appointed  to  consider  the  removal  of  the  font, 
making  a  private  entrance  to  the  organ  loft,  and  erecting  sittings  for  the  district 
schools,  and  it  was  agreed  to  defray  the  cost  of  the  same  by  voluntary  contributions. 
It  was  resolved  to  have  the  stained  glass,  which  had  been  put  in  the  east  window  by 
Mr.  Starland,  removed. 

1842.  Mr.  Norgate  gave  some  ancient  stained  glass,  which  was  placed  in  the 
east  window.  The  officers  elected  on  the  28th  March  were  Mr.  Charles  Bensley  and 
Mr.  James  Howes,  churchwardens ;  Robert  Palmer,  Thos.  Colman,  sidesmen ; 
51ark  Stockii^,  George  Ward,  overseers ;  Eagle  Willett,  Sam.  Bignold,  Geo. 
Durrant,  W.  K.  Famell,  James  Hardy,  E.  C.  Bailey,  auditors;  Sam.  Bignold,  John 
Norgate,  Paving  Commissioners ;  H.  F.  Boardman,  organist.  This  year,  as  in 
others,  the  vestry  opened  at  ten  and  closed  at  eleven,  when  Guardians  were  nominated 
and  elected.  The  Clerk  (Mr.  Browne)  commenced  proceedings  in  the  Consistory 
Court  to  compel  the  parish  to  pay  him  the  fees  which  he  thought  he  was  entitled 
to,  but  he  lost  the  day.  The  vestry  refused  to  repair  the  Back  Street. 

1843.  The  churchwardens  were  empowered  to  consult  with  the  Surveyor  of 
St.  Peter  Mancroft  and  the  Clerk  to  the  Waterworks,  as  to  watering  the  road  from 
Brazen  Doors  to  York  Place. 

1844.  An  election  for  one  churchwarden  and  the  org;anist  took  place.  The  poll 
was  open  till  four  o’clock  on  that  day,  April  8th ;  from  ten  till  four  on  the  Tuesday ; 
and  opened  again  on  the  10th  at  ten  o’clock.  Mr.  B.  Boardman  obtained  1 14  votes, 
and  retired;  Mr.  Noverre  received  118  votes,  and  was  elected  churchwarden; 
Mr.  U.  F.  Boardman  was  re-elected  organist,  with  140  votes,  Mr.  Reuben  Warne 
receiving  only  thirty -four  votes.  But  a  committee  of  Messrs.  Henry  Francis, 


28 


TirE  EAST  ANOLIAV;  OE. 


Henry  Miller,  and  Edward  Field  were  appointed  to  consider  if  an  apology  was  not 
due  from  the  organist  to  the  churchwardens,  and  what  his  duties  were.  There  was 
an  opposition  to  the  re-election  of  the  Guardians,  Messrs.  Brightwell,  Jliller,  and 
Towler  (probably  Liberals)  rejected.  The  churchwarden  (Mr.  Xoverre)  asked  for 
a  Church  Rate  of  U.  in  the  £. ;  Mr.  Hardy  and  .Mr.  Howes  proposed  6d. ;  Mr. 
Moore  and  3Ir.  Greenwood  that  the  making  of  a  Church  Rate  be  adjourned  tweWe 
months.  A  poll  was  taken  on  the  19th  of  July,  when  seventy-three  voted  for 
6d.,  six  voted  for  twelve  months’  adjournment.  The  assessment  question  ag^n  arose, 
the  Property  Tax  assessment  being  suggested  as  a  basis  by  the  Guardians. 

1845.  To  lessen  the  Church  Rate  the  feoffees  of  the  parish  property  were 
approached,  and  it  was  agreed  that  the  rent  payable  by  Mr.  Chamberlin  (Atkins’ 
Close)  should  be  received  by  the  churchwardens,  less  any  sums  due  to  Mr.  Francis. 
A  memorandum  to  that  effect  is  inserted  in  the  minute  book,  signed  Sam.  Bignold, 
I.  Jermy,  and  £.  T.  Booth.  And  it  was  further  agreed  to  take  Id.  in  the  £  from 
the  Poor  Rate  and  use  it  as  a  Church  Rate.  Goddard  Johnson  signs  this  year. 
The  following  properties  were  found  liable  to  pay  rent  to  the  churchwardens  in  aid 
of  Church  Rate : — Next  the  Bull  Inn  in  St.  Stephen’s,  now  let  to  James  Burgess  at 
£21  per  year;  Beale’s  tenements  in  Surrey  Street,  now  vested  in  the  Rev.  J.  Bowman 
at  £l  1  per  year ;  three  acres  at  Thuxton,  let  to  I.  O.  Taylor,  Esq.,  at  £5  per  annum  ; 
Browne’s  tenements,  in  occupation  of  S.  Bignold,  Esq.,  at  £2.  12t.  per  annum;  £l 
rent  from  Heydun,  now  Bulwer’s;  tenements  in  NeedRam  Street  paid  lOs.,  now  in 
hands  of  S.  Bignold,  Esq.;  fur  preaching  a  sermon  under  Blackett^  will;  £1.  I  Os., 
paid  by  St.  Peter  Mancruft,  for  poor ;  Mr.  Boardman  paid  6<f.  a  year  fur  a  right-of- 
way  through  the  churchyard  ;  Mrs.  D.  Roulliun  pays  the  same  ;  and  Atkyns’  Close, 
2a.  3r.  32p.  In  January,  1 839.  counsel’s  opinion  had  been  taken  as  to  the  legality 
of  using  these  for  Church  Repair.  Sir  William  Webb  Follett  and  Mr.  Duval  held 
that  if  objection  were  taken  to  such  use,  the  Court  of  Chancery  might  direct  a 
different  course  in  future,  but  the  churchwardens  were  not  liable  to  make  good 
monies  so  used,  as  they  had  acted  botid  Jidi.  Mr.  E.  Field  and  .Mr.  W.  P.  Nichols 
were  nominated  for  the  office  of  parish  churchwarden  ;  but  when  the  vestry  opened 
next  morning  to  take  the  poll,  a  letter  was  received  from  the  latter,  withdrawing  his 
nomination.  Mr.  Abel  Towler  and  Mr.  Samuel  Woodcock  Alealing,  overseers. 
The  names  of  Mr.  Edmund  Reynold,  Mr.  Foster  Grand  Aloore,  Chiles  Raven, 
Mr.  Wilson,  Mr.  John  Middleton,  Mr.  Hallows,  Mr.  Hutchin,  Mr.  Clayton,  and 
Mr.  Fred  Sapey  were  mentioned  as  having  their  ratal  qualification  altered,  and  the 
Assembly  Rwms  were  increased  to  £105.  There  was  an  election  for  Guardians — 
Nichols.  Miller,  and  Colman  (Liberals)  being  defeated  by  Cooper,  Famell,  Hardy, 
and  Field. 

1846.  Mr.  Field  presented  the  parish  with  an  antique  chair.  Wm.  Brazell 
Bensly  was  the  chairman  on  several  occasions.  The  total  rates  collected  for  the 
year  were — 4s.  lOd.  for  the  Poor  Rate;  Is.  l^fi.  for  the  Borough  Rate;  and  2^d. 
in  the  £  for  the  Watch  Rate.  There  was  another  contested  Guardian’s  election,  ^e 
three  Liberals  receiving  three  votes  each,  which  possibly  they  gave  themselves. 
They  were  Messrs.  Towler,  Miller,  and  Easto. 

This  is  the  last  year  entered  in  the  book  ;  but  at  the  end  is  the  poll  for  the 
churchwarden  and  organist  in  1844,  the  list  beginning  on  the  last  page,  and 
continuing  nearer  the  beginning.  237  persons  voted,  of  whom  29  were  females, 
and  8  had  some  objection  raised  against  their  vote.  Amongst  the  clergy  living 
in  the  parish  were  the  Rev.  John  Perowne,*  Rev.  Samuel  Titlow,t  Rev.  Robert  Rolfe. 

The  following  names  were  signed  to  the  Churchwardens'  Accounts  for  1790 : — 

W“  Taylor  Rob*  Harvey,  jun' 

T.  Matthews  John  Patteson 

Rich**  Peets 

Hapton,  Norfolk.  A.  E.  R. 

*  Father  of  Mie  present  Archdeacon  of  Norwich. 

4  Bev.  Samuel  Titlow  was  the  Incumbent  of  St.  John  Baptist  at  Timberhill  and  St.  Peter 
Hongrate. 

Note  —The  outrage  mentioned  on  page  14,  line  10,  was  mentioned  in  Th4  Sorwieh  Mercury. 
On  the  evening  at  Wednesday,  May  1st,  or  the  morning  of  Thursday,  May  2nd,  the  cast-iron  gate 
to  this  chnrchyaid  was  stolen  by  some  person  or  persona  unknown. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  El'C. 


29 


SOME  SUFFOLK  CHURCH  NOTES.  No.  LH. 

St.  Mary  at  the  Tower,  Ipswich  {continued). 

A  memorial  tablet  of  painted  wood  hangs  on  the  wall  in  the 
south-west  corner  of  the  church,  at  the  lower  comers  of  which  are 
depicted  William  Smart,  a  great  Ipswich  benefactor,  and  his  wife. 
They  are  kneeling ;  he,  a  venerable  bearded  figure  in  a  red  gown  and 
black  doublet  with  ruff  and  ruffles ;  the  lady  in  a  dark-coloured  gown 
with  ruff,  and  a  black  hood  over  a  close  white  coif.  A  quaint  view  of 
Ipswich  is  in  the  background,  and  above  are  two  cherubs.  On  a 
scrolled  tablet  in  the  centre  is  painted  the  following  acrostic  epitaph, 
that  looks  to  have  been  retouched : — 

W  hat  can  a  deade  man  feede  aud  cloth  and  holy  precepts  geve 
I  t  cannot  be  tush  tel  not  me  I  know  he  stil  dooth  line. 

L  iue  then  sweete  Soule  in  ample  rest,  example  to  the  rest 
L  ike  thine  his  ground  must  low  be  laid  that  high  wil  build  his  nest. 
I  f  none  think  now  on  thank ;  if  out  of  sight  be  out  of  minde 
A  Ithough  ’tis  wrong  yit  lights  thy  los  that  heueuly  thank  doost  finde 
M  ay  never  yet  faire  Ipswich  fry  be  foully  so  vukinde. 

S  chooles  Churches  Orphanarye  roomes  shal  keepe  y*  stil  in  sight 
M  en  Weeme  Children,  ould  and  3’uug,  shal  were  the  day  and  night. 
A  las  then  not  for  y'  wee  cry  but  for  our  selues  alas 
R  uing  the  want  of  such  a  wight  as  al  thine  adge  did  pas  • 

T  hus  I’le  poore  Man  one  did  moorne  thus  gras  bewayled  gras. 

Smart  was  buried  under  the  altar,  but  his  massive  gravestone  now 
lies  within  a  low  iron  railing  in  the  churchyard  west  of  the  tower.  It 
is  inscribed : — 

Qvlielmvs  Smart  |  integerrimse  piet  |  atis  institiaq’  Senator  | 
defvnctvs  est  23  Sep  |  tembris  A.D.  1599.  Cvivs  vx  |  or  Alicia  nvpta 
Rv  I  dvlpho  Scrivener  Ar  |  migero  obiit  13  Oc  |  tobris  A.D.  1600. 

There  are  no  heraldic  insignia  here,  but  the  shield  on  his  alms¬ 
houses  is: — Ermine,  3  chess  rooks  Gu.  two  and  one. 

Another  acrostic  inscription  is  upon  a  small  stone  now  set  up  on  a 
tower  buttress  near  to  Smart’s  memorial: — Eccl.  ij  1  |  Cast  on  |  y* 
Waters  thy  bread,  after  |  many  dayes  thov  sbalt  find  it.  |  ix  Marcij 
An.  Dni.  1618.  | 


L  eonard  Caston  Xpe  his  care  '  C  an  then  black  Oblivion 
E  terniz’d  therefore  y*  his  name  A  Ithough  the  Man  be  deceased 
0  ah  knewe  wee  the  joyes  w*^**  are  S  o  blot  ovt  the  name  of  one  that 
N  owe  given  to  him  for  the  same.  T  hat  for  love  by  will  bequeath’d 
A  mongest  S^*  in  glory  blessed  I  0  n  indigent  and  aged  lame 
R  oyally  in  heaven  he  is  dressed  I  N  ot  for  a  hav'n  but  lasting  fame. 
D  oing  there  a  work  expresst.  ' 

On  a  small  square  of  marble  close  by  is : — 

John  Wright  Gen:  dyed:  |  Nov:  27:  1623:  and  gave  |  40*:  yeerely 
to  this  par  |  ish,  for  ever  tor’™’^*  a  ser  |  mon  every  afternoon  |  on  the 
Lord’s  day.  | 

Another  mural  stone  has  a  coffin  lid,  pick,  spade,  and  broom, 
carved  and  painted  below  the  following : — 

Remember  them  that  have  the  role  over  yov,  who  have  spoke 


so 


TH£  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OK, 


Tnto  I  y’’  the  word  of  CKxl,  whose  faith  |  follow,  considering  the  end  1 
of  I  their  conversation:  Heb:  13:  ver:  7:  |  K 

D*  Gelke  :  A®  Eliz:  2**:  Jvn:  10:  I 

IK  Norton  :  :  Eliz:  18  :  Apr:  7:  i 

M'  Pemberton:  :  Eliz:  24  :  Apr :  6:  c 

M'  Wright  :  :  Eliz:  27  :  Sep :  8:  ^ 

M' Harrison  :  :  Eliz:  32  :  Sep:  8: 

D'  Burges  :  ;  Eliz:  34  :  Sep :  27: 

D' Reeves  :  :  Eliz:  44  :  Jvn:  27:  ^ 

M'  Askew  :  :  Jaco:  2**®:  Dec :  8:  i 

M'  Ward  :  :  Joco:  3  :  Nov:  4:  t 

A  brass  plate  at  the  west  end  of  the  south  aisle  bears  this  T 
inscription  in  Roman  capitals : —  [ 

Svb  hoc  marmore  sepvltvm  est  corpvs  Robert!  |  Sparrowe,  nvper 
vnivs  Portmannorvm  hvivs  |  Vill»  Gippi  qvi  obiit  xxvi.  die  Jvlii 
Anno  I  Salvtis  mdlxxxxiiii  ^tatis  vero  svse  lxxxiiii^.  | 

Another  rectangular  plate,  after  lying  loose  for  some  time,  has 
been  affixed  to  the  vestry  wall : — 

Blessed  are  the  dead  w®**  die  in  the  Lorde  for  they  |  rest  from 
their  labovrs  |  and  their  workeS  doe  |  follow  them. 

A  slab  of  marble  in  the  vestry  floor  is  the  only  memorial  of  S*“i 
Ward,  B.D.,  chosen  town  preacher  in  1604.  Watch  Ward  |  for  yet  p 
a  little  I  while  and  he  that  shall  |  come  will  come.  | 

On  a  mural  tablet  in  south-west  corner  of  the  church  is  this  *1 
shield : — Quarterly,  first  and  fourth,  Arg.  on  a  bend  Sa.  three  crosslets 

fitchy  Gu . ;  second  and  third,  Gu.  six  annulets  Or,  three,  two,  >j 

and  one . 

1:  John  32.  |  Nigh  hereto  lie  interred  the  |  Remains  of  M'  Math: 
Lavrence  |  Publike  Preacher  of  this  Towne  |  9  yeares  and  9  moneths.  I 
Incvlpatee  fidei  et  vitae  |  Morib’  spectabilis  |  Concionator  facvnd’ 
Copios’  I  Adeoq’  hvj’  loci  ordine  licet  decern’  |  vix  uni  aut  alter! 
secund’.  |  Jvdith  his  3'*  wife  addeth  to  his  living  |  and  more  indvring 
labovrs ! ! !  This  Monvment  of  her  afi'ection  to  |  the  Memory  of  bis 
Name.  |  Hee  departed  Mar:  19:  1653:  |  Aged  53  yeares.  |  Hab:  2: 4:  | 

By  it  he  being  dead  |  yet  speaketh.  | 

Another  marble  tablet  in  the  same  part  of  the  church  displays 
these  arms : — Or,  a  chevron  between  three  crescents  Gu.,  on  a  chief 
Arg.,  three  roses  proper.  Chapman:  — 

Subter  Johannes  Chapman  Armiger  jacet  |  Magister  Artium  Et 
Svee  foras  Domi  |  qvo  nemo  flore  Corporis  vidit  magis  |  pvlchrvm  avt 
decent!  more,  mentis  Candidse  |  qvam  hvmilis  in  alta  sorte  liberalior  | 
parcendo  ivstum  noverint  omnes  pivm  |  Devs :  favores  non  amavit : 
alter!  |  tamen  memor  facere  atqve  fecisse  immemor  |  Tegit  per  annvm 
BIBLIUM,  stvdens  Deo:  |  qv»  concio  cor  impvlit  cordi  fvit.  | 
Apoplexia  vis  rapvit  aunorvm  cito  |  opera  at  loqvvntvr  pro  loqventibvs 
qvoqve.  |  Obiit  4®  Octob:  |  Ano  Dni  1657  |  An®  .ffitatis  svse  77.  | 

A  flat  stone  now  in  the  churchyard  is  inscribed  : — 

Here  Resteth  the  Body  |  of  Bridget  the  Wife  of  |  Gilbert  Pinefild 

Daught.  I  of  John  Smythier  Gent.  | . one  of  the  Portmen  |  of 

this  Towne  who  departed  |  this  life  May . 


XUM 


iroxES  Airu  qubkus,  bxc. 


31 


Another  is : — 

Richard  Pyrplett  Gent,  one  of  |  the  Fortnaen  and  fovr  times 
Bailife  of  this  Towne  Obijt  |  19:  Aprill  Ann**:  1659:  aged  81.  | 

A  large  monument  now  in  the  vestry  is  surmounted  by  a  flowered 
pediment  containing  this  (faded)  shield: — Or.,  on  a  chevron  Gu., 
between  three  stags  trippant,  as  many  fleur  de  lys  of  the  fleld, 

Jtohinton ;  impaling  Vert,  a  griffin  segreant  Or, .  Beneath  is  this 

inscription : — 

In  this  Chancell  waiting  for  a  Blessed  Resurrection  Rest  y* 
bodys  I  of  John  Robinson  Gen*  late  Portman  of  this  Town  who 
deceased  |  May  y*  9*'’  1666  Aged  69  Years,  and  of  Elizabeth  bis  Wife 
who  I  deceased  FeV  y*  3^  1694  Aged  86  years.  |  Besides  four  dying 
Infants  they  had  Issue  Thomas,  John,  Mary  |  and  Elizabeth  who  died 
Adult  before  their  Mother.  |  Memorand.  the  John  gave  20/.  to  the 
Library  of  this  Town,  and  a  Fair  |  Communion  Patin  to  this  Parish, 
th  s'*  Elizabeth  July  y*  First  A®  1680  |  Gave  to  y*  Bailifs,  Burgesses 
and  Comunality  of  this  Town  100*  |  in  Trust  for  y®  Yearly  Paiment 
for  Ever  of  52*  to  this  Parish  and  52*  to  |  y*  Parish  of  S*  Clement’s  to 
be  Distributed  in  12'*  worth  of  Bread  |  Every  Sunday  to  y*  Poor  in 
each  Parish,  and  Sep*  13***  1683  |  She  paid  100*  to  y®  s'*  Bailifs  &c. 
towards  y'  yearly  Maintenance  |  for  ever  of  Two  Poor  Working  Boys 
in  the  Hospital  of  this  Town  |  by  the  Interest  of  the  same.  |  Revel: 
ch:  13:  v:  Y:  They  Rest  from  their  |  Labours  and  their  work*  do  follow 
them.  I 

{To  be  continued).  H.  W.  Birch. 


REPLIES; 

Bkllamy  OP  Suffolk  (vol.  ix.,  p.  116). — Pages  778 — 784  of  the 
Suffolk  part  of  Weaver’s  Ancient  Foneral  Monvmente,  1631,  are  devoted 
to  “  Certaine  Church  collectione  within  thie  County,  taken  by  William 
Harvey  Clarencieux,  King  of  Armi,  now  in  the  hande  of  William  le  Neve, 
Yorke  Herald."  At  p.  782  is  the  following  monumental  inscription 
from  “  the  Cherch  of  Hoxney  (Home)  ” : — “  Mabell  Bellamy  late  wyef 
of  Rychard  Bellamy  of  London  gent,  and  one  of  the  doughters  and 
heyres  of  Thomae  Boyte  of  Harrow  of  the  hyll  in  the  county  of 
Medelsez,  which  Mabell  dyed  in  Anno  M.D.  xxxiiii."  This  inscription 
is  no  longer  to  be  found  in  Home  Church.  Partridge. 

Southern  Nigtrxa,  W*$t  Africa. 


Manwood  Family  (second  series,  vol.  vi.,  pp.  96,  208,  224,  240, 
320;  third  series,  vol.  vii.,  pp.  48,  128;  vol.  viii.,  p.  112).  I  send 
extracts  from  these  three  wills  proved  in  the  Archdeaconry  of 
Sudbury. 


32 


THS  £A8T  JlNOLLIM  ;  UR, 


1.  Nuncupative  will,  dated  “some  one  daye”  in  April,  1574,  of 
Tho.  Manwood  of  Glemsfo'd.  To  Margerye  my  wife  messuage 
wherein  I  now  dwell,  for  life ;  then  for  three  years  to  Tho.  Manwoode  ; 
my  son ;  then  for  two  years  to  Joane  my  daughter ;  then  for  two  years 
to  M  argarett  my  daughter ;  then  for  two  years  to  Richard  my  son ; 
then  for  two  years  to  Tobie  *  my  son ;  then  to  Naum  Manwood  my 
son.  Unto  the  said  Naum  “  one  greate  Cheste.”  Margerye  my  wife  ^ 
to  be  ex’ix.  He  surrendered  said  messuage  to  John  Allen  and  John 
Ruggell  of  Glemsforde,  copyholders  of  the  manor  whereof  the  same 
be  liolden.  Witnesses — John  Allen,  John  Ruggell,  Anthonie  Carter 
of  Bury  8.  Ed.  Proved  29  Mar.  1 592  by  Margerie,  relict  and  ex’ix. 

2.  Will  of  Edmunde  Manwood  of  muche  Cornerde,  29  Nov.  1576. 

To  be  buried  in  Cornerde  churchyard.  “Item  I  give  to  the  poore 
men's  boxe  of  the  same  pishe  xij'*.’’  To  Thomas  my  son  “  the  Lease 
of  my  fearme  vp6  this  Condicion  that  Johane  my  wife  shalbe  ptiner 
(partner)  of  the  same  together  w“*  him  duringe  the  tyme  of  her 
wyddowhode.  Also  I  will  that  the  same  Thomas  shall  geve  vnto  her 
at  the  tyme  of  her  mariage  whensoever  the  same  shall  come  to  passe 
twoe  milche  kine  and  xiij*  iij*^  towards  the  bringing  vp  of  John  my  sonne 
And  I  will  that  Thomas  my  sonne  shall  stand  chardged  w^**  the  bring- 
inge  vp  of  my  sonne  Tobye  *  vnles  theye  doe  otherwise  agre  betwene 
themselves  Item  I  will  that  Thomas  my  sonne  shall  paye  to  Roberte 
my  sonne  his  brother  thre  pounds  at  the  tyme  of  twentie  yeres  of  age  or 
attfaedaye  of  his  mariage  which  of  them  comethe  firste  and  also  a  cowe  i 
bullock  of  twoe  yeres  of  age  yf  yt  may  be  spared  Item  I  will  y‘ 
Gressill  my  daughter  shall  have  a  Cowe  Bullock  of  twoe  yeres  of  age  } 
delivered  to  her  at  the  tyme  of  twentie  yeres  of  age  or  at  the  daye  of  I 
her  mariage  w'**  of  them  cometh  firste  by  the  hand  of  my  executor  ; 
Item  I  give  to  Margerie  f  my  daughter  a  cowe  buUocke  of  twoe . 
yeres  of  age  at  the  tyme  of  twentie  yeres  of  age  or  at  the  daye  of  her  I 
mariage  which  of  them  comethe  firste  by  the  hande  of  my  Executor 
All  the  reste  of  my  goods  I  comend  them  to  Thomas  my  sonne  and  I 
the  houshould  stuSe  as  beddinge  brasse  pewter  and  other  suche  j 
Implements  I  will  shalbe  equallie  devided  betwene  Thomas  my  sonne  i 
and  my  wife  saveinge  I  will  that  Grysell  and  Margerie  my  daughters 
shall  be  remembered  w***  some  smale  porcion  of  my  houshoulde 
accordinge  to  the  discretion  of  my  wife  and  Thomas  my  sonne  Item  I 
will  that  Robert!  Grisell  and  Margerie  my  children  shall  have  etche  of 
them  a  hutche  Cofer  or  cheste  to  put  in  theire  necessaries  to  be 
delivered  to  them  by  tbe  hands  of  my  Executor.  There  is  a  latten 
basen  and  a  brasse  potte  w‘''‘  was  my  father’s  those  I  will  that  Thomas 
shall  have.”  Thomas  my  son  to  be  sole  ex’or.  Witnesses  :  Tho.  Pinch¬ 
becks,  John  Hichecocke,  Walter  Richardson,  clerk.  Proved  5  Feb. 
157^  by  ex  r.  Chaelbs  Partbidoe. 

Southern  Nigeria,  Weet  Afrieet. 


*  Tobias  Manhood,  singleman,  was  buryed  the  fifte  daye  of  ffelmiarye  Anno  ' 
Dni  1596. — Parish  Register  St.  Gregory’s,  Sudbury. 

t  Baptized  20th  August,  1566,  at  Great  Comaid. —  The  Eaet  Anglian,  third 
series,  vol.  vii.  p.  48. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


33 


THE  GOODS  OF  A  SUFFOLK  PAESON  IN  THE 
SEVENTEENTH  CENTUEY. 

An  Inventary  of  all  and  singuler  the  Goods,  Chattells,  Cattell, 
Household  stuSe  and  personall  Estate  whatsoever  of  Abraham  Chaplin, 
late  of  Wetheringsett,  in  the  County  of  SufE.  Clerke,  deceased,  viewed, 
valued,  and  apprized  by  Eoger  Foulser  and  John  Calver  the  22th  day 
of  July,  Anno  Dni.  1679,  foUoweth. 

Viz*  In  the  Hall. 

Imps’  :  one  long  Table,  twoe  lormee,  one  little  Table  and  one 
round  Table  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  . . 

Item  one  Cupboard  with  a  Carpet  . .  . .  . .  . .  xij* 

Item  one  Dresser,  Eight  Chaires,  Eleaven  Cushions,  twoe  Stooles. .  iiij* 

Item  twoe  Muskets,  twoe  Rests,  one  Birding  Peece,  one  Jack  . .  jU 
Item  Cobirons,  Andiron,  firepan  and  Tonga,  Stock  Iron,  Smell 
Roast,  twoe  Hakes,  Qridiron,  twoe  smoothing  Boxes,  Cliyer, 

Bellowes,  twoe  S^tts,  Shredding  Knife  . .  . .  . .  ju  yiij* 

Item  one  Mortar  and  Pestle,  twoe  Chafeing  Dishes,  twoe  Wasters, 

Pepper  Box,  Bridging  Box,  CuUendar,  Fish  Plate,  Bread 
Grate,  4c.  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  yiij*  yj* 

In  the  little  Parlor. 

Item  one  Bed  and  Bedstead  as  it  stands  . .  . .  . .  iiju 

Item  one  little  Table,  Carpet  and  Windows  Curtains  . .  , .  y* 

In  the  Best  Parlor. 

Item  one  long  Table,  six  joyned  Stooles,  one  forme,  twoe  Carpets, 
one  Liyery  Cupboard,  one  little  Table,  one  Wainscot  Chaire, 
one  QIasse  Keepe  and  Glasses  . .  . .  . .  . .  ji>  xyij* 

Item  Cobirons,  Creepers,  Bellowes,  Fire  Pann  and  Tonga  . .  yiij* 

Item  six  Leather  Chaires,  one  other  Chaire  ..  ..  ..  ju  y* 

Item  twoe  Backswords,  twoe  Rapieres  . .  . .  . .  xy* 

Item  one  Cabbinet  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  x* 

In  the  Great  Parlor. 

Item  the  Best  Bed  and  Bedstead  as  it  stands  . .  . .  . .  yU 

Item  one  great  Bedsteads,  twoe  'Pruckle  Bedsteades,  one  Matt  and 

Bedcords,  one  Rugg  . .  . .  . .  . .  ju  y* 

Item  twoe  Chests,  old  Stools,  two  Wicker  Chaires,  one  old  Chaire, 

Bellowes,  Cobirons,  one  Portall  . .  . .  . .  . .  ju  xij* 

In  the  Maide’s  Chamber. 

Item  one  Feather  Bed  and  Truckle  Bedstead  as  it  stands,  one 

Cradle,  twoe  old  Chaires..  ..  ..  ••  j'‘ 

In  the  Best  Chamber. 

Item  one  Greene  Bedstead,  twoe  Feather  Beds,  fours  Blankets,  one 
Rugg,  one  Bolster,  twoe  Pillowes,  Straw  Bed  and  Lines  and 
Curtaines,  Rodds  and  Valence  . .  . .  . .  . .  yiij'* 

Item  one  other  Bedstead,  one  Feather  Bed,  twoe  Bolsters,  twoe 

Blankets,  Matt  and  Cords,  Curtaines,  Rods  and  Yallence  . .  y" 

Item,  one  Trundle  Bedstead,  Feather  Bed,  three  Bolsters,  Matt 

and  Cord  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  ij“ 

Item  one  Liyery  Cupboard,  fours  wrought  Stooles,  one  wrought 
Chaire,  one  Skreene,  one  joyned  fforme,  one  Round  Table  and 
Carpet,  Cobirons  and  Window  Curtaines  . .  . .  . .  ij" 

In  the  Great  Parlour  Chamber. 

Item  one  Feather  Bed  and  Bedstead,  one  Flock  Bed,  twoe  Blankets, 
one  Rugg,  twoe  Pillowes,  twoe  Bolsters,  Curtaines,  Rodds  and 
Vallence  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  yj" 

Item  one  Table  and  Carpet,  one  great  Chest,  one  hanrag  Presse. .  ij"  iij* 

Item  twoe  wrought  Chaires  and  Cobirons,  Windows  Curtaines  . .  yiij* 

D 


34 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAH;  OK, 


In  the  Battery  Chamber. 

Inx  one  Feather  Bed,  one  Flock  Bed,  one  Irodstead,  twoe  Blanketa, 
three  Bolsters,  twoe  Pillowee  . .  . .  . .  . . 

Item  six  Wedges,  one  Hammer,  twoe  Sawes  ..  ..  x* 

Item  old  Lumber  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  iij* 

In  the  long  Chamber. 

Three  Rundlets,  sixteene  pound  Flax . .  . .  . .  , .  x* 

In  the  Come  Chamber. 

Wheat  lower  Comb  ..  ,.  ..  ..  ..  iiij*'  iiij* 

One  Come  Skreene,  one  Bushell,  one  halfe  Bushell,  Peck,  Come 

Skuppet,  Quickfall  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  xrj* 

Old  Iron  and  Skuppet  and  Hopps  , .  . .  . .  . .  xj* 

In  the  Entry. 

One  Clock,  one  Linnen  Horse  . .  . .  . .  . .  ju  x* 

In  the  Buttery. 

Three  halfe  Barrells,  twoe  Barrells,  one  Hoggshead,  foure  Ale 

Stooles,  one  Mulet,  twoe  Firkins,  one  Powdering  Tubb  . .  xj* 

Boulting  Hutch,  another  Powdering  Tubb,  Scales  and  Beame,  30“ 

Leaden  Weights,  one  wooden  Bottle  ..  ..  ..  xrij* 

A  Presse  and  old  Lumber  . .  . .  . .  , .  . .  tj*  Tiij'' 

In  the  Washhouse. 

One  CopTOr,  fower  Tubbe  , .  . .  . .  . .  . .  ij“  xv* 

Old  Lumber  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  , .  ij* 

In  the  Dairy. 

.  Twoe  Butter  Keelers,  twoe  Tubbe,  three  Keelers,  thirteene  Bowles, 

Traffing  Dish,  Pintes,  Milke  Tray  . .  . .  . .  j“  xiiij* 

The  Ladder  and  fower  Shelves  . .  . .  . .  . .  V 

In  the  Backhouse. 

A  Cheese  Presse  and  Chume,  eight  Cheese  Fatts,  three  Breads  . .  v^* 

Salting  Keeler,  Stoole  and  Milke  Tongs  . .  . ,  , ,  ii* 

One  Hale  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  ]* 

Salting  Trough,  twoe  Pailes,  twoe  Swill  Tubbs  and  Lumber  ..  x* 

In  the  Cheese  Chamber. 

Halfe  a  load  of  Cheese  and  Butter  . .  . ,  . .  ix“ 


In  the  Kitchen. 

The  Pewter  129“,  three  Pewter  Chamber  Potts  and  a  Porrenger  . .  v“ 

The  Bottom  of  the  Still  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  ij* 

Two  Brasse  Candlesticks,  three  Brasse  Kettles,  fower  Skellets  . .  j“  xiij* 
Three  Brasse  Potts,  one  Iron  Pott,  twoe  Pott  Hookes,  one  Bake 

Pann,  Basting  Ladles,  and  Skummer  . .  . .  . .  j“  ix* 

Twoe  Warmins:  Panns,  twoe  Dripping  Panns,  Peele,  and  Padding 

Pann  and  Fryeing  Pann . .  . .  . .  . ,  . .  xiij* 

Tow  Comb,  Pashell,  Gridiron  and  Lumber  . .  . .  . .  v* 

Twelve  Dozen  Trenchers  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  xiij* 

In  the  Study. 


The  Library  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  xx“ 

In  Linnen  Tenn  Board  Cloths,  Seaven  Dozen  Napkins,  one  and 
twenty  paire  of  Sheets,  Eleaven  paire  of  Pillow  Beeres,  twoe 
Cupboard  Cloaths,  twenty  Towells  and  other  ordinary  Linen  . .  x“ 
His  weareing  Apparrell  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  xij“ 

Without  Doores. 

In  the  Stable. 

A  Saddle  and  twoe  Bridles,  three  Collars,  fower  paire  Traise,  six 

Halters,  Cart  Rope,  Cart  Saddle,  Fill  Bells  . .  . .  j“ 


X* 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


35 


Hjwr  and  joo  of  Board 


In  the  Neathouae. 


In  the  Bame, 

Tiinr  Loadea  of  Har  . .  . .  . .  . .  x*‘ 

Twoe  Fanna,  one  Cart,  five  Forks,  twoe  Hay  Rakes,  a  Cutting' 

Knife  and  Sieve,  a  Ladder,  Caveing  Sieve  and  a  Chaffe  Sieve  iij’*  ziii* 

A  MiU . iju 

Lumber  in  the  Mill  House  , .  . .  . .  . ,  x* 

In  the  Carthouse. 

Onb  Tumbrell,  one  Milk  Cart  and  Wheele  Barrowe,  and  Whipple 

Trees  and  Plowes,  an  old  Cart  and  Wheeles,  Faire  Harrowes  . .  iji*  j* 
A  Roll  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  , .  . .  viij* 

In  the  Store  House. 

Thb  Lumber  . .  . ,  . .  . .  . .  . .  x* 

In  the  Hoggs  Stye. 

Tvroi  Hoggs,  three  Shotta  and  twoe  Hoggs  Troughs  . .  . .  iij*'  j* 

In  the  Wood  Yard. 

Txkn  Loadea  of  Wood  great  and  small  . ,  . .  . .  v** 

Twoe  Loadea  of  Blocks  . .  . .  . .  . .  xvj* 

Come  on  the  Ground. 

Six  acres  of  Barley  and  Pease  . .  . .  . .  . ,  ixU 

Five  acres  of  Wheats  and  fours  acres  of  Bullimong  . .  . .  xij^ 

Eight  Cowes,  twoe  Budds  . .  . .  . .  . .  xxviju  x* 

A  Weaneing  Calf  and  an  Old  Mare  ..  ..  ..  ..  iiiju 

Lr  Bills,  Bonds,  Sperable  Debts,  ready  money  and  Plate  cccxl^^ 

The  Totall  Same  is  . .  DLii'*  xiij* 


DLiju  xiij* 


Ex*"’  humoi'  Inv*°’  octavo  Die  Mensia  Angusti  Anno  Dni  1679 :  per  Catherinam 
Chaplin  viduam  et  Henricum  Chaplin,  Executores,  &c.  pro  vero  pleno  et  perfecto 
Inventario,  Ac.  Sub  protestacbne  tamen  de  addendo  ^  si 

W““  Colman,  Reg'®* 

There  eeeins  to  be  some  doubt  as  to  the  actual  meaning  of  the 
word  Builimong  (under  the  head  of  “Come  on  the  Ground”).  I  am 
informed  that  a  farmer  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Wetheringsett  thinks 
a  mixture  of  crops  is  intended,  as  when  the  original  crop  has  partly 
failed  and  a  different  one  is  sown  to  take  its  place.  Forby’s  definition 
(see  Vocabulary  of  Eoit  Anglia,  toI.  i.  (1830)  pp.  43,  44)  is  a  variation 
of  this.  He  says,  “  Bully-mung,  8.  According  to  T.  [Tusser]  a 
mixture  of  the  meal  of  oats,  pease,  and  vetches.  Sk.  [Skinner’s 
Etymol]  makes  buckwheat  the  main  in^edient.  With  us  [Fincham, 
CO  Norf.]  it  means  any  coarse  thick  mixture  for  homely  food.  The 
derivation  doubtfully  proposed  by  Sk.  is  probably  right.  A.S.  bilig, 
ater,  and  mengean,  miscere.” 

In  N.  Bailey’s  Dictionary  the  explanation  given  is  “Bullimong  or 
bullimong:  a  mixture  of  several  sorts  of  grain  together,  as  pease, 
oats,  vetches.  Ettex”  This  might  apply  to  either  of  the  preceding 
definitions,  as  he  does  not  say  for  what  purpose  the  grain  is  mixed. 
Probably  the  first  idea  is  more  correct  in  the  present  instance. 

d2 


36 


TUK  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


There  are  other  words  worthy  of  notice,  such  as  “portall,”  “rundlet,” 
“mulct,”  and  “traflhng  dish,”  but  I  am  not  prepared  with  any 
explanation  of  these. 

The  registers  of  Wetheringsett  contain  the  following  entries : — 

Baptisms. 

22  March,  1644.  Abraham,  the  son  of  Mr.  Abraham  Chaplin,  minister  of  Ood’i 
word  in  this  parish. 

27  December,  1646.  John,  son  of  Mr.  Abraham  Chaplin  and  Catherine  his  wife. 

31  December,  1648.  Peter,  „  ,,  ,,  ,,  ,, 

2  J une,  1630.  Susanna,  daughter  of  Mr.  Abraham  Chaplin  and  Catherine  his  wife. 

16  May,  1632.  Anne,  ,,  ,,  „  ,,  „ 

20  December,  1653.  Peter,  son  of  Mr.  Abraham  Chaplin  and  Catherine  his  wife. 

Burials,  1679. 

Mr.  Abraham  Chaplin,  Clerk,  was  buried  only  in  woollen  according  to  the  late 
Act,  July  20. 

Mr.  Chaplin’s  tombstone,  formerly  on  the  floor  on  the  south  side  of 
the  communion  table,  has,  within  recent  years,  been  removed  to  make 
room  for  a  new  altar  step  and  now  lies  in  the  nave,  near  the  font 
It  bears  the  following  inscription : — 

His  iacet  |  Abrahamus  Chaplin  |  A.  M.  &  Ann.  36  Hujus  |  Eccl" 
Rector  |  Obiit  Jul.  )  18 

An.  Dni.  [  1679 
Aetat  )  70. 

Etiam  Catherina  uxor  |  vicesimo  secundo  Januarii  |  Anno  Aetatis 
Ixxiii.  I  Salutis  mdcxc  |  defuncta. 

I  shall  be  glad  to  hear  of  any  further  information  regarding  him 
or  his  ancestors. 

R.  G.  Chaplin  Ltvbtt. 

Fulboume,  Cambridge. 


8T.  STEPHEN’S  CHURCH  AND  PARISH,  NORWICH. 
MEMORANDUM  FROM  BOOKS  OF  ACCOUNT. 

LICENSES  TO  EAT  FLESH,  &c. 

Extracts  made  from  the  Parish  Registers  by  the  Vicar,  the  Rev.  Dundu 
Harford,  May,  1902  : — 

“  1385.  [In  very  small  writing  (Miles  Mosse)  at  top  of  page].” 

“  The  names  of  such  as  hare  repaired  to  St.  Stephen’s  with  (P)  licenses  from 
the  Q.  Majestic  to  ask  and  gather  the  devotions  of  the  people,  and  have  gathered 
the  same.” 

[Entries  on  left  margin]. 

“  Maii  8.  Henrie  Joanes  for  ye  hospital!  of  Beccles." 

“Maii  9.  Richard  Big^olde  of  Carlton  Roade,  for  a  businesse.” 

[Three  memoranda  in  centre  of  page]. 

“  Memorandu.  That  Robt.  Rooke  and  his  wyffe  in  regard  to  boath  ther  healthet 
are  licensed  to  eat  fldesh  in  the  tyme  of  this  lent  notwithstanding  the  prohibition, 
as  it  doth  appears  hy  the  phisition's  certi6cate  to  me  directed.  And  therefort 
according  to  the  statute  in  the  case  provided,  the  sayde  license  to  continue  until  thej 
shalbe  better  and  in  more  perfect  health.  Qrant^  this  xvth  day  of  March,  anno 
1397.  “  By  me  Rich.  Carlton,  Curat.” 


A 


NOTX8  AMU  QUKK1J&8,  BTC. 


37 


[Book  I.,  sheets  between  Marriages  and  Burials]. 

**  Memorandum.  That  March  2;  Anno  Dili  1629.  There  was,  according  to 
the  statute  in  that  behalfe,  granted  unto  Mr.  William  Rant,  Doct.  of  Physicke,  and 
Mary  his  wife,  a  license  for  the  eating  of  flesh  this  present  lent.  In  witness  whereto 
I  the  Minister  there  have  put  to  myne  hand.  “  Mattb:  Stonham,  Vicare  there.” 

”  Memorandum  also.  That  the  same  March  22<> :  Anno  Domni  1629.  There 
was  according  to  the  same  statute  above  mentioned,  granted  unto  Mr.  William 
Ming^y,  Counsailer,  and  Mary  his  wife,  by  the  said  Doctor  Rant,  Doct:  of  Physicke, 
a  license  for  the  eating  of  flesh  this  present  Lent.  In  witness  whereto  I  the  minister 
there  have  also  put  to  myne  hand.  “  Matth:  Stonham,  Vicare  there.” 

[From  the  second  page  of  entries  after  Burials]. 

“  Memorandu.  Yt  Mr.  Robert  Rooke  and  Mrs.  Rooke  his  wyfe  were  by 
Mr.  D.  Sherman,  physition,  prescribed  a  dyet  of  fBeshe  of  them  to  be  used  this 
Lent  for  the  recovery  of  their  healthe,  as  appeareth  by  his  prescript  in  wryting 
bearing  date  the  xtb  day  of  February,  a.  1599.  Registered  the  xviij^*'  of  the  same 
moneth.  ”  By  me,  John  Holden.” 

”  Memorand.  That  Robert  Conley  and  his  wyfe  were  by  Mr.  D.  Sherman, 
Physition,  prescribed  a  certaine  dyet  of  ffleshe  of  them  to  be  used  this  Lent  for  the 
recovery  of  their  health,  as  appeareth  by  his  prescript  in  wryting  bearing  date  the 
fyfth  daye  of  February,  1599.  Registered  the  xiij‘''  of  the  same  moneth. 

“  By  me,  John  Holden.” 

“Memorandum.  That  upon  the  first  Day  of  Aprill  in  the  yeare  of  our  Lord 
1640,  there  fell  so  grate  a  Snow  that  it  was  judged  it  would  have  bin  as  deepe  a 
Snow  as  ever  was  knowne,  but  that  it  did  melte  in  the  falling.” 

[Upon  the  third  page  after  the  Burials]. 

“  AO  1577,  26  nebruarij.  Memorandu  that  Catherine  Rant  the  wife  of 

Mr.  Humfrey  Rant . bodily  infirmities  was  licensed  by . to  eat  fleshe 

(notwithstanding  the  tyme  forbidding)  for  ye  more  ease  of  her  body  and  for  her 
easier  amendment,  according  to  the  statute  in  that  behalfe  provided.  The  said 
license  to  continue  only  the  time  of  her  sickness  and  no  longer,  as  appeareth  by  a 
spyciall  writing  bearing  the  date  of  the  day  and  yeare  above  written. 

“  Witnesse  myselfe  the  eighth  of  March  a°  ^dicto. 

“  Toby  Holland,  Curate,  ibid.” 

“  1581.  Memorandu.  Richardu  Davy  et  Maria  ejus  conjuge  corporu  infirmitate 

et  diutuma  febre  laborantes  facultate  a  domino  Episcopo  obtiuuisse  ut . 

quadragesimall,  et  pristinas  vires  recuperadas,  camibus  libere  impune  vesci  liceat, 
quod  literis  4‘  Martii  siraatis  testatoribus  fecit.  Teste  me  Joanne  Holt  14°  Martii 
anno  prsescripto,  1581.” 

[Register  I.,  St.  Stephen’s  Births,  &c.]. 

“To  all  and  singular  to  whom  these  presents  shall  or  may  apertain.  Milles 
Morse,  pastor  of  the  Congpregatiun  of  St.  Stephen  in  the  City  of  Norwich,  sendeth 
greetinge.  Know  ye  that  the  banns  of  matrimony  between  Henry  Bond  of  the 
parish  of  St.  Stephen  as  aforesaid  and  Margaret  Jilhng^  of  Yarmouth  in  the  County 
of  Norfolk,  have  by  me  been  published  three  several  holydays  openly  in  the  parish 
church  of  St.  Stephen  according  to  the  form  and  order  in  that  case  provided.  And 
noe  cause  hath  been  aUeged  wherefore  parties  above  named  may  not  be  joined 
together  in  matrimonie.  In  witness  whereof  I  have  to  these  presents  subscribed  my 
name  9  August,  1585  (?).” 

EXTRACT  FROM  A  MEMORANDUM  IN  MACKERELL’S  HISTORY. 

The  parish  church  of  St.  Stephen,  in  the  City  of  Norwich,  was  thoroughly 
repaired  and  reseated  in  1858-59,  at  an  expense  of  £1562.  8«.  lltf.,  the  Rev.  Edward 
Evans  being  the  Vicar,  and  Messrs.  Joseph  and  John  Howes  the  churchwardens. 
Architects,  Messrs.  Goodwin  and  Butcher.  Builder,  Mr.  John  Burrell  of  King 
Street  in  the  city.  [The  work  done  consisted  of  re-seating  the  whole  church,  pulpit 
with  stone  base,  reading  desk,  poppy  heads  to  ends  of  benches,  repairing  clerestory 
and  east  and  west  windows,  and  windows  in  north  and  south  aisle,  removing  the 
font  and  adding  new  steps,  repairing  roof,  removing  the  monuments  (including  all 
the  raised  slabs  mentioned  in  Mr.  Macker^’s  list),  gas  fittings,  plastering  the  walls. 


38 


XUK  J&A8X  AMOLIAM  ;  UK, 


repau  and  remoTing  organ,  Vicar  a  j^lour,  and  wanning  apparatna,  ftc.  Tne 
receipta  included  auma  voted  by  the  Veatry,  from  the  Parochial  Charitiea,  £000; 
Church  Building  Societiea,  £130  ;  Dean  and  Chapter,  £40;  and  160  aubacriptiona, 
the  largeat  being  George  Durrant,  Eaq.,  £60  ;  Mayor  of  Norwich  (E.  Field,  Eaq.), 
£60 ;  Httdaon  Gurney,  Eaq.,  £21 ;  'ilie  Lo^  Biahop,  W.  Butcher,  Eaq.,  Sir  8. 
Bignold,  and  J.  Norgate,  £20  each  ;  and  othera  ranging  from  £10  to  2«.  6d.].  The 
cloth  for  the  table  of  the  Holy  Communion,  the  carpet,  the  chaira,  and  the  pulpit 
lighta  were  given  through  the  munificence  of  Thomaa  Jez>Blake,  Eaq.,  of  Brighton ; 
Robert  Chamberlin  of  Catton,  and  othera. 

The  rails  and  the  cushion  round  the  same  were  nven  by  several  ladies  of  the 
parish.  The  organ  front  was  given  by  Edward  Field,  Esq. 

The  church  was  closed  for  repairs  on  Nov.  28th,  1868  ;  and  service  was 
celebrated  in  the  Assembly  Rooms  in  the  parish,  during  the  period  occupied  by  same, 
with  the  permission  of  the  Lord  Bishop. 

The  church  was  re-opened  for  divine  service  on  March  1st,  1869,  when  sermons 
were  preached  in  aid  of  the  restoration  fund  by  the  Lord  Bishop  and  the  Rev.  Henry 
Preston,  Rector  of  Tasburgh,  when  the  collections  amounted  to  £72.  6s.  6d. 

Mr.  Edward  Field  was  at  this  time  Mayor  of  the  City,  and  gave  valuable  aid  to 
the  work.  Mr.  Joseph  Howes,  then  churchwarden,  was  the  principal  agent  in  the 
work.  Edw.  Edwaru,  Vicar. 


Hapton,  Norfolk. 


A.  £.  B. 


SOME  SUFFOLK  CHURCH  NOTES.  No.  LIII. 

St.  Mabt  at  the  Towbk,  Ipswich  {continrui). 

The  deceased  are  represented  kneeling,  turned  towards  the 
spectator,  an  open  book  between  them.  The  husband  wears  a  short* 
sleeved  gown,  his  long  hair  descends  upon  his  band  or  falling  collar, 
and  he  wears  a  moustache.  His  right  hand  is  extended,  open,  in 
front,  his  left  rests  upon  his  breast,  and  he  kneels  upon  one  knee. 
The  lady’s  robe  has  a  loosely-cut  skirt  with  tight  sleeves  and  small 
ruffles ;  on  her  head  a  plaited  cap  with  kerchief  thrown  over  it.  The 
right  hand  grasps  her  drapery  while  the  left  is  extended.  The  figures 
are  unpainted. 

Beneath  the  inscription  is  a  group  of  children,  of  whom  one  son 
is  kneeling  and  reading  a  book ;  another  kneels  on  one  knee  and 
offers  a  skull  to  his  sister  (who  faces  him)  and  touches  it  with  her  left 
hand,  holding  a  scarf  to  her  head  with  her  right.  Another  girl  kneels 
behind  with  both  hands  full  of  flowers.  Underneath  are  carved 
festoons  of  fruit,  &c.,  and  at  the  sides  are  a  shield  and  lozenge,  each 
charged  with  the  Rohimon  arms. 

A  rectangular  brass  plate,  evidently  only  an  appendix  to  another, 
now  lost,  is  now  mounted  on  the  wall  behind  the  font : — Hie  quoqve 
depositvs  est  Bobertvs  |  prsedicti  filivs  et  proximd  jacentis  pa  |  ter; 
vir  silentio  minime  prseterevndvs,  |  qvi  in  hoc  comit  clericus  pacis 
annos  |  plus  quam  viginti,  et  in  hoc  municipis  |  clericus  oomunis  plus 
minus  quadraginta  |  floruit;  munijs  obeundis,  fidelis,  exper  |  tus, 
constans.  |  Una  cum  conjuge  dilectisima  Ghisilla  |  Thomse  Corbould 
de  Holbrooke  genero*'  |  filia,  ex  qu4  suscepit  prolem  numero  | 
sam,  Buperstites  verb  filius  unicus,  fill  |  eeque  duse,  quibus  vixit 
charissimus.  I 


Die  Nov.  X® 

Ilia  Sept.  X® 


Ann®  Domini 


NOTBS  AKD  QUEBIB8,  BTC. 


39 


f1 


Two  shields  are  engraven  on  the  plate: — (1)  Or,  two  bars  Az., 
over  all  a  hoiee’s  head  erased  Arg.,  and  in  chief  three  escallops  Qu., 

Clarke.  (2)  The  same,  impaling  a  fleur  de  lys  and  a  chief . 

A  marble  tablet  to  the  Kev**  Chas.  Beaumont  and  Blanditia  his 
wife,  mounted  in  this  part  of  the  church,  is  placed  so  high  as  to  be 
nearly  illegible.  He  was  rector  of  Hintlesham,  and  the  latter  part  of 
the  inscription  runs: — 

. Fato  non  sibi  sed  Suis  |  amaturo  concessit  |  £t  in  hoc  ipso 

loco  I  Quo  Yitam  reliquit  |  Sepulturam  invenit.  |  In  eodem  Tumulo 
repositum  est  |  Quod  mori  posuit  Mariee  uxoris  ejus  |  cujus  Mures 
decorandos  |  Natura  et  Qrati&  |  Pudor  et  Fidenti&  |  Severitas  et 
Lenitudo  |  Prudentia  et  Simplicitas  |  Dullce  conspirabant.  |  Obiit.  | 

Hie  \  Jan.  18°  |  |  1708  |  x**  .  (  59.  I 

Ilia  \  Jul.  13°  j  i  1717  j  i  69.  1 

Above  is  the  shield  of  Beaumont,  impaling .  (Too  highly 

placed  to  be  legible). 

Upon  another  tablet  near  at  hand  are  these  bearings : — On  a 
fees  (  )  between  three  dragon’s  heads  erased  (  )  as  many  birds 

displayed  Or, . impaling  (  )  a  greyhound  statant  (  ) . 

Near  this  Place  |  Ueth  the  Body  of  Joseph  Cutlove  |  Clerk:  | 
he  was  Minister  of  this  Parish  Almost  31  Years.  |  who  died  the  n*** 

day  of  February  |  Anno  |  ^j^tiV?!'  j  Place  )  lieth  the 

Body  of  Susan  his  |  Wife  who  died  the  8“"  of  Aug*‘  |  Anno  |  ^t^tiJss  | 

Another  tablet  exhibits  this  emblazoned  shield : — Beaumont, 
impaling  Az.  two  bars  Or,  in  chief  three  escallops  Gu.,  over  all  in 

fees  point  a  horse’s  (?)  head  erased .  . 

M.S.  I  Koberti  Beaumont  A.M.  |  Ecclesim  8.  Laurentii  in  hoc 
Yico  I  Pastoris  fidissimi.  |  Yiri  |  Pietate  sincera,  |  Erudition  e  non 
vulgari  |  Indole  liberali,  |  Moribus  ingeninius,  |  Benevolentia  veri 
Christiana  |  omati  |  £t  Priscilla  Uxoris  Ejus,  Filiae  Bicardi  |  Drury 
de  Colne  m  Com.  Huntingdon  Armigeri.  |  Fseminee  |  Officii  erga 
Deum,  Parentes,  Maritum,  Liberos,  |  Amicos,  Pauperes,  omnes  | 
ObservantissimsB.  |  Yixerunt  Ambo  Sibi  invicem  &  suis  dilecti  |  Sublati 

desiderantur.  |  J}}®  j  Obiit  j  12.  I749  j  A°no  iEtatis  j  | 

On  a  ledger  slab  at  west  end  of  south  aisle  is  carved  the  Edgar 
shield,  with  this  inscription  below : — 

Under  this  Marble  |  Besteth  the  Body  of  |  William  Edgar  of  y* 
Parish  Gent.  I  who  was  Born  I  1**  January  1637  I  and  Dyed  Sinerle  I 
3*  October  1716.  1 

Good  Friend  for  Jesus  sake  forbear  | 

To  Move  the  Dust  Entombed  here  | 

Blest  be  the  Man  that  spares  these  Stones  | 

And  curst  be  He  that  moves  My  Bones.  | 

(Perhaps  these  lines — off  Shakespeare’s  epitaph — may  be  the 
reason  that  this  stone  was  allowed  to  remain  in  the  Church). 

The  arms  of  Bithop  are  painted  on  a  white  marble  tablet  in  the 
wall  above,  with  this  inscription : — 


XUM 


40 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAH;  OK, 


M.S.  I  Thomee  Bishop  S.T.F.  I  Honesto  loco  Lincolnise  nati  | 
et  hujus  EcclesisB— Triginta  fer^  Annos  Minister.  |  XTxorem  duxit 
Elizabetham  |  Joannis  Fowle  Cl:  filiam  |  De  Creting  St.  Pet:  I  In 
Comitatu  SuSolciensi:  |  Hie  procul  sub  Ara  ubi  filios  duos  |  Et 
quatuor  filias  jam  an  tea  composuerant.  |  Ambo  requiescunt  in  Pace  | 
Et  spe  certa  felicis  Resurrectionis  |  Moitem  obierunt.  |  Hie  die  xxix* 
Junii  A.D.  1737,  |  .^tatis  Anno  56°  |  Hsec  die  iir  Junii  A.D.  1749,  | 
.£tatis  Anno  62°  |  Nibil  opus  est  |  Ut  hoc  Manner  virtutes  testetur 
Yiri  I  Seu  Concionatoris,  Seu  Scriptoris.  |  Merito  insigni  |  Qualis 
vixit, — Testentur  Paroebiani,  qui  uno  ore,  filium,  |  Grati  ergo  Animi,  | 
In  Patris  locum  eligebant.  |  Quale  vero  &  quantum  |  In  Scholarium 
severioribus  Disciplinis  |  In  genii  Acumen  ostentabat,  |  Testetur  clara 
ilia  Vox  Academise  Cantabrigiensis,  |  Quum  8.T.P.  gradum 
solicitaret.  |  Sic  virtute  adomatus,  Doctrina  Celebris,  |  Et  carus  suis,  | 
Ex  Vita  quasi  Coeli  maturus  |  Placide  decessit.  || 

Now  in  the  churchyard,  west  of  the  church,  is  a  black  marble 
ledger  slab  with  the  Edwin  coat  carved  on  a  lozenge : — 

M"  Hannah  Edwin  |  Daughter  of  Sir  Humphrey  Edwin  |  and 
Dame  Elizabeth  his  Wife  |  died  16**'  July  1745.  || 

On  another  is  the  shield  of  Neave  (Arg.)  on  a  cross  (Sa.)  five  fleur 
de  lys  (of  the  first).  The  crest  is  a  fleur  de  lys. 

Under  this  Stone  |  Resteth  the  Body  of  I  Cap*  William  Neave  of 
this  Parish  |  Portman  &  Thrice  Bayliffe  |  of  this  Town.  |  He  departed 

this  life  I  1703.  j  Body  of  Sarah  his  Wife  | 

Daughter  of  John  Truston  of  Bawdsey  Gent.  |  She  departed  this 
life  I  j  And  also  Francis  the  Son  of  |  Nathaniel  Goodrich 

by  Mary  his  Wife  |  who  died  28*°  Novem*"  1747.  | 

A  mural  monument,  now  placed  nearly  on  the  ground  in  the 
south-west  comer  of  the  church,  bears  a  carved  and  painted  shield  in 
a  somewhat  illegible  condition: — Quarterly,  first  and  fourth,  Sa.  a 
dolphin  hauriant  embowed  {?  Tonyn) ;  second  and  third,  Arg.  a  fess  Gu. 
between  three  hunting  horns  Sa.,  stringed  of  the  second,  an  annulet 
for  difference,  Bellingham.  Crest,  two  swords  crossed  in  saltire  Arg. 
hilted  Or,  knotted  with  a  ribbon  Sa. 

Here  Lyeth  |  The  Body  of  Forth  Tonyn,  Fifth  Son  |  of  Major 
Ch:  Will:  Tonyn  And  of  Jane  |  Bellingham  His  Wife,  Obiit  Dec.  26. 
A°  1748  I  Mi.  XII.  I 

A  round  tablet  in  the  vestry  shews  the  following  upon  a  scroll 
carved  within  a  wreath : — 

This  Monument  was  erected  |  by  W“  Wollaston  of  Great  |  Fin- 
borough  Hall  in  this  Coimty,  |  one  of  the  members  returned  to  I 
Parliament  for  this  borough,  |  to  the  memory  of  Miles  Wallis  Esq.  | 
one  of  the  Portmen  of  this  town  |  who  died  January  the  4“*  1776  I 
aged  45.  |  Sarah,  daughter  of  the  said  |  Miles  Wallis  Esq'  died  March 
the  27**“  1784,  Aged  13.  | 

There  is  a  tablet  over  the  south  door  of  the  church  to  Sarah, 
Mr.  Wallis’  widow,  afterwards  wife  to  Emerson  Cornwell,  Esq.,  who 
died  Feb.  7.  1819,  aged  about  78. 


XOTXS  AND  QUKRIK8,  BTC. 


41 


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In  the  vestry  is  a  white  marble  tablet  with  a  Latin  inscription  to 
the  Rev^  John  ^ng  A.M.,  Fellow  of  St.  Peter’s  College,  Cambridge, 
Rector  of  Witnesham,  for  23  years  public  preacher  at  Ipswich  and  31 
years  Master  of  the  Queen’s  School,  who  died  7*^*  Ctd.  Feb.  1822, 
aged  83.  Below  is  his  shield  of  ai-ms : — Sa.  a  lion  rampant  crowned, 
between  three  crosslets  Or,  King.  Evidence  is  given  of  the  prevalent 
pluralism  of  the  period  in  another  Latin  inscription  on  tlie  same  wall : — 
M.S.  I  Viri  Reverend!  Thomee  Cobbold  A.M.  |  hujusce  Ecclesise 
per  tres  et  quinquaginta  annos  |  grande  mortalis  sevi  spatium  | 
ministri  |  necnon  Ecclesiee  de  Wilby  |  itemque  de  Woolpit  |  utriusque 
in  Agro  Suffolciensi,  |  hujus  per  quinquaginta,  |  illius  per  quatuor  & 
sexaginta  annos  |  Rectoris.  |  Fuit  in  illo  |  mens  literis  elegantioribus 
apprime  ornata  |  Ardens  amor  patriee  |  summa  |  gravitas,  constantia, 
charitas,  |  sine  fasti  eruditus,  |  sine  vanitate  liberalis;  |  sine  fuco 
plus;  I  occidit  |  Charus  amicis,  |  Flebilis  egenis,  |  plurimis  bene- 
faciens,  |  nemini  nocens  |  octogesimo  nono  fere  anno  eetatis  finite,  | 
Aug.  die  XII.  hdoocxxxi.  I  In  the  same  grave  rest  the  remains  of  his 
consort  |  Anne  Savage  Cobbold,  |  of  whom  it  is  little  to  say  that  the 
chief  virtues  which  |  endear  the  wife  &  mother  |  and  adorn  the 
Christian  |  met  in  that  meek  |  affectionate  &  exemplary  woman.  | 
She  died  Oct.  8.  1806.  Aged  62.  |  Also  of  |  Thomas  Cobbold  |  their 
eldest  son,  a  youth  of  rare  promise,  |  who  sacrificed  his  life  to  his 
ardent  pursuit  I  of  knowledge  at  Trinity  College,  Cambridge,  |  in  the 
20’’*  year  of  his  age,  March  26^  1788.  |  Also  of  Robert  Chevallier 
Coblmld  their  youngest  son  |  who  died  an  infant.  J 

On  a  shield  below  are  painted  the  Cobbold  arms,  with  motto, 
*'  Rebus  angustis  fortis.”  A  white  marble  tablet,  near  by,  has  inscrip¬ 
tions  to  two  of  Mr.  Cobbold’s  daughters: — Sarah,  the  youngest,  died 
Oct.  15.  1812,  aged  62,  and  Mary  Ann  Frances,  June  26. 1857,  aged  81. 

Several  other  inscriptions  to  members  of  this  well-known  Ipswich 
family  are  to  be  seen  in  the  church,  thus : — 

A  black  marble  tablet  in  the  south  aisle  to  Elizabeth,  wife  of 
John  Cobbold  E^.  of  Holy  Wells,  obt.  Oct.  17**"  1824,  aged  59. 

Inscription  in  north-east  window  of  north  aisle  to  Harriett  Sophia 
Cobbold,  died  an  infant  Aug.  25.  1834;  Tenmle  Francis  Cobbold  an 
infant,  March  26’*'  1837,  ana  Sophia  M.  E.  Cobbold,  May  IQ***  1844, 
also  an  infant. 

Another  glass  inscription  in  the  south  aisle  to  Herbert  Wilkinson 
Cobbold,  died  in  the  Oulf  of  Martaban  May  9’*'  1852,  in  his  n***  year. 
Five  brass  plates  in  various  parts  of  the  church : — 

One  by  the  north  aisle  west  window,  emblazoned  with  the  Cobbold 
arms,  set  up  by  fellow  townsmen  and  friends  to  John  Patteson  Cobbold 
M.P.  for  the  borough,  obt.  Dec.  10.  1875,  in  his  45"*  year. 

Two  in  the  north  wall  to  his  brothers,  Thomas  Clement,  C.B., 
M.P.  for  the  borough,  obt.  Novr.  21**  1883  in  his  51**  year ;  Nathaniel 
Fromanteel,  obt.  Feb.  18***  1886  in  his  48**'  year. 

The  other  two  plates  are  under  north  aisle  windows,  com¬ 
memorating  their  parents,  John  Chevallier,  M.P.  for  51  years  and 
High  Steward  of  the  borough  7  years,  who  died  Oct.  6**'  1882  in  his 
86**  year;  Lucy  his  wife  died  May  !•*  1879,  in  her  80**  year. 


yilM 


42 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


A  plain  white  marble  tablet  by  the  font  is  in  memory  of  Benjamin 
Page  and  Elizabeth  Buckland  his  wife,  and  their  only  son  Benjamin 
and  Ann  Leman  his  wife,  who  brought  up  a  large  family  in  the 
parish.  1830. 

Another  is  to  Vice-Admiral  Benjamin  William  Page,  oht.  Oct.  3. 
1845,  aged  80;  and  Eliza  Herbert,  38  years  his  wife,  who  died 
Nov.  30.  1834. 

Another  white  marble  tablet,  now  in  the  vestry,  carved  with 
regimental  colours,  busby,  cannon,  and  other  military  trophies,  is  to 
Lord  W”  Frederick  Arthur  Montague  Hill,  second  son  of  Arthur  3*^ 
Marquis  of  Downshire,  and  Captain  in  the  Boyal  Scots  Greys,  who 
was  accidentally  killed  while  riding  in  Bramford  Park,  March  18*^ 
1844,  in  his  28“*  year.  The  tablet  was  put  up  by  his  brother  officers. 

Two  tablets  in  the  south  aisle  are  memorials  of  John  Denny, 
surgeon,  who  died  Feby.  7.  1835;  and  Mary  Ann  his  relict,  who  died 
May  20.  1853,  aged  73. 

Besides  those  already  noted  there  are  two  brass  plates  to  the 
Rev**  Robert  William  Bacon  M.A.,  ob*  Novr.  2*”*  1862  ;  73  ;  and  his 
sister  Elizabeth  Margaret  Beck,  died  Nov.  5***  1865. 

Another  brass  tablet  near  the  chancel  screen  commemorates  their 
brother,  to  whose  munificence  the  church  owes  its  restoration,  and  to 
whom  the  reredos  was  erected.  He  was  bom  July  26.  1813,  and  died 
Nov.  13.  1880. 


Upon  the  reredos  is  a  painted  scroll  in  memory  of  the  Vicar  at 
the  time  of  its  erection,  James  Robert  Turnock  A.M.  Hon.  Canon  of 
Norwich,  and  vicar  from  1861  to  1890. 

In  the  south  wall  is  an  inscription  to  Hercules  Mills  Esq.  but 
placed  too  high  to  be  read,  and  also  a  brass  inscription  under  a  small 
canopy.  The  south  aisle  windows  also  contain  several  anonymous 
inscriptions.  The  west  windows  of  this  aisle  is  in  memory  of  W" 
Mumford,  45  years  a  surgeon  in  the  town,  who  died  March  O***  1877, 
in  his  72“^  year. 

Besides  those  already  given  there  are  these  noticeable  inscriptions 
in  tiie  churchyard: — 

M.8.  I  Depositi  hie  sunt  Cineres  |  Margaretse  Sayer,  |  Uxoris 
Reverendi  Viri  Rob**  Sayer  S.T.B.  |  Qua5  |  Postquam  per  quadraginta 
circiter  Annos  |  Vidua  Pietati  et  Charitati  |  Operam  dedisset 
assiduam  |  Leeta  tandem  Fideli  Creatori  |  Animam  reddidit  |  Dec.  10. 


Anno 


Salutis  1743.  | 
iEtat  73. 


Here  |  lies  buried  |  John  Proby  Esq.  | . Elton  in  Huntingdon¬ 

shire  I  who  died  |  the  15***  of  March  1762  |  Aged  64.  | 


H.  W.  Birch. 


I 

I 

I 

( 

1 

? 

I 


1 

1 


A  CALENDAR  OF  FEET  OF  FINES  FOR  ESSEX.  No.  XLm.  i 
Hilary,  6  James  I. 

1.  Ric.  Belcham  1  Tho.  Nevard  1  Isabell  his  wife  land  in 
Bamston.  ( 


n 


irOTBS  AHD  QUBBIES,  BTC. 


43 


lin  2.  Bic.  Allanson  1  Stephen  Stevens  1  Margaret  his  wife  mess,  in 

lin  Bomford. 

he  3.  Bobert  Beynolds  John  Hooke  1  Margaret  his  wife  mess,  in 

Dagenham. 

3.  4.  Tho.  Eliott  gent.  Nic.  Frincke  gent,  land  in  Hatfeild 

ied  Brodoke. 

5.  John  Brett  Tho.  Coe  Agness  his  wife,  Henry  Ermlter  1 
ith  Qnilter  Agness  his  wife  land  in  Fordham. 

to  6.  Lewis  Stubbynge  Giles  Stubbynge  mess,  land  in  Berden. 

S'*  7.  John  Lake  Stephen  Letton  Ann  his  wife  land  in 

ho  Barsledon  als  Basseldon  &  Layngdon. 

8**  8.  Tho.  Lukyn  gent,  t  W””  Gooche  gent,  Emlen  his  wife  mess. 

I.  land  in  Good  Easter,  High  Easter  Mashebury. 

ly,  9.  John  Adams  1  John  Warren  1  Eliz.  his  wife  land  in 

ed  Harlowe. 

10.  John  Clarke  als  Webb  Bobert  Bankworth  1  Eliz.  his 
he  wife  mess,  in  Hennyngham  Sible  als  Hednyngham  Sible. 
lis  11.  Tho.  Adams,  James  Adams  Daniel  Gyfford  1;  Ann  his 

wife  mess.  ‘I  land  in  Chaldwell,  Wansted  Stratford  Langthome. 
nr  12.  Nic.  Fasfeild  1  Daniell  Parker  1  Mary  his  wife,  Bobert 

to  Finche  Lidia  his  wife  land  in  Wethersfeild. 

ed  n  13.  Bio.  Allanson  Bobert  Cresswell  gent.  %  Ann  his  wife  mess. 

y  land  in  Hornechurche  Haveringe  at  Bower, 
at  I  14.  Edward  Ghrymeston  Master  in  Chancery  Tho.  Wilkinson 
of  ■  Frances  his  wife  mess.  1  land  in  Fr3mton  Walton. 

I  1 5.  John  Milles  Eliz.  his  wife  1  Francis  Sumpner  son  1  heir 
>ut  P  of  Mathew  Sumpner  1  Eliz.  his  wife  mess.  1  land  in  Eppinge. 
all  L  16.  Stephen  Hawke,  Henry  Lawe  t  W"”  Lawe  gent.  mess.  1 
us  M  land  in  Arkesden  Elmedon. 

V"  p!  17.  W"”  Dod  gent.  John  Milnard  gent.  Geo.  Saris  gent,  Stephen 

^7,  1  :  Page  gent.  %  Jane  his  wife  mess.  1  land  in  Peldon. 

I  !  18.  Jeffrey  Lee  gent,  Humfrey  Stane  Mary  his  wife  mess, 

ns  j  i  'i  land  in  Fyfehyde  als  Fyfeld. 

!  i  19.  John  Sparrowe  gent.  Sir  Edward  Gostwicke  knt.  Anne 

ris  I  I  his  wife,  John  Wentworth  arm.  t  Cecilia  his  wife  Manor  of  Overhall 
ita  with  mess,  lands  rent  in  Gestingthorpe,  Sible  Hedingham,  Great 
set  I  i  and  Little  Maplested,  Bulmer  Wickham  St.  Paul. 

0.  I  20.  Tho.  Owen  Simon  Egerton  gent.  Susan  his  wife  mess. 

I  I  land  in  Little  Thurrocke  Chadewell. 

\\  21.  Sir  John  Poyntz  knt.  Sir  Bobert  Cotton  knt.  Manor  of 

>n-  :  Mascalls  Berry  with  mess.  &  lands  in  White  Boodynge. 

j  22.  John  Page  arm.  Otho  Gayer  gent.  “I  Geo.  Keding  arm.  1 
Bose  his  wife  Prebend  Bectory  of  West  Thurrocke. 

23.  Edward  Grymeston  arm.  a  Master  in  Chancery  *1  John 
Tendringe  sen.  Elizabeth  his  wife,  John  Tendringe  jun.  \  Anne  his 

[I.  ,  wife  mess.  land  in  Tendringe  Little  Bentley. 

24.  John  Nutthall  gent.  John  Johnson,  John  Wentworth  arm. 
Wentworth  Parker  gent,  land  in  Barkinge. 

io  [i  25.  Nicholds  Bichold  Elizabeth  Stanffielde  wid.  Bobert 

Churchman  1  Anne  his  wife  mess,  in  Coggeehall. 


XUM 


44 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAH;  OK, 


26.  W“  Piicke,  Ric.  Skynner  gent.  W“  Smyth,  John  Smyth  1 
Jane  his  wife  mess  land  in  Foxhearth. 

27.  Tho.  Claydon  gent.  Tho.  Mallowes,  Tho.  Olyver  arm. 
Isabella  his  wife  1  John  Fortescue  arm.  Manor  of  Falkeborne  with 
mess,  and  lands  in  Fayrestede,  Tarlinge,  White  Notley,  Cressing, 
Wytham,  Ravenhall  Hatfeild  with  advoudson  of  Falkeborne. 

28.  Cecil  Lunsford  John  Lunsford  arm.  Manor  of  Lambum 
Hall  with  mess.  'I  lands  in  Canwyden. 

29.  Francis  Mone  sen.  arm.  Robert  Earl  of  Sussex  mess.  1 
land  in  Boreham  als  Boram. 

30.  Tho.  Steele  1  John  Archer  gent,  Eliz.  his  wife  *1  Anthony 
Osborne  mess,  land  in  Oreat  Little  Wigborowe  Salcot  Virley. 

31.  W“  Rowe  arm.  Nath.  Duckett  gent.  Raulph  Mannynge 
Katherine  his  wife,  Tho.  Righley  arm.  Anne  his  wife  Ric.  Wrothe 
arm.  land  marsh  free  warren  in  Torrock  ats  Terrock  Grays  ats 
Qrayes  Thorock. 

32.  Chris  Holford  arm.  Sir  Roger  Owen  knt.  *1  Ursula  his 
wife,  W“  Owen  gent.  Manor  of  West  Thorrock  als  West  Hall  als  The 
Vyneyard  with  mess.  lauds  in  Boddinghurst,  Orfod,  Stifford,  Grays 
Alvethley  Purfleete. 

33.  Tho.  Wight,  Gabriel  Wight  1  John  Hare  arm.  *1  Margaret 
his  wife  Hugh  Hare  arm.  mess.  \  land  in  Gayesham  Hall,  Barking 

Woodford. 

34.  Sir  Alexander  Temple  knt.  Anne  Lambe  wid.  'I  John 
DrabuU  gent.  mess.  lands  'I  moiety  of  Manor  of  Barrow  als  Barrow 
Hall  in  Little  Thurrock  and  Chadwell. 

35.  W“  Towse  arm.  Anthony  Luther  arm.  Edmund  Moore  gent. 
Ric.  Francke  arm.  1  Leveuthorpe  Francke  gent,  son  1  heir  of  said 
Richard  Manors  of  Ryse  Morsses  with  mess.  lands  in  Hatfild, 
Brodooke  als  Kings  Hathld,  Little  Halingbury  Takeley,  also  fourth 
part  of  Manor  of  Leyer  Breton  als  Leyer  Barlee  1  Mulstram  als 
Moulsham,  Salcott  Virley,  Great  Wigborowe,  Leyer  Marney,  Barstable 
t  Leyer  de  la  Hay  with  advoudsons  of  Leyer  Breton,  Salcott  Virley  1 
Tolleshunt  Elnights. 

End  of  Hilary  6  James  I. 


CAMBRIDGESHIRE  SUBSIDY  ROLLS.  No.  XXVH. 

Appendix  No.  X. 

The  accounts  of  the  receiver  of  the  Scotch  Ijoan,  1645. 

[The  following  is  a  compilation  from  Lay  Subsidies  The 

former  is  a  book  headed  “  The  account  of  Peter  Collins  of  Cambridge 
of  several  sumes  of  money  collected  by  him  in  the  county  of  Cam* 
bridge  for  the  Scott  advance,  beginning  the  28^'*  March,  1645,  as 
foUoweth."  The  latter  is  a  book  headed  “An  account  of  the  Scotch 
Loan  ordered  to  be  received  by  me  Peter  Collins,’’  and  is  simply  the 
day-book  in  which  the  Collector  entered  the  amounts  as  he  received 
them,  with  the  names  and  residences  of  the  contributors.  Some  years 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


45 


ago  I  made  a  transcript  of  as  much  of  this  day-book  as  related  to  the 
county — as  distinct  from  the  town— of  Cambridge.  On  referring  to  the 
persons  under  their  places  of  abode  I  found  the  document  in  its 
original  state  difficult  to  search,  so  I  cut  up  my  transcript  into  slips 
and  sorted  them  into  topographical  order.  Soon  afterwards,  to 
beguile  the  tedium  of  a  forced  sojourn  aboard  a  plague-stricken  ship 
in  the  Gulf  of  Aden,  I  started  to  add  such  notes  as  1  was  able] : — 


Ahington. 

£.  ».  d.  £.  s.  d. 

Robert  Bitten  ..  2  10  0  Ralph  Collins  ..  2  6  8 

Richard  Amye  . ,  2  13  4  f  Miss  Ann  Piggot  . .  3  0  0 

*  Thomas  Amye  ( Great  {  Mr.  Clarke  (Little 

A.)  ..  ..  2  10  0  A.)  ..  ..  30  0  0 

Daniel  Fletton  (A. 

Piggote)  . .  . .  10  0 

Arrington. 

£.  *.  d.  I  £.  d. 

Judith  North  ..2  0  01  William  Pierce  ..  1  10  0 

AihUy  cum  Silverly. 

£.  t.  d. 

§  Ezekiell  Ashpoole . .  2  0  0  John  Taylor 

Mr.  Henry  Smith  . .  5  0  0  John  Poulter 

John  Parker  ..  1  15  0 

Bahraham. 

£-  t.  d.  I  £.  »,  d. 

II  Giles  Josselinge  ..  1  13  4  |  Sterine  Osburne  ..  2  0  0 

*  The  Amyei  were  an  armigerons  family,  see  Harleum  Soe.  Fieitatiim,  p.  61.  A 
Henry  Amy  was  vicar  of  Little  Abington  in  1524. 

t  John  ^gott  was  fined  £540  by  the  House  of  Commons  in  1648,  for  residing  in 
the  enemy’s  quarters  at  Oxford,  whither  he  had  ^ne  to  escape  his  creditors.  The 
first  of  the  name  who  resided  here  was  John  Pigot  who  received  a  grant  of  the 
manor  about  36  Hen.  VI.,  on  failure  of  the  heirs  of  William  de  Notton.  The 
family  still  possess  the  manor  and  advowson  of  the  rectory. 

X  Concerning  this  Mr.  Clarke,  one  of  the  largest  contributors  in  the  list,  I  have 
been  able  to  find  nothing.  He  paid  on  August  loth,  1645. 

\  He  was  appointed  Rector  of  Ashby  November  21st,  1639,  and  remained  until 
1656,  and  perhaps  longer. 

y  Giles  Joselyn  or  Joscelin  was  a  very  much  talked  of  man  in  his  day.  He  made 
armed  resistance  to  the  collectors  of  ship-money  in  1640  (see  Eutt  Anglian,  vol.  vi., 
p.  51).  But  in  1648  he  took  a  prominent  part  in  the  abortive  insurrection  at  Linton, 
and  a  special  and  severe  report  concerning  him  was  sent  up  to  'London  by  the 
Cambrige  Committee  {S.  P.  Dom.  Inter.  A.,  135).  He  died  in  1662,  aged  74 
(pedigree  in  Oenealogiet,  new  ser.,  iii.).  His  will  in  Fragmenta  Oenealogiea,  vol.  iv. 
(Crisp). 


£.  ».  d. 
..368 
..250 


XUM 


46 


THX  SA8T  ANOLIAK  ;  OB. 


Badlinghatn. 

£. 

». 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Bichard  Copine 

3 

0 

0 

Thomas  Hynson  . .  2 

13 

4 

Baltham. 

• 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Mr.  Tho8.  Webb 

3 

0 

0 

Robert  Apelyard  . .  1 

6 

8 

John  Linsey 

1 

0 

0 

John  Taylor  . .  . .  3 

6 

8 

Aron  Flack  . . 

2 

0 

0 

Thos.  and  John  Buie  1 

10 

0 

Tbos.  Simons 

2 

6 

8 

John  Linsell,  Flack, 

Bobert  Bland 

3 

0 

0 

and  Simons,  tenants 

William  Linsdell  . . 

1 

16 

8 

to  Mr.  Wm.  Lage 

Joan  Marche 

2 

8 

0 

for  Oharterhoiue 

*  Doctor  Warner  . . 

7 

0 

0 

lands  in  Balsham, .  6 

13 

4 

Barrington. 

f  Mr.  Marshall,  yickar 

•• 

. 2  18  0 

Barnwell. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

t. 

d. 

Mr.  Nicholas  Buck- 

Mr.  Bichd.  Sanders  . .  1 

10 

0 

ridge 

4 

0 

0 

Mr.  Henry  Adkinson  0 

10 

0 

John  Barnes . . 

2 

0 

0 

Susan  Buckton  . .  3 

6 

8 

Bartlow. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Thomas  Scargill 

2 

10 

0 

John  Webb  . .  . .  1 

0 

0 

Henry  Flacke 

1 

15 

0 

1  Mr.  John  Baker  . .  3 

0 

0 

Barton. 

£. 

». 

d. 

£. 

t. 

d. 

Nathan  Witton 

1 

10 

0 

§  S'  Thomas  Martin . .  28 

0 

0 

Fraocis  Donington  . .  2  10  0 


*  Thomas  Warner,  Rector,  October  9th.  1611.  Returned  by  the  Parliamentary 
Commissioners  of  1650  as  “  a  worthy,  paynful,  godly  person.”  He  died  1657,  and 
was  buried  in  the  church. 

t  Anthony  Marshall  ejected  in  1646. 

$  A  John  Baker  had  been  ejected  from  the  Vicarage  in  1644,  but  there  was  a 
landowner  of  the  same  name.  On  February  Ist,  1639,  Sir  John  Millicent  petitioned 
his  majesty,  that  ”  whereas  John  Baker  of  Bartlow,  bath  committed  felony,  where¬ 
by  his  estate  will  become  forfeited,  may  y'  ma>><  be  pleased  to  grant  to  petitioner 
the  benefit  that  shall  accrue  to  you  if  the  party  on  trial  shall  be  found  guilty.” 
Whereupon  a  caveat  was  entei^  against  all  other  suitors  {Girgtc  Tranteripts, 
P.R.O.)  But  as  Baker  was  in  possession  of  his  property  in  1640  {Lap  Subtidy),  he 
was  evidently-found  not  guilty.  John  Baker,  the  Vicar,  had  a  temporal  estate  of 
£130  a  year.  Millicent  possessed  the  dissolv^  priory  of  Bergbam  or  Barham,  in 
Linton. 

^  He  was  a  Committeeman  and  Sheriff  (see  £att  Anglian,  vol.  vi.,  p.  384). 


N0TB8  AND  QTTB&IBS,  ITC. 


47 


Battinghoum. 


£.  i.  d. 

*Mr.  Richard  Crom- 
vell,  forMra.Crom- 
▼ell  . .  ..368 

Nicholas  Graye  . .  2  0  0 

f  Edward  Turpin  ..  1  10  0 

William  Blower  . .  10  0 

{  Mr.  Qreffery  Nightin¬ 
gale  (Eneesworth)  13  6  8 


£.  «.  d. 

§  Robert  Stoughton. .  15  0 

II  Francis  Westrope, 
for  Sir  Thos.  Hatton  20  0  0 
^  Mrs.  Phillip  Curtis, 

widow  . .  . .  3  0  0 

**  Henry  Waller  ..  1  13  4 


.  Borough  Oreen.  £  ,  ^ 

Roger  Sizar  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..100 

Boxworth.  £  ,  ^ 


f  fMr.  Eillingworth  ..  ..  ..  . .  2  10  0 

Bourn. 


£. 

1. 

d. 

£.  «. 

d. 

Isaac  Well  . . 

..  1 

0 

0 

J  J  Mr.  Robert  Hagger  13  6 

8 

John  Cooke  . . 

..  1 

13 

4 

William  Ipec  ..  0  10 

0 

Richard  Knight 

..  2 

0 

0 

Thomas  Mumford  ..  .0  16 

0 

Henry  Woode 

..  1 

3 

0  1 

8 


0 

0 


a 

id 

9- 

sr 

ff 


16 

in 


*  Afterwards  Lord  Protector  for  a  few  months,  now  18  years  old.  Oliver 
Cromwell’s  mother  was  the  widow  of  William  Lynne,  Esquire,  of  Bassingboum, 
More  she  became  a  Cromwell. 

t  There  are  several  memorials  of  this  family  in  the  church.  They  held  a  manor 
at  Whaddon  and  land  in  Bassingboum  and  Litlington.  Edward  Turpin,  gent., 
was  buried  in  Bassingboum  Church  in  1683.  His  will  is  in  the  Arehdtaeon’* 
RtgUtry,  Peterboro’,  vol.  z.,  p.  316. 

$  This  family  settled  here  about  1598,  when  they  bought  land  of  William 
Burman.  They  came  from  Newport,  in  Essex. 

I  He  was  one  of  the  s^uestrators  of  estates  of  royalists  in  Cambs.  In  the 
neighbouring  church  of  Litlin^n  is  a  monument  to  Roger  Stoughton,  Esq.,  late 
Alderman  of  London,  who  died  30th  May,  1690,  aged  81.  In  the  22nd  year  of 
Elizabeth  a  Thomas  Biseley  aliat  Stoughton  held  land  in  eapit*  in  Litlington  and 
Steeple  Morden.  Inq.  po$t  mortem. 

I  Sir  Thomas  Hatton,  who  afterwards  possessed  the  Manor  of  Richmond,  seems 
from  the  Court  Rolls  to  be  a  copyhold  tenant  at  this  time.  Sir  Thonoas  also  paid 
£7  for  Longstanton,  and  a  further  £2  for  some  other  property. 

1 1n  1646  William  Curtis,  clerk,  described  variously  as  being  of  Bassingboum, 
Cambridge,  and  Orwell,  paid  a  fine  of  120  marks  for  spending  two  months  in  the 
King's  quarters  at  Oxford. 

**  A  family  of  this  name  held  a  fourth-part  of  the  Manor  of  Rous,  in  Bassing- 
bourn,  24th  Elizabeth.  Inq.  poet  mortem. 

ft  He  signs  the  register  as  Curate  in  1635.  On  a  brass  plate  in  the  Church  of 
Boxworth  is,  or  was,  this  epitaph,  “Johannes  Killingwortb,  hujus  per  sex  lustra  et 
bienium .  gpregis  pastor  fidelissimus  eccleeieque  filius  hie  dormit,  obiit  Dec.  18, 
1667  anno.,  setatis  69.”  He  also  found  favour  with  the  Parliamentary  Com¬ 
missioners,  who,  in  1650,  describe  him  as  a  pious,  able  man. 

X  t  The  Hagger  or  Hagar  family  of  Bourn  held  the  Castle  Manor  there  for  many 
years.  In  1625,  John  was  reported  (for  taxation  purposes)  to  be  one  of  the  largest 
wool  owners  in  the  county.  See  further  mention  of  him  in  appendix  viii. 


48 


THX  BAST  ANGLIAN ;  OR, 


BoUitham. 


£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

i. 

*  Mr.  Thos.  Parker 

George  Foster 

,  2 

10 

0 

(Anglesey  Abbey) 

10 

0 

0 

Cornelius  Pampl3m  . , 

.  1 

0 

|1 

John  Duffield 

0 

10 

0 

Mr.  John  Hasell 

.  5 

0 

Brinkley. 

£. 

a. 

d.  1 

£. 

«. 

II 

Ambrose  Mortlocke. . 

0 

15 

0 

John  Bentley 

.  0 

15 

0 

Mr.  Bichd.  Fotton  . . 

1 

10 

0 

William  Jacob 

.  1 

0 

0 

Thos.  Clarke 

0 

15 

0 

Francis  Frost 

.  2 

10 

0 

t  Mr.  Roger  Stutville, 

John  Humfrey 

.  2 

16 

8 

Esq. 

12 

0 

0 

■ 

Linton,  Camht.  {To  ho  continued.)  W.  M.  Palmer. 


QUERY. 

“Garden  Penny:  an  Ecclesiastical  Impcst” — In  Besse’s  Suffer, 
ingt  of  the  People  called  Q^akera  (vol.  i.,  p.  1671)  under  Essex  is  the 
following Ezra  Purclias  was  committed  to  prison  for  refusing  to 
pay  three  shillings  demanded  of  him  for  Smoke  Penny,  Garden  Penny, 
and  Easter  Offerings.” 

What  was  “  Garden  Penny  ”  ?  In  some  parishes  I  believe  it  is  still 
customary  for  the  parson  to  claim  from  each  inhabitant  over  fifteen 
years  of  age  payment  for  a  plough  in  addition  to  “  smoke  money.”  Ii 
the  garden  penny  identical  with  the  plough  due? 

Bishopoate. 


REPLY. 

The  Spanish  Armada  and  the  East  Coast  (vol.  ii.,  new  ser., 
pp.  325,  348,  iii.,  p.  72).  A  recent  catalogue  of  a  London  bookseller 
contained  the  following: — “-<4  Watch-tcorde  for  Warre.  Not  so  new 
as  necessary :  Published  by  reason  of  the  dispersed  rumours  against 
vs,  and  of  the  unsuspected  coming  of  the  Spanyard  against  vs. 
Wherein  we  may  leame  how  to  prepare  ovrselves  all  the  time  of 
that  trouble.” — 8m.  4to.,  Cambridge:  lohn  Legat,  1596.  On  a  leaf 
following  the  table  is  an  acrostic  on  Elitabeth  Regina,  ensigned  by  a 
cut  of  the  Eoyal  Arms.  The  work  is  dedicated  to  “  The  Right 
Worthipful  the  Mayor  of  the  horrough  of  King' a  Lynne  and  to  hia  Aaaociati 
or  Bretheren  the  Aldermen  of  the  aame  Towne."  The  author  is  one, 
C.  Gibson,  who  writes  “a  Pedantic  Epistle  dedicatory.”  Lowndes 
makes  no  mention  of  the  book.  Is  anything  known  of  the  author  or 
the  local  circumstances  under  which  this  singular  work  was  written  ? 

K.L. 

*  He  was  the  receiver  of  sequestration  moneys  from  February  21st,  1643,  to 
October,  1644. 

t  The  Stutvilles  lived  at  Brinkley  Hall  from  the  middle  of  the  15th  century. 


!fOTX8  ADD  QDKKI28,  STC. 


“8IDE-B0ABD”  CLOTH  OF 
DAMASK  LINEN  WITH  PICTORIAL  DESIGN 
(vol.  iy.,  p.  145  ;  vol.  ix.,  p.  357). 

In  continuation  of  previous  articles,  we  are  now  able  to  draw 
attention  to  further  interesting  examples  of  figured  damask  cloths. 
The  Rev.  E.  Edwards  Montford,  Rector  of  Swanton  Abbot,  Norfolk, 
has  a  large  (table)  cloth,  9  ft.  by  7  ft.,  and  two  smaller  (tray)  cloths, 
29  in.  by  41  in.,  each  showing  identically  the  same  pattern.  The 
linen  is  of  special  importance,  for  apart  from  its  value  as  an  art 
production  of  a  byegone  period,  it  is  said  to  have  formed  part  of  a 
wedding  present  given  by  Queen  Elizabeth  to  her  maid  of  honour — 
Catherine  of  Tisted — on  the  occasion  of  her  marriage  with  Sir  John 
Norton.  In  the  genealogy  of  the  late  Summersby  Edwards  of  Long 
Buckley,  whose  daughter  was  married  to  the  Rev.  E.  Edwards 
Montford,  the  name  of  the  said  Catherine  appears  without  surname 
attached. 

The  design  is  illustrative  of  St.  John  iv.,  6—31,  and  represents : — 
(1)  The  woman  of  Samaria  in  the  act  of  drawing  water  from  the  well 
of  Sychar;  (2)  the  buildings  of  an  important  city;  and  (3)  the 
disciples  of  our  Lord,  three  in  number,  bringing  food  to  their  Master 
in  a  basket. 

Unlike  the  heraldically-inscribed  cloth  previously  described  (vol. 
ix.,  p.  357)  containing  one  clear  woven  design,  the  specimens  under 
notice,  similar  to  other  examples  in  the  South  Kensington  Museum, 
shew  a  repetition  of  pattern  in  reverse  order,  which,  as  in  the  case  of 
lettering,  has  a  singular  effect  in  presenting  the  words  backwards 
way.  The  Saviour,  for  instance,  in  Ids  intercourse  with  the  woman 
appears  four  times — twice  in  each  half  of  the  cloth,  which,  in  point 
of  fact,  may  be  said  to  be  in  four  breadths.  Similarly  the  three 
disciples  are  twice  represented.  This  repetition  of  subject  leads  to  an 
occasional  strange  and  abrupt  termination  of  the  design.  A  repeating 
floral  pattern  that  appears  in  the  general  design,  is  thus  divided  in  two 
at  the  sides,  while  the  singular  effect  of  the  bottom  of  the  disciples’ 
feet  and  legs,  and  that  of  the  basket  they  hold,  are  seen  dangling 
from  the  top  of  the  cloth. 

The  well  is  low  and  font-shaped,  of  Gothic  character.  Beneath 
it  stands  the  waterpot  or  ewer  of  good  design.  The  woman,  who  is  in 
the  act  of  letting  down  the  bucket,  which  is  suspended  by  a  chain 
which  works  on  a  pulley,  appears  to  be  suddenly  arrested  by  the 
Saviour.  She  is  shown  full-faced,  and  is  attractively  arrayed  in  a 
richly-worked  dress  (with  deep  embroidered  collar)  having  full  sleeves, 
gathered  at  the  elbow,  from  whence  to  the  wrist  is  a  cuff  of  figured 
material.  The  thin  face  of  the  Saviour,  having  beard  and  moustache, 
wears  a  pained  expression.  He  has  flowing  hair ;  upon  the  head  rest 
halo-rays  of  light,  showing  three  distinct  lines,  alternating  with  a 
floriated  triple  form  resembling  the  fleur-de-lis,  and  of  a  kind  we  have 
no  remembrance  of  ever  having  seen.  He  wears  a  loose-sleeved  robe 
or  coat,  having  ornamental  bands  at  the  neck,  sleeves,  and  hem,  which 
descends  nearly  to  the  feet,  which  are  qmte  bare. 


XUM 


60  THX  KAST  AHOLIAN;  OH, 

Immediatelj  below,  beneath  the  waterpot,  four  times  repeated,  ii 
the  “alpha”  and  “omega,”  the  A  within  a  shield  and  the  ft  abova 
Twice  in  the  same  line  occurs  an  ornamental  escutcheon  bearing  two 
castles  (?),  over  each  is  an  expanded  hand  in  an  opposite  slanting 
direction. 

A  central  floral  design,  or  rather  fruit-bearing  tree  (pomegranate?), 
starts  from  this  point,  ^e  stem  of  which  is  carried  down  to  a  position 
at  the  foot  of  the  buildings,  that  represent  a  city,  where  the  ramifica¬ 
tion  of  the  roots  are  shown. 

Underneath  occurs  the  lettering : — 

lOES  4*  I  °4  sxoi  I  10X8  4°  I  *4  sxoi 
SYOHAB  I  BAHOYS  {  8YCHAB  |  BAHCYS 

into  which  the  buildings  below  (which  occupy  a  considerable  space) 
may  be  said  to  rise. 

The  full  design  is  rendered  complete  by  an  eSectiye  pourtrayal  of 
three  disciples  (two  sets),  each  with  the  nimbus.  The  central  l^ard- 
less  figure  (presumably  8t.  John)  apparently  stands  within  the  city 
gate,  with  portcullis  overhead.  The  trimming  of  the  neck  of  the 
tunic  differs  in  form  to  that  of  the  other  two  disciples.  The  hands 
are  seen  falling  in  front,  or  may  be  holding  food  by  way  of  invitation 
to  partake  (“  Master,  eat  ”).  The  two  bearded  disciples  on  either 
side  have  each  hold,  with  one  hand,  of  a  basket,  in  which,  at  the  top, 
three  loaves  are  seen.  The  other  hand  of  the  partiaUy- bared  arms  is 
extended  in  the  direction  of  the  food.  As  we  have  already  said  the 
lower  portion  of  this  design  appears  at  the  top  of  the  cloth. 

The  cloth  we  have  examined  is  hemmed  top  and  bottom,  having 
the  sides  selvedged,  with  the  “  dice  ”  pattern  running  along  the  sides. 


A  CALENDAR  OF  FEET  OF  FINES  FOR  ESSEX.  No.  XLIV. 

Mic.,  6  Jakxs  I. 

1.  John  Havers  Letrange  Mordaunt  arm.  mess.  1  land  in 
Radwynter  'I  HemMted. 

2.  John  Webo  1  Adam  Mathewe  mess,  t  land  in  Walden. 

3.  W“  Beriff  arm.  Ric.  Carr,  John  Spurgeon  1  John  Boade  arm. 

mess.  *1  land  in  Woodham  Ferris,  Layham,  Rettendon,  Black  White 
Notley,  Great  Leis,  Challey,  Great  Stambridge,  Hawkewell,  Rocheford, 
Boreham,  Rayleighe  Hadley.  , 

4.  Michael  Foxe  *1  W“  Greene  'i  Anne  his  wife  land  in  Sandon. 

5. *  Ric.  Stane  gent.  1  James  Clegge  1  Eliz.  his  wife  1  Nic.  Stane 
land  in  High  Onger. 

6.  Nic.  Sharpe  gent.  1  Tho.  Goldenge  gent,  land  in  Ashen  ais 
Esse. 

7.  Frances  Barnes  gent.  1  Tho.  Strangman  gent.  ‘I  Dorothey  his 
wife  mess.  1  land  in  Hadleighe. 

8.  Tho.  Shortland  1  Henry  Goldinge  arm.  *1  Johane  his  wife, 
Robert  Gooday  *1  Winifred  his  wife  mess,  in  Coggeshall. 


M 


XUI 


N0TB8  AND  QUISRHS,  KTC. 


51 


9.  Sir  Edward  Fynchon  knt.  James  Clerke  arm.  Clerke  1 
Tho.  Olynton  ats  Fynes  arm.  Mary  his  wife  mess.  *1  land  in  Little 
Warley  als  Est  Warley  ais  Warley  Semelts  Childerdich. 

10.  Sir  John  Browne  knt.  ‘I  John  Eeale  Letice  his  wife  mess. 
land  in  Norton  ats  Cold  Norton  *1  Woodham  Ferrers. 

11.  Edward  Nevill,  John  Clarke  gent.  1  Andrew  Clarke  gent, 
mess.  1  land  in  Stystedd  Patteswicke. 

12.  Tho.  Mildemaye  gent.  Sir  Henry  Clovyle  knt.  Anne  his 
wife  mess.  1  land  in  West  Hannyngfeild. 

13.  Dionis  Palmer  gent.  Philip  Purkys  *1  John  Hare  mess. 
land  in  Felsted. 

14.  John  Sorell  gent.  *1  Oliver  S.  John  arm.  *1  Eliz.  his  wife,  Sir 
Oliver  Take  knt.  Tho.  Anscell  arm.  Manors  of  Fambridge  Sherde 
Lowes  with  mess.  *1  lands  in  White  Notley,  Cressinge,  Ryvenhall 
Witham. 

15.  Sir  W“  AylofE  knt.  Ric.  Martyn  gent.  1  Oeo.  Take  arm. 
1  Eliz.  his  wife  mess.  *1  land  in  Layer  Mamey,  Wigborowe  1  Salcott 
Virley. 

16.  Tho.  Hawley  *1  John  Palmer  Johane  his  wife  mess.  1  land 
in  Harward  ats  Harvard  Stock. 

17.  John  Parke  gent.  Robert  Jones  1  Frances  his  wife, 
John  Wright  1  Agness  his  wife  John  Bamler  mess.  *1  cottage  in 
Barkinge. 

18.  Geo.  Ryston  clerk  Tho.  Lacie  Sarah  his  wife  mess.  1  land 
in  Ghreat  Warley. 

19.  Geo.  Baker  gent.  John  Wall  *1  Margaret  his  wife  mess.  I 
land  in  Great  1  Little  Burch,  Copford  *1  Esthorpe. 

20.  John  Longe,  Giles  Turra  Tho.  Forde  *1  Marg^et  his  wife, 
W"  Lyngey  ats  Carter  Helen  his  wife  mess.  1  land  in  Great  Bard- 
feild  1  Bardfeild  Sal3mge. 

21.  Henry  Kent,  W“  Mayor  1  Eliz.  Mayor  wid.  mess.  "X  land  in 
Belchamp  Otten  Water,  Belchamp  ats  Belchamp  William,  Fozearth 
ats  Foxherd  Borley  *1  Lyston. 

22.  W"*  Kent  1  Johane  his  wife  1  George  Raymonde  mess. 
land  in  Bockinge. 

23.  Jerome  Bassano  gent.  Ric.  Sumpner  1  Phillipa  his  wife 
land  in  Waltham  Holy  Cross. 

24.  W“  Berriff  arm.  Geo.  Heminge  1  Mary  hie  wife,  W“  Harris 
1  Johane  his  wife  mess.  land  in  Colchester. 

25.  Ric.  Heywarde  John  Nycolson  Mary  his  wife,  John 
Gyrton  *1  Eliz.  his  wife  mess.  ‘I  land  in  Hennyngham  Syble. 

26.  Sir  Tho.  Grymes  knt.  Sir  Tho.  Hunt  knt.  W”  Carewe  arm. 
W*"  Glascocke  Arthur  Glascocke  arm.  mess,  land  in  Eevington, 
Yeldham,  Toppesfeild,  Hedingham  Sible  Castle  Hedingham. 

27.  Thomas  Reynolds,  Laurence  Grene  sen.  'I  Tho.  Grene  sen. 
mess.  land  in  Dagenham  'I  Barkinge. 

28.  Reginald  Etheridge  *1  Mathew  Teversham  *1  Avice  his  wife 
mess.  1  land  in  Waltham  Holy  Cross. 

29.  Peter  Gate,  Tho.  Tanner  gent.  Tho.  Burle  ats  Sponer  mess, 
land  in  Eling’s  Hatfild  ats  HatfeUd  Broadooke. 

e2 


XUM 


52 


THl  BAST  ABOUAir;  OR, 


30.  Sir  James  Altham  knt.  W*  Johnson  gent.  John  Johnson  t 
Ric.  Durrant  mess,  t  land  in  Layton  Walthamstowe. 

31.  W*"  Billingsley,  Abdia  Ashton,  Peter  Bindlosse,  Ric.  Sibbs, 
Laurence  Burnell,  Mark  Mott  t  John  Jude  Mary  his  wife  land  ia 
Radwynter. 

32.  Jeremia  Burges  'I  Agnes  his  wife,  Tho.  Goulding^  1  Mary 
his  wife,  John  Gouldinge  jun.  Eliz.  his  wife  land  in  Fynton. 

33.  Tho.  Bendishe  arm.  *1  Ric.  Hovell  als  Smy^h  Margeret  hii 
wife,  Blunteshall. 

34.  W“  Lord  Cavendishe,  W®  Cavendishe  arm.  t  Sir  Henry 
Maynard  knt.  t  Susanna  his  wife,W'‘  Maynard  arm.  Manors  of  Thaxted 

Ricbmonde  with  mess.  1  lands  in  Thaxted,  also  Rectory  of  Thaxton. 

35.  W“  Byrd 't  Arthur  Howsden  Petronell  his  wife,  W“  Ormei 
Johane  his  wife,  Redenald  Addams  *1  Helen  his  wife  mess.  land  ia 

Northweald  Bassett. 

36.  Ric.  Field,  John  Ithell  John  Bustard  gent.  1  Rebecca  hit 
wife  mess,  t  land  in  Orsett. 

37.  Stephen  Vessey,  W“  Ere  t  Edmtmd  Baker  *1  Margaret  hit 
wife  mess.  *1  land  in  Great  Tey. 

38.  Henry  Sworder,  John  Brockis  jun.  Henry  Pryer  1  Ag^ea 
his  wife,  Tho.  Frenche  clerk  \  Ellen  his  wife  mess.  \  land  in  Great 
Paringdon. 

39.  W“  Clopton,  Tho.  Walton  arm.  John  Gurdon  Brampton 
Gurdon  son  heir  of  said  John  mess.  *1  land  in  Great  Coggeshall  1 
Paswich. 

40.  John  Titterell,  W”  Howe,  Tho.  Scotcher  1  Gregory  Titterell 
Johane  his  wife,  Ric.  Putto  als  Mihill  Anne  his  wife,  Tho. 

Wakelyn Jocosa  his  wife.  Geo.  Kinge  *1  Rose  his  wife,  Silvester 
Raymont  als  Alyn  Frances  his  wife,  Tho.  Weedge  *1  Elina  his  wife 
mess.  1  land  in  Thaxted  Great  Berdfeild. 

End  of  Mic.  6  James  I. 


SOME  SUFFOLK  CHURCH  NOTES.  No.  LIV. 

St.  Nicholas,  Ipswich. 

Although  the  greater  part  of  the  present  church  is  no  older  than 
the  Decorated  Period,  it  is  supposed  to  stand  upon  the  site  of  an 
earlier  building,  dedicated  to  St.  Michael,  which  is  mentioned  in 
Domesday  Book,  and  from  which  a  few  carved  stones  remain  built  into 
the  north  wall  of  the  present  structure.  It  now  consists  of  Decorated 
nave  and  aisles,  with  tower  (recently  restored)  panelled  in  flint  and 
stone,  and  a  late  chancel  of  debased  Perpendicular  architecture.  The 
south  aisle  has  a  porch  with  rounded  gable,  and  there  is  a  small  south 
porch  to  the  chancel.  The  ancient  vestry  on  the  north  was  pulled 
down  a  few  years  back  and  enlarged.  The  north  door  has  been 
bricked  up.  One  or  two  Perpendicular  windows  have  been  inserted 
in  the  aisles,  the  eastern  bays  of  which  appear  to  have  formed  chapels. 
There  is  a  fine  Decorated  piscina  in  north  aisle  under  a  cinquefoiled 


XUK 


e-s  r 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


53 


1*^1 

N 

is 

“■! 

bed ; 
an.  i 
lei ! 
ia ; 

biij 

bit 

lee 

9at 

on 

[•\ 

eU 

10. 

ter 

ife 


an 

an 

in 

ito 

ed 

id 

be 

th 

ad 

an 

ad 

is. 

ad 


head,  a  plainly-arched  piscina  in  the  chancel,  and  another  in  the 
south  aisle.  The  proportions  of  the  interior  have  been  injured  by 
the  nave  floor  having  at  some  time  been  heightened  to  aVoid  floods,  to 
which  the  church  was  liable,  and  thus  the  bases  of  the  fine  clustered 
Decorated  pillars  have  been  buried.  No  remains  of  the  rood  screen 
nor  its  staircase  are  to  be  seen.  There  is  now  no  chancel  arch,  but 
a  Perpendicular  dormer  window  on  each  side  of  the  nave  roof  towards 
the  east  probably  lighted  the  loft.  The  southern  of  these  windows, 
a  two-light,  retains  its  tracery  and  a  carved  barge-board.  Of  the 
rudely-carved  stones  referred  to  as  being  relics  of  St.  Michael’s  Church, 
one  appears  to  represent  the  patron  saint,  who  is  shewn  in  a  skirted 
garment,  and  has  what  looks  like  a  pair  of  wings  on  his  helmet, 
encountering  a  winged  dragon  breathing  out  flames.  The  Archangel 
holds  a  sword  in  his  right  hand,  and  in  his  left  a  long-pointed  shield 
with  rounded  top.  An  inscription  in  very  archaic  letters  on  the  stone 
has  been  rendered : — 

HER  SCT  MIKAOL  FIHT  VID  DANE  DRACA. 

Upon  another  stone  (or  perhaps  three  placed  together)  are  the 
mutilated  figures  of  three  ecclesiastics,  possibly  Apostles.  A  large 
cross  is  beside  each;  one  wears  alb  and  dalmatic,  with  a  maniple 
on  his  left  arm,  and  a  cross  staff  in  his  right  hand;  another  appears 
to  be  vested  in  a  long  chasuble  of  curious  make,  and  holds. a  stole 
between  his  hands.  The  third  is  greatly  defaced,  and  little  can  with 
certainty  be  made  out  from  it.  On  the  crosses  is  the  word  apostolus. 
The  third  stone  was  evidently  the  tympanum  of  a  round-headed 
doorway,  and  has  a  rough  but  spirited  carving  of  a  boar.  There 
is  a  round  fillet  round  the  edge,  wluch  is  thought  to  read : — 

IN  DEDICACIONE  OMNIUM  SANCTORUM. 

In  the  spandrels  of  the  west  doorway  of  the  tower,  which  is  of 
Perpendicular  date,  are  shields  containing  the  ordinary  Holy 
Trinity  symbol  and  the  Instruments  of  the  Passion.  Between 
the  doorway  and  the  large  west  window  are  three  shields: — 
(1)  An  arrow  erect  in  pale  between  two  crowns;  (2)  Dexter,  a 
bishop’s  crosier  erect,  sinister  a  mitre,  and  in  base  a  fleur  de  lys ; 
(3)  A  cross  engrailed.  These  are  reproductions  of  the  original 
shields,  but  from  my  recollection  of  them  in  their  greatly  decayed 
state  they  appear  to  be  pretty  accurate.  Two  fonts  are  now 
in  the  church,  that  in  use  being  placed  at  the  west  end  of  the 
nave.  It  is  said  to  have  once  belonged  to  another  church  in  the  town, 
and  has  an  octagonal  bowl  with  two  five-foil  headed  panels  on  each 
face ;  angel  heads  are  carved  at  the  lower  comers,  and  it  is  borne  on 
a  modern  shaft,  round  which  are  placed  figures  of  the  Evangelists 
bearing  scrolls  in  their  hands.  The  other  font  stands  in  the  south 
porch,  and  is  an  ugly  Georgian  affair  with  a  small  hand  basin-shaped 
bowl  on  a  tapering  pedestal. 

The  earliest  monument  now  to  be  seen  is  a  brass  in  the  nave  floor 
with  standing  figures  of  William  Style  and  his  wife.  He  is  habited 
in  a  long  gown  with  narrow  collar  and  cuffs  of  fur,  and  a  border  of 
the  same  material  about  the  ankles.  The  sleeves  are  narrow,  and 


k 


64 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


on  his  right  shoulder  is  fixed  his  hood  with  stiff  roundel,  and  a  long 
scarf  depending  in  front.  His  hands  are  raised  and  spread,  with  the 
little  fingers  crooked  in  an  unusual  way.  From  the  belt  with  which 
his  gown  is  confined  hang  a  large  plain  purse  and  a  tasselled  pater¬ 
noster  with  two  strings  of  twelve  beads  each.  His  face  is  somewhat 
turned  towards  his  wife ;  he  is  shaven,  and  his  hair  reaches  just  below 
his  ears.  The  lady  is  in  a  dress  cut  very  low  in  front,  revealing  an 
undergarment.  The  broad  collar  of  fur  is  continued  down  below  her 
broad  waistbelt.  The  sleeves  are  moderately  full,  tight  at  the  wrist, 
with  a 
falls  in  _ 

head-dress  over  a  close  coif.  Two  prayer  scrolb  issue  from  their  I 
mouths,  and  between  them  overhead  was  apparently  a  representation  l- 
of  God  in  Three  Persons.  There  were  rosettes  in  the  comers  of  the 
stone  and  a  shield  below  the  figures,  between  two  groups  of  children,  I 
apparently  five  boys  and  three  girls.  From  each  group  proceeded  a  |  ^ 
label  with  ejaculatory  prayer,  but  all  the  brass  is  now  lost  except  the 
above-described  two  figures  and  the  following  inscription  in  Gothic  |  ! 
lettering  at  their  feet : — 

Hie  iacent  Willms  Style  Ac  Issabella  Vxor  eivs  qui  quidem 
WUlfhs  I  obijt  Vndecimo  die  Mensis  Junij  Anno  dni  millmo  oooc"  , 
Lxxv"  Et  dicta  Issabella  |  obijt  xyj°  die  ffebruarij  Anno  dni  millmo 
coco  nonage”  qr°  (itr)  ale  reqiescant  I  pace. 

A  stone  at  the  foot  of  this  last  was  the  memorial  of  William  Stiles  ^ 
a  few  years  later,  and  had  figures  of  a  man  and  wife  with  inscription 
plate,  two  groups  of  children  below,  and  four  shields  in  the  angles  of 
the  stone ;  but  ^  have  been  lost  except  the  effigy  of  the  husband,  who 
wears  a  long  gown  open  to  the  waist,  and  about  halfway  up  from  the 
bottom.  The  gown  is  lined  and  collared  with  fur,  and  its  wide  sleeves 
are  bordered  with  the  same.  There  is  a  belt  at  the  waist,  the  hands 
are  joined  in  prayer,  face  shaven,  and  hair  reaching  almost  to  the 
shoulder,  the  shoes  broad-toed  and  shapeless.  The  wife,  wearing  a 
kennel  head-dress,  was  turned  towards  her  husband. 

On  a  third  stone,  further  east,  are  effigies  of  William  Bloys  and  I  i 
his  wife.  There  appears  to  be  some  attempt  at  portraiture;  the 
male  figure  is  represented  as  wearing  a  beard  and  moustache,  and 
hie  hair  is  short.  He  wears  a  long  fur-edged  portman’s  gown  with 
high  sleeves,  standing  collar  and  r^,  his  arms  being  passed  through 
openings  in  the  long  hanging  sleeves.  The  open  gown  discloses  his  ! 
doublet,  confined  at  the  waist  with  a  cloth  girdle,  its  skirts  reaching  | 
midway  down  the  thigh,  sleeves  close  fitting  and  furnished  at  the 
wrist  with  a  small  turned-back  cuff,  while  his  legs  are  encased  in 
close-fitting  hose,  his  shoes  low  with  high  fronts  fastened  with  straps, 
and  with  very  low  heels.  His  wife’s  dress  is  set  out  very  full  from 
the  hips  and  has  many  folds,  but  it  is  otherwise  plain,  the  body 
gathered  into  a  long  pointed  stomacher ;  the  sleeves  are  close,  with  a 
small  cuff.  She  wears  a  small  ruff,  and  on  her  head  a  close  coif  with 
a  large  hood  over  it,  pointed  and  depressed  in  the  middle  and 
spreading  at  the  sides,  its  drapery  resting  on  her  shoulders.  She 
wears  shoes  similar  to  her  husband’s.  A  portion  of  this  plate  is  tom 


deep  cuff  of  fur,  and  her  hands  are  joined,  while  the  gown 
ample  folds  about  her  feet.  She  wears  a  plain  kerchief 


w 

lx 

w, 

tl 

B 

A 


P 

n 

q 

a 

n 

i) 

1 


NOTES  AND  QUEKIBS,  BTC. 


55 


away.  The  figures  are  slightly  turned  in  towards  each  other.  Above 
was  a  large  plate,  no  doubt  engraven  with  coat  of  arms,  &o.,  and 
below  the  inscription  were  two  smaller  plates  with  groups  of  children, 
which  are  lost,  together  with  the  inscription : — 

Here  lyeth  the  bodyes  of  William  Bloys,  merchant,  portman  of 
this  town,  and  Alice  his  wife,  who  were  married  together  49  years. 
He  died  the  23^  of  Jan.,  1607,  being  81  years  of  age;  and  the  said 
Alice  the  3^  of  Nov.,  1608,  being  82  years  of  age. 

Another  lost  inscription  was  to  Thomas  Bloys,  ob.  Oct.  14,  1528. 
Upon  a  red  marble  stone  in  the  chancel  is  a  rectangular  brass 
plate  with  this  inscription  cut  within  Elizabethan  scroll  work : — 

Hie  iacet  |  Svsanna  Parker  vx  |  or  qvondam  Avgvstini  |  Parker 
mercatoris  qve  |  obiit  1 3  die  mensis  Avgusti  |  anno  dini  1 604  anno  | 
qve  eetatis  sve  24.  | 

On  two  smaller  plates  above  are  the  M$rchantt  Adventurert'  arms, 
and  Ermine  a  chevron . 

On  a  fourth  plate  beneath  is  ajmerchant’s  mark,  formed  of  Parker’s 
monogram,  SAP. 

]^und  the  edge  of  a  large  stone,  west  of  Bloys’,  runs  this 
inscription,  now  encroached  upon  by  the  benching : — 

[Here  lieth  the]  Body  |  of  Willia  |  Bridon  of  this  towe 
Marcn*  |  nt  who  died  ll*  of  Deceber  A®  D”*  1616.  | 

In  the  centre  of  the  stone  is 


Industry 

whose 

Increase 

Integ^rity 

Creditt 

Marriage 

1  God  did , 

Children 

Faith 

Fruittes 

Sickness 

1  bless  w*** 

Patience 

Death 

Lyfe 

vita  vitse  mortalis 

est  spes  immortalis. 

On  another  marble,  at  the  west  end  of  the  church,  is  a  marginal 
insm^tion — 

Here  Besteth  the  |  Body  of  John  Alderman  Merchant  late  one  | 
of  the  24  of  Ips  I  wich  who  dyed  October  the  1 642.  | 

Adjoining  this,  eastward,  is  a  large  slab  with  carved  shield : — 
(Sa.)  on  a  fess  counter-embattled  between  three  goats  passant  (Arg.) 
as  many  pellets,  JHann ;  impaling  per  fess,  first,  two  bars,  and  in  chief 
three  estoiles  (?)  Ifieolton;  second,  (Az.)  three  griffins  passant  in  pale 
(Or),  Withe.  The  crest  is  a  demi-griffin  segreant. 

;  Here  Lieth  the  Body  of  Edward  |  Mann  Esq'  son  of  Edward 

Mann  Esq'  |  his  first  wife  was  Martha  davghter  |  of  Francis  Nicolson 
;  in  Essex  Esq'  he  |  had  by  hvr  8  Bones  &  7  Davghters  |  whereof  3 

I  Sonns  A  3  Davghters  |  are  now  living  Otho  Tho:  and  |  Ffelton 

Elizabeth  Hannah  &  Elino'  |  he  Died  the  4“*  of  Apll  An*  Do**  1680  | 
Aged  61.  I  his  Second  wife  was  the  Relec*  I  of  Robert  Marriot'  of 
BreadfieP  |  Esq'  Davghter  of  James  Withe  |  of  Framesdon  Gen*  he 
had  by  |  her  one  Sonne  Edward  |  who  is  now  Living.  | 

Bislow  the  present  wooden  ^tar  steps  is  a  marble  ledger  stone 


! 


56 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAH  ;  OR, 


with  incised  shield: — a  dolphin  naiant  between  two  bendlets  wavy, 
Ventrit ;  impaling  three  chevronels  (?  Atpall).  The  crest  is  a  crescent. 

Here  Resteth  the  Body  of  S'  |  Peyton  Ventris  Late  One  of  the  | 
Justices  of  Their  Court  of  Comon  Pleas  at  Westminster  Who 
I  Departed  This  Life  the  Sixth  Day  of  I  April  1691  Ann:  .^tatis 
Suse  45“  II 

Adjoining  this,  on  the  south,  is  a  similar  marble,  displaying  these 
arms: — (Sa.)  three  bells  (Arg.)  and  a  chief  ermine.  Porter-,  impaling 
Neave.  The  crest  is  a  portcullis,  chained. 

H.  S.  I.  I  Quicquid  remanebat  |  Richardi  Porter  de  Framlingham 
in  hoc  Coin:  Arm:  |  Legum  Humanarum  valde  periti  |  Divinarum 
Studis  et  Praxi  maximi  dediti.  |  Qui  Proavorum  mentis  clams,  suis 
clarissimus.  |  .^teraam  sperans  vitam  deposuit  mortalem  |  1 2°  Martij 
A'Xti.  1702.  jEtatis  71.  |  Yxor  Maria  sex  nlij  filiaeq’ quatuor  |  Ecclesiee 
de  Framlingham  Altare  juxtam  Domino  dormium  |  et  Monumentum 
ibidem  extat.  | 

A  shield  of  arms  within  a  broken  pediment,  above  a  mural 
monument  on  east  wall  of  south  aisle,  is  thus  emblazoned: — Az.  a 
fees  between  three  mascles  pierced  Arg.,  Whitaker-,  impaling  Vert  a 

chevron  engrailed  Or .  The  crest  (now  broken  and  lying  loose 

on  the  ledge  of  the  tablet)  is  a  horse  stataut  Or. 

P.S.  I  Hie  Juxta  Jacet  |  Carolus  Whitaker  Arm  |  hujus  Burgi 
diu  Recordator  |  in  Parliamento  Angliee  ter  Socius  |  Regi  Gulielmi  iii° 

I  cum  primis  Serviens  ad  Legem  |  Anna  regnante  |  in  Australi 
WallisB  parte  Capitalis  I  trium  |  Conaitatum  Justitiarius  merito 
constitus.  I  Obijt  xix°  die  Junij  An.  Dom.  mdccxv.  |  .^t.  suee  Lxxin” 

I  Vivo  adhuc  Patre  Tumuloq’  Patris  contermino  |  Humatse  quiescunt 
Reliquiae  |  CaroliWhitaker  |  InteriorisTempliAr:  Forinsec’ Oppositoris 
Scaccarij  |  intempestiva  morte  praerepti  |  cum  xxxv  ad  diem  com- 
plevisset  |  vu®  Martij  An.  Dom.  mdccx.  j 

Adjoining  Sir  Peyton  Ventris’  stone,  on  the  north,  a  black  marble 
slab  is  sculptured  with : — 8a.,  two  shinbones  in  saltire,  the  dexter  sur¬ 
mounted  of  the  sinister  Arg.,  Newton ;  impaling  Ermine  on  a  bend  (  ) 

three  pairs  of  scimetars  crossed  saltierwise  (  ),  Kerrington.  Crest,  a 

lion  rampant. 

Under  this  Stone  Resteth  the  Body  |  of  Richard  Newton  of  this 
Parish  |  Gent,  who  Departed  this  Life  |  December  the  20“*  1718  Aged 
74.  I  And  within  this  Chancell  are  Interr’d  |  the  Bodys  of  Leticia  his 
Vertuous  |  and  Good  Wife  (who  was  the  youngest  |  Daughter  of 
Roger  Kerrington  of  |  Acton  Hall  in  this  County  Gent:)  |  and  of 
Robert  the  third  Son  of  the  |  said  Richard  and  Leticia,  and  of  | 

Leticia  their  Eldest  and  Anne  | .  (The  rest  is  hidden  under  the 

steps).  Richard  Newton  was  brother  to  the  well-known  Sir  Isaac, 
and  was  a  Romanist. 


(To  he  continued). 


H.  W.  Birch. 


!rOTS8  Aim  QTTXarBS,  KTC. 


67 


ST.  STEPHEN’S  PARISH,  NORWICH.-LIST  OP  INCUMBENTS. 


[1206.  John  de  Hastings  was  Reetor.]  > 
1304.  Clement  de  Hozne.* 

1319.  Jeffery  de  Hunstanton. 

1342.  Jeffery  de  Hecham. 

1349.  Henry  Hoddes  of  Baconsthorpe. 
1369.  John  Fride  of  Aldburgh. 

1398.  John  Reyner. 

1400.  Jeffery  Barney. 

1402.  Richd.  de  Castre  or  Caistor.’ 
1420.  John  Spenser.* 

1424.  Willm.  Bemham. 

Richard  Poringland,  O.D.* 

1467.  John  Underwood  or  Leystoft.* 
1461.  Jeffry  Chaumpneys,  D.D. 

1471.  Robert  Calton,  O.D. 

1601.  Thos.  Bowyer.’ 

*1530.  Thos.  Cappe,  Doctor  of  Law.^ 
*1546.  Richard  Lusher.* 

•1566.  John  Pory.* 

1661  to  1670.  Qeorge  Ledys,  married, 
“  Curate.”  Original  and 
quaint  entries. 

1686.  Dr.  Miles  Mosse,  “Pastor” 
(Latinist),  married  while 


here.  Published  list  of 
banns,  including  his  own. 
Full  of  interest. 

1698.  John  Holden  (Latinist). 

1602.  Matthew  Stonham. 

1637.  Samuel  Booty. 

1642.  Samuel  Harding  (ejected). 

1644  to  1662.  No  Vicar  institute.* 

1662.  Qabriel  Wright  (ran  away  from 
the  Plague). 

1683.  John  Connould. 

1708.  Samuel  Salter. 

1729.  Thomas  Manlore. 

1746.  James  Heath. 

1773.  Hy.  Carrington. 

1811.  'WWiam  Fitt  Drake. 

1836.  Stephen  Oakley  Attlay. 

1866.  Edward  Evans  (aftwwards 
Evans- Lombe). 

1863.  Charles  Baldwin. 

1876.  James  Wilson. 

1892.  Fredk.  Chas.  Davies. 

1901.  Dundas  Harford- Battersby 

(afterwards  Dundas  Harford). 


A  PAMPISFOED  CHARTER. 

John  Mortlak,  eldett  ton  and  heir  of  John  Mortlak,  lenior,  of 
Patnpitford,  grants  to  William  Tyrtilhe,  John  Pryst,  senior,  Qeorge 
Mylwade  and  Robert  Hogon  of  the  same  place,  a  messuage  with  a  croft 
adjoining  in  the  aforesaid  town.  Dated  at  Pampisford  28**  May, 
26  Hen.  VIII. 

Sciant  p’sentes  et  futuri  qd.  Ego  Johes  Mortlak  sen’  filius  et 
heres  Jofais  Mortlak  seniorf  defucti  du  vixit  de  Pampis worth  in  Com 
Gantebrig’  dedi  concessi  et  p’senti  Carta  mea  confirmavi  WiUmo 
Tyrtylbe  Johi  Pryst  sen’  Georgio  Mylwade  et  Roberto  Hogon  de 
Pampis  worth  p’dict'  unu  mesuagiu  edificat’  cum  crofto  adiacen  put 

1  Appropriation  extant.  Ko  list  of  Rectors  during  the  twelfth  and  thirteenth  oentnries  is 
traceable.  After  the  death  of  John  de  Hastinn,  Rector,  in  1306,  John  de  Qrey,  Bishop  of  Norwich, 
presented  the  Living  of  St.  Stephen’s  to  the  Monastery  of  the  Holy  Trinity,  Norwich. 

*  Institution  of  Vicsrage  extant. 

*  Great  “preacher  of  God’s  word  in  English.”  Fitts,  HoUingshed,  Ac. 

*  Gave  chalice,  Ac. 

*  Bran. 

*  Brass. 

1  Will  very  interesting. 

B  Rebuilt  chancel  and  nave.  The  Will  is  fnU  of  interest.  Began  registers. 

B  Presented  by  a  lay  patron,  John  Godsalve. 

I  Great  pluralist,  Vice-Chancellor  of  Cambridge,  Ac.,  Ac. 

s  During  the  Civil  War  and  Commonwealth,  1642  to  1660,  there  was  great  unsettlement  in 
Church  affairs,  and  no  Vicar  was  episcop^y  instituted  from  1614,  when  Samuel  Harding  was 
ejected,  owing  to  the  Act  of  Uniformity  in  1662.  Dr.  John  Collings.  a  Presbyterian  minister  of 
note,  acted  as  Incumbent  from  1650  to  1663.  The  anthor  of  numerous  published  sermons. 

*  Original  MSS.  of  registers  in  these  Vicars’  handwritings. 


58 


THE  E18T  AHOLIAH;  OB, 


iaoet  in  villa  p’dict’  inter  Tent  dni  ville  de  Fampieworth  p’d,  ex 
utraq3  pte  et  unu  caput  abutt’  sup  mariecu  de  Pampisworth  p’diot’  £t 
p’dict’  croftu  extend,  se  in  longitud,  a  p’dict’  meeuag’  inf  id  t’f 
ultra  viam  vocat  londonwey  Necnon  cu  omib3  aliis  terr’  prat’  past’ 
reddif  et  s’uicf  cu  univ’sis  et  singlis  eorf  ptin  ^uiei’  iacent  m  villis  et 
campis  de  Pampisworth  p’dicf  et  Babiirh*m  in  Com  Cantebrig’  Que 
nup  fuerunt  dci  Johis  Mortlak  sen’  p’ris  mei  Et  que  p  eius  post 
mortem  p’dci  Johis  Mortlak  sen’  p’ris  mei  michi  p’faf  Johi  Mortlak 
fit  hered,  et  assignat’  meis  iur’  hereditar’  nup  discendebant  Hendu  et 
tened,  totu  p’dict’  mesuag’  et  croft  adiac’  Necnon  cu  omib3  aliis  terr — 
prat’  past’  reddif  et  s’uicef  et  univ’sis  ac  singlis  eorf  ptin  p’faf 
WiSmo  Tyrtilbe  Johi  Pryst  sen  Georg^o  Mylwade  et  Bohrto  Hogon 
hered,  et  assignat’  eorf  Tamen  ad  usum  opus  et  pficiu  mei  dm  Johis 
Mortlak  fit  hered,  et  assignaf  meorf  imppm  De  capitb3  dnis  feod, 
ill  p  servic’  inde  debit’  et  de  jur’  consuef  Et  Ego  vero  p’dicf  Johes 
Mortlak  filius  et  hered,  mei  tot’  p’dict’  mesuag’  et  croff  amac’  Necnon 
cu  omib3  aliis  terr’  praf  past’  reddif  et  seruic’  cu  univ’sis  et  singlis 
eorf  ptin  p’faf  Wilhno  l^rtilbe  Johi  Pryst  sen’  Georgio  Mylwad,  et 
Bohrto  Hogon  hered,  et  assignat’  eorf  ad  opus  et  usum  sup'dicf 
contra  othes  gentes  warantizabim  et  imppm  defendem  p  p’sentes 
In  cuj’rei  testimoniu  hinc  p’senti  carte  mee  sigiUu  meu  appoeuj 
Dat’  vicesimo  octavo  die  mensis  maij  apud  Pampisworth  p’d  anno 
regni  Henrici  Octavi  dei  gra  angle  et  ffrancie  Bege  fidei  defensorf  et 
dni  hibn  vicesimo  sexto. 

In  dorsum. — Seisina  delihaf  fuit  pacific’  et  apta  die  et  anno  infra 
script’  p  v’tute  hui^  Cart’  die  et  anno  infra  script’  in  p’senf  Johis 
Clark,  Johis  Bassyngborn,  Bobrti  Clark  et  aliorf  phir’. 

[The  seal  is  missing]. 

SoHALD  Li  V  Err. 

Fulboume,  C*mbi. 


PAETRIDGE  OF  SHELLEY  HALL,  SUFFOLK. 
(Concluded  from  vol.  ix.,  p.  365). 

Extracts  fboh  Parish  Beoisters. 

[Those  extracts  to  the  year  of  which  an  asterisk  is  attached  are 
here  reprinted  in  order  to  show  the  full  history,  of  Daniel  Partridge 
and  his  descendants,  to  whom  all  the  following  extracts  refer] : — 

Hiohak. 

*1642.  Daniel  son  of  Robert  >  &  Elizabeth  Partridge  was  bapt.  20  Oot. 

S.  Clement’s,  Ipswich. 

167{.  Daniell  Fattridge  ft  Ann*  Mann  [were  oaarried]  March  23. 

1  Bapt.  1607  at  Higham,  afterwards  of  Holton  8.  Marf  Hall ;  will  prored  1S77,  C.P.C.C. 
68  Hale.  * 

t  Error  for  “  Harr.”  Marriage  lioenee  bond  244.  Ardid.  Snff.,  dated  16  Mar.,  167£,  la  between 
Dan.  Fattridge  of  Holton,  “gent.,”  and  “Mrs”  Marj  Man  of  Ipswich,  to  be  married  at  8. 
Clement's  Chorch.  She  was  daughter  of  Edward  Mann  of  8.  Marr-at-the-Onar,  Ipswidi,  En., 
a^  with  her  husband  and  two  duldten,  was  devisee  in  her  sister  Jane  Mann's  will  of  1679  {Tm 
£s(<  Aagitoa,  third  series,  voLTii.,p.  864;  Tol.  Tiii.,  p.  388). 


NOTU  AKD  QtrSBIBB,  ITO. 


59 


Holton  S.  Maby. 

*167).  Daniel  the  eonn  of  Daniel  Partridge  &  Mary  hia  wife  was  bom  March  2** 

&  baptised  March  12^  Anno  pdic: 

Capsl  S.  Mabt. 

*1674.  Mary  daughter  of  Daniel  Partridg  and  Mary  his  wife  bap.  May  26. 
Holton  S.  Mabt.  ' 

*1686.  Daniel*  Partridge  of  East  Bergholt  was  bnryed  June  y*  serenth 
anno  pdicto. 

*169^.  Mary  Partridge  Wid  was  buried  ffeb.  16***. 

Bbanthah. 

s 

*1700.  Daniel  Partridge  Singt  not  worth  600  married  Elisabeth  Prat  Singt  both 
of  East  Bergholt  May  11*^  1700. 

Stbatfobd  S.  Maby. 

*170^.  Thomas  Bones  singleman  Sc  Mary  Partridg  singlewoman  [were  married] 
Jan:  2. 

East  Bkbqholt. 

£ 

*1701.  Thomas  Son  of  Dan:  Partridge  not  worth  600 — bora  29  March  ba[pt.] 
Ap  6. 

*1706.  Mary  Daugh¥  of  Daniel  Sc  Elisabeth  Partridge  fariB  [fanner]  bapt: 
30  Noremb. 

West  Bebgholt,  Essex. 

17{f.  Bur.  [Buried]  Daniel*  Partridge  Jan.  28">. 

A  headstone  in  the  churchyard  is  inscribed  as  follows : — *'  Here  Lyeth 
the  Body  of  Damibl  Pabtridok  who  Departed  this  Life  January  y*  23: 
1739  Aged  68  Tears.” 

At  the  bepnning  of  toI.  ir.  of  the  parish  register  the  following  note 
occurs: — “Feb.  21'*  1740-1.  Received  of  the  widow  Partridge  for 
setting  up  a  Stone  at  the  Head  [there  is  no  footstone]  of  her  late 
Husband’s  Grave,  6*.”  Signed— “  S.  T' ”  (SackviUe  Turner,  rector). 
And  at  the  end  of  the  same  vol.  is  written : — 

Hov*>  16**  1743.  Received  of  John  Smith,  for  setting  up  a  s.  d. 

Stone  at  the  Head  of  hia  late  Wife’s  Grave  . .  . .  5  0 

N.B  — I  had  before  received,  for  erecting  the  Tombstone  over 

Mn  Sadler  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  10  6 

Also,  for  setting  up  the  Stone  at  the  Head  Sc  Foot  of  King’s 
Grave  *  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..60 

Also,  for  Patridge  ..  .,  ..  ..  ...  6  0 

POLSTEAD. 

1726.  May  20.  Daniel  *  son  of  Thomas  Patridge  bapt. 

1  Will  dated  8  June,  16B6 ;  proved  16  Aug.,  1682,  at  Ipswidt. 

*1  In  the  marriage-setUement  deed,  dated  26  Jan.,  1768,  of  Arthur  Partridge  of  Sbeller  Hall, 
firmer,  Daniel’i  son,  Thomas  Partridge  of  Layham,  fanner,  is  called  only  son  and  heir-at-law  of 
Daniel  Partridge,  late  of  West  Ber^mt,  Essex,  and  afterna^  of  Layham,  Suffolk,  yeoman.  In 
1714  Daniel  Partridge,  being  then  at  TB^^^ham.  Essex,  yeoman,  bought  a  oopyhold  farm  at  Layham 
esUed  “  WynooU’s’*^  (Court  Bolls  of  Hanor  of  Overbury  Hall,  Layham,  pnst  Mr.  Q.  F.  Beaumont, 
FAA.,  Coggeahall).  His  descendant,  Thompson  Partridg,  now  lives  there.  On  the  white 
pargeted  won  over  a  doorway  of  the  farmhouse  **  D.  P.  1728 ’’  is  painted  in  black. 

*  Mrs.  Sadler’s  altar  tomb  and  King’s  roughly-inscribed  headstone  (dated  1787)  still  exist  in 
West  Bergholt  churdiyard. 

4  Of  Wiston,  farmer;  died  1808,  aged  77  (mon.  inaerip.  at  Stoke-by-Nayland) ;  will  proved 
(Aithd.  Sudb.).  lands  at  Weeley  in  Essex,  Wiston,  Assington,  Nayland.  and  Stoke.  By  Ann  his 
wife  (ni$  StewM  of  Assington)  had Ann,  wife  of  Stm^en  Lewis  of  Tolstead ;  Daniel,  buried 
1813,  at  Assington ;  Mary,  wife  of  John  Clark ;  John,  will  proved  1884  (Ar^d.  Sudb.) ;  Bobert, 
buried  1806,  at  Aasing^;  and  Alderman,  buried  there  1770.  Of  these  six  chiMrsm,  only 
Hts.  Lewis  left  issue. 


60 


THI  BAST  ABOLIAB  ;  OR. 


Latham. 


1727. 

1728. 
1731. 
1734. 
1809. 

1812. 


172^. 

1744. 

1749. 

1756. 

1761. 

1766. 

1769. 

1778. 

1783. 

1789. 

1806. 


•1759. 


ChritUningt. 

Dec.  4.  Arthur  son  of  Tbomu  and  Margaret  >  Patridge. 

Oct'.  !••.  Alderman  *  S.  [son]  to  Thomas  &  Margaret  Patrdge. 

Dec.  9‘‘‘.  Richard  y*  son  of  ^omas  Partridge  [and]  Mugaret  his  wife. 

J  uly  30‘‘‘.  John  y'  Son  of  Thomas  [and]  Margaret  Patridge. 

Mary:  Ann  daug*'  of  Daniel*  &  Mary  Partridge  (late  Blois)  bon  I 
March  e**" — bap‘  March  29*'’. 

Lionel  Bloss  Son  of  Daniel  and  Mary  Partridge  (late  Mary  Bloss)  pnbliclj 
baptised  May  24^‘>. 

[Next  Partridge  baptism  is  in  1849]. 


Burial*. 

March  ll‘'>.  M^  *  Partridge. 

July  the  1**.  Richard  the  Son  of  Thomas  k  Margaret  Partridge. 
July  the  3'<‘.  Alderman  the  Son  of  Thomas  k  Margaret  Partridge. 
Aug.  21.  Rob**  Partridge. 

Feb.  19.  Ellizabeth  *  Partridge. 

March  9.  John*  Son  of  Thomas  k  Margaret  Partridge. 

March  22.  Sarah  *  Partridge  an  infant. 

Sept'  y*  22*  Ann  *  Partridge — Infant. 

Much  12.  Margaret  Partridge  from  Shelly. 

Oct'>'  12**‘.  Thomas*  Partridge  of  Shelly  [Dairy  House]  aged  80. 
Arthur*  Pattrid^e,  f“  Shelly  [Hall],  agM  61  Feb'*  ll***. 

Mary  Ann  Partndg^e — Aged  9  mont^  bury*  July  9**. 

Daniel  Partridge,  Age  2  days — buried  Novemb'  13**. 


Fordham,  Essex. 


Arthur  Partridge  of  Shelley  [Hall]  Suff.  bachelor  k  [his  third  cousin] 
Sarah  Partridge  of  this  parish  spinster  were  married  in  this  church  bj 
licence  7  Feb.  1759  by  me  Hadley  Cox  Rect'  In  the  Presence  of  John 
Partridge,  Mary  Partridge. 

^  ^  ChARLBS,  PARTRtDaB,  Juit. 

Stowmarkft,  Suffolk.  ’  ’ 

1  Dsnirhter  of  Samuel  Strand  of  Polstead,  feoman,  in  whose  will  (proved  1739,  Archd.  Sndb.) 
she  was  a  devisee.  Ste  Strand  headstones  in  Stoke-bj-Nayland  and  Aldham  churchyards. 

2  Devisee  in  the  wills  of  his  grandfather,  Daniel  Partridge,  1734,  and  his  grandfather’s  OiU 
oonsin,  Alderman  Partridge  of  Stratford,  “  gent.,”  1736. 

3  Youngest  son  of  Arthur  Partridn  of  Shelley  Hall;  died  1830,  at  Bury  8.  Edmund’a 
Some  of  his  children  were  bapt.  at  Hadleigh.  The  only  son  who  attained  manhood  was  Liond 
Bloss  Partridge,  who  died  1883,  aged  69  (mon.  inscrip.  at  Bury).  Sto  also  Bloss  headstones  it 
Aliiham  (buTchyard. 

4  Probably  identical  with  Mary,  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Elizabeth  Partridge,  baptized  at  East 
Bergholt  in  1706  (set  above). 

s  Son  of  Thomas  and  Margaret.  A  headstone  in  Layham  churchyard  commemorates  John 
Partridge,  died  6  Mar.,  **1762,”  agedS6,  and  "Also  hen  on  the  North  siMlieth”  Robert  Partridge, 
died  18  Aug.,  1749,  agrf  6  years. 

s  Probably  widow  of  Daniel  Partridge  of  West  Bergholt,  and  nie  Prat.  Soo  above  nnd« 
Brantham  and  West  Bergholt. 

7  He  lived  probably  at  Shelley  Da^.  In  1760  he  was  co-oveneer  of  Shelley ;  he  was  alio 
churchwarden  then.  Bis  pocket  book  is,  jwaei  sm.  Soi  note  9. 

0  Daughter  of  Arthur  and  Sarah  Partridge  of  Shelley  Hall. 

»  Will  proved  8  Dee.,  1788,  Norwich  Consistory  Court;  lands  at  Stoke,  Asiington,  Wiston,  and 
Layham. 

I  Will  proved  8  April,  1789,  P.C.C. ;  lands  at  Stratford,  Holton,  Baydon,  Hemingstons  f 
Barham,  Coddenham,  and  lAyham.  Memorial  ring,  ptnoo  an. 


XUI 


K0TB8  Aim  Qxnouxs,  rrc. 


CAMBRIDQESHIEE  SUBSIDY  BOLLS.  No.  XXVm. 
Apphtdix  No.  X. 


Burwell. 


Mr.  Waller  Clapton 
of  Wickham,  for 
estate  in  Burwell  . . 
John  Flanders 
John  Casebome 
John  Wilkes 
Godfrey  Barron 
Mr.  OliTer  Pamplyn 
Luke  Woodbridge  . . 
Bobert  Brown 
Stevine  Palmer 
William  Lichfield  . . 


£.  t.  d. 


4  0  0 
1  0  0 

3  0  0 

1  3  4 

0  10  0 

4  0  0 
1  0  0 

1  15  0 
1  10  0 

2  0  0 


£.  s.  d. 
William  Isakson  •  •  |  1  0  0 

Thomas  Isakson  . .  {  1  0  0 

(By  them  voluntarily 
sent). 

William  Bogers  . .  3  0  0 

Robert  Wilkin  . .  115  0 

Bobert  Barron  . .  0  10  0 

Bobert  Gilbert  . .  3  0  0 

•  Mr.Isaac  Barrow  . .  4  0  0 

Grace  Wilkin,  widow  113  4 
Ezekiel  Parkin  . .  0  10  0 

Thomas  Bunting  . .  115  0 


Caldteott. 


£.  «.  d. 

Mr.  Daniel  Standish  4  10  0 
f  Mr.  George  Biker  . .  110  0 

Bobert  Peast 


£.  «.  d. 

Mr.  John  Marshall  . .  2  5  0 

Edward  Curtis  . .  0  15  0 


Mr.  John  Bolfe 
Anthony  Cornwell  . . 


CatiU  Campi. 

£.  «.  d.  £.  d. 

2  0  0  {S' James Beynolds. .  5  0  0 

2  0  0  Katherine  B^e  . .  2  6  8 


itor  Finar 


Carlton. 


£.  «.  d. 

Mr.  Thos.  Deresleye  2  0  0 
Abraham  Bookee  . .  10  0 

(  Mr.  Thos.  Greeks  . .  2  0  0 


8  0  0 


£.  «.  d. 

Lady  ||  Stukeley  by 
Mr.  James  Hitch¬ 
cocks  ..  ..  10  0  0 


*  He  wu  returned  as  one  of  the  largest  wool  owners  in  Cambe  in  1626.  In  the 
evidence  aigainst  Mr.  Peacock,  Vicar  of  Swaffham  Prior,  on  30th  March,  1644,  it 
was  charged  aninst  him,  that  “he  keeps  company  with  Mr.  Barrow,  who  is 
esteemed  to  be  (Usaffected  to  Parliament." 

t  He  had  succeeded  to  the  vicarage  on  the  ejection  of  Thomas  Saunders  in  1644. 
He  was  not  in  holy  orders. 

{  Lessee  of  the  Castle  from  the  Charter-house.  He  had  a  son  who  was  major  in 
the  Parliamentary  Army  in  1647. 

§  He  was  Rector  and  was  ejected  a  little  later  on. 

I  The  Stokeleys  possessed  the  Manor  of  Carlton  Magna  from  1560  to  1675. 


yilM 


62 


THl  lAST  AirOUAK;  OB, 


£.  «.  d.  £.  $.  I 

♦  Mr.  Wisteller  ..7  0  0  Richard  Ouflye  ..  0  10  0 

Ralph  Linsey  . .  10  0 


Che$UrUm. 


£.  t.  d. 

Charles  Hobson  ..  2  13  4 

f  Mr.  Phillip  Storye  . .  6  0  0 

Mrs.  Mary  Merrer  . .  3  0  0 

t  Joseph  Ransom,  sen.  1  10  0 
John  Blimt  . .  ..100 


Mrs.  Margaret  Leete,  £.  «.  i. 

for  land  in  Kingston  16  8 
Joseph  Ransome,  for 
Nicholas  Barton  of 
Orwell  . .  . .  2  0 

William  Read  . .  3  10  0 


ChtntUy. 


^  Mr.  Raren. . 
John  Norrige 
Geoffrey  Deere 
Henry  Clarke 


John  Cheimye 
John  Hodgekin 
John  Francis 


£.  «.  d. 
2  0  0 
1  16  0 
2  0  0 
2  13  4 


£.  «.  i. 

Mr.  Robert  Audley  . .  0  10  0 

Laurence  Eeat  . .  2  13  4 

§  Sir  John  Cotton  . .  20  0  0 


Chippenham. 

£.  «.  d.  £.  s. 

3  13  0  II  Mr.  George  Warren, 

2  10  0  clerk  ..  ..  1  10  0 

1  10  0 


Clapton. 


£.  * * * §.  d. 

Christopher  Blott  ..  1  13  0  Widow  Stacy 


Comherton. 


Thomas  Barron 
Thomas  Stevens 
Thomas  Meade 
Mr.  Francis  Mottram 
Mr.  John  Mottram 
Henry  Barnes 


£.  ».  d. 
1  10  0 
0  10  0 
1  10  0 


0  10  0 


William  Hills 
William  Barron 
Robert  Holden 
John  Barrett,  jun. 
Thomas  Anger 


£.  t. 

0  10  0 


£.  «. 

0  10  0 
0  13  4 
1  5  0 

1  6  8 
1  5  0 


*  His  name  does  not  appear  in  Ljsons,  bat  it  occurs  in  the  SubeidT  of  1641,  under 
Caxton,  and  he  was  one  of  the  Commissioners  appointed  by  Act  of  Parliament  to 
assess  that  Subsidy. 

t  He  was  one  of  the  witnesses  against  Mr.  Watts,  who  was  ejected  from  the 
vicarage  in  March,  1644. 

I  He  was  one  of  the  witnesses  against  Robert  Levitt,  the  ejected  Parson,  March 
22nd,  1643. 

§  Gheveley  was,  according  to  Layer,  in  1632  the  chief  residence  of  the  Cottons. 

g  Institutkl  Yioar  May  2nd,  1642,  and  was  still  here  in  1650. 


irons  AiTD  Qumis,  xtc. 

ComingUm. 

£.  t.  d. 

*  Mr.  Smith  Watson. .  12  10  0  Henry  Mayle 
Henry  Smith  . .  1  10  0 


6S 


£.  t.  d. 
1  13  4 


Coton. 


£.  t.  d. 

fMr.  John  Heyward, 
clerk  ..  ..  2  10  0 


£.  *.  d. 

Mr.  William  Holland  3  0  0 


Croydon. 


{  Mrs.  Hose  Hale 


Linton,  Cambt. 


{To  ho  continued). 


£.  I.  d. 

.  16  13  4 

W.  M.  PaucER. 


REPLIES. 

Phxkdca  or  PHENEimA  EsTTiJi  (toI.  vii.,  p.  381) — Extracts  from 
the  parish  register  of  Langham  in  Essex  (adjoins  Higham  and 
Dedham) : — 

1651.  The  12^  of  November  was  buried  Poninnah  Andrewe  widdow. 

1667.  The  4***  of  July  was  buried  Pamel  Kottlo  daught'  of  y'  widdow  Kettle. 

Southom  Niftria,  Wt*t  Africa.  ChARLIS  PaRTRIDOE. 


Ebttle  of  Suffolk  (vol.  xi.,  p.  288) — Extract  from  the  parish 
register  of  Stoke  by  Nayland : — 

1570,  Feb.  The  8  day  was  buried  Ellen  Kettell  daught?  of  ... .  Kettell. 
“Henry  Kettle  my  godaon”  was  a  devisee  in  the  will,  dated  28  Aug.  and 
proved  8  Dec.  1682  (Arwd.  Sudb.),  of  Cicelie  Kemboldeof  Hitcbam,  widow. 

Southtm  Nigeria,  Weet  Africa.  CharlrH  PartRIDOE. 


Sheldrake  of  Suffolk  (yoI.  vii.,  p.  64). — In  Stoke  Ash  church¬ 
yard  there  is  a  headstone  (now  lying  flat  against  the  south  wall  of  the 


His  property  soon  afterwards  passed  to  the 
In  1650  he  was  reported  to 


*  A  mistake  for  Simon  Watson. 

Cottons. 

t  Rector  from  1607  until  his  death  in  August,  1651. 
be  still  using  the  Book  of  Common  Prayer. 

t  Of  King’s  Walden,  Herts.  Her  maiden  name  was  Cam.  Sir  Anthony  Cage 
was  head  of  the  family  and  held  the  Manors  of  Clopton  and  Croyden.  There  are 
many  interesting  letters  between  Mrs.  Hale  and  her  son  Rowland  in  AMit.  MS. 
33572. 


XUM 


64 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAH;  OR, 


chancel)  in  memory  of  Mary,  wife  of  Tho.  Sheldrake,  29  Aug.,  1728, 
aged  45  (bom  1682-83). 

James  Bird,  “the  Yoxford  poet,”  was  son  of  Samuel  Bird  of 
Deerbolt’s  Hall,  Earl  Stonham,  by  Ann  his  wife,  who  is  said  to  hare 

been  daughter  of . Sheldrake  of  Needham  Market.  She  was 

bom  in  1747-48.  In  Barking  churchyard  (of  which  parish  Needham 
Market  is  a  hamlet)  there  is  a  headstone  to  John  Sheldrake,  late  of 
Needham  Market,  7  Jan.,  1883,  aged  77  (born  1745-46),  and  Ann, 
wife  of  John  Sheldrake  of  Needham  Market,  3  Nov.  1807,  aged  62. 
Mary,  sister  of  James  Bird,  married  Isaac  Everett  Sheldrake  of 
Aldham.  third  son  of  Robert  Sheldrake  of  Hadleigh,  and  nephew  of 
Thomas  Sheldrake  of  Wetheringsett  Hall.  (See  The  Eatt  Anglian, 
second  series,  vol.  v.,  pp.  35-37).  It  is  sometimes  spelt  Sheldrick. 

Southern  Nigeria,  Weit  Africa.  CHARLES  PARTRIDGE. 


QUERY. 

The  “  CoCK-BARER  ”  AND  THE  “  PoALE-BARER.” — I  CRD  nowhers 
find  allusion,  even  of  the  remotest  kind,  to  two  seventeenth-century 
village  officials,  designated  respectively  as  the  “Cock-barer”  and  the 
“  Poale-barer,”  who  are  mentioned  in  a  small  MS.  book,  of  a  dozen 
or  so  parchment  leaves,  belonging  to  the  Parish  of  St.  Michael,  Long 
Stanton,  Cambs,  and  known  as  “  a  medow  book  maid”  (July  1st,  1679) 
“  for  the  grate  medow  by  the  consent  of  ye  whole  towne  and  othe 
former  Booke  Haue  bin  examined.” 

The  (hay)  meadow  under  the  land  tenure  of  former  days  was 
divided  into  strips,  which  were  duly  apportioned  and  held  by  some 
arrangement  of  shifting  rotation  until  the  grass  was  mown,  when  the 
strips  reverted  to  undivided  territory  and  became  common  pasture 
until  the  following  spring.  The  return  of  spring  was  customarily 
celebrated  in  the  Shrove-tide  observances,  prominent  among  which 
was  the  barbarous  pastime  of  “throwing  at  Cocks,”  and  its  attendant 
display  and  hilarity.  It  would  seem  that  the  “  Cock-bearer  ”  and  the 
“  Pole-bearer”  each  by  virtue  of  his  office  enjoyed  the  privileges  of  a 
special  meadow-land  allotment  with  the  owners  generally,  prominent 
among  which  are  Sir  Thomas  Hatton,  Maudlen  (Magdalen)  College. 
Trinity  Hall,  Mr.  John  Famham,  Mr.  Henry  Edwards,  and  All 
Saints’  Parsonage. 

The  book,  besides  giving  the  names  of  persons,  and  the  allotment 
or  rotation  numbers,  adds  some  interesting  descriptions  and  place 
names. 

Is  it  at  all  likely  that  the  “Cock-bearer”  and  the  “  Pole-bearer” 
may  have  reference  only  to  work  connected  with  the  “  cocking  ”  of  hay 
and  the  like  ?  Can  anyone  throw  further  light  on  the  above-named 
offices,  or  refer  to  such  circumstances  and  conditions  as  those  to  which 
allusion  is  made  ? 

L.  8. 


8( 

n 

ei 


(1 

I 


a 

t( 

b 

u 


b 

a; 

8( 

b 

81 

c 

8< 

t( 

tl 

t; 

8< 


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a 

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e 

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e 

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8 

1 

t 

i 

1 


hliL 


XUM 


yOTSS  AND  QUBBIE8,  STC. 


65 


THE  EAELT  QUAKERS  IN  EAST  ANGLIA.  No.  I. 
CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 

A  valuable  and  interesting  MS.,  collection  is  preserved  at  the 
Central  OflBces  of  the  Society  of  Friends,  Devonshire  House,  Bishops- 
gate  Without,  entitled,  “  Accounts  of  the  first  Publishers  of  Truth.” 
The  series  contains  records  of  early  Quaker  preachers  and  sufferers, 
sent  up  from  various  parts  of  the  country  in  response  to  enquiries 
made  by  the  “Meeting  for  Sufferings,”  in  London  early  in  the 
eighteenth  century. 

It  seems  that  the  Quakers  were  accustomed  at  this  period 
(1659-60)  to  preach  publicly  in  the  streets  and  elsewhere  against  the 
Universities  and  learning  in  general,  the  clergy,  tithes,  &c.* 

We  are  indebted  to  Mr.  Norman  Penney,  the  courteous  librarian 
at  Devonshire  House,  for  the  following  transcript,  relating  to  the 
town  and  University  of  Cambridge.  We  trust,  from  time  to  time,  to 
be  favoured  with  other  extracts  from  these  important  and  hitherto 
unpublished  documents. 

“  Some  of  the  sufferings  off  the  people  off  god  (called  quakers) 
by  the  scoUers  and  the  Rude  and  blood  thirsty  people  off  this  towne 
and  vniversitie  off  Cambridge  briefly  Related  as  followeth  : — 

vpon  the  8th  day  off  the  2nd  month  called  Aprill  1660 ;  the 
BcoUers  (who  are  taught  but  not  off  the  lord)  with  other  Rude  people 
brake  violently  upon  us  into  our  owne  hired  house  with  a  malicious 
spirit :  and  a  Cruell  intent  in  there  hearts  as  did  appears  by  there 
Cruelly  beatings  of  us  and  drawings  of  our  blood  and  drawings  off 
severall  off  us  out  by  the  haire  off  the  head,  haueinge  Regard  neither 
to  old  or  younge  men  or  women  with  Child,  but  did  uery  much  abuse 
them  by  tearinge  there  Cloathes  ^  tumblings  and  moileinge  diners  in 
the  nasty  and  loathsome  Channells  in  the  streets ;  and  this  did  the 
scoUers  and  the  Rude  multitude  unto  us  att  our  meetings  ; 

vpon  the  13  of  the  third  month  followings  (C^led  may)  the 
unruly  scolllars  and  the  Rude  people  came  to  our  owne  hired  house 
and  violently  broke  open  severall  doores  thereof,  and  brake  the 
lockes  and  bolts  with  a  great  hammer,  and  when  our  meettinge  was 
ended  :  we  passings  away  to  our  seuerall  outward  habitations  was 
most  shamefully  abused  by  the  Rude  Scollars  and  the  wicked  people 
severall  hundreds  standings  in  the  sheds  some  beatings  of  vs ;  others 
Rejoyceinge  to  se  us  beaten,  and  neuer  a  magestrate  appeared  to 
suppresse  these  wicked  actions  but  Alderman  blackly  which  could  not 
pacifie  the  Rude  multitude  because  they  will  not  obey  Justice ;  and 
this  was  done  at  another  meetings. 

Vpon  the  20th  of  the  same  month  the  disorderred  scoUers  which 
is  a  shame  to  there  seuerall  tutors  who  joined  themselues  with  the 
worst  of  men  Came  in  with  one  off  the  Constables  who  Came  under  a 

*  Sewell,  HUtory  of  the  Quakert,  pp.  10,  176. 

{  “  From  there  hackee  ”  follows,  but  is  struck  out. 

P 


XUM 


66 


THE  EAST  ANOIJAN;  OK, 


pretence  to  search  us  for  Armes  and  searched  some  of  vs  and  found  a 
bible  in  a  friend’s  pocket  but  noe  armes,  and  then  the  rude  multitude 
did  fall  violently  upon  us  and  drew  some  off  us  out  by  the  haire  off 
the  head  and  pulled  and  haled  most  off  the  Eest  and  punched  some 
insomuch  that  for  a  tyme  they  were  in  danger  off  there  lines  whither 
they  would  Recover  yea  or  nay  this  was  att  another  meetinge. 

Vpon  the  27  off  the  same  month  the  blood  thirsty  men  and 
schollars  did  joine  themselves  together  with  a  murderous  intent  and 
purpose  in  there  hearts  towards  us  and  Came  desperatly  and  uiolently 
in  vpon  us  seuerall  scores  iff  not  hundreds  and  some  with  sticks  and 
strucke  friends  on  the  heads  faces  and  hands.  A  Justice  off  peace 
beinge  in  the  Boome  and  saw  there  wickednesse  Charged  them  in  the 
Kings  name  severall  tymes  to  be  quiet  and  to  keepe  the  peace ;  but 
the  schollers  and  others  beinge  soe  wickedly  bent  they  neither 
Regarded  the  King’s  name  nor  him  although  he  was  a  justice ;  but 
most  wickedly  went  and  gott  a  smiths  great  hammer  and  broke  open 
4  doores  and  broke  a  wooden  window  and  tooke  peices  of  the  boards 
and  beat  us  with  them  in  our  owne  hired  house,  and  drew  us  out  into 
the  streets  and  there  knocked  seuerall  of  us  downe  and  drew  the 
blood  or  spilled  off  24  of  us  or  more  insoemuch  that  it  was  seene  in 
seuerall  places  in  the  streets  upon  the  stones  all  this  beinge  done  neere 
the  mayor’s  house,  he  not  at  all  appearinge  that  day  untill  this 
mischiefe  aboue  mentioned  was  ouer  and  then  the  mayor  passinge  by 
the  doore  to  the  steeple  house  and  the  shreiffe  Cominge  with  him  they 
made  a  stand  att  the  doore  off  our  meettinge  house  and  the  shreife 
viewed  the  hauocke  that  the  Rude  multitude  had  made  in  the  house 
and  went  out  and  made  proclamation  for  all  to  depart  upon  the  perill 
that  should  fall  there  on,  yett  soone  after  they  were  passed  away  the 
Rude  multitude  came  in  againe  and  fell  to  worke  as  if  some  carpenters 
had  beene  att  worke  pullinge  most  of  the  staires  downe  soe  that  we 
could  not  gett  up  into  the  Chamber,  and  brake  most  off  the  glasse 
that  was  about  the  meetinge  house  and  did  much  wronge  to  y*  house. 

And  those  wicked  Riotous  persons  followed  friends  to  the  townes 
end  and  in  a  most  unreasonable  and  unmercifull  bruitish  manner 
beatinge  and  stoneinge  off  us  all  the  way  soe  that  uery  few  escaped 
from  Receiveinge  much  wronge  done  to  there  bodies  and  some  thy 
hield  while  others  put  durt  in  theire  mouthes  and  afterwards  as  we 
were  passing  through  the  streets  they  stabbed  two  women  privatly 
the  on  being  an  alderman’s  wife  in  the  towne  the  other  A  widow 
woman,  and  yet  to  this  day  euery  first  day  haue  they  come  in  a  most 
sauage  manner  seeking  for  to  destroy  us,  and  the  major  of  y*  towne 
being  willing  to  grattifie  the  wicked  people  and  scollers  causes  people 
to  stand  in  the  streetes  to  stop  friends  from  there  owne  hired  house. 

Heare  all  may  see  what  moudie  waters  this  fountayne  of  Cam¬ 
bridge  streams  forth. 

And  we  whose  names  are  under  written  doth  owne  good  an 
wholsome  lawes  and  godly  learned  ministers  who  doth  serue  the 
lining  god  and  not  there  owne  bellies,  and  he  who  ministers  frely 
unto  those  who  are  heires  of  salvation  those  we  loue  and  allow  of, 
with  the  rest  of  all  true  Christians  and  we  hope  we  shall  do  for  ever, 


M0TB8  AND  QUBRIES,  ETC. 


67 


and  if  man  heare  not  our  complaint  the  lord  of  heuen  and  earth 
will.” 


“Henry  ffoster 
William  Allen 
John  Smith 
John  Webb 
Mathew  Blakly 
Edward  Salmon 
George  Nash 
Phillip  Williamson 
Buben  Steuens 
Jerimah  Eose 
Eichard  Steaton 
Edward  Write  [?] 
John  Cranwell 
Thomas  Golden 


James  Blackly,  Alderman 
Clement  Crabb 
Samuell  Cater 
Joh  Pamel 
Samuel  Nottingam 
Joh:  Moone 
Eobert  Letchworth 
John  Peace 
Eusebius  Eeade 
Gregory  Tingy 
John  Hart 
Thomas  Hawkes  ” 


The  original  manuscript  of  the  foregoing  transcript  occupies  two 
folio  pages,  and  is  in  two  (or  three)  handwritings ;  the  names  are  not 
autograph  signatures.  The  paper  is  brown  with  age. 

Alderman  James  Blackley  (one  of  the  Quaker  proselytes),  wrote, 
in  conjunction  with  other  Friends  :  A  Lying  Wonder  Diteovered  and  the 
Strange  and  Terrible  Newet  from  Cambridge  proved  false  (London.  1659, 
4to.  8  pp.).  Certain  Quakers  had  been  accused  of  “bewitching 
Margret  Pryor  of  Long  Stanton  into  a  Mare,”  and  riding  upon  her 
four  miles,  and  this  pamphlet  rebuts  the  charge.  The  worthy  aider- 
man  also  appears  in  a  tract  entitled.  The  ^laker  Disarm'd;  or,  A 
True  Relation  of  a  Late  Publiek  Dispute  held  at  Cambridge  by  Three 
Eminent  Quakers,  against  One  Scholar  of  Cambridge,  With  a  Letter  in 
Defence  of  the  Ministry  and  against  Lay  Preachers ;  Also  Several  Queries 
proposed  to  the  Quakers  to  be  answered  if  they  can  (London,  1659,  4to. 
24  pp.).  The  disputation  was  between  “Thomas  Smith,  f  Keeper  of 
the  University  Library,”  and  George  Whitehead,  George  Fox  (“the 
younger”),  and  William  Allen.  It  was  held  in  the  Friends’  Meeting¬ 
house,  which  is  described  as  “over  against  Sidney  Colledge-gate.” 
The  mayor  and  his  wife  are  referred  to.  The  wife  (Mrs.  Nicholson) 
it  would  seem  was  a  Quakeress. 

Concerning  the  “  lying  wonder”  above  referred  to,  it  appears  that 
two  of  the  accused  appeared  before  Judge  Windham  at  the  Cambridge 
Assizes,  July  28th,  1659  (a  year-and-three-quarters  after  the  occur¬ 
rence),  when  Margaret  Prior,  being  bound  over  by  Justices  Thompson 
and  Dudley  Pope  to  prosecute,  brought  a  like  accusation  against  one, 
Widow  Morlin  (“but  she  said  she  quitted  William  Allen”),  alleging 
that  Merlin  “took  her  owt  of  bed  from  her  husband  in  the  night,  and 
that  she  put  a  bridle  into  her  mouth,  and  transformed  her  self  into  a 
bay  Mare  and  rode  upon  her  to  Maddenly  House,  where  she  said  they 
hung  her  on  the  latch  of  the  door,  and  that  they  went  in  to  the  Feast, 
where  she  said  they  had  Mutton,  Eabbets  and  Lamb,”  etc.,  etc. 

t  B.D.,  of  Christ’s  College,  Professor  of  Arabic,  and  Bector  of  Caldecot,  Cambs. 

f2 


68 


THB  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OK, 


Asked  by  tbe  Judge  how  it  came  to  pass  that  she  was  ridden  no  more, 
she  answered  that  she  “  burnt  elder  bark  and  her  own  hair,”  where¬ 
upon  the  power  of  Widow  Morlin  was  supposed  to  have  ceased. 
Margaret  Prior  had  thus,  it  was  plainly  seen  by  her  own  confession, 
used  sorcery.  Of  her  strange  statement  the  Judge  said  he  perceived 
it  to  be  “  a  meer  dream  and  a  phantasie.”  The  writer  of  the  pamphlet 
is  answerable  for  the  assertion  that  “  the  priest  of  the  towne,  if  he 
had  been  honest  might  have  stopt  her  from  proceeding.”  Anyhow, 
the  Quakers  who  had  thus  been  accused  of  “enchanting  witches” 
were  apparently  alone  among  those  professing  godliness  who  regarded 
witchcraft  in  its  true  light,  for  it  seems  that  even  John  Bunion  (the 
Bedford  tinker),  who  termed  the  Quakers  “  the  abominable  children 
of  hell,”  believed  the  story  of  “  good-wyfe  Prior.”  The  Quakers,  on 
the  other  hand,  held  Bunyan  to  have  slandered  them  on  the  report  of 
“a  wicked  lewd  woman”  *  *  *  he  being  “an  incourager  of  her  in 
this  horrible  wickednesse  *  *  *  with  other  professors  and  priests 

*  *  *  These  slanders  against  the  Quakers  are  much  manifest  in 
Cambridgeshire,  *  *  *  though  some  of  the  priests  and  John  Bunion 
in  his  witchcraft  doth  seek  to  delude  and  make  people  wonder  with 
such  profane  and  vaine  bablinge  against  the  innocent,”  etc.,  etc. 
These  reflections  were  sent  out  from  Cambridge  (August  6th,  1652)  by 
James  Blackley  (Alderman),  John  Smith,  sen.,  George  Whitehead, 
and  John  Harwood. 

The  other  tract  {The  Quaker  Dttarm’d),  together  with  the 
accompanying  letter,  is  the  work  of  Thomas  Smith,  the  “  One 
Scholar”  who  dates  from  “Cawcot”  (Caldicot).* 

In  the  “  Letter  sent  to  Mr.  E.  of  Taft  (Mr.  John  Ellis,  sen..  Rector 
of  Toft,  Cambs),  four  miles  from  Cambridge,  a  year  since,  to  which 
no  answer  hath  been  returned,”  Mr.  Smith  says,  “the  tinker  hath 
not  only  intruded  into  the  pulpits  in  these  parts  and  caused  the 
people  of  your  town  to  hate  their  lawful  minister,  but  encouraged 
them  to  proceed  so  far  as  to  cudgel  him  and  break  open  the  Church 
doors  by  violence.” 

In  the  course  of  one  of  these  4to.  tracts  (contained  in  vol.  xzxii., 
one  of  some  500  or  more  in  the  possession  of  the  Society  of  Friends  at 
Devonshire  House),  certain  worthies  of  Norwich  are  alluded  to, 
including  a  certain  “Mr.  Townsend,  Minister  of  Norwich,”  in  the 
following  reproachful  terms : — “Thee  Townsend  *  *  *  thou  Dreamer 

*  *  *  thou  Deceiver  *  *  *  Witch  ♦  *  ♦  0  thou  blinde  Guide,  thou 
enemie  of  God  *  *  *  without  Christ  and  his  knowledge  and  in  Anti- 
Christ.”  Christopher  Atkinson,  James  Lancaster,  George  Whitehead, 
and  Tho.  Simonds  are  mentioned  as  “  now  in  Norwich  Goal  for  their 
errors  and  miscarriages.” 

*  He  relates  how  that  Daniel  Angler  of  Toft,  occasionallly  invited  Bunyan  to 
preach  in  his  bam.  On  one  of  these  occasions,  in  May,  1659,  Smith  walked  in 
towards  the  close  of  the  sermon  (from  1  Timothy  iv.  6),  and  amidst  much  confusion 
and  after  some  controversy,  denied  the  layman's  right  to  preach,  and  asked  Runyan 
what  he  had  to  say  to  the  Apostle’s  question,  “  How  shall  they  preach  except  they 
be  sent  P  ”  To  this  Bunyan  replied  that  the  Church  at  Bedford  had  sent  him,  to 
which  Smith  rejoined  that  being  lay  people  the  “Church”  there  could  not  give 
that  which  they  had  not  themselves. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  BTC.  69 

BELL-METAL  M0ETAE8  (Vol.  ix.,  pp.  325-328). 

Since  the  former  article  on  bell-metal  mortars  was  written,  a  few 
more  ornamented  specimens  have  come  into  my  possession.  One  is  a 
fine  Dutch  mortar  with  its  original  pestle — a  thick  and  heavy  one, 

10  ins.  in  length.  The  mortar  is  very  similar  in  form  to  5a  in  the 
illustration  to  my  last  paper.  It  is  6  ins.  high,  6  ins.  in  diameter, 
and  bears  the  inscription ; — “  torqen  •  quade  •  g  •  s  •  m  •  o  (or  q) 

•  B«T«D«B«Y«F*  1644.”  *  The  first  two  words  appear  to  be 
“George  Quade,”  probably  the  founder’s  name,  and  the  letters 
following  are  most  likely  the  initials  of  the  words  forming  the  rest  of 
the  sentence.  I  shall  be  glad  if  someone  acquainted  with  Dutch  will 
supply  it,  together  with  the  translation.  The  mortar  has  the  usual 
conventional  pattern  round  waist,  and  on  one  side  is  a  straight-sided 
shield  bearing  a  merchant’s  or  guild  mark  and  the  letters  d.q.  (or  o). 

Two  other  mortars,  which  are  of  the  same  size — height 
3|^  ins.,  diameter  4^  ins. — apparently  belong  to  the  same 
series  as  4a,  8a,  10a,  one  having  the  same  grotesque  head 
that  appears  on  8a  and  10a,  alternating  with  a  sort  of 
shield  which  appears  also  on  the  other,  together  with  a 
pointed  elliptical  stamp  four  times  repeated,  the  centre  of 
which  is  too  worn  away  to  be  deciphered,  but  it  has  the  appearance  of 
an  ecclesiastical  seal.  A  fourth  mortar,  3^  ins.  high  and  5  ins.  in 
diameter,  has  a  unicorn  trippant  within  an  oval  wreath  stamped  twice 
upon  it.  This  belongs  to  the  same  series  as  3a,  9a,  3e.  Mr.  J.  W. 
Taylor’s  mortar,  referred  to  in  my  last  paper,  bears  the  inscription : — 
“Petrus  Van  den  Ghein  me  fecit  15M.”  A  similar  one  is  in  the 
possession  of  Mr.  D.  Davison  of  Cromer,  but  is  dated  1581.  Mr. 
'laylor  also  possesses  a  fine  mortar  with  two  bands  of  ornamentation, 
similar  to  those  used  by  the  Oldfields  of  Nottingham  upon  their 
church  bells,  and  the  initials  I.B.  Unfortunately  tlm  mortar  is  badly 
cracked. 

Mrs.  Head  of  Kensington  has  sent  me  the  following  list  of  those 
in  her  possession : — 

(1)  Belongs  to  same  series  as  4a,  8a,  &c.,  ornamented  with 
alternate  acorns  and  Tudor  roses.  Height,  4 1  ins. ;  diameter,  5f  ins. 

(2)  Similar  to  15 ;  a  band  of  escallops  and  scrolls,  in.  wide, 
round  waist.  Height,  4^  ins. ;  diameter,  5^  ins. 

(3)  Stamped  with  a  lion  passant  guardant ;  one  round  handle  on 
opposite  side  to  lion.  Height,  4^  ins. ;  diameter,  4j^  ins.  This  is  very 
similar  in  outline  mouldings  and  the  peculiarity  of  the  one  handle  to 
a  mortar  bearing  the  head  of  Queen  Elizabeth,  in  the  possession  of 
Mr.  Redfern  of  Cambridge,  and  figured  in  The  Antiquary,  vol.  xxziii., 
p.  339. 

(4)  Has  a  very  smooth  fine  surface  with  inscription  round  the 
outer  edge: — “Soli  Deo  Gloria,  1724.”  Height,  3^  ins.;  diameter, 
4^  ins. 

(5)  Has  two  large  fleurs-de-lys  on  waist,  in  form  very  similar  to 

*  TheM  stops  are  of  a  lozenge  shape  in  the  inscription. 


XUM 


70 


TUK  EAST  AMOUAN;  OK, 


those  on  one  of  Mr.  England  Hewlett’s  mortars,  as  given  in  The 
Antiquary,  Tol.  xxxiii.,  p.  364.  Height,  3^  ins. ;  diameter,  4|  ins. 

(6)  Ornamented  with  two  small  fleurs-de-lys.  Height,  4  ins. ; 
diameter,  5^  ins. 

(7)  Has  a  crowned  Tudor  rose  impressed  twice  upon  it.  Height, 
3^  ins. ;  diameter,  4{  ins.  An  illustration  of  it  appears  in  The 
Chemitt  and  Druggitt,  January  27th,  1900,  p.  169,  fig.  7. 

(8)  Has  two  crowned  Tudor  rotes  similar  to  No.  7.  Height, 
4  ins. ;  diameter,  4j^  ins. 

(9)  Has  the  head  of  Charles  II.  on  a  medallion  with  an 
undecipherable  inscription  round  it  impressed  thrice  on  its  waist. 
Height,  3^  ins. ;  diameter,  4|  ins. 

(10)  Also  a  “Charles  II.  mortar,”  the  head  impressed  upon  it 
twice.  Height,  4^  ins. ;  diameter,  5f  ins. 

(11)  Has  stag’s  head  erased  on  a  wreath  within  an  oval,  similar 
to  9a  and  Zc.  Height,  3|  ins. ;  diameter,  4|  ins. 

(12)  Also  a  “stag’s  head  mortar,”  similar  to  No.  11,  but  the 
impression  is  from  a  different  die.  Height,  3^  ins. ;  diameter,  4}  ins. 

(13)  Has  two  shields  conjoined  within  a  wreath  of  palm  and 
laurel,  the  left-hand  shield  bearing  St.  George’s  Cross  for  England ; 
the  right-hand  one  the  Irish  harp.  Height,  3f  ins. ;  diameter,  4^  ins. 
This  is  similar  to  one  in  the  possession  of  Mr.  Crowther  Beynon. 

(14)  Has  ornamented  scroll  bands  round  waist  and  outer  edge, 
similar  to  li,  &c.  Height,  5^  ins. ;  diameter,  7  ins. 

(15)  Is  similar  to  25  in  outline  and  form  of  handles,  but  has  five 
lions  rampant  impressed  upon  it.  Height,  5  ins. ;  diameter,  5^  ins. 

In  addition  to  these,  Mrs.  Head  has  three  Portuguese  mortars, 
somewhat  similar  in  form  to  2a,  but  more  closely  resembling  one  in 
the  possession  of  Mr.  Davison  of  Cromer. 

In  The  Chemitt  and  Druggitt,  January  31st,  1903,  there  is  an 
illustrated  paper  by  Mr.  Davison  on  a  collection  of  mortars  in  his 
possession.  Besides  those  referred  to  above,  it  includes  a  large  one, 
similar  to  6a  and  45,  bearing  the  same  pattern  round  the  waist.  It 
weighs  110  lbs.,  and  is  11  ins.  high  and  14  ins.  in  diameter.  The^e  I 
believe  to  have  been  cast  at  the  Whitechapel  Bell  Foundry,  London. 
Mr.  Davison  has  notes  of  several  other  large  ones  having  the  same 
pattern,  and  dated  respectively  1651,  1653,  1659;  also  one  now  at 
Cromer,  inscribed  round  the  outer  edge: — “Phillip  Lockton  in 
Abington,  grocer,  1653.”  He  has  two  Dutch  mortars,  dated  1627  and 
1635;  a  similar  one  to  65,  dated  1631;  one  belonging  to  the  same 
series  as  10a,  &c. ;  a  “Charles  II.  moiiar”  with  round  handles;  a 
“stag’s  head  mortar  ”  with  pointed  handles;  one  with  crowned  roses 
and  one  with  fieur-de-lys;  one  with  scroll  band  similar  to  15;  two 
with  double-headed  eagles  impressed  upon  them,  one  of  which  has 
round  handles ;  and  lastly,  a  smooth  cast  mortar  with  handles  in  the 
form  of  closed  fists.  In  The  British  and  Colonial  Druggist,  Sept.  5th, 
1902,  there  is  an  interesting  article  on  mortars,  with  illustrations  of 
some  large  and  handsome  specimens.  In  The  Chemist  and  Druggist, 
Sept.  13th,  1902,  is  figured  a  large  mortar,  then  in  the  possession  of  a 
chemist  at  Chester,  weighing  112  lbs.,  and  measuring  12  ins.  in  height 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


71 


and  18  ins.  in  diameter;  round  its  waist  is  the  inscription: — “Luke 
Asheton  Wigan  fecit  1732,”  above  and  below  which  there  is  a  band  of 
a  running  conventional  pattern.  A  short  time  back  a  large  old  bell- 
metal  mortar  was  offered  for  sale  in  Worcester,  together  with  its  iron 
pestle.  It  was  inscribed : — “Nicholas,  1651.” 

In  his  Church  BelU  of  Camhridgethire,  Dr.  Raven  telle  us  (p.  51) 
that  the  little  Hall  bell  at  Peterhouse  came  from  the  Louvain  foundry. 
It  is  inscribed: — feeter  vanden  qhein  heft  mioheqotsn  icdxlvu. 
He  also  says: — “We  have  few  of  their  bells,  but  a  good  many  of 
their  bell-metal  mortars.  The  Peter  Vanden  Qhein  mentioned  above 
appears  to  have  been  followed  by  Jan  Vanden  Qhein,  who  made,  in 
1558,  a  mortar  now  in  the  possession  of  Mr.  Fitch  of  Norwich ;  Jan 
is  succeeded  by  another  Peter — the  Petrus  Qheinens  who  made  the 
handbell  of  the  Corporation  of  Rye  in  1565;  and,  in  1580,  a  mortar 
which  I  saw  at  Bungay.”  q  Pearson. 

Stnlty  Vicarage. 


SOME  SUFFOLK  CHURCH  NOTES.  No.  LV. 

St.  Nicholas,  Ipwsich  {continued). 

A  marble  in  north  aisle  floor  is  now  partially  illegible,  only  this 
fragment  being  readable : — 

. expectans  iacet  . . .  | . endi  viri  Johannis  La . | 

....  eriti  qvi  Obijt  14®  die . |  An®  Dom:  1647.  | 

At  the  west  end  of  south  aisle  a  stone  is  thus  inscribed  : — 

Mary  Eliz:  Brathwaite  |  Widow  of  |  Francis  Brathwaite  Es'''  | 
Second  ^n  of  |  Thomas  Brathwaite  |  of  Westmorland  |  And  Eldest 
Daughter  |  of  S' Roger  Manly,  |  Died  the  |  Seventhof  January  17  | 

Aged  78.  I 

Towards  the  east  end  of  the  same  aisle  is  a  slab  with  this 
inscription : — 

Hero  Resteth  the  Body  of  |  M"  Sarah  Edwards  |  Daughter  of  | 
Henry  Edwards  Esq.  |  one  of  the  Masters  |  of  the  High  Court  of 
Chancery  |  By  Sarah  his  Wife  |  who  departed  this  Life  |  the  26““  Sept: 
1754  I  Aged  34  Years.  |  She  was  Dutiful  to  her  Parents,  |  Religious 
without  ostentation,  |  Charitable  to  the  Poor  |  and  Patient  in  her 
A£9iction.  |  Here  also  lyes  the  Body  of  M'*  Sarah  Edwards  |  Mother 
of  the  abovesaid  |  Sarah  Edwards  I  who  departed  this  Life  |  the 
6:  Day  of  Dec’"  1768  |  In  the  Eighty  First  |  Year  of  her  Age,  |  Much 
Lamented  |  by  her  Acquaintance  |  and  the  Poor.  | 

The  stone  bearing  Bloys’  inscription  has  been  re-used,  and  the 
following  cut  on  it : — 

Here  lyeth  the  Body  of  |  Samuel  Jacomb  Esq'  |  late  Collector  of 
^swich  I  who  died  8“*  August  1757  [  Aged  73  Years.  |  And  also  of  I 
Flora  Jacomb  his  Wife  ]  who  died  24""  April  1765  |  Aged  71  Years.  | 
Upon  W“  Styles’  slab  also  a  later  inscription  has  been  cut : — 
Eliz”*  Mary  Long,  Wife  of  Bartholomew  Long  |  died  29***  October 
1796  Aged  44  Years.  |  Bartholomew  Long  Esq'  |  died  May  8^  1829  | 


72 


THE  EAST  ANOUAN;  OK, 


Aged  82  Years.  |  Peter  Thomas  Long  died  the  28  Day  |  of  May  1821 
Aged  43  Tears.  |  Harriett  Long  died  the  4“*  Day  of  |  April  1824 
Aged  43  Tears. 

This  family  is  again  commemorated  by  a  black  marble  tablet  on 
south  aisle  wall  with  this  shield: — Sa.  a  lion  rampant  within  a 
bordure  of  crosslets  Arg.,  Long. 

In  the  centre  aisle  of  this  church  |  are  deposited  the  remains  of  | 
Bartholomew  Long  Esquire  1  for  nearly  fifty  years  an  inhabitant  |  of 
this  parish,  |  having  practised  the  profession  of  the  law  |  above  half 
a  century  |  with  unsullied  reputation.  |  He  died  the  8^  day  of  May 
1829  I  Aged  82  years.  |  Also  of  Elizabeth  Mary  the  wife  of  |  the  said 
Bartholomew  Long.  |  She  died  the  29“*  day  of  October  1796  |  aged 
44  years.  |  Also  of  Peter  Thomas  Long  their  son  |  who  died  the 
28***  day  of  May  1820  |  aged  44  years.  |  Also  of  Harriot  Long  daughter 
of  I  the  said  Peter  Thomas  Long  |  who  died  the  4***  day  of  April  1824,  | 
aged  16  years.  |  Also  of  Louisa,  relict  of  the  |  Eev.  J.  Ward  rector  of 
Stoke  Ash  and  |  Occold  in  this  County,  and  eldest  |  daughter  of  the 
said  Bartholomew  Long  |  and  Elizabeth  Mary  his  wife.  |  She  died 
March  2*"*  1846  |  aged  62  years.  | 

In  the  north  aisle  pavement  lies  a  stone  inscribed : — 

Here  Lieth  the  Body  of  |  Nicholas  Barry  |  who  departed  this 
Life  I  the  20***  of  June  1742  |  Aged  55  Years.  | 

On  a  black  marble  in  nave  floor,  and  a  marble  tablet  with  urn 
carved  in  relief,  on  a  pier  south  side  of  chancel : — 

John  Elsdale  Qent.  1  Died  17“*  May  1790  |  Aged  63.  | 

Sacred  |  To  the  Memory  of  |  John  Elsdale  Gent.  I  Who  by 
cultivating  a  friendly  disposition  |  was  deservedly  esteem’d,  nor  was 
his  Friendship  |  circumscribed,  but  whenever  objects  of  |  indigence  or 
distress  presented  themselves,  |  he  contributed  to  their  relief  with  a  ] 
generosity  worthy  of  imitation :  |  he  departed  this  Life  |  the  1 7“*  day 
of  May  1790  I  Aged  63.  | 

A  tablet  on  sacrarium  north  wall : — 

In  Memory  of  |  The  Rev“  Will™  Reeve  A.M.  |  30  years  Minister 
of  this  Parish  1  who  died  the  13“*  of  Sept'  1755  |  Aged  56.  |  The  Rev. 
Thomas  Reeve  |  Rector  of  Brockley  in  this  County,  ]  youngest  Son  of 
the  above,  |  died  June  4.  1824.  aged  79.  |  His  Remains  are  deposited  | 
with  those  of  his  Father  |  in  a  Vault  )  near  the  South  Porch  of  this 
Church.  I 

On  the  opposite  wall : — 

In  Memory  of  |  The  ReV*  James  Coyte  |  27  Tears  Minister  of 
this  Parish  |  and  Rector  of  |  Cantley  in  Norfolk.  |  He  died  June  13. 
1812.  I  Aged  63.  |  Also  of  |  Ann  hie  Wife  |  who  died  February  18“* 
1820  I  aged  60.  | 

On  the  opposite  pier  to  the  Eldsdale  monument  is  an  inscription 
to  William  Beeston  Coyte  M.D.,  ob.  March  3.  1810  in  his  69“*  year; 
Sarah  his  wife.  Sept.  21.  1776,  aged  36;  Hester  his  second  wife, 
July  21.  1820,  in  her  81“  year;  and  three  children  who  died  in 
infancy ;  the  monument  being  erected  by  Wm.  Coyte  Freeland  their 
grandson. 

A  white  marble  tablet  over  south  chancel  door  is  placed  by  her 


i 


NOTES  AND  QtTEBIKS,  ETC.  73 

husband  in  memory  of  Mary,  wife  of  Thomas  Cooper  Colls,  and  her 
infant  daughter,  who  died  Septr.  20“*  1818. 

A  tablet  in  south  aisle  is  to  Harriet  Jermyn  Brown,  daughter  of 
W*  &  Harriet  Brown,  died,  aged  22,  Feby.  3"*  1835. 

In  the  same  wall  another  tablet  is  to  John  Carter  Esq.,  died 
Aug.  2"'*  1842,  aged  67 ;  Mary  his  wife,  Septr.  1825,  aged  50;  and 
Anna  their  daughter,  Jany.  1827,  aged  16.  Two  small  squares  of 
marble  near  by,  with  names  and  dates,  mark  the  places  of  interment, 
and  on  a  rough  gravestone  is  the  memorial  of  Justinian  Carter,  died, 
aged  75,  Augt.  23.  1834. 

At  east  end  of  north  aisle,  now  used  as  an  organ  chamber,  is  a 
mural  tablet  to  George  Goose,  a  Lieut.  R.N.,  died  July  17***  1840 
aged  52 ;  and  Elizabeth  Mary  his  wife,  last  surviving  daughter  of 
Bartholomew  Long,  died  March  30.  1852,  in  her  63^  year. 

Another  is  to  Maria,  youngest  daughter  of  Peter  Thos.  Long, 
and  wife  of  Lt.-Col.  James  Alexander  of  the  Bengal  Horse  Artillery 
and  Commander  of  the  Most  Honourable  Order  of  the  Bath,  who 
died  at  sea  on  the  passage  from  India  to  England,  April  26^**  1852. 

An  urn  is  carved  on  this  tablet,  and  below  is  a  cherub  head  in  a 
nightcap. 

Another  um  in  the  same  aisle  surmounts  an  inscription  to 
Charlotte  Bloomfield,  April  13“*  1882,  aged  73. 

The  only  stained  window  in  the  church  has  an  inscription  to 
Simon  Batley  Jackaman,  died  March  6“*  1875. 

{To  he  continued).  H.  W.  Bibch. 


CAMBKIDGESHIEE  SUBSIDY  ROLLS.  No.  XXIX. 

Cottenham. 


£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

t. 

d. 

John  Bond  . . 

2 

3 

4 

William  Emerson  . . 

1 

13 

4 

John  Phillips 

3 

0 

0 

William  Briggs 

1 

6 

8 

John  Essex  . . 

2 

5 

0 

Mr.  Bryan  Tailer  . . 

3 

0 

0 

John  Barnes.. 

2 

0 

0 

§  John  Tennison,  clerk 

1 

16 

8 

*  Thomas  Dowsing  . . 

4 

0 

0 

Mr.  Thomas  Peme  . , 

1 

13 

4 

t  John  French,  clerk 

10 

0 

0 

Frances  Ivatt 

2 

0 

0 

Mr.  John  Williams  . . 

2 

0 

0 

John  Bridges 

1 

6 

8 

William  Bouner 

2 

0 

0 

John  Brigham 

1 

10 

0 

{  Thomas  Hobson  . . 

14 

0 

0 

Edward  Haddowe  . . 

2 

4 

8 

John  Lovell  . . 

1 

13 

4 

*  In  an  exchequer  suit  of  1664  he  is  described  as  Thomas  Dowsing,  gent.,  aged  54. 

t  He  was  appointed  Rector  on  the  ejection  of  John  Manby,  D.D.  He  married 
Cromwell’s  sister  Robina.  According  to  Walker,  he  was  a  very  mean  creature 
indeed,  but  Walker  was  nothing  if  not  partial.  In  1646  the  committee  for 
plundered  ministers  ordered  French  to  pay  Mrs.  Hester  Manby  £60  a  year  as  a  fifth 
part  of  the  value  of  the  Rectory. 

X  A  Cambridge  carrier  built  the  conduit  and  originated  "  Hobson’s  choice.” 

§  Father  of  the  future  Archbishop,  who  was  bom  here  in  1630. 


yilM 


1 

74  THE  EAST  AEOLIAN  ;  OR,  ■ 

CroxUm.  I 


£. 

«. 

d. 

£.  «. 

d. 

Mr.  Thomas  Creswell 

2 

0 

0 

Mrs.  West,  by  J. 

4 

0 

0 

Wright  . .  . .  2  0 

0 

George  Edwards 

2 

6 

8 

Mr.  Thos  Millar  . .  3  0 

0 

*  Edward  Brooks, 

Alice  Sutton  . .  2  10 

0 

clerk,  jun. 

1 

10 

0 

Dry  Drayton. 

£. 

t. 

d. 

£.  ». 

d- 

John  GiSard,  sen.  . . 

0 

13 

4 

Eobert  Fuller  . .  10 

0 

Wm.  Eamen.. 

0 

13 

4 

Jeremy  Giffard  , .  10 

0 

Eichd.  Mims 

0 

13 

4 

William  Bourne  . .  3  10 

El 

Eobert  Cross 

1 

6 

0 

Tabitha  Giflard  . .  1  10 

0 

Ellen  Boyden 

0 

16 

8 

Dullinyhatn. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£.  *. 

d. 

f  Mr.  Hall,  vicar 

2 

13 

4 

J  Thomas  Apelyard, 

John  Bentley 

2 

0 

0 

assessed  on  Deane 

John  Saunders 

1 

10 

0 

Tindall  for  S' 

Thomas  Eanew 

1 

6 

8 

Eichard  Winkfield  12  0 

0 

Mr.  West,  by  Jeames 

John  Britton  . .  16 

8 

Wright 

2 

13 

4 

John  Chapman  ..  2  10 

0 

1 

10 

0 

Henry  Harrington  . .  2  3 

4 

Thos.  Harrington  . . 

2 

10 

0 

Margery  Thornton  . .  10 

0 

Duxford. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£.  ». 

d. 

James  Swan  . . 

3 

0 

0 

§  Mr.  Chamberlain, 

Thos.  Eutland 

1 

6 

8 

clerk  . .  . .  6  0 

0 

Thos.  Dunn  . . 

1 

10 

0 

Mr.  William  Webb. .  6  0 

Charles  Smith 

1 

0 

0 

Myhill  Eaynor  . .  10 

0 

Eichd.  CoUman 

1 

16 

8 

EUtoorth. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£.  «. 

d. 

Oliver  Eempton 

0 

16 

0 

Mr.  Phillip  Story  . .  112 

0 

II  Doctor  Winkop  . .  3  0  0 


*  Appointed  Rector  1623,  May  13th,  and  remained  till  his  death  in  1656. 
t  Mr.  Thomas  Catherall,  appointed  Vicar  1639,  March  12th,  and  continued 
through  the  Civil  War. 

$  Captain  Thomas  Appleyard  took  a  leading  part  in  the  Linton  insurrection  in 
1617,  on  the  King’s  side  (S.P.D.  Inter.  A.,  xxh.,  p.  14).  A  John  Appleyard  of 
Linton  was  fined  £41.  16«.  for  being  in  arms  in  1647. 

^  He  was  ejected  from  the  Rectory  in  1646*7  in  favour  of  a  man  ntuned  Swan. 

II  Rector  from  February  18tb,  1631  to  1656,  when  he  died. 


I 


I 


L 


NOTES 

AND 

UUSBIES,  BTC. 

76 

EltUUy. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

». 

d. 

Elias  Woodward 

0 

13 

4 

Paul  Peck  . . 

3 

10 

0 

*  Mr.  Desborough  . . 

1 

10 

0 

f  Mr.  Marsh^ 

3 

0 

0 

John  Gillman 

2 

10 

0 

Evertdm. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Robert  Peck 

0 

13 

4 

Elizabeth  Place 

1 

0 

0 

Richard  Peppercorn 

0 

13 

4 

William  Adam  (Great 

James  Butler 

1 

10 

0 

Eversden) . . 

2 

0 

0 

Sarah  Scot  . . 

2 

6 

8 

William  Battell  (Little 

Mr.  John  Barron 

7 

0 

0 

Eversden)  . . 

4 

0 

0 

Fenditton. 

£. 

1. 

d. 

£. 

». 

d. 

J  Mr.  Eichforde,  clerk 

3 

0 

0 

Rachel  Williams,  widow  1 

0 

0 

Mr.  Thos.  Dalton  . . 

1 

0 

0 

Elizabeth  Reynolds, 

William  Bradey 

0 

13 

4 

widow 

3 

0 

0 

§  S'  Thos.  Willis 

10 

0 

0 

Mr.  John  Reynolds  . . 

2 

0 

0 

Fendrayton. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

». 

d. 

Francis  Apthorpe,  sen. 

3 

0 

0 

John  Martin  . . 

0 

10 

0 

Mr.  Robert  Vallance 

2 

4 

0 

Edward  Allgood 

1 

0 

0 

Robert  Cropwell 

1 

0 

0 

William  Raspeller  . . 

1 

16 

8 

Henry  Barton 

2 

13 

4 

Fordham. 

£. 

1. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Mrs.  Elizabeth  Hill . . 

1 

0 

0 

Mr.  Steward 

4 

0 

0 

John  Masonn 

5 

6 

8 

Thomas  Hynson,  sen. 

2 

0 

0 

Mr.  Erasmus  Warrine 

2 

0 

0 

Mr.  Henry  Vernon  . . 

4 

0 

0 

Mark  Chesewright  . . 

1 

13 

4 

Foxton. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

John  Raynor 

0 

13 

0 

Samuel  Campion 

2 

0 

0 

Thos.  Wells  . . 

1 

10 

0 

Richard  Bemond 

1 

13 

4 

William  Myles 

2 

10 

0 

Edward  Raynor,  jun. 

1 

5 

0 

Edward  Raynor 

2 

5 

0 

II  Robert  Scroope,  Esq. 

5 

0 

0 

Nathan  Singelton  . . 

1 

6 

8 

•  Brother  of  Major-General  Desborough. 

t  The  Marshall  family  held  the  Manor  of  Pappeley  in  this  parish  since  the  disso- 
Intion  of  Monasteries. 

X  William  Ketchford,  appointed  Rector  on  the  ejection  of  Dr.  Samuel  Collins 
in  1644. 

{  The  Manor  was  granted  to  his  grandfather  in  1605. 

I  Scroope  of  Bolton  Castle,  Wensley  Dale. 


XUM 


76 


THI  XA8T  AVOUAK  ;  OB, 


Fou)lmer$,  or  FouJmero. 


William  Hicks 

*  John  Man 

*  John  Dove 

*  Mary  Woodly 


•f  Mr.  Thos.  Turrell 
John  firidgeman 
Mr.  Bobert  Hancocke 


Thos.  Clavering 
§  iStephen  Apthorpe 
K  Mr.  John  Herring, 
clerk 


£.  «.  d. 
2  0  0 
0  15  0 
0  10  0 
0  10  0 


£.  «.  1 

*  William  Finckell, sen.  0  10  0 
Edward  Skinner  . .  0  13  4 

Thomas  Senior  . .  0  15  0 

John  Sweet  ..  ..  5  10  0 


Fulhoum. 
£.  d. 


4  0  0 
4  0  0 
1  0  0 


£.  «.  d. 

{Elizabeth  Killingworth  6  0  0 

John  Pratt  for  Ful- 

bourn&Woodditton  15  0 


Oamlingay. 
£.  «.  d. 

2  6  8 
2  10  0 


2  0  0 


Clement  Sell . . 
James  Apthorpe 


£.  «.  d. 
2  0  0 
2  16  8 


Oirton. 


£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

John  Smee  . . 

2 

10 

0 

^  Mris.  Jeane  Hynes 

17 

10 

il 

William  Collett 

2 

10 

0 

GranchetUr. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Mr.  John  TrafEorde  . . 

.  4 

13 

4 

Mr.  Buckridge 

2 

10 

0 

John  Smith  . . 

,  0 

10 

0 

Mrs.  Katherine  Benge 

3 

0 

0 

♦  M''  Clenche,  Esq.  . . 

2 

0 

0 

MyhiU  Gunnell 

0 

10 

0 

Little  Qrantden. 

£. 

>. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Edward  Higneye  . . 

,  0 

13 

4 

John  Pedley  . . 

2 

0 

0 

John  Apthorpe 

,  1 

0 

0 

t  Mr.  Perry,  clerk  . . 

3 

0 

0 

Peter  Brampton 

1 

10 

0 

*  Was  very  active  in  giving  evidence  against  John  Morden,  the  ejected  Royalist 
Rector. 

t  Held  the  Manor  of  Zouches. 

J  Possessed  the  impropriate  Rectory  of  All  Saints. 

§  Five  of  this  name  were  assessed  in  the  Subsidy  of  1640,  all  of  whom  signed 
the  petition  against  Bishop  Wren. 

II  The  Vicarage  was  sequestered  to  him  from  John  Worlich  in  1644.  He  resigned 
it  in  1647  for  All  Hallows,  Derby. 

f  The  Hindes  came  into  possession  of  the  Manor  of  Girton  soon  after  the  sup¬ 
pression  of  Ramsey  Abbey. 

*  He  was  an  energetic  county  committeeman. 

t  Thomas  Perry  was  appointed  to  the  Rectory  of  Little  Gransden  on  the  seques¬ 
tration  of  John  Tolly,  3rd  July,  1646. 


NOTES  AND  QTJEKIB8,  ETC. 


77 


Ota/ctUy. 


£. 

s. 

d.  1 

£. 

s. 

d. 

Edward  Craft 

1 

6 

8  1 

*  William  Jenks 

2 

0 

0 

, 

GuikUn  MoTd* * * §n. 

£. 

$. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Phillip  Waller 

1 

10 

0 

Henry  Ballden 

3 

0 

0 

Richard  Lilly 

2 

0 

0 

William  Chamberlain 

1 

0 

0 

Mris.  Astrea,  widow 

2 

5 

4 

f  Mr.  Hayes  . . 

3 

6 

8 

f  Simon  Clarke 

5 

6 

8 

Arthtir  Warboyce  . . 

1 

10 

0 

Hardtpieie. 

£. 

t. 

d.  1 

£. 

1. 

d. 

William  Adams 

0 

16 

8 

Mr.  Harberb 

2 

13 

4 

William  Fuller 

2 

0 

0 

John  Bacon  . . 

0 

10 

0 

Harlton. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

t. 

d. 

t  Daniel  Duckfield, 

Thos.  Page  . . 

1 

0 

0 

clerk 

1  ■ 

0 

0 

Edward  Adams 

1 

10 

0 

Mr.  Thos.  Smith 

2 

0 

0 

§  Doctor  Fryar  . . 

2 

0 

0 

Martian. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

1. 

d. 

Elizabeth  Adams  . . 

1 

0 

0 

II  Robert  Swan 

2 

10 

0 

Allen  Hurrell 

1 

0 

0 

Edward  Newman  . . 

2 

0 

0 

Hoielingfield. 

£. 

». 

d. 

£. 

1. 

d. 

Robert  Hardy 

0 

10 

0 

^  Mr.  Thos.  Wendy 

13 

6 

8 

Richard  Newman  . . 

1 

0 

0 

Peter  Marshe 

1 

10 

0 

Araham  Driver 

1 

0 

0 

•  Pouibly  William  Qereke,  Vicar,  1613 — 1656. 

t  A  fine  was  levied  in  the  King’s  Court,  between  John  Clarke,  gent.,  and  John 
Warbois,  in  Elaster  term,  14  Charles  I.,  concerning  land  in  Guilden  Morden.  The 
widow  of  Thomas  Hayes,  gent.,  ob.  1621,  married  Sir  Simon  Clark,  Baronet.  The 
Hayes  family  acquired  an  estate  here  at  the  beginning  of  the  century. 

^  He  may  have  been  Rector  here  for  a  short  time.  Richard  Sterne,  afterwards 
Archbishop  of  York,  was  sequestered  early  in  the  war;  and  Jonathan  Allen  was 
Rector  in  1648. 

§  According  to  lytont,  John  Fryar,  M.D.,  was  in  possession  of  an  estate  here  un> 
lawfully.  For  his  father’s  will  and  monument  im  Ecut  Anglian,  vol.  v.,  pp.  342-4. 

I  S«*  under  Newton.  Robert  Swan  (note). 

f  Descended  from  the  celebrated  Court  Physician  of  Henry  the  Eighth’s  time, 
who  bought  the  Chapel  of  Our  Lady  of  Whitehill  and  other  ecclesiastical  plunder 
in  this  village. 


78 


THE  BAST  AHOLIAN;  OB, 


Hatley  8t.  George. 


£.  «. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

1 

*  Mr.  Skelton 

2  10 

0  William  Pearce 

..  0 

10 

0 

John  Mayweather  . . 

0  10 

0  William  Hall 

..  0 

16 

0 

Hauxion. 

£.  *. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

1 

William  Reynolds  . . 

0  10 

0  Henry  Seymor 

. .  0 

10 

0 

Robert  Bryan 

0  10 

0  John  Newman 

..  0 

13 

4 

Mr.  Frances  Wendy 

3  0 

0 

Xm<on,  Cambt. 


W.  M.  Palmer. 


FIGURED  DAMASK  LINEN  CLOTHS 
(vols.  iv.,  p.  145 ;  ix.,  p.  357 ;  x.,  49). 

A  well-preserved  specimen  (in  private  possession)  of  somewhat 
thicker  material  than  the  woven  examples  previously  described  as 
remaining  in  families  connected  with  East  Anglia,  has  just  been 
brought  to  our  notice.  It  is  similar  in  shape  and  character  to  the 
others,  and  is  clearly  of  Flemish  manufacture,  although  a  tradition 
remains  in  the  owner’s  circle  that  this  and  a  like  cloth  were  wrought 
by  one  of  the  family  upon  a  wheel  still  treasured  as  an  heirloom. 

The  subject,  presented  in  three  several  groupings  or  scenes,  is 
the  death  of  Jezebel  (2  Kings  ix.  30 — 37),  and  measures  20  ins.  by 
36  ins.  It  is  within  a  wide  floral  border  enclosed  by  lines,  the  whole 
surrounded  by  the  familiar  dice  pattern,  and  measuring  30  ins.  by 
46  ins. 

At  the  top,  surmounting  a  city  of  decided  German  appearance,  is 
the  descriptive  word  3leB=reel  iu  German  text.  The  main  city  wall, 
which  is  formed  of  large  square  blocks,  rests  upon  a  line  of  arches 
showing  gates,  windows,  and  other  openings  with  towers  and  vaned 
turrets,  chimney  (from  which  smoke  ascends),  shrubs  growing  upon 
the  lower  wall,  &c.,  &c. 

Below,  in  similar  lettering,  is  Isabel  {Jetehel).  The  large  figure 
of  the  woman  is  represented  (out  of  all  proportion  to  the  surroundings) 
as  falling  headlong  through  the  air  to  the  ground,  with  outstretched 
arms,  distended  fingers,  open  mouth  (indicative  of  sudden  terror),  and 
loose  flowing  drapery.  Her  bodice  is  ornamented  with  a  row  of 
buttons  down  the  centre,  the  large  sleeves  flowing  back  from  the 

*  John  Skelton,  Rector,  April  13th,  1620  to  1663.  He  was  ordered  hy  Dowsing 
in  1643  to  lower  the  steps  to  the  altar. 


!l 


I;  ams,  leaving  them  bare  above  the  elbow.  The  waist  is  confined  by 
a  belt.  The  skirt  divides  in  her  fall,  displaying  the  limbs.  The 
d.  \  \  head  is  “tired,”  an  ornamental  head-dress  being  conspicuous.  Three 
0  I  hounds  are  seen  bounding  towards  the  Queen  as  she  falls  to  the 
0  i  ground,  over  which  is  scattered  skull,  feet,  and  palms  of  hands. 

Beneath  is  Jleibtt '  1^0  {^^nig),  who  is  seen,  crowned,  driving  in  a 
canoe-shaped  chariot,  drawn  by  two  prancing  horses. 

All  the  above  is  once  repeated,  except  that  the  dimensions  of  the 
I  cloth  preclude  more  than  half  of  the  chariot  in  the  lower  portion  being 
:  seen.  To  the  same  cause  is  to  be  attributed  the  divided  figures  on 

^  either  side,  a  singular  feature  in  these  pictorial  designs. 


at 

as 

m 

le 

m 

at 

is 

•y 

le 

•y 

is 

d 

>n 


•e 

*) 

d 

d 

le 


«  ¥ 


East  AwoLiAifs  m  Kent. — The  following  copy  of  an  inscription 
on  a  stone  in  the  nave  of  Keston  Church,  near  Bromley,  Kent,  may  be 
of  some  interest  to  Eaet  Anglian  readers.  Mr.  Clinch  also,  in  his 
Antiquarian  JoUingt  about  Bromley,  enumerates  amongst  the  rectors : — 
John  Sudbury  in  reign  of  Henry  III. 

William  de  Bliburg,  1310  (?). 

At  West  Wickham,  close  by  is  the  tomb  of 

“  Sire  Wauter  :  de  :  Hontingfeld  :  Chevalier  :  gist :  icy  : 

Deu  :  de  :  sa  :  alme  :  eyt :  merci.” 

Walter’s  son,  John  de  Huntingfield  in  Eastling,  left  two 
coheiresses,  of  whom  Alice  married  Sir  John  Norwich. 

L.  M.  Biden. 


The  Baptismal  Bason  (vol.  ix.,  pp.  133,  181,  341). — In  the 
Inventory  of  Church  Goods  appertaining  to  the  Church  of  Hadleigh, 
Suffolk  (a.d.  1480),  besides  several  other  basons,  is  the  following: — 
"Item  another  Bason  of  Laten  w“*  an  Ewer  belonging  to  the  Funt.” 
Also  in  the  will  of  Agas  Herte  of  Bury  St.  Edmimd’s  (a.d.  1522),  is 
the  following : — “  Itfn  I  bequethe  to  the  Chyrche  of  Seynt  Jamys  a 
laten  and  a  ewer  of  pewter  hamerd  to  be  used  at  crystnyng  of  chyldem 
in  the  seyd  Chyrch  as  long  as  it  will  indure.”  The  pre-Eeformation 
use  of  the  baptismal  bason  is  thus  established,  aud  in  character  the 
vessel  seems  to  have  resembled  the  bason  of  Puritan  days.  A  bason 
of  identical  form  with  that  belonging  to  Eampton,  Cambs  (figured  on 
p.  133,  vol.  ix.),  is  represented  in  a  paper  on  “  Scottish  Pewterers”  in 
the  Connoitteur  (vol.  v.,  p.  234),  among  the  Communion  and  other  plate 
of  the  Episcopal  Church  of  Stonehaven.  It  is  interesting  to  read  that 
the  pewter  laver  and  bason,  being  necessary  adjuncts  to  Divine  service, 
are  still  found  in  many  churches  in  Scotland,  and  always  associated 
together  in  old  accounts;  singularly  enough,  too,  they  are  found 
similarly  mentioned  in  respect  of  pre-Eeformation  usage  of  the 
English  Church.  In  the  Presbyterian  Churches  of  to-day,  where  the 


XUM 


80 


THE  EAST  AHQLIAH;  OK, 


font  has  not  superseded  the  pewter  bason,  a  vessel  of  more  preciooi 
metal  has  been  brought  into  requisition.  The  manner  of  use,  we  are 
told,  was  for  one  of  the  parents  to  hold  the  child  over  the  bason,  the 
water  being  poured  from  the  laver  upon  the  face  of  the  baptized. 


QUERY. 

Lenten  distribution  of  Herrings. — The  purchase  of  herrings 
for  distribution  among  the  poor  of  Duxford,  Cambs,  during  Lent, 
was  certainly  until  late  years  effected  out  of  a  sixteenth  century 
bequest  by  one,  James  Bedell.  Was  such  a  benefaction  frequent  in 
byegone  times?  Are  other  like  instances  known  in  East  Anglia? 
May  not  the  custom  of  giving  bread  and  herrings,  &c.,  to  needy 
parishioners  have  something  to  do  with  such  a  phrase,  as  “  they  only 
go  for  the  ‘  loaves  and  fishes  ’  ”  ? 

T.A.C. 


REPLIES. 

The  Ventkis  Arms  (p.  56). — The  true  explanation  of  the  arms  of 
Lady  Ventris  is  briefly  this: — Sir  Peyton  Ventris  married  Margaret 
Whiting  of  Ipswich  {vide  Muskett’s  Suffolk  Manorial  Families,  vol.  ii., 
p.  134),  and  the  arms  of  Whiting,  as  recorded  in  the  Suffolk  Visitation 
of  1664,  were  three  ehevronels.  Blois  says: — Sable,  three  chevrons 
Argent.  This  furnishes  only  another  instance  of  the  extreme  value  of 
a  work  like  Dr.  Muskett’s  incomparable  undertaking. 


In- BREAD  (p.  15). — The  will  of  Francis  Pynner  of  Bury  St. 
Edmund’s,  gent.  (a.d.  1639),  provides  for  the  distribution  of  forty-two 
penny  wheaten  loaves  among  the  poor  of  St.  Mary’s  parish,  the  Clerk, 
Sexton,  or  bedel  “to  have  the  in-bread  of  the  same  bread  w'*"  shalbe 
brought  and  provided.”  A  further  bequest,  of  a  yearly  sum  of  five 
pounds,  in  the  same  will  is  for  the  bestowal  of  “wheaten  bread  to  be 
made  into  penny  loaves,  and  upon  ev’y  Lord’s  day  called  Sonday 
*  *  *  fowre  and  twenty  loaves  of  the  said  bread  w***  the  in-hread 
allowed  by  the  baker  for  those  twoe  dosens  of  bread  *  *  *  the  saide 
Clarke,  Sexton,  and  bedell  shall  alwaies  haue  the  in-bread  of  all  the 
bread  aforesaid  ov'  and  besides  their  shares  in  the  said  twoe  dosens  of 
bread.”  In  former  days  a  very  heavy  penalty  was  inflicted  for  short 
weight,  so  to  avoid  any  risk  in  respect  of  the  sale  of  bread,  bakers 
gave  with  each  dozen  loaves  a  thirteenth  or  vantage  loaf.  Hence  the 
origin  of  the  familiar  term,  “a  baker’s  dozen." 


NOTB8  AND  QUB&1S8,  KTC. 


81 


■re  j 
he  I 


g* 

It, 

S 

a?  i 

dy 

Jy 


of 

ret 

ii., 

OJI 

D8 

of 


k 

^0 

h, 

be 

ve 

be 

ay 

ad 

de 

he 

of 

•rt 

re 

he 


A  COUNTRY  PARSON  OF  1627. 

Some  of  the  wills  of  the  late  sixteenth  and  early  seventeenth 
centuries  are  notable  reading.  Written  by  the  testators  themselves, 
they  are  full  of  autobiography  and  of  passing  allusions  to  the  customs 
of  the  times.  A  book  of  records  of  this  kind  would  be  a  wholesome 
study  for  quiet  hours.  The  will  of  the  parson  of  Little  Thurlow,  which 
we  now  subjoin,  is  replete  with  homely  piety  enlivened  by  a  re^y  wit 
and  punning  allusions  to  the  testator’s  name.  The  burial  he  planned, 
as  he  wrote  in  the  shortening  September  days,  appeals  to  the  imagin¬ 
ation  of  the  reader.  We  see  the  open  grave  in  the  chancel,  and  a 
solitary  taper  here  and  there  shines  through  the  gloom.  Brother 
clergymen  in  their  black  gowns  bear  the  ^dy  to  the  tomb.  The 
awed  villagers  fill  the  building  to  the  doors.  We  hear  their  responses 
as  Evensong  is  said  in  the  presence  of  the  dead,  the  special  lessons — 
the  well-known  chapter  from  the  Epistle  to  the  Corinthians — and  the 
solemn  verses  from  the  book  of  Job,  “ Man  lieth  down  and  riseth  not: 
till  the  heaven  be  no  more  they  shall  not  awake  nor  be  raised  out  of 
their  sleep.  0  that  Thou  wouldest  hide  me  in  the  g^ave :  that  Thou 
wouldest  keep  me  in  secret  until  Thy  wrath  is  past.” 

Who  now  possesses  a  copy  of  Daye’s  Deteant  on  David"!  Dialmi?* 
Where  now  shall  we  find  the  “  Jacke-in-the-Kitchen,”f  or  the  “rug 
gowne,”  such  as  was  given  to  the  clarke  of  Little  Thurlow?  And 
who  was  Day  himself?  He  leaves  to  his  brother  “the  golde  ringe 
with  his  father’s  arms  ” ;  and  to  his  sister  “  the  ringe  with  five 
diamonds  which  was  his  mother’s.”  A  scholar  and  of  gentle  birth,  his 
quaint  turns  of  thought,  his  generosity  and  his  loveable  character  are 
apparent  in  the  writing  which  he  left  for  others  to  read  when  he  was 
dead. 

J.  J.  Muskbtt. 


“I,  John  Daye,  Bachelour  of  Divinity  and  Parson  of  Little 
Thurlow,  make  my  last  will  and  testament  this  28***  day  of  September 
in  the  third  year  of  Kinge  Charles,  1627.  I  know  not  how  soone 
myselfe  may  be  summons  hence,  whoe  according  to  my  vocation 
have  soe  many  tymes  given  warning  to  others.  A  most  wretched 
sinner  I  yet  commend  myselfe  vnto  God  and  to  his  infinite  greate 
mercies.  I  have  waited  for  thie  salvacoh,  0  Lord.  My  desire  is  that 
my  bodie  be  buried  in  Little  Thurlowe,  my  owne  parish  church,  at 
evening  prayer,  vpon  some  Sunday  or  holy  dale — as  vpon  a  Wednes¬ 
day  or  ffry dale— shortly  after  my  death  (if  not  ymediately) :  and  at 

*  Spurgeon  {Treatury  of  David,  vol.  ii.,  p.  10)  quotes  from  John  Day’s  David' i 
Dttirt  to  go  to  Church,  1609;  but  there  is  no  further  allusion  there  to  any  other  of 
Day’s  works  on  the  Psalms. — Ed. 

t  Brewer  (Dictionary  of  Fhrato  and  FabU)  gives  scores  of  “Jack”  meanings, 
but  no  “  Jack-in-the-Kitchen.”  Would  this  he  a  "Bottle  Jack’’  or  a  "Smoke 
Jack,”  or  is  a  clock  with  a  figure  alluded  to  P 

O 


XUM 


82 


THI  lAST  AKOLIAK;  OR, 


that  tjme  to  bee  read  the  fourteene  chapter  of  the  booke  of  Job  for 
the  ^t  lesson  and  the  fifteenth  chapter  of  the  first  Epistle  ct 
St.  Pauls  to  the  Corinthians — and  soe  ymediately  to  the  funeraU, 
as  is  prescribed  in  the  booke  of  comdn  prayer.  I  g^ye  to  euy  house¬ 
holder  of  St.  Marie's  parish  in  Oxford,  as  alsoe  to  euy  householder 
of  Littlemore  one  of  my  bookee  ynbound*  called  Dayes  Descant  os 
David’s  Fasalmes :  which  also  I  give  to  euy  howsholder  of  my  parish 
of  Little  Thurlowe.  To  my  sister,  Mrs.  Mary  daye,  my  gold  Kings 
with  fiue  diamonds,  which  was  my  mother’s.  I  bequeath  to  the  vse 
of  the  Parsonage  howse,  my  long  table  w*^  leaves  in  the  Parlor,  mj 
long  table  and  little  table  in  the  hall,  my  Jaoke  in  the  Kitchen,  and 
my  copper  and  Brewing  vessels  in  the  bruing  house.  Whereas  I 
haue  begune  with  a  Commentary  on  David’s  Psalmes,  and  hsvs 
allready  printed  the  first  daye  of  the  worke:  and  since  that  tyms 
haue  written  vpon  the  ix. — xviii.  psalmes;  and  haue  preached  vpoa 
the  rest  to  the  54  Ps. : — namely  an  hundred  and  ninty  lectures :  I 

give  those  bookes  and  lectures  to  my  approved  g^ood  Mend  Mr.  D 
lewett,  desireing  him  to  goe  forward  where  it  pleaseth  Qod  that 
I  shall  leave  and  to  publish  in  a  fayre  folio.  To  my  brother,  Mr. 
Lyonell  Daye,  my  gold  ringe  with  my  ffather’s  armes.  To  the  over¬ 
seers  of  this  my  will  fortie  shillings  apecce  to  buy  them  Bings  w* 
all,  haueinge  these  words  in  those  Bings  ‘  While  it  is  daie.’  Item.  I 
giue  to  the  Clarke  of  Little  Thurlowe  my  rug  gowne.”  (P.C.C.  27 
Barrington). 


»  THE  SONG  OF  THE  ANGLIAN.” 

The  following  is  the  fourth  of  a  series  of  orig^inal  Songs  of  the 
Counties,”  which  our  contributor  has  evidently  written  with  the  view 
of  emphasizing  the  affection  with  which  men  are  wont  to  regard  the 
region  that  either  has  given  them  birth  or  that  has  welcomed  them 
within  its  charmed  circle.  With  the  one  exception  of  local  folk  and 
similar  rhymes  of  some  merit,  we  have  from  the  first  set  our  face 
against  the  insertion  in  these  pages  of  original  poetry  and  the  like,  as 
betokening  a  departure  from  the  avowed  object  for  which  the  JSati 
Anglian  was  founded.  This  object  we  have  throughout  sought  to 
further,  often,  we  fear,  at  the  risk  of  being  regarded  somewhat  severe 
in  our  aims,  and  much  too  dry  in  our  subject  matter.  We  are, 
however,  pleased  to  make  an  exception  at  a  time  when  ”  the  men  of  the 
East  ”  are  rallying  under  an  East  Anglian  fiag  ;  but  we  specially  give 
the  song  a  place  here  because  there  is  not  only  music  but  archaeology 
in  it,  and  we  are  glad  to  enshrine  in  this  body  of  verse  the  expressive 
lines  9,  10,  and  1 1,  as  evidencing  true  poetic  instinct,  a  just  apprecia¬ 
tion  of  Esist  Anglian  legendary  lore,  and  the  stem  onward  march  of 
the  ever-encroaching  sea. 


NOTB8  AND  QUKRIB8,  KTC.  *  83 

Ths  Sono  of  thi  Anoliah.* 

The  corner  of  England  we  love  the  beet. 

The  comer  we  haU  as  our  own, 

’Tis  there  we  return  to  the  dear  home-nest. 

Find  mpose  for  the  rolling  stone ; 

In  whose  luscioiu  Fens  there’s  a  world  of  calm, 

Whose  shimmering'  Broads  whisper  peace, 

Where  wearied  souls  find  tranquility’s  balm. 

And  the  world’s  petty  troublings  cease ; 

’Tis  where  the  wind  chants  it  wild  hero  tunes 
To  the  bass  of  the  brave  North  Sea, 

Where  the  thief-waves  snatch  at  the  yellow  dunes. 

There  is  the  land  for  you  and  me. 

Angles  are  we. 

Sons  of  the  Free 

Yikings,  our  sires  were,  from  o’er  the  Foam ; 

Who  g^ve  us  name. 

Honour,  and  fame. 

Pride  of  our  Anglia,  birth-place,  and  home. 


Need’st  thou  the  firm  grip  of  a  faithful  friend, 

Gk> !  grasp  thou  an  Anglian  hand ; 

Callest  thou  comrades,  thy  rights  to  defend. 

Sing  ho !  for  an  Anglian  band ; 

Should’ st  thou  seek  the  counsel  of  greybeards  staid. 
Wise  men  there  are  still  in  the  East ; 

And  would’st  thou  settle  to  woo  some  fair  maid. 

On  native  charms,  let  thine  eyes  feast ; 

With  her  shalt  thou  live  long  life  on  that  soil 
Amid  drowsy  contentment  rust. 

Till  Qod  when  He  bids  thee  rest  from  all  toil. 

Thy  bones  merge  in  Anglia’s  diist. 


Angles  are  we, 

Sons  of  the  Free 

Vikings,  our  sires  were,  from  over  the  Foam ; 

Who  gave  us  name, 

Honour,  and  fame. 

Pride  of  our  Anglia,  birth-place,  and  home. 

4,  SeariduU  Ttrraet,  KINGSTON. 

Kmtiitfttn,  W. 


Musical  rights  reserved. 
O  2 


84  THE  EAST  ANOLIAE;  OR, 

8T.  STEPHEN’S,  NORWICH,  CHURCHWARDENS’ 
ACCOUNTS. 

In  vol.  ix.  p.  255,  of  the  Eati  Anglian  there  is  a  note  as  to  t^ 
origin  of  the  Christian  name  Enipe,  given  to  Mr.  Gnbbett.  In 
Tacolneston  Church,  Norfolk,  there  are  the  following  inscriptions 
(partly  given  in  Farrer’s  Church  Heraldry  of  Norfolk)  which  explain 
how  the  two  names  came  to  be  united : — 

On  the  Weit  Wall. 

“  Near  this  place  are  deposited  the  remains  of  Edmund  Knipe, 
Esq.,  formerly  of  this  parish  and  late  of  Heigham  near  Norwich,  who 
departed  this  life  March  2nd,  1673,  in  the  83rd  year  of  his  age.  He 
married  Mary,  da.  and  coheiress  of  Henry  Burroughs,  gentleman,  by 
whom  he  had  twelve  children.  Mary,  his  only  surviving  daughter, 
married  John  Goodman,  Esq.,  Alderman  of  the  City  of  Norwich.  Hie 
daughter  Ann  married  the  son  of  George  Gobbett,  of  the  said  city, 
Alderman,  and  by  him  had  issue  Mary  and  Knipe,  and  di^ 
January  22nd,  1736,  aged  22  years.  Reader,  wouldst  thou  have 
more.  The  day  shall  declare  thyself  to  Angels  and  to  men.  Thomai 
Enipe  Gobbett,  son  of  the  abovesaid  Enipe  Gobbett  and  Jane  hie 
wife,  daughter  of  Thomas  Woode,  Esq.,  late  of  Bracon  Ash,  died  of 
the  small-pox  by  inoculation.  12th  of  April,  1762,  in  the  fourth  year 
of  his  age,  and  was  here  interred  with  the  other  branches  of  the 
family.  R.I.P.” 

On  the  North  Wall  of  the  Chancel. 

“William  Enipe,  Counsellor- at-Law,  who  died  Dec.  3rd,  1769, 
aged  53;  and  also  for  Anne  his  wife,  who  died  Jan.  13th,  1762, 
aged  39.” 

On  the  Floor  at  the  West  End. 

“  In  memory  of  Enipe  Gt>bbett,  Esq.,  Lieutenant  Colonel  of  the 
West  Norfolk  Militia,  and  one  of  his  Majesty’s  Justices  of  the  Peace 
for  the  County.  He  was  chosen  Alderman  of  the  Citv  of  Norwich  in 
1768,  served  the  office  of  Sheriff  the  same  year,  and  that  of  Mayor  in 
1771.  Departed  this  life  Oct.  13th,  1791,  aged  55  years.” 

“  To  the  memory  of  Miss  Maria  Gobbett,  youngest  daughter  of 
Enipe  Gobbett,  Esq.,  Lt.-Col.  of  the  West  Norfolk  Regiment  and 
Alderman  of  Norwich.  She  died  July  16th.  1790,  in  her  22nd  year.” 

There  is  also  another  slab  inscribed  to  “  Henry  Enipe,  who 
departed  this  life  the  30th  day  of  March,  Anno  Dom.  1775.” 

It  thus  appears  that  John  Goodman,  who  formerly  carried  on 
business  in  St.  Stephen’s  Street,  on  the  site  now  occupied  by  Messrs. 
Harwell  &  Sons,  married  Mary,  daughter  of  Edmund  Enipe.  Ann 
Goodman  married  the  son  of  George  Gobbett,  and  their  son  was  named 
Enipe,  being  given  his  grandmother’s  maiden  name  as  his  Christian 
name,  and  he  also  inherited  his  grandfather’s  business,  having  his 
private  residence  at  Tacolneston.  One  of  the  monuments  also  com¬ 
memorate  the  fact  that  inoculation  for  small-pox  was  in  use  in  1762. 


Hapten,  Nerwieh. 


A.  E.  R. 


NOTSS  AND  QUXRIKS,  ETC. 


85 


THE  WYTHIPOLL  FAMILY  OF  IPSWICH. 

I. — Will  op  Edmund  Wythipodl.* 

52  Stafford  [A®  1606].  Our.  Prserog.  Cant. 

“  In  the  name  of  God,  Amen.  I  Edmund  WythipoU  of  Ipswich 
in  the  county  of  Suff.  Esquire  being  of  pfett  mynde  and  remembrance 
doe  ordeine  and  make  this  phte  my  last  will  and  testament  written  all 
with  myne  owne  hand  the  tenth  yeare  of  the  reigne  of  our  souereigne 
Lady  queene  Elizabeth  w‘'‘owt  any  interlyninge  or  strickinge  owt  and 
is  sealled  and  subscribed  w***  myne  owne  hand.  £Brst  I  bequeath  my 
soule  to  god  my  body  w*‘‘owt  any  great  ceremony  to  bee  buried  in  the 
chauncell  of  St.  Marget’s  pishe  in  Ipsw®**  where  I  dwell  vnder  the 
northe  windowe  there  w"*  the  greate  stone  and  all  as  it  is  now 
sppoynted  for  my  wyffe  and  mee  and  our  children.  Item  I  will  there 
bM  given  to  the  poore  people  of  the  said  pishe  of  St.  Margett’s  to 
the  number  of  a  hundred  psons  a  hundreth  shiUinges  the  day  of  my 
buriall  and  soe  much  that  day  twelue  moneths  agayne  and  soe  yeerly 
for  three  yeeres  after  my  said  buriall  w®**  is  in  the  whole  twenty 
poundes.  Item  I  g^ue  to  euerie  couenant  servant  in  my  howse  at  the 
nower  of  my  death  twenty  shillinges  besides  there  wages  both  man  & 
woeman  and  to  my  trusty  servant  Roger  Colthrust  seaventene  nobles 
of  money  besides  to  make  his  bequest  twenty  nobles.  Item  I 
bequeath  to  my  five  daughters  Anne,  Marie,  Martha,  Elizabeth  and 
ffrancis  to  euerie  one  of  them  twoe  hundreth  poundes  of  Englishe 
mony  to  bee  paide  w*'‘in  the  yeere  after  theire  manage  and  yf  any  of 
them  hapen  to  dye  afore  they  doe  marry  I  will  the  survivors  haue  the 
some  bequeathed  devided  amongest  them  equally  Provided  that  yf 
any  of  them  doe  marry  w*''owt  theire  mother’s  consent  or  there 
brother  Powles  yf  yf  [«m]  any  of  them  be  then  lyuinge  that  then  shee 
that  doth  soe  marry  shall  have  but  fortie  poundes  to  her  manage  and 
noe  pte  of  any  bequest  by  survivor.  Item  I  will  that  my  wyffe  doe 
deliver  to  my  sonnes  as  they  bee  of  age  to  receiue  it  (w®'‘  I  meane 
shalbe  at  twenty  yeeres)  the  dede  of  guifte  or  pention  that  I  have 
assigned  to  euery  of  them  dureinge  theire  lyffe  owt  of  my  mannor  of 
Ghriste  church  wythipoU  in  Ipswiche.  Item  I  giue  to  my  good  lord 
Wentworth  my  signet  w^**  the  lyon  on  my  finger  in  remembrance  of  the 
speciall  good  will  I  have  borne  him.  And  to  my  lady  his  wyffe  my 
blood  stone  and  agatt  spoone  she  hath  of  myne.  Item  I  giue  to  my 
ffriende  Harry  Itenolds  my  ringe  w**"  the  lyon  and  Cupide  w'**  as  I 
haue  euer  taken  for  the  speciallest  peece  of  woorke  that  euer  I  had 
soe  I  haue  euer  accompted  of  him  for  my  speciallest  freind.  [f  Item  I 
^ue  to  my  friend  ffrancis  Bacon  my  greate  Saphiar  w^*  the  whole  as 
it  is  w‘*‘owt  gould].  Item  I  giue  to  my  daughter  Mary  my  little 
diamant  and  my  litle  ruby  that  whas  my  mother’s  w<’‘‘  bee  matchis  and 
speciall  paragons,  trustinge  shee  will  keepe  them  for  my  sake  as  long 
as  shee  canne.  [fitem  I  giue  to  my  sonne  Daniell  withipoU  besides 

*  From  materials  for  a  history  (nnpublished)  of  the  Parish  of  St.  Margaret, 
Ipswich,  and  the  Priory  of  the  Holy  Trinity. 

t  Crossed  out  in  the  original. 


86 


THS  KA8T  ANOUAir;  OE. 


his  pencion  twenty  of  my  bookee  the  beet  bee  canne  chuee].  And  after 
bee  batb  cboeen  I  giue  as  many  to  my  eonne  Peter  Wytbipoll  of  bit 
cboyse  lykewyee.  Item  to  my  friend  Tbomas  Wingfeild,  acbolemaeter 
at  Bungay,  I  giue  fower  bookes  of  bis  cboyse  after  the  other  have 
chosen  and  forty  sbillinges  in  mony  to  bee  paid  presentlye.  And 
where  my  father  Powle  Wytbipoll  and  I  did  ordeine  that  the  profit  of 
the  places  in  sanct  George’s  in  Jene  should  g^e  to  my  younger  children 
the  neire  alwayes  excepted  And  that  none  of  my  said  children  should 
injoye  the  said  yearly  profit  or  revenew  vntill  hee  came  to  the  age  of 
five  and  twenty  yeeres,  but  that  in  the  meane  tyme  it  should  lye  and 
multiplie  till  one  were  of  that  age  and  to  begin  at  my  sonne  Bartil* 
mewe  Withipoll  and  soe  successively  one  after  an  other  dureinge  hia 
lyffe  and  noe  further.  I  will  that  soe  euer  of  them  inioyeth  the 

said  profit  or  revenue  by  surviuinge  the  same  shall  not  enioye  the 
pention  graunted  him  owt  of  my  manner  of  Christechurch  aforesaid. 
And  by  cawse  my  saide  sonnes  may  the  easelier  obteyne  the  revenewe 
at  glue*  when  any  of  them  shalbe  fit  for  it,  the  way  is  to  get 
testimonial!  in  London  that  hee  is  the  sonne  of  Edmund  Wytbipoll 
and  of  the  age  of  five  and  twenty  or  more.  And  then  goe  to  giue  or 
send  by  sufficient  Attorney  and  there  demande  the  yeerly  profit  in 
Sanct  George  in  gene  of  those  places  w***  the  increase  that  poll 
wytbipoll  and  Edmund  his  sonne  had  there  and  did  ordeine  should 
come  to  the  children  of  the  said  Edmund,  and  prove  by  testimonial! 
besides  that  hee  is  next  brother  to  him  that  had  it  before.  The 
remainder  of  increase  or  revenewe  after  all  the  men  children  of 
mee  the  said  Edmund  bee  extinct  and  dead  remayneth  to  mee  and  my 
heires  to  sell  or  continewe  as  it  is  at  o'  please',  ffinally  I  will  that 
my  wyffe  Elizabeth  withipoll  have  for  her  dower  and  ioynter  all  my 
lande  in  Walchinstowe  and  Leight  dureing  her  lyffe  w'**  is  w*^in  little 
of  twoe  hundretts  markes  by  the  yeere  trustinge  (ye  I  may  say  as  I 
thinck  assureinge  my  self  y'  shee  will  marry  noe  mann  for  feare  to 
meate  w***  so  evill  a  husband  as  I  have  bine,  but  live  w***  her  sonne 
Poll  withipoll  together  in  my  bowse  here  in  Ipsw'^  and  betwene  them 
both  lay  to  pforme  theis  my  bequests  aforenamed  and  that  my  said 
sonne  wool  bee  content  to  beare  a  lowe  sayle  till  his  sisters  bee  all 
bestowed  and  married  and  shew  himself  obedient  to  his  mother  that 
god  may  the  better  prosper  him  in  all  his  doeings.  And  to  the  intent 
they  shall  the  better  performe  all  theis  legacies  and  bequests  I  giue 
to  my  said  Wyfie  and  sonne  all  my  moveables  vnbequeathed  and  to  my 
eonne  Powle  wytbipoll  all  my  land  after  my  said  legacies  pformed  and 
after  that  his  said  sisters  shall  have  theire  bequests  payd  them  of  my 
landes  and  goodes  as  they  shall  agree  betwene  them  selves  not  meane- 
inge  but  hee  shall  take  the  pfitt  of  it  pntly,  but  that  owt  of  the  same 
be  paid  all  my  bequests  betwene  my  wyfie  and  him  whome  both  I 
make  my  executors,  requiringe  them  both  to  haue  good  regard  to  the 
bestowinge  of  my  daughters  in  witnesse  of  the  trawth  1  the  aboue 
named  Edmund  Wytbipoll  haue  as  afore  saide  written  and  f  [perj- 

*  Clearly  “  Oene,”  as  further  on — a  mistake  of  the  transcriber  who  entered  the 
Will  in  one  of  the  great  parchment  folios  now  at  Somerset  House. 

t  The  “  per  ”  crossed  out. 


XUM 


irOTBS  AND  QUERIB8,  BTC. 


87 


formed  this  pnte  m3rne  owne  hand  the  day  and  yeere  afore  written 
by  mee  Edmund  Withipoll  EX3.” 

Snia  [Sententia]  pro  valore  acripti  fact  p  Edmu  WithepoU 

def . curie  Preroeative  Cant . cuiusdam  negocij  approba6Snis 

teetamenti . Edmundi  Yidepoli  Armigeri . inter  egregin 

rirum  Dm  Edmundum  Yidepolum  equitem  auratum . ex  una  et 

duum  Petrum  Yidipolum  legum  dootorem  filium  predicti  Edmundi 

Yidepoli  armegeri  defuncti  . ex  altera. 

[No  probate  here]. 

n. — Wnj.  OP  Damb  Fbances  Wythipoll.* 

Our.  Prserog.  Cant.  66  Hele. 

“  In  the  name  of  God  Amen.  I  comende  my  eoule  to  Allmightie 
god  and  desire  his  blessinge  maie  direct  me  in  this,  consideringe  our 
mortalitie.  I  think  it  vnfitt  to  hazard  the  prouision  for  my  children 
and  satis£fac68n  of  my  Creditors,  and  therefore  though  I  hope  it  will 

5 lease  god  to  giue  me  time  to  dw  this  worke  with  more  deliberacSn, 
oe  soe  well  as  I  maie  for  the  pnte  declare  my  will,  and  shewe  that 
whereas  I  haue  bargained  and  sould  all  my  landes  in  which  I  haue 
Inheritance  as  well  as  that  which  came  by  my  mother,  as  that  which 
my  husband  gaue  at  his  death,  for  performance  of  his  will,  to  the  Lord 
Wentworth,  S'  John  Tasborough,  S'  Thomas  Glemham,  my  cosen 
Thomas  Cornwallis  and  S'  Charles  Glemham,  with  trust  and  confidence 
that  they  will  imploie  it  wholeie  for  the  performeannce  of  this  my  will. 
I  here  testifie  that  I  giue  to  my  Aunte,  comonlie  called  and  certainelie 
ought  to  be  soe  the  Countesse  of  Bathon,  who  hath  ever  tenderlie 
loued  me,  as  a  token  of  my  gratitude  my  sable  muffe.  I  giue  to  my 
sister  Sandes  my  diamond  Bracelett.  I  give  to  my  sister  of  Argile  the 
Pomander  chain  g^ven  me  by  my  Aunt  Countesse  of  Exetor.  I  give 
to  my  daughter  Lucie  fower  dozen  Buttones  which  are  with  Diamondes, 
Rubies,  and  Pearle.  I  giue  to  my  daughter  Lucie  besides  her  other 
partes  (7*  as  a  token  of  her  father’s  love,  which  I  would  she 
should  haue  at  her  marriage  either  in  Jewells  plate  or  money  as  shal 
be  thought  moste  fitt  in  respect  of  the  man  she  shall  marrie  withall. 
I  giue  to  my  sonne  ffrancis  one  hundred  poundes,  and  I  giue  to  my 
sonne  Harrie  ffiftie  pounds  the  yeare  of  Inheritance  to  be  laid  out  at  the 
discreobn  of  my  executors.  And  I  would  haue  it  knowen  that  I  giue 
not  my  sonne  ffrancis  lesse  because  I  loue  him  lesse,  but  because  his 
brother  vndertakes  for  him,  and  Harrie  I  have  put  into  a  waie  of 
expense  that  I  thinke  my  self  tyed  to  maintaine  to  my  power.  I  give 
to  my  servant  Weekes  as  a  remembrance  tenne  poundes  of  Wythe's 
money  I  hadd  in  my  keepinge  ffowertene  poundes  of  which  he  hath 
hadd  as  he  saieth  all  but  ffiue  or  sixe  poundes,  for  which  remnant  and 
my  guift  I  will  that  he  have  Sortie  poundes,  which  must  be  put  to 
some  use  for  him,  or  eUs  it  will  doe  him  noe  good.  I  give  to  my  three 
Prentices  fiive  poundes  a  piece.  My  ould  servant  Thomasine  I  thinke 

*  Widow  of  Sir  Edmund  WiUnpoU,  Ent.,  High  Sheriff  of  Suffolk,  eirea  1601. 
She  wu  the  eldest  daughter  of  Sir  Wm.  Cornwallis. 


88 


THE  BAST  AHOLIAH;  OR, 


hath  noe  neede  but  if  she  haue  my  will  is  that  she  want  not  durings 
her  lief  nor  Besse  who  cannott  well  dispose  of  what  she  hath  and 
therefore  must  be  putt  into  the  Almesbouse  or  be  otherwise  provided 
for  in  anie  wise  that  she  want  not  duringe  her  lief.  My  husband  hadd 
of  my  cosen  Reignoldes  the  money  for  which  he  sould  the  Wardshipp 
of  my  cosen  Winkfield  for  which  he  should  haue  of  me  by  agreement 
CXX**  yearelie  during  hie  lief,  which  I  would  haue  carefullie 
paid  whether  he  be  in  England  or  wheresoever  in  anie  other  partes  of 
the  world,  and  soe  soone  as  my  estate  male  be  settled  I  will  that  he 
haue  assureance  of  CXX'*  by  yeare  during  his  lief.  I  give  to  my 
cosen  Charles  Qlemham  C?*  by  yeare  duringe  his  lief.  I  owe  to  my 
sister  ffrobusher  CL**  which  I  will  shall  be  made  two  himdred  poundes 
to  her.  All  ells  whatsoever  I  have  land,  money,  houshold  stuSe, 

Elate,  my  debts  first  beinge  paid  whatsoever  I  giue  to  be  diuided 
etween  my  ffive  daughters,  vnmarried,  to  be  paid  them  at  theire  age 
of  one  and  twentie  yeares  or  at  theire  marriadge,  soe  as  they  marrie 
with  the  consent  of  my  ffeoSees,  except  two  hundred  poundes  which  I 

five  accordinge  to  a  noate  here  enclosed,  and  my  foresaide  por68ns  to  my 
aughters  I  will  that  they  be  deuided  amongst  the  rest,  if  anie  shall 
die  before  the  times  lymitted.  Lastlie  I  g^ve  to  my  noble  ffrend  my 
Ladie  Annand  my  Emerald  Binge  as  a  remembrance  of  my  a£[ec68n  to 
her.  By  me  firan:  WithipaU,  the  ffourth  of  August  1623.  I  giue  to 
my  noble  frend  my  Lord  Wentwoi-th  my  Greene  Yeluett  glasse,  and 
the  rest  of  my  fieoffees  twentie  pounde  the  peece,  to  be  bestowed  in 
some  thing  to  remember  my  confidence  of  theire  willingnes  to  this 
works  of  Charitie,  for  my  poore  estate  will  not  allowe  what  is  worthie 
of  them.  I  give  to  my  sonne  Harrie  WithipoU  the  Lease  of 
Hallibread  close  for  one  thousande  yeares,  but  if  my  sonne  William 
WithipoU  shaU  suffer  my  executors  peaceablie  to  use  the  house  caUed 
Christchurch  sixe  weekes  after  my  death  and  give  noe  impediments  to 
this  my  will,  then  I  give  him  that  lease,  and  the  hangings  in  the 
parlor,  and  whatsoever  Statu,  Picture  or  the  Uke  aboute  the  house, 
ffra :  WythypoU.  lastly  I  doe  appointe  for  executors  my  cosen  Thomas 
Comewallis  and  S'  Charles  Glemham.  I  knowe  my  estate  is  wracked 
and  will  be  troublesome  but  I  presume  of  theire  loue  and  charitie  and 
in  that  confidence  they  shaU  haue  a  dyinge  womans  praier  if  I  shalbe 
able  to  remember  anie  thinge.  ffra:  WithipaU.  The  bargaine  and 
sale  I  have  made  which  is  herewith  must  be  pntlie  [presently]  inrowled 
or  ells  all  my  daughters  are  vndone  and  the  rest  of  my  trusts  failed, 
which  god  forbidd.  ffra :  WithipoU.  I  give  to  my  noble  ffrende  my 
Ladye  Sesar  my  gould  spoone,  and  to  my  good  cosen  Winkefield  of 
Crowfield  the  hanginges  and  carpett  on  the  cowch  chamber.  Vpon 
the  payment  of  sixe  hundred  poimdes  to  my  cosen  Thomas  Comewalley 
of  Ipswich  he  is  to  deUver  in  a  bond  of  a  thousand  poundes.  Ypon 
payment  of  ffive  hundred  poundes  to  M'  Carr  he  is  to  deliver  in  a  Bonde 
of  vii'  “  I  have  left  the  maintayneinge  of  my  daughters  to  the  discreoSn 
of  my  Executors  my  estate  is  soe  wracked  as  I  knowe  not  what  to 
appointe.  I  desire  that  my  great  Ebonie  glasse  male  be  presented  to 
the  Countesse  of  Exetor  (not  the  dowager  Countesse)  with  my  humble 
suite  to  her  that  she  wiU  be  pleased  to  take  ffranke,  or  Nan,  one  of  my 


MOTKS  AND  QUKR1K8,  KTC. 


89 


daughters,  to  waite  vpon  her,  my  executors  maintayneinge  her  as  maie 
fitt  for  my  ladie  her  service,  And  I  shall  dye  her  humble  servant, 
ffira:  Withipoll.  June  1625.  The  two  hundred  poundes  I  spake  of  in 
my  will  1  give  to  my  ffaithful  servant  ffrancis  Downes,  and  if  my 
children  maie  not  be  dispersed  amongst  my  frendes  to  the  likinge  of  my 
Executors,  and  that  this  my  servant  live  not  with  her  husband,  I 
desire  she  maie  be  with  them  for  I  know  her  to  be  moddest  and  free 
from  anie  great  vice.  And  I  desire  all  my  children  to  have  a  care  of 
her  for  my  sake.  By  me  ffra:  Withipoll.” 

Beginning  immediately  after  the  last  full  stop  this  will  is 
repeated  almost  verbatim,  and  the  one  document  so  formed  was  proved 
at  London  in  the  Prerogative  Court  of  Canterbury,  6th  May,  1626,  by 
the  oath  of  Thomas  Cornewallis,  Esq*^  one  of  the  executors.  Sir  Charles 
Glemham,  Knt.,  the  other  Executor  having  died. 

[We  are  indebted  to  Mr.  J.  J.  Muskett  for  these  interesting 
Wills]. 


MONUMENTAL  INSCRIPTIONS  IN  OTHER  COUNTIES 
RELATING  TO  EAST  ANGLIA. 

HeadMtone  tn  the  Churchyard  of  Goudhurtt,  Kent. 

In  memory  |  of  |  Samuel  Hickling  |  late  of  Cawston,  Norfolk  | 
who  departed  this  life  at  |  Combwell  in  this  parish  |  January  31*^ 
1857,  aged  59  years.  ^ 

Tunbridge  Well*.  _ 


PARTRIDGE  OF  SHELLEY  HALL,  SUFFOLK. 
(Continued  from  vol.  x.,  p.  60  *). 

Extracts  from  Parish  Reoisters. 

Shelley. 

The  old  register  is  missing.  Baptisms  begin  1790,  marriages 
April,  1754,  burials  April,  1747.  The  Register  Bills^  preserved  in  the 
Suffolk  Archdeaconry  Registry  at  Ipswich  begin  1711,  from  which 


*  At  p.  fiS,  foot-note  1,  C.P.C.C.  ahonld  be  P.C.C. ;  at  p.  50,  foot-note  4,  Tolstead  should  be 
Polstead ;  at  p.  SO,  foot-note  7,  note  2  should  be  note  6. 

1  Up  to  the  year  1812  the  parson  and  chnndiwardena  of  erery  pariA  had  to  send  every  Easter 
to  the  Registry  of  their  Archdeaconry  a  Cray  of  all  entries  in  their  parish  register  during  the  past 
twelve  months — i.s.,  since  the  preceding  Easter.  This  duplicate  was  called  officiallv  “a  Register- 
Bill,”  and  in  the  churchwardens’  accounts  “  a  bill  indent^.”  It  was  signed  by  the  parson  and 
generally  by  the  churchwardens.  Those  preserved  at  Ipswich  date  from  1711  to  1812.  Sometimes 
the  bundle  for  a  year  (Easter  to  Easter)  is  missii^,  and  sometimes  the  biU  for  a  pa^oular  parish  is 
missing  from  the  bundle.  Each  year’s  billsaretied  up  in  sepeuate  bundles,  but  the  bills  themselves 
are  arranged  in  no  definite  order.  The  good  preservation  of  these  records  is  greatly  due  to  the 
interest  and  personal  labours  bsatowed  upon  them  by  Mr.  O.  Jacob  of  the  Suffolk  Aradsaeonry 
Registry,  whose  courteous  help  I  am  glad  to  have  an  opportunity  of  acknowledging. 


90 


THS  KXBT  AMOLU.N  ;  OK. 


date  up  to  the  above  three  dates  I  have  transoribed  all  the  Shelley 
"  bills  ’’  that  1  could  find  in  the  bundles.  Every  seventh  year  him 
were  sent  to  the  Bishop’s  Begistry  at  Norwich  instead  of  to  the 
Archdeacon’s  Begistry  at  Ipswich. 


Baptimt  (from  1714). 

Ian.  19.  lohn*  son  of  M'  Arthur’  Partridge  and  Sarah  his  Wife. 

May  30.  Mary  dan.  „  „  „  „ 

May  22.  Sarah  „  „  „  „  „ 

Aug.  12.  Robert*  son  „  „  „  „ 

July  27.  Mary'dau.  „  „  „  „ 

June  13.  Ann  ,,  ,,  ,,  ,•  ,, 

June  26.  Lucy  „  ,,  „  „  „ 

•  “June  16*^  1783  DanieP  Partridge  Was  Bom  About  7  Oclock  in  y« 
Morning,'*  written  by  Arthur  Partridge  in  his  deceased  brother  John’s 
pocket-book,  /mmm  mw.] 

May  28.  Arabeila  dau.  of  John  Partridge  A  Eliz.  his  wife  (late  Elis. 
Ansell,  spinster). 

June  19.  Mary  Ann  ,,  ,,  „  „  ,,  „  ,, 

Not.  29.  Elizabeth  „  „  „  ,,  „  „  „ 

Dec.  3.  Robert  Ansell  son  „  „  ,,  ,,  „  ,, 

Feb.  28.  Robert’  ,,  „  Robert  ,,  Maryhiswife(lateMaryAnBell). 

June  26.  Harriet  Louisa  dan.  „  John  „  Eliz.  „ 

July  2.  Mary  Ansell  „  „  Robert  ,,  Mary  „ 

Aug.  9.  Hester  Amelia*,,  „  John  „  Elis.  ,, 

Sept.  7.  Thomas**  son  ,,  Robert  ,,  Mary  „ 

Feo.  28.  Sarah  Ann  dau.  „  John  „  Eliz.  „ 

Aug.  12.  Sarah  Ann  „  ,,  Robert  „  Mary  „ 

Dec.  18.  John  son  ,,  John  „  Elis.  „ 

Not.  16.  Charles**  ,,  „  Robert  „  M^  ,, 

June  28.  Henry  ,,  „  John  „  Elis.  „ 

Not.  3.  William  „  ,,  ,,  „  „  „ 

Mar.  17.  Elisa  dau.  „  Robert  „  Mary  „ 

Mar.  31.  Emily  Caroline  „  ,,  John  „  Eliz.  „ 


t  Sneeeeded  his  grandfather,  Thomas  Paittidm,  as  tenant  at  Shelley  Dairy,  and  died  there 
intertate  18S7,  aged  71.  Of  his  fire  sons,  only  two  left  issue,  Henry  of  Shdley  Didry,  and  Edward 
of  Water  House,  Layfaam. 

S  Suoeeeded  John  Spells  in  1786  as  tenant  at  Shelley  Hall  (see  IpntiA  Journal,  aOth  Sept.,  1768, 


*  Suoeeeded  his  father  at  Shelley  Hall,  where  he  died  in  1864,  aged  81.  Will  prored  P.C.C., 
lands  at  Stratford,  Baydon,  Peldon  in  Eaez,  Hadleigh,  Layhion,  Holton,  Bingshall,  OffUm, 
Briestt,  and  Higham. 

*  Mistake  for  “James  son  of,”  ete.  Arthur  Partridge  reoorded  his  diildren’a  births  or 
baptisms  in  a  pocket-book  now  p<i«u  sm.  These  entries  indude  “  July  27th,  1776,  James  Partridge 
Was  Baptised.”  The  Mary  Partridge  baptised  in  1788  lired  till  1831.  James  lired  at  Stratford, 
and  died  1860,  aged  83.  He  married  Elisabeth,  sister  of  Sir  Joseph  Bailey,  M.P.,  first  baronet  of 
Olanuak  Park,  weoonahire,  grandfather  of  Lord  Qlannsk,  and  is  now  represented  by  his  grandson, 
William  Bailey  Partridm  of  Bacton,  Herefordshire,  and  Llandfoist  House,  Monmouthshire,  J.P. 
for  those  oounties,  and  High  Sheriff  elect  of  Breconshire. 

*  1783-84  was  a  “  serenth  year.”  Probably  the  bill  recording  this  baptism  could  be  found 
atNorwicb. 

7  SneoeseiTely  of  Shelley,  Layham,  Hadleirt,  Bramford,  and  Bury  St.  Edmund’s,  where  he 
died  in  1880.  His  only  scm  irao  attained  to  manhood  was  lioiiel  Bloss  Partridgs,  sriio  ob.  a  p.  1862, 
aged  89. 

*  SueceasiTely  of  Mason’s  Bridge  in  Baydon,  Overbury  Hall  in  Layham,  and  Stratford  Lodge. 
Died  1886,  learing  three  sons,  Rob^  Bladen,  Walter  Archer,  and  Frederick. 

t  Died  in  1827  at  Thun  in  Switseriand.  Buried  at  Melnn  in  France.  Mural  tablet  in  Shelley 
Church. 

10  SueceasiTely  of  Chattisham  Place  and  Aldham  Hall,  Suffolk,  where  hs  died  1876.  Will 
prosed  P.C.C. 

I*  Sneeeeded  his  father  at  Shelley  Hall,  and  was  succeeded  there  in  1872  by  his  nephew,  Charles 
Thomas  ParMdge,  formerly  of  Offton  PlaoA  now  of  Stowmaxket,  and  Snu«r*s  Farm,  Baydon. 
Chsrias  Buttridge  oisd  unmarried  at  Shelley  House  in  1878.  Will  prored  Aieha.  Snfl. 


NOTES  AND  QUEEISS,  BTC. 


91 


June  6.  John‘*  eon  of  Bobert  and  Muy  hia  wife. 

1813.  Sept.  16.  Georgiana  dan.  „  John  „  Elis.  „ 

1816.  Aug.  27.  Edward  son  „  ,,  „  „  „ 

[From  1845  onwards  are  recorded  the  baptisms  of  8  children  of  Henry  and  Phoebe 
Partridge  of  Shelley  Dairy]. 


Marriagn  (from  1714). 

1774.  May  4.  Thomas  Partridge  (of  Shelley  Dairy,  father  of  Arthur]  was 
witness  to  a  marriage  of  thu  date. 

1788.  Not.  4.  Thomas  Wilsmore  of  Higham,  farmer,  and  Mary  Partridge  of 
Shelley,  spinster,  by  licence.  (John  Partridge  a  witness). 

1790.  Oct.  6.  Ambrose  Mayhew  of  Holton,  farmer,  and  Sarah  Partridge  of 
Shelley,  widow,  by  licence. 

1827.  Oot.  30.  liiomas  Partridge  of  Shelley,  single  man,  and  Catherine  Sheldrake 
of  Hadleigh,  single  woman,  by  licence. 

1838.  Dec.  20.  James  Berry  of  Layham,  farmer  and  bachelor,  son  of  Will.  Berry, 
and  Georgiana  Partridge  of  Shelley,  spinster,  dan.  of  John  Partridge. 

1874.  Not.  11.  Francis  Braham  Sturgess  Robinson,  aged  28,  of  Portsea,  gent. 

and  bachelor,  son  of  Will.  Braham  Robinson,  and  Georgiana  Partridge 
of  Shelley,  spinster,  dan.  of  Henr;'  Partridge. 


1807.  Jnly  22. 
1828.  Deo.  3. 
1832.  Sept.  29. 
1837.  July  19. 

1841.  Ap.  20. 

1842.  Dec.  1. 
1847.  Feb.  28. 
1860.  Jan.  18. 
1864.  Dec.  21. 
1866.  Jan.  13. 

Ang.  31. 
1868.  Sept.  21. 
1860.  Dec.  14. 
1864.  Mar.  24. 
Mar.  26. 
Mar.  28. 
Mar.  28. 
Oct.  11. 
1866.  Sept.  7. 

1870.  Feb.  16. 
June  30. 

1871.  Jan.  27. 
1878.  Ap.  18. 
1884.  Mar.  14. 
1886.  Dec.  21. 


BuriaU  (from  1714). 

Sarah  Ann  Partridge,  aged  6  years. 

William  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  19  years. 

John  Partridge,  aged  28  years. 

John  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  71  years. 

Arthur  Partridge  of  Roydon  [Raydon]  aged  8  months. 
Elisabeth  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  71  years. 
Harriett  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  1 1  months. 

Fanny  Baker  Partridge  of  layham,  aged  10  years. 
Robert  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  81  years. 

Mary  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  84  years. 

Robert  Ansell  Partridge  of  Layham,  aged  60  years. 
Robert  PartridM  of  Stratford  S.  Mary,  aged  62  years. 
Mary  [AnselQ  Partridm  of  Shelley,  agM  63  years. 
Emma  Partridge  of  Layham,  aged  16  years. 

Anna  Partrid^  of  Layham,  agM  1 3  years. 

Edward  Partridge  of  layham,  aged  4  years. 

Rose  Partridge  of  Layham,  aged  1 1  months. 

Henry'*  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  21  years. 

Edwsra  Partridge  of  Layham,  aged  61  yean. 

Emily  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  20  yean. 

Mary  Ann  '*  Partridge  of  ColMester,  aged  79  yean. 
Aral^lla  Partridge  of  Hadleigh,  aged  80  yean. 
Charles  '*  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  73  yean. 

Henry  Partridge  of  Colchester,  aged  76  yean. 

Lily  Partridge  of  Shelley,  aged  22  yean. 


Ohuir»  EUl,  Onu  Rw*r, 

8ouiA*m  Nifmri*. ' 


ChABUE  PABTRIDaE. 


I*  Of  Woodhouse  in  Stratford,  and  Stratford  Lodge.  Married  Jane  Bridges,  dawAter  of 
Edward  Cook,  of  Holton  Hall,  by  Ann,  sister  of  the  Rer.  Thomas  Nunn,  M.A.,  Beetor  of  l^ydon 
and  afterwards  of  Stanrtead,  Kent.  Died  1878.  Mural  brass  in  Stratford  Chu^. 

I*  Died  4th  March,  18SS,  aged  SI ;  Ambrose  Mayhew,  died  1881,  aged  71— head-stone  in 
Stratford  Churchyard.  His  will  prored  1888,  P.C.C. 

>*  Died  unmarried ;  will  prored  18B6,  Norwich  Oonsiat. 

■*  Died  unmarried;  will  proved  Arcbd.  Suff. 

IS  Memorial  window  in  Shelley  Church. 


92 


THS  BAST  AHOLIAM  ;  OR. 


CAMBRIDGESHIRE  SUBSIDY  ROLLS. 

HUdertham. 


No.  XXX. 


£.  «. 

d. 

£.  «. 

•  Mr.  Smith  . . 

3  0 

0 

Mr.  Puckeringe 

3  0 

Mr.  John  Trowell  . . 

1  15 

0 

Hinton. 

£.  «. 

d. 

£.  «. 

Mrs.  Mary  Prime  . . 

2  15 

0 

Francis  Martin 

3  0 

William  Boome 

2  10 

0 

Robert  Killingworth 

1  10 

Thomas  Nunn 

1  0 

0 

Robert  Parnbye 

2  10 

f  Mr.  Dockery 

3  0 

0 

HinxUm. 

£.  «. 

d.  1 

£.  «. 

t  Samuel  Nowell, clerk 

1  13 

4 

Richard  Richmond  . . 

2  10 

Lady  Hinde  . . 

3  0 

0 

Bomingtta. 

£.  «. 

d. 

£.  «. 

Mrs.  Alice  Smith  . . 

3  0 

0 

Robert  Prime 

1  10 

Thomas  Rowland  . . 

1  6 

8 

Horwheath. 

£.  «. 

d. 

£.  $. 

Lord  Allington 

30  0 

0 

II  Thomas  Flacke 

1  0 

Mr.  Ghles  Allington. . 

7  0 

0 

William  Petlye 

2  2 

§  Edward  Ralf 

2  0 

0 

^  Mr.  Wakefield 

5  6 

•  VicMT,  1642—1684. 

t  Probably  Edward,  son  of  Thomas  Docura,  second  son  of  Ralph  Docnra  of 
Folbonm,  by  Catherine  Wisse  of  Hinton  (see  Vititntion,  published  by  Harleian 
Sodety).  The  Fulboum  Docuraa  probably  had  their  property  sequestered  for  the 
share  they  took  in  carrying  off  the  College  plate  to  the  King. 

X  Not  the  Vicar,  for  John  Conway  was  here  1617 — 1667. 

f  He  took  part  in  Linton  Insurrection  of  1647.  S.P.D.  Inttr.  A.,  xxii.,  p.  311. 
“Oct  28th,  1661.  Information  by  one  Bury  on  behalf  of  Colonel  Lilbume  that 
Edward  Ralfe  of  Horseheath  sent  his  man  Parkin  with  a  muskett  to  Linton  against 
Parliament.’’  He  died  in  1662,  aged  74  (m«  Visitation  in  Ointalofitt,  new  ser., 
Tol.  iii.). 

H  lliomas  Flacke  of  West  Wickham,  ob.  1677,  set  80,  married  Grace,  daughter 
of  Thomas  Richardson  of  Horseheath,  brother  of  Dr.  John  Richardson,  Master  of 
Trinity  HaU,  and  had  Robert  Flack  of  Linton,  Attomsy-atlaw,  set.  68,  in  1684 
(Visitation  in  Otntalofut,  toI.  iii.,  p.  137). 

9  Appointed  Rector,  March  1st,  1626.  Stayed  all  through  the  Ciril  War  and 
Commonwealth  (*m  toI.  ▼!.,  p.  4). 


XUI 


NOTB8  AND  QnKBlBS,  KTO. 

93 

lekUUm. 

£. 

a. 

d. 

£.  a. 

d. 

Mr.  William  Symonds 

2 

5 

0 

Anthony  Swan 

1  14 

4 

♦John  Crudde 

2 

10 

0 

Simon  Swan  . . 

0  15 

0 

Mr.  Potkiu  . . 

2 

8 

0 

John  Trig  . . 

0  15 

0 

Bichard  Swan 

2 

0 

0 

Impington. 

£. 

a. 

d.  1 

£.  a. 

d. 

Widow  Wiaton 

0 

10 

0 

t  Mr.  Talbot  Pepys  . . 

8  0 

0 

William  Haddelow  . . 

1 

12 

0  1 

Daniel  Jolly . . 

3  6 

8 

lulham. 

£. 

a. 

d. 

£.  a. 

d. 

William  Sharpe 

1 

18 

0 

Mr.  William  Lukin. . 

0  15 

0 

Mr.  Tiiomas  Peyton. . 

4 

0 

0 

Kingston. 

£. 

a. 

d.  . 

1 

£.  a. 

d. 

John  Angood 

1 

10 

0 

1  Elizabeth  Malden  . . 

2  10 

0 

Kirtling. 

£. 

a. 

d. 

£.  a. 

d. 

^  Mr.  Thomas  Creake 

5 

0 

0 

William  Deersley  . . 

3  0 

0 

Mr.  John  Abbot 

4 

15 

0 

Qeorge  Hubard 

2  10 

0 

Mr.  Doctor  Mumford 

2 

IS 

4 

Knapwell. 

£. 

a. 

d. 

£.  a. 

d. 

S  Mr.  Francis  Scargill 

1 

10 

0 

Thomas  Pamplyng  . , 

1  0 

0 

§  Robert  Colwell 

0 

15 

0 

Landheaeh. 

£. 

a. 

d. 

£.  a. 

d. 

Thoe.  Storey. . 

4 

0 

0 

William  Badger 

.  2  0 

0 

John  Arris  . , 

3 

6 

8 

William  Taylor 

.  1  10 

0 

*  Implic«ted  in  Linton  Inrarroction,  1648  (see  Xatt  Anflian,  toI.  Ti.,  p.  366). 

t  Recorder  for  Cambridge.  ' 

^  According  to  Fuitmtion  of  1619  he  wae  the  grandaon  of  John  Creake  and 
Alice  Derealey,  both  of  Kirtling. 

}  He  waa  the  son  of  Francia  Scargill  of  Knapwell,  by  Elizabeth,  daughter  of 
Richard  Godfrey  of  Crawden,  bom  about  1618  (Fintation,  Harleian  SMiety).  He 
had  acted  aa  Curate  to  John  Stanton  the  Rector,  and  when  he  waa  deprived  of  thia 
living  aa  a  pluraliat  in  1644,  Scargill  waa  recommended  to  the  Weatminater 
Ataembly  of  Divinea  for  the  appointment.  He  died  about  1658.  Hia  brothera, 
John  and  Henry,  were  living  here  in  1662,  when  there  waa  an  intereating  tithe  auit 
brought  by  the  old  Rector,  who  had  returned.  Colwell  waa  one  of  the  aequaatratora 
when  Stanton  waa  deprived  (m«  Longatow). 


i 


XUM 


»4 


THB  KABl'  ANGLIAN  ;  OR. 


Lanwad*. 

£.  t.  d. 

*  The  Lady  Carlton  ..  ..  10  0  0 


Longitanton. 


£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

s. 

1 

t  Sir  Thofl.  Hatton  . . 

75 

0 

a 

f  William  Brett  and 

j  The  Lady  Vemey. . 

4 

0 

0 

Richd .  Winkfield  for 

Thomas  Edwards  . . 

2 

0 

0 

Sir  Thos.  Hatton  . . 

9 

10 

0 

John  Stewkins 

0 

13 

4 

Sir  Anthony  Cag^  . . 

20 

0 

y 

Linton. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

s. 

d 

William  Smith 

1 

13 

4 

George  Fairer  and 

§  Bamabie  Richmond 

6 

0 

0 

Widow  Ashley 

5 

6 

8 

Inward  Birt 

1 

6 

8 

Robert  Richardson  .. 

2 

0 

0 

Doctor  Mason 

4 

0 

0 

John  Meade  . . 

1 

10 

0 

II  Duglis  Millicent  . . 

2 

0 

0 

William  Dench 

1 

0 

n 

Edward  Maulte 

1 

15 

0 

LitlingUm. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

Robert  Meane 

1 

10 

0 

Edward  Waller 

0 

13 

4 

Richard  Adams 

0 

10 

0 

^  William  Russell  . . 

2 

13 

4 

Henry  Adams 

0 

10 

0 

Miles  Thurg^ood 

2 

10 

0 

Jeane  Ivory  . . 

0 

13 

4 

John  Lundon 

1 

0 

Thomas  Sell . , 

2 

4 

0 

Robert  Huggin 

2 

6 

8 

Lolworth. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£ 

». 

d. 

John  Askew . .  . . 

0 

15 

0 

George  Beck 

4 

0 

Tho.  Dyckmen  . . 

0 

13 

4 

*  Lanwade  belong  to  the  Cottona,  but  Sir  John  Carlton,  Bart.  (oh.  1637), 
married  Ann,  widow  of  Sir  John  Cotton. 

t  The  Hattoni  had  reeided  at  Longstanton  since  the  time  of  Queen  Elinbeth, 
when  a  cousin  of  Sir  Christopher  Hatton  settled  there. 

X  8e*  under  Steeple  Morden. 

j  Richmond  was  Quarter-master  to  the  Royalist  force  which  assembled  at 
Linton  in  1647  [8.P.D.  A.,  zzii.,  p.  14).  He  was  buried  March  11th,  16f§ 

(ZiNlSN  Btfitltr). 

I  &«  under  Bartlow,  Mr.  Baker  (note). 

1  In  1617,  William  Russell,  son  and  heir  of  'fhomas,  held  property  of  the 
Manor  of  Doyedalea,  in  Litlin^n,  including  a  Close  called  “  Football  Close”  (/tsf. 
pe$t  wurtm,  16  Ja.  I,  part  ii,  No.  64). 


i 


NOTK8  AND  QTTSRIS8.  STC. 


M 


LongtUnB. 


*  Mr.  John  Stanton 


£.  «.  d. 

3  0  0 


MaddingUf. 


£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Henry  Drirell 

1 

0 

0 

f  Jane  Hynde  .. 

17 

10 

Mr.JohnSteukley,Esq.  4 

0 

0 

0 

4 

Afelhoum. 

0 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

s. 

William  Wood 

1 

10 

0 

John  Pettit  . . 

1 

6 

Robert  Frost 

1 

0 

0 

Thomas  Hitch 

2 

0 

Benjamin  Hamold  . . 

2 

0 

0 

§  Sir  Benjamin  Ayloffe 

8 

0 

d. 

^  Robert  Hitch 

8 

0 

0 

Mr.  Thos.  Turner  per 

John  Thurgood 

2 

10 

0 

Triamor  Robinson 

2 

0 

8 

William  Browne 

2 

6 

8 

0 

0 

Meldreth. 

0 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

s. 

0 

John  Candell 

2 

13 

4 

Benjamin  Fayn 

0 

15 

William  Warner 

3 

10 

0 

Thomas  Segrave  . . 

1 

6 

Richard  Coz.. 

3 

0 

0 

John  Dinke  . . 

2 

13 

d. 

y  Henry  Blane 

2 

10 

0 

Richard  Harrie 

5 

6 

4 

4 

Milton. 

0 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

s. 

0 

John  Scote  . .  . . 

2 

10 

0 

Thomas  Richards  . . 

1 

0 

8 

Mr.  John  Ellice 

4 

0 

0 

Susan  Mathew  . . 

3 

0 

L\nt<m,  Omh*. 


(To  ho  continued). 


W.  M.  Fauckb. 


*  Rector,  November  24th,  16S4,  and  continued  all  through  the  Commonwealth, 
although  he  had  to  resign  the  RMtory  of  Knapwell,  and  was  described  by  the 
Psrliamentary  Commissioners  of  1660  as  “a  very  weake  man.** 

t  Hyndes  had  been  here  since  Henry  VIII. 

^  A  wealthy  yeoman.  In  1666  he  had  220  acres  of  growing  com  in  Melboura 
fields.  His  descendant,  about  60  years  later,  purchased  Uie  Manors  of  Argentinea 
and  Trayles. 

f  The  Ayloffes,  an  Essex  family,  became  connected  with  Melboura  by  the 
marriage  of  Hir  William,  the  first  Baronet,  with  the  heiress  of  John  Sterne,  of 
Malton,  who  brought  as  her  portion  the  Manor  of  Shene,  in  Meldreth.  James 
Ayloffe,  brother  of  Benjamin,  leased  the  Rectory  and  Bury  Manor  from  the  Dean 
and  Chapter  of  Ely.  In  1660,  Guiccardine  Ayloffe,  Mnt.,  of  Marv  Savoy,  bought 
the  Bury  Manor  of  the  'rrusteM  for  Sale  of  Lands  of  Deans  and  Chapters,  Ac.,  for 
6816.  16«.  {Clou  Roll,  1651,  part  49,  No.  12). 

I  Farmed  the  impropriate  Rectory,  which  waa  leased  to  John  Hagwer,  of  Bourn. 
His  circumstances  must  have  improvM  since  the  time  of  the  forced  loan,  tat  then 
he  was  returned  as  too  poor  to  pay. 


XUM 


96 


THK  BAST  ANOLIAB  ;  OR, 


REPLY.  j 

Ebttlb  of  Suffolk  (vol.  x.,  p.  63). — From  Layham  ehurehyard:— 

(1)  John  Kettle,  gent.,  1 9th  December,  1794,  aged  71 ;  (2)  Margaret,  \ 

wife  of  John  Kettle,  gent.,  30th  June.  1820,  aged  73;  (3)  John  < 

Kettle,  8th  March,  1826,  aged  50;  (4)  Sarah,  relict  of  John  Taylor  |  ( 
Hicks,  Esq.,  late  of  Cliattisham  Place,  and  daughter  of  John  Kettle,  |  < 
Esq.,  and  Margaret,  his  wife  of  Nether  Bury  Hall  in  this  parish,  ^ 
18th  November,  1856,.  aged  75  ;  (5)  James  Kettle  Norman,  of  Nether-  |  ^ 
bury  Hall,  25th  December,  1882,  aged  73;  (6)  James  Kettle,  son  of  j  J 
George  and  Elizabeth  Norman,  18th  July,  1883,  aged  28.  From  i  - 
Athhotking  churchyard : — Samuel  Kettle  Garnham,  28th  January,  j  ^ 
1812,  aged  17.  From  HaUttcoith  churchyard: — (1)  Rebecca,  wife  of  f 
Guitton  Kettle,  November,  1834,  aged  49;  (2)  Anna,  wife  of  William 
Kittle,  September,  1827,  aged  63.  j  ^ 

Charles  Partkidoe.  j  ' 

Obubra  Hill,  Cron  Biter,  1  ^ 

Southern  Nigeria.  j 


QUERIES.  [ 

Hawes  Family  of  Walsham-lb- Willows,  Suffolk.  Portraits.  1 
— Can  anyone  give  me  information  respecting  a  collection  of  portraits  g 
(oil  pictures)  of  this  family,  which  was  said  to  be  in  existence  about  E 
the  year  1854?  At  that  date  a  Beccles  medical  man  (long  since  |l 
dead)  spoke  of  having  seen  the  portraits  in  question.  The  Hawes  I 
family  were  land  owners  in  Walsham-le-Willows  from  the  time  of  I 
Edward  III.  up  to  the  middle  of  the  eighteenth  century.  Has  any-  I 
one  now  living  seen  these  portraits  or  any  of  them,  and  if  so,  where  ?  jl 

Walshah. 


Pewter  Stoup  or  Baptismal  Basok  (?). — In  the  course  of  some  I 
notes  by  Mr.  0.  P.  Allix  on  the  restored  Church  of  St.  Mary,  Swafi-  | 
ham  Prior,  Cambs,  mention  was  made  of  an  "  original  pewter  stoup,”  I 
having  a  handle  upon  which  is  engraved  ”  Sts  Marie.”  The  “stoup"  I 
was  some  time  since  found  among  other  disused  church  goods,  and  is  u 
now  said  to  have  been  “restored  to  it»  place  on  the  iouth  tcall  of  the 
Sanctuary."  Is  there  any  evidence  that  a  church  possessing  such 
remarkable  stone  work  contented  itself  with  a  “  pewter  stoup  ”  ?  Is 
it  not  far  more  likely  that  the  “  stoup  ”  is  really  a  baptismal  bason, 
similar  in  character  to  the  examples  already  noted  in  the  £att  Anglian 
(vol.  ix.,  133,  181,  341.;  vol.  x.,  79).?  What  authority  is  there  for 
stating  that  “  its  place  ”  is  “  the  south  wall  of  the  Sanctuary  ”  ? 

8.P.O. 


il 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


97 


THE  VISIONS  OF  EICHAED  ALLINGTON. 

The  last  testament  of  Eichard  Allington  of  Lincoln’s  Inn,  son  of 
the  elder  Sir  Giles  Allington  of  Horsheath  in  Cambridgeshire,  and  his 
dying  confession  give  a  vivid  insight  into  the  mental  workings  of  a 
devout  and  cultured  man  in  the  early  days  of  Queen  Elizabeth.  They 
are  almost  too  sacred  for  mere  antiquarian  reading.  But  the  light 
which  they  throw  upon  the  religious  thought  of  the  country,  at  a  time 
when  the  evolution  of  the  Church  of  England,  as  we  now  see  it,  was 
almost  completed,  appeals  alike  to  the  historian  and  the  theologian. 
The  physician  too,  the  psychologist,  and  the  student  of  human  nature 
will  find  much  to  excite  their  interest  in  the  quaintly  worded  but  most 
graphic  narrative. 

!  Eichard  Allington  was  of  distinguished  ancestry.  Sir  Giles,  his 
father,  was  knighted  at  Windsor  by  Henry  the  Eighth  on  that  Trinity 
I  Sunday  when  Charles  the  German  Emperor  was  made  Knight  of  the 
j  Garter.  Sir  Giles  Allington,  the  younger,  his  grand-nephew,  married 
a  grand-daughter  of  the  great  Lord  Burleigh.  Eichard  Allington’s 
wife  was  sister  to  Sir  William  Cordell,  Master  of  the  Eolls.  His  social 
position  and  his  learning  would,  by  themselves  alone,  give  interest  to 
his  will,  evidently  written  by  his  own  hand.  In  the  transcript  in  the 
ancient  folio  at  Somerset  House,  attention  is  at  once  attracted  to  it  by 
the  drawing  of  a  crucifix  on  the  margin  of  the  page.  The  reason  for 
this  device  is  clearly  explained  when  we  find  the  testator  assuring  land 
to  Dr.  Scott,  late  Bishop  of  Chester;  Mr.  Feckenliam,  late  Abbott  of 
Westminster;  Dr.  Cole,  late  Dean  of  St.  Paul’s;  and  Mr.  Boxall,  late 
Secretary  to  Queen  Mary,  to  be  devoted  to  some  foundation  for  the 
“  lively  remembrance  of  the  passion  and  death  of  Christ,  especially  in 
giving  thanks  for  our  redemption  thereby.”  And  then  he  adds : 
“For  I,  moste  vile  and  vnworthie  wretche,  in  mine infanciehave  received 
such  ineffable,  peculier  and  speciall  compfort  by  a  picture  of  the  crosse 
and  Christe  nailed  thereon  appearing  to  me  in  speciall  wise  and 
manner,  sundry  tymes  at  one  place  and  always  in  one  sort  as  before, 
that  I  had  never  yett  been  able  to  have  given  codigne  thanckes  for  the 
same.” 

These  words  were  written  in  June,  1561.  The  confession  which 
follows,  which  records  something  of  his  delirium  as  well  as  his 
religious  life,  was  made  on  the  22nd  of  November  of  the  same  year, 
“  aboute  viii  of  the  cloke  at  night,”  before  a  number  of  the  clergy 
whom  he  had  called  together  “  to  discharge  his  conscience  and  yeilde 
himself  whollie  to  Allmighty  God.” 

“  Masters,”  he  began,  “  seeinge  I  most  nedes  dye,  suffer  me  to 
speke  vntill  I  be  deade.  For  Christ’s  passion’s  sake  praye  continually 
for  me  uppon  your  knees.  Pray,  pray.  Praye.” 

“Nev'  man  hathe  had  more  especial  tokens  of  God’s  singular 
graces,  at  often  and  sundrie  times  shewed  vnto  him,  as  I  have 
hade,  and  so  little  regarded  them  as  I  have  done.  When  I  was  a 
childe  I  was  brought  vp  w**"  a  good  father  and  mother,  whome  ye 
kuowe,  who  dulie  vsed  vs  children  vertuislie,  and  kept  vs  for  one  hower 
or  two  everie  dale  &  moruinge  to  praiers  ;  and  then  when  praiers  was 

li  u 


98 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAE  ;  OR, 


done  to  o'  bokes.  And  afterwarde  we  were  wonte  to  goe  to  playe  into 
an  orchard  nere  adjoyninge  ynto  my  father's  house,  where  as  often 
times  for  the  space  of  thre  yere  there  appered  vnto  me,  in  a  thike  hedge, 
a  goodlie  &  a  comfortable  vision.  I  well  remembre,  frome  tenne  yeree 
olde  vnto  thirtene,  there  appeared  to  me  the  verie  image  of  o'  savio* 
Jhesus  Christe,  as  he  suffred  his  blessed  passion  vppon  the  cros 
image  appered  vnto  me  veri  livelie,  and  that  veri  often,  so  loving  k 
tend'lie  as  ever  any  eartheli  man  would  desier  or  wisshe,  w'**  I  did  eu 
more  kepe  veri  secrete  vnto  my  selfe,  io^  my  great  comfort  &  consolcSn. 
Then  not  longe  aft'  I  came  to  London  &  at  the  last  was  maried  ;  sith 
w'*"  tyme,  I  assure  you,  I  haue  offended  my  Ijord  God  &  Saiou^  Christ 
so  sure  &  manifold,  by  committing  so  abhominable  vsurie,  that  I  am 
afraid  I  shalbe  condemned  eternallie.  Indede  one  great  oceasion 
was  because  I  never  gave  my  selfe  to  praye.  Thus  my  consiens 
streving  w***  my  selfe  brought  me  to  SImlis  (numberless)  troubles  of 
mind,  so  that  nev'  man  was  in  suche  case.  And  being  in  this  great 
treble,  at  the  last  the  selfesame  vision  appered  vnto  me  agayn,  and 
put  me  in  remembranc  agayne  of  God’s  speciall  grace  before  shewed 
vnto  me ;  and  also  of  many  other  things ;  willing  me  to  leve  of  the 
worlde  &  the  busines  therof  and  not  to  trouble  my  self  so  mouch 
there  w^*"  all.  Sithen  the  w'**  tyme  I  assure  you  I  have  gone  aboute  to 
leve  of  all  trobles  of  the  law  &  mine  office  also  &  not  to  folowe  the 
studie  of  the  lawe  againe  ;  and  so  to  haue  leved  more  quietlie  w^  that 
that  o'  Lord  hade  send  me.  Nowe  good  masters  praye  stille  &  I  will 
shew  e  you  veri  strange  things.  The  second  night  aft'  I  fell  sick,  being 
in  my  bed,  brode  awake,  and  as  I  thought  all  my  folkes  being  aslepe 
here  in  my  chamb'  there  appeared  vnto  me  fearfull  things  like  to 
theses  poppets,  they  ran  vp  and  downe  my  chamber  &  at  last,  being , 
merveluse  sore  afraide,  they  came  vnto  me  ronde  about  my  bede  i 
vppon  my  bed,  polled  me  and  tossed  me,  &  so  vexed  me  as  I  was 
never  in  my  life  so  sore  trobled.  I  was  almost  brought  to  vtf 
despaircbn.  Yet  at  the  last,  remembrnge  w“*  my  selfe  the  goods 
grases  that  my  Lord  and  Savio'  had  shewed  vnto  me,  I  sayed  vnto 
myself.  O  good  Lord  what  do  theis  things  meane?  What  should  I 
do  ?  With  that  there  apered  vnto  me  my  vision  agayne,  w'**  shewed 
vnto  me  in  writing  all  the  vsurie  that  ever  I  had  recevid  in  all  my  life 
so  playne  that  I  red  it,  &  indeed  the  sommes  were  true  g  named  everi 
man  of  whome  I  had  recevid  it :  as  of  one  M'  Wilecok  this  moche, 
of  my  Lorde  Scrope  thus  moche,  of  M'  ffynnes  thous  moche, 
also  what  1  had  recevid  of  Spaniards,  ffrenche  men  &  Italians 
and  suche  like.  At  the  last  I  made  answer  vnto  my  vision  &  said, 
O  God  all  theis  things  are  true  which  shall  I  do  ?  Then  my  vision 
made  answer  and  comforted  me,  comanding  me  first  to  pay  all  the 
vsuri  money  againe  to  everye  man  as  he  had  shewed  me ;  w'**  came 
to  an  x'viij*' ;  and  for  the  vi‘‘  w'**  I  had  received  of  Spaniards,  Italians, 
&  ffrenche  men,  he  willid,  by  cause  I  kiiowe  not  where  they  dwell, 
to  geve  it  to  poore  psons  &  good  men  that  were  in  prison.  Masters  I 
cannot  tell  of  what  religion  you  be  of  that  be  here,  nor  I  care  not, 
for  I  speak  the  truth ;  and  indeed  I  have  geven  the  some  all  redi  and 
will  paye  everi  man  as  my  vision  comannded  me,  and  do  intende,  God 


M 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


99 


willing,  to  send  for  them  if  I  leve  so  longe.  If  not  I  will  desire  the 
M'  of  the  Holies  that  he  will  see  it  discharg  and  paied  oute,  that  my 
soule  may  here  no  perell  for  it.  Then  my  vision  comforted  me  more 
&  more  and  wold  shewe  me  ix  psames  w'**  if  I  did  saye  everi  day  I 
should  neu'  siune  againe  mortall ;  for  1  assure  you  I  have  not  vsed 
myself  to  prayer  as  I  was  woul  to  do,  nor  nev"^  went  to  the  Churche  at 
tyme  of  comon  prayer  bycause  my  prayers  did  condem  my  consiens. 
The  psalmes  were  those :  ‘  Miserere  mei  deus,’  ‘  beati  omnes,  qui 
timent,’  ‘  Domiiiu,  ad  Domncoh  con  tribula,’  ‘  Leuaui  oculos  meos 
in  montem,’  ‘Nisi  quia  dominus  erat  in  nobis,’  ‘qui  confidant  in 
Domino,’  ‘iudica  me  deus  &  disserne  causas  meas,’  ‘illumina  oculos 
meos,’  ‘  Domine  non  est  Exalte  cor  meas’;  &  so  my  vision  left  me 
sith  w'^'‘  tyme  I  have  had  as  moch  quietnes  as  any  man  can  wisshe  & 
have  seene  suche  comfortable  sights  as  nether  hart  can  thinke  or 
tongue  can  express.  Nowe  good  S'  John  saye  the  vj“”  psalmes  and 
Due  Jhu  Xpe  w^  gloriosa  passio.  He  said  (these)  him  selfe ;  and 
then  he  thought  he  should  have  died ;  but  revived  againe  and  fell  to 
praing  still  and  gave  him  self  wholie  to  quietnes.” 

Hichard  Allington  died  the  next  day.  This  his  confession  is 
recorded  in  one  of  the  Harleian  MSS.,  with  much  more  that  he  said 
and  did  during  his  last  hours.  It  is  solemn  reading.  The  psalms 
he  repeated  have  afforded  consolation  to  many  a  sufferer  during  the 
last  nineteen  centuries.  His  wife,  a  wealthy  heiress  who  survived  him 
very  many  years  and  made  no  second  marriage,  erected  a  beautiful 
and  costly  monument  to  his  memory  in  the  Bolls  chapel,  where  he 
was  interred,  and  was  herself  buried  by  his  side.  When  it  was 
demolished  a  year  or  two  ago — the  tomb,  and  the  vault  beneath  it, 
were  left  untouched — and  were  incorporated  with  the  newer  section 
of  the  Kecord  Office  recently  erected.  He  left  three  daughters, 
one  of  whom  married  Sir  John  Savage,  and  another  Sir  John 
Stanhope.  Of  what  nature  was  the  usury  he  so  greatly  deplores? 
He  had  but  “  taken  of  needle  men  the  more  somme  for  longer  dales.” 
And  what,  it  may  be  asked,  were  his  theological  leanings,  as  evidenced 
by  the  documents  we  have  quoted?  We  think  it  may  be  answered 
that  they  were  those  of  one  who  accepted  alike  historical  Christianity 
and  such  moderate  reformation  as  the  times  were  bringing  about.  In 
the  colloquies  which  accompany  his  confession  he  deprecated  prayers 
to  the  Saints.  He  cared  not  whether  the  clergy  who  stood  around 
him  were  of  Marian  or  Elizabethan  leanings.  Only  he  bid  them  say 
(apparently)  the  penitential  psalmes  and  other  ancient  devotions — 
and  his  last  words  to  them,  if  one  may  so  gather,  were  ‘‘  Pray, 
pray,  praye.”  _  j  j  Muskett. 

A  CALENDAR  OF  FEET  OF  FINES  FOR  ESSEX.  No.  LXV. 

Easter,  7  James  I. 

1 .  Thomas  Bowyer  Ric.  Franck  arm.  1  Sir  Leventhorpe  Franck 
knt.  pasture  in  Hatfeild  Bradooke  ais  Kings  Hatfeild. 

2.  Qeo.  Frost  1  W™  Bragg  land  in  Sible  Heningham. 

H  2 


100  THE  EAST  AHGLIAH  ;  OR, 

3.  Daniel  Sparkhawke  John  Harrys  Johane  his  wife  mess. 
T;  land  in  Great  Bentley. 

4.  Thomas  Chatterton,  Gilbert  Jeale  T;  John  Webb  Cecilia  his 
wife  mess.  T;  land  in  Stanford  le  Hope. 

5.  Robert  Warren  clerk  Geo.  Warren  *1  Bennett  hie  wife  mess, 
t  land  in  Mannyngtree. 

6.  Tho.  Dixie  John  Debnam  Mary  hie  wife  mess,  land  in 
Wakes  Colne. 

7.  W™  Wyseman  1  John  Hatchman  1  Judith  his  wife  mess, 
land  in  Goldanger. 

8.  Thomas  Robinson  Thomas  Garrold  Alice  his  wife. 

9.  W“  Hewes  sen.  John  Heughes  ats  Hewes  1  Letice  his  wife 
mess.  ^  land  in  Southminster. 

10.  Tho.  Luther  Ric.  Stane  land  in  High  Onger. 

11.  Katherine  Preston  widow  John  Skeetton  Petronell  his 
wife  mess,  land  in  Dagenham. 

1 2.  Ralph  Balye  \  Sir  Barnard  Whitestones  knt.  Mary  his 
wife  land  in  Woodford. 

13.  Michael  Twytt,  Robert  Bence  t  Tho.  Twytt  Margaret  his 
wife  mess.  *1  land  in  Harwich. 

14.  Tho.  Cox  John  Wright  mess.  *1  land  in  Mannyngtree. 

15.  Tho.  Tendringe,  Edward  Hasteler,  Ric.  Radley  John 
Noke  T;  Johane  his  wife  land  in  Great  Hallingbury  ats  Hallingbury 
Morley. 

16.  Samuel  Treon,  John  Treon  T;  Sebastian  Harvey  Alderman  of 
London  Mary  his  wife  mess.  land  in  Barkinge. 

17.  Simon  Egerton  Henry  Brownwynter  moiety  of  a  mess,  t 
land  in  Upton  Ham  ats  West  Ham. 

18.  Edward  Willowes  W”  Willowes  Margaret  his  wife  mess, 
land  in  Ashdon. 

19.  Ric.  Banes  George  Glascocke  Sarah  his  wife  land  in 
Bobingworth  ats  Bobnnor  ats  Bobinger. 

20.  W”  Baker  T;  John  Reve  \  Mary  his  wife  mess,  land  in 
Halsted. 

21.  Ralph  Coker  Ric.  Hopkyn  *1  Margaret  his  wife  land  in 
Woodham  Mortymer. 

22.  Robert  Gosnold  Henry  Creake  1  Johann  his  wife  mess, 
in  Ardley. 

23.  Tho.  Plume  jun.  Tho.  Plume  sen.  Eliz.  his  wife  mess,  t 
land  in  Little  Bardfield. 

24.  Robert  Leffingwell  Francis  Daniell  arm.  mess.  land  in 
Hockley. 

25.  John  Threplow  George  Tayler  Margaret  his  wife  mess, 
in  Great  Chesterford.  W arrants  against  heirs  of  Tho.  Tayler  the  grand¬ 
father  t  Thomas  Tayler  the  father  of  said  George. 

26.  Henry  Carter  T;  John  Luckin  Manor  of  Fulchers  ats  Fowchers 
ats  Collyn  Fowchers  with  mess,  land  rent  in  Good  Easter,  Margaret 
Rooding,  Rooding  Masye  Roxwell. 

27.  Tho.  Adam W”  Thurgar  Anne  his  wife  shops  in  Walden. 

28.  John  Addams  "X  Nicholas  Collon  advowson  of  IJttle  Laver. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


101 


29.  Robert  Wood  1  John  Goddard  Anne  his  wife  mess.  land 
in  Little  Baddowe. 

30.  Tho.  Owen  1  Geo.  Hulke  *1  Anne  his  wife’t  W“  Hulke  mess, 
land  in  Little  Thurrock. 

31.  Elizeus  Dobson  *1  W“  Eccles  1  Dorothy  his  wife  mess,  in 
Baylighe. 

32.  John  Bedell  1  Edward  Amcott  Johane  his  wife  mess.  1 
land  in  Sible  Hinyngham,  Caste  Hinyngham  Maplested. 

33.  W“  Bennett  T;  Peter  Morgan  T;  Elizabeth  his  wife  mess. 
land  in  Laver  Magdelen. 

34.  Jone  Wyndle  t  W“  Snowe  Elizabeth  his  wife  mess. 
land  in  Wytham. 

35.  George  Golding  1  Francis  Brighouse  Dorothy  his  wife 
mess,  t  land  in  Barkinge.  Warrant  against  heirs  of  W“  Nuttbrowne. 

36.  Tho.  Adam  "I  W“*  Wilson  ’X  Eliz.  his  wife  land  in  Walden. 

37.  John  Woodthorpe  jun.  Hugh  Isaacke  W™  Isaacke  mess, 
t  land  in  Lamarshe  'I  Qreat  Henney. 

38.  Robert  Mildemay  t  Agness  his  wife  Tho.  Mildemay  arm. 
t  Elizabeth  his  wife  mess.  land  in  Terlinge,  Fayersted,  Boreham, 
Hatfeild  Peverale,  Hatfeild  Brodocke  ats  Hatfeild  Regis  Wytham. 

39.  Edward  Fage  Ralph  Howe  Clemence  his  wife  mess.  'X 
land  in  Brentwood. 

40.  John  Crowe  1  Francis  CoUyn  Prudence  his  wife  land  in 
Rozwell. 

End  of  Part  I.,  Easter,  7  James  I. 


Easter,  7  Jaues  I.  Part  II. 

1.  Sir  Henry  Poole  knt.,  Tho.  Myldemay  T;  Eustace  Darcy  arm. 
Manors  of  Tolshust  ats  Tolshunt  Darcy  1  Verley  ats  Verlies  with 
mess,  land  1  rents,  franck  pledge  in  Tolshunt  Knights,  Great 
Tolshunt,  Gouldhanger  ats  Sawcotts  ats  Sallcotts,  Tiptery  1  Tollesbury, 
also  Rectory  of  Tolshunt  Tregoose  ats  Tolshunt  Darcy. 

2.  Tho.  Foster,  Tho.  Ha  ward  1  Richard . T  Jane  his  wife 

mess.  1  land  in  West  Bargholt  1  Fordham. 

3.  John  Longmer  "I  Helen  his  wife  1  W“  Glascocke  *1  Fortune 
his  wife  land  in  Etmt  1  West  Hannyngfeild  1  Sandon. 

4.  Tho.  Parsons  'X  Robert  Mason  gent.  1  Margaret  his  wife 
mess.  1  land  in  West  Thorock. 

5.  W“  Stubbinge,  W®  King  *1  Robert  Unwin  ats  Onion  1 
Margaret  his  wife  mess.  'I  land  in  Birdbruoke. 

6.  Francis  Raymond,  Henry  Raymond  sen.  Silvester  Barker  1 
Ann  his  wife  mess,  in  Great  Dunmowe. 

7.  Jeremiah  Rogers'!  Ric.  Freman  1  Johane  his  wife  mess.  1 
pasture  in  Ramsdene  Bellowes. 

8.  W“  Plomer  arm.,  Francis  Pomforth  1  Robert  Sorrell  mess. 
1  pasture  in  Stebbing  1  Old  Salinge. 

9.  Henry  Raymond,  Edward  Barker  1  Mary  his  wife  1  Silvester 
Barker  mess.  \  land  in  Great  Dunmowe. 


102 


THX  BAST  AirOIJAN;  OB, 


10.  Gilbert  White,  James  Cooke  1  Cecilia  his  wife 't  Mary 
Bastwicke  mess.  1  land  in  Boreham. 

11.  John  Tendring  Mowse  Watson  mess.  1  land  in  Ardleigh. 

12.  Stephen  Hatch,  John  Woods  *1  Henry  Woods  1  Mary  his 
wife  mess.  land  in  King’s  Hatfeild  als  Hatfeild  Brodeoke. 

13.  Henry  Osborne  Tho.  Browne  Johane  his  wife  land  in 
Dagenham. 

14.  Alexander  Prescot  jun.  Anthony  Berners  als  Barners  arm. 
Manor  of  Thobye  T;  Scite  of  Priory  of  8.  Ijeonard  of  Thobye  with 
mess.  %  lands  in  Ynge  Mountney  als  Mountneysinge  Wastells,  Rome 
als  Homeland,  Mowland  als  Little  Molland,  Warley  Ingrasse. 

1 5.  John  Vintner  W“  Cooke  'I  Margaret  his  wife  mess,  in 
Great  Dunmowe.  Warrant  against  heirs  of  Tho.  Glascocke  dec. 
father  of  Margaret. 

16.  Henry  Draper,  Tho.  Hoskyns.  John  Collen  sen.  John 
Collen  jun.  Manor  of  Oaks  with  mess.  lands  in  High  Laver. 

17.  John  Collman  *1:  Sir  Francis  Herris  knt.  Eliz.  his  wife 
land  in  South  Mynster  als  Southmyster  'I  Bumeham. 

18.  Geo.  Pompkrett,  John  Clark  1;  Jane  his  wife  John  Hutt 
Matilda  his  wife  land  in  Great  Dimmowe. 

19.  John  Blanche  John  Seaman  LL.D.,  Elizabeth  his  wife 
mess,  in  Chelmsford. 

20.  Edmund  Pirton,  Edmund  Birte  *1  Peter  Latham  Manor  of 
Lachindon  Barnes  als  Purleighe  Barnes. 

21.  Christopher  Sidey,  W“  Payne  Eliz.  his  wife  *1  Tho. 
Smith  messuage  \  land  in  Alphamston  Lamarshe  "X  Great  Hennye. 

22.  Tho.  Simpner Geo.  Colte  arm.  Mary  his  wife  Manor  of 
SewaUes  als  Sewells  als  Sawelles  als  Weldes  with  lands  rent  in 
Herlowe  Weld  als  Northweld  als  Northweld  Bassett  *1  Laufare 
Maugdelyn  als  Maudlyn  Laver. 

23.  *Tobias  Wood  Sir  Thomas  Hewit  mess,  land  in  Leighton 
in  Walthamstowe. 

24.  Henry  Jenour,  Ric.  Butterwicke  1  Francis  Browne  Manor 
of  Radwynter  Grange  als  Badwynter  Graenge  with  mess,  land  t 
rent. 

25.  *JefErey  Nightingale,  Robert  Pigge  Nicholas  Pigge  land 
in  Newport  t  Wydington. 

26.  Tho.  Norden  Martin  Trott,  Rectory  of  Nasinge. 

27.  John  Stotheridge  jun.  *1  Robert  Kyrbye  T;  Mary  his  wife 
mess,  land  1;  rent  in  West  Tilbury,  East  Tilbury  Chadwell,  Chadwell 

Homdon. 

28.  Eustace  Blatche,  John  Feild  ‘I  Ann  his  wife  Edward 
Lewen  Johane  his  wife  mess.  *1  land  in  Harvard  Stock  als  Hertford 
Stock  High  Easter. 

29.  James  Chapleyne,  John  Riddesdale  als  Loker,  Edmund 
Hacke  \  Edward  Altham  %  Margaret  his  wife  pasture  1  wood  in 
Sible  Henningham  Gosfyld. 

30.  Matthew  Alden  als  Bryant  T;  Ann  his  wife,  John  Drewe 
Margaret  his  wife  Ric.  Frenche  Ellen  his  wife  mess,  in  Ballingdon 
als  Ballydon. 


R0TB8  AND  QUBBIB8,  XTO. 


103 


31.  Thomas  Tomlinson  gent,  Robert  Fawkner  t  Margaret  his 
irife  mess  land  in  Horndon  upon  the  Hill, 

32.  W“  Cornewall,  John  Osborne  als  Osbourne  t  Mary  his  wife 
‘t  Reginald  Scott  Benedict  his  wife  mess,  in  Boreham. 

83.  W™  Pytt,  Peter  Moyes,  Sir  Edward  Barrett  knt.  John 
Leveson  mess,  land  in  Alveley  Wennyngton. 

34.  *Henry  Smith,  W™  Smith  Sir  Robert  Wrothe  knt.  Manor 
of  Ashewell  Hall  with  mess.  land  in  Fynchingfylde,  Shalforde. 
Wethersfylde  *1  Great  Berdfylde. 

35.  *Robert  Springnell  *1;  Sir  Tho.  Gardenir  knt.  Jane  his 
wife  Manors  of  Great  and  Little  Maldon  with  mess,  land  rent  in 
Hasleighe,  Purleighe,  Woodham  Mortymer  Woodham  Water. 

36.  *Tho.  Roberds,  Tho.  Wood,  Giles  Wood  clerk,  Gregory 
Hubberde  1  Mary  his  wife  Eliz,  Wood  in  Boreham,  Rayne,  Felsted, 
Great  Salinge  l)unmowe. 

37.  Robert  Kyngg,  Tho.  Genyns  Helen  his  wife  'I.  Robert 
Genyns  mess.  'I  land  in  Laver  Magdelen,  Harlowe  Northweald 
Basset. 

38.  Tho.  Brand,  Edward  Brand,  John  Eliot  Sir  Tho.  Eliot  knt. 
mess.  land  in  Bromefeild. 

39.  *John  Wood,  W“  Cook  sen.  *1  Margaret  his  wife  t  W“ 
Glascock  mess.  land  in  Great  Dunmowe  High  Rothing. 

40.  Geo.  Gilberd  John  Dixe  1  Mary  his  wUe  mess,  in 
Colchester. 

End.  of  Ptui  II.,  Easter,  7  James  I. 

•  From  Notes  of  Fines. 


WILL  OF  WILLTAM  HASTE  OF  NORWICH,  WORSTED 
WEAVER,  A.D.  1539. 

In  THE  NAME  OF  GoD.  Amen.  The  16“*  daye  of  the  monyth  of 
January  1535. 

I  Wyllyam  Haste  Cytezyn  of  Norwiche  worsted  wever,  hole  of 
mynde  and  good  Remembraunce  being  God  be  lowdyde,  at  Norwiche 
aforeseide  make  my  Testament  and  last  wille  in  this  wise  following : — 
ffirst  I  bequeith  my  Soule  to  Almightie  God,  to  our  blessede  Ladie 
Seint  Marye,  Seynt  Edmunde  myn  Advowe,  and  to  all  the  holy 
Sayntes  in  heven,  and  my  bodie  to  be  buried  in  the  Church  of  Seynt 
Edmunde  in  the  Ghapell  of  Oure  Ladye  under  the  fioote  of 
Seynt  Eateryn,  unto  whose  high  aulter  for  my  Tithes  ofEerynge 
and  my  Dueties  neglygently  forgotten  6*  8^. 

Itm.  I  will  have  any  honest  prest  seculier  to  sing  and  praye  for 
my  soule,  and  the  soules  of  my  wyves,  and  all  my  frendes  soules 
in  the  Chapell  of  Oure  Ladye  by  the  space  of  two  yeres,  he  to 
have  for  his  stypende  yerlye  8  markes  6'  8"*. 

Itm.  To  Robert  Thorpe  pshe  clerke  of  pshe  of  Seynt  Edmunde 


104 


TUB  SA8T  AKQLIAN  ;  OK, 


.  aforesaid  in  augementyng  his  wage  6*  S'*  so  y*  he  continue  in 
the  same  office. 

To  eache  anker  and  ancres  in  Norwich  12^. 

To  the  {su»h  ?)  of  Normans  1 2*. 

To  the  House  of  Lazers  by  and  wythout  the  gate  of  Norwiche 
aforesaide  12^. 

To  the  Prisoners  in  the  Castell  2*. 

To  the  Prisoners  in  the  Guylde  Halle  2*. 

To  the  Reparere  of  the  Churche  of  Seynt  Edmunde  aforesaide  40*. 
Itm.  I  bequethe  a  Cope  and  a  vestment  of  woursted  w***  all  yt  y* 
necessarie  to  the  saide  vestment  belongyng  for  my  preest  to  syng 
in,  and  after  his  tyme  to  remayne  to  the  Church  there. 

To  eache  of  my  godchildren  12**. 

To  eache  preest  beyng  at  my  Durge  and  Masse  the  daye  of  my 
buryall  4"*. 

To  each  parishe  clarke  2'*. 

Itm.  I  will  yt  everye  weke  upon  the  same  daye  of  my  Deptying,  yf 
yt  maye  evelle  the  nyxte  daye  following,  durying  the  space  of  one 
hole  yere  have  five  poore  folke  by  myu  Executryce  assigned  to 
praye  for  my  soule  and  to  eache  of  them  1*. 

To  my  daughter  Marye,  20  markes. 

To  my  daughter  Elyzabeth*  20  markes  yf  yt  may  be  borne. 

Itm.  I  will  yt  myn  executryce  do  distribute  to  poore  people  in  the 
evyn  of  the  Nativytie  of  Cure  Lord  Jhs  Christe  wche  cum’  in  the 
pshe  of  Seynte  Edmunde  aforesede  20*. 

To  my  brother  John  Haste,  a  goune  and  20*  in  moneye. 

To  Edmunde  Hart  a  goune. 

To  John  Shireman  a  goune  the  whiche  is  furrede  w***  bridge. 

To  the  pson  of  Seynte  Edmunde  keping  within  the  pshe  and  reside 
not  out  the  same,  doing  his  dutie,  yerely  6*  S'*  by  the  space  of 
fiyve  yeres. 

Itm.  I  wyll  yt  Margerie  my  wyff  shall  have  all  the  landes  in  Morley 
in  See  symple  for  to  give  and  sell  according  to  the  state  therof  made 
unto  her  bering  oute  the  paymentes  yerly  and  yf  she  will  sell  yt  I 
will  Thomas  my  sonne  to  have  oute  of  that  moneye  100  markes. 
Residue  I  bequethe  unto  the  good  Disposyen  of  myn  executrice  to  take 
my  debtes  and  paye  my  Debtes  and  to  pforme  this  my  Testament 
and  last  will  and  other  deedes  of  pytie  and  charytie  to  the  moste 
pleasure  of  God  and  pffitte  to  my  soule. 

The  sayde  Margerie  my  welbeloved  wyfie  to  be  myne  Executrice  and 
Maister  Thomas  Godsalve  the  elder  to  be  supervisor  to  whome  I 
putte  all  my  truste  to  be  good  to  my  wyfie  and  to  my  children  and 
to  all  my  Srendes,  and  I  gyve  hym  for  hie  labours  the  beet  pece 
of  Worsted  in  my  housse. 

•  This  Elizabeth  described  ( Harl.  Vitit.)  as  “  daughter  of . Haste  of 

Norwich,  and  widow  of  Wyndham,”  married  Laurence  Ball  in  1559.  He  died  in 
1561,  and  soon  after  the  widow  married  Thomas  Blunt.  She  subsequently  married 
Alexander  Nowell,  the  famous  Dean  of  St.  Paul’s,  who  in  his  will  speaks  of  her  in 
high  terms.  She  died  circa  1612,  but  there  is  nothing  in  her  will  to  connect  her 
with  the  Hastes  of  Norwich.  It  would  be  interesting  to  gather  further  particulars. 


NOTES  AND  HUSKIES,  SIC. 


105 


And  yf  this  mj  Testament  and  last  will  be  not  made  according  to  the 

Lawe  I  wille  yt  it  be  refourmyd  by  the  saide  Maister  Godsalve  as 

he  thiiiketh  most  best  at  his  discre^n. 

Witnesses,  Signed  and  sealed. 

Thomas  Osborne. 

John  Shereman. 

Wyth  others. 

This  Testament  and  last  Wyll  at  the  desire  of  the  saide  Testatoure 
was  opynly  red  on  the  Vigille  of  Seynte  Kateryne  the  yere  of  oure 
Lord  God  1539,  and  by  the  saide  Testatour  being  then  of  good  and 
pfycte  remembraunce  confessde  Knowlegile  and  afflrmyde  to  be  his 
full  Testament  and  last  Will  in  all  things  above  expressde,  ther  being 
pseut  Thomas  Godsalue  the  elder,  Elyzabeth  his  wyfe,  Wyllym  Myngay 
and  others. 

And  ffurther  the  saide  Testatour  declared  in  the  ^sence  aforesaid 
that  he  had  caused  to  be  made  delyvered  sufficient  and  lawful  estate 
in  feoffamente  as  well  of  a  syngulair  his  laudes  ten  and  heryd  w^**  there 
appurt  in  Morley  aforesaid  as  also  of  his  house  w***  appurt  in  the  pshe 
of  Seynt  Edmunde  in  Norwiche  wherein  he  dwelleth  and  all  other  his 
tenenements  in  the  pshe  of  Seynte  George  in  Muspoole  in  Norwiche 
aforesaide  to  the  use  of  the  saide  Margerye  bis  wyfe  her  heires  and 
assignee  as  by  the  deedes  and  ffeuSemeutes  thereof  do  appere. 

Probate  granted  14“*  February  1539  to  Alexander  Mather, 
the  exor  of  Margerie  the  Relict  and  Executrix  now  defunct. 
[19  Cromwell  P.C.C.].  3  novBTOj,  Ball. 

South  Lawn,  ' 

Bithop'o  Stortford.  _ 


THE  LAW  OF  SETTLEMENT  IN  PARISHES. 

Curious  Procedure  in  regard  to  Hire  of  Labour. 

The  examination  of  individuals  by  Justices  of  the  Peace  with  a 
view  of  determining  the  precise  place  of  abode  or  legal  settlement  of 
migratory  folk,  formed  a  feature  of  the  old  Poor  Law  system  of  this 
country,  which  not  infrequently  displayed  a  side  of  much  singularity. 
Documents  of  this  byegone  period,  still  found  in  the  parish  chests  of 
our  country  parishes,  set  out  the  varying  conditions  under  which 
settlement  was  urged,  claimed,  or  enforced,  often  in  terms  that  seem 
unduly  harsh,  and  on  lines  that  have  some  appearance  of  inhumanity 
in  actual  working.  The  restraints  occasioned  by  the  ties  involved  by 
the  pursuit  of  an  industry  (which  gave  rise  to  the  phrase,  “  the  law  of 
settlement  impedes  the  freedom  of  labour  ”),  find  suitable  illustration 
in  the  paper  writing,  of  which  the  following,  deposited  with  a  few  other 
documents  relating  to  settlement  matters  in  the  church  chest  of 
Hampton,  Cambs,  is  a  copy. 

The  law  of  settlement  pressed  with  undue  severity  upon  labour, 
and  it  was  evidently  to  meet  such  cases  as  the  following  that  it  was 
urged  the  place  of  settlement  ought  to  be  determined  by  the  question 
of  occupation  rather  than  that  of  habitation. 


106 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OB, 


The  gaining  of  a  settlement  by  hiring  and  service  was  absolutely 
abolished  by  the  Poor  Law  Act  of  1 834. 

Camhridgethire. — The  Examon  of  Isaac  Norman  Lab'  now  living  in 
the  Parish  of  Bampton  in  the  said  County  touching  the  place 
of  his  legal  settlement  who  being  sworn  saith  upon  his 
oath — 

That  about  a  week  after  plough  Monday  before  last  he  was  let  by 
his  fiather  Thomas  Norman  to  hire  to  Stephen  Day  of  Oakington  in 
the  said  (bounty  ffarmer  to  serve  him  in  the  business  of  husbandry 
from  time  until  the  following  Michaelmas  which  service  he  performed 
and  that  a  few  days  before  Michaelmas  last  he  was  let  by  his  said 
fiather  to  the  said  Mr.  Day  for  one  shilling  and  S'*  week  for  a  month 
from  Michaelmas  and  50  shillings  from  that  time  until  the  next 
Michaelmas — that  about  May  last  he  received  one  pound  6*  of  his 
wages — that  about  a  fortnight  ago  his  master  called  him  into  the 
house  and  said  he  must  pay  him  away  because  he  should  not  belong 
to  the  Town — that  his  master  then  paid  him  3  or  4  and  20  shillings  as 
the  wages  due  to  him  up  to  that  time— that  he  wanted  more  money 
but  his  Master  would  not  pay  him  more  and  that  he  staid  3  days  after 
that  and  then  went  away  and  has  not  been  in  his  Master’s  service 
since. 

Sworn  the  1“  day  of  October  1 
1825.  Before  us  j 

)  Alex.  Cotton  ^ 

Signed  j  ^  p  Norman. 

[Endorsed — The  Examination  of  Isaac  Norman.] 


CAMBEIDGESHIBE  SUBSIDY  ROLLS.  No.  XXXI. 


Mr.  Henry  Blackwin 
Mrs.  Jackson  of  Lon¬ 
don 

Mr.  Henry  Sterne  . . 


•  William  Payment, 
clerk  . .  . , 

f  Mr.  Robert  Swan  . . 
John  Pate  . . 


Newmarket. 
£.  s.  d. 

1  10  0 


1  14  8 

2  10  0 


Mr.  John  Ince 
Mary  Balls,  widow 
Jeremy e  Garven 


Newton  {by  Cambridge). 
£.  *.  d. 


1  10  0 
6  0  0 
1  13  4 


John  Brown  . . 
Martha  Pryme,  widow 
William  Pettit 


£.  s.  d. 
2  0  0 
2  15  0 
2  0  0 


£.  s.  d. 
1  0  0 
2  0  0 
2  0  0 


•  Perhaps  he  was  a  minister  placed  here  by  order  of  the  Parliament.  Newton 
was  joined  with  Hauxton  for  ecclesiastical  purposes,  hut  the  Parliamentary  Com¬ 
missioners  reported  that  they  were  not  fit  to  be  united,  being  far  distant.  Thomas 
Lynsdell  was  Vicar  of  Hauxton  at  this  time. 

t  There  are  several  monuments  to  this  family  in  the  church.  The  male  line 
became  extinct  in  1727,  when  the  estates  passed  to  the  Stevensons. 


NOTBS  AND  QUSBIB8,  BTa 


107 


Oakington. 


John  Gardiner 
....  Gardiner 
Phillip  Baaset  (West- 
wick)  . .  . . 


William  Barnard 
Thomas  Stacy 
Eobert  Fayrechild 
t  Thomas  Sterne 


£.  <.  d. 
2  0  0 
0  10  0 


£.  «.  d. 

0  10  0 

3  0  0 

4  0  0 

1  0  0 


£.  ».  d. 

Frances  Dellamor, 

widow  (Westwick)  2  10  0 

*  Mrs.  Kath.  Pers 

(Westwick)  . .  5  0  0 


£.  *.  d. 

J  Mr.  Nevill  Butteller  1  10  0 
§  Sir  Bichard  Horell, 
by  Thos.  Stacy  of 
Meldred  . ,  . .  3  6  8 


£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Henry  Collett 

1 

0 

0 

Agnes  Pyke  . , 

0 

16 

0 

Eeuben  Bond 

2 

0 

0 

William  Webb 

2 

0 

0 

Thos.  Kilbom 

3 

0 

0 

John  Stevens 

1 

3 

0 

George  Bond 

1 

16 

0 

Nathaniel  Desborough 

0 

13 

4 

Henry  Pyke  . . 

2 

6 

8 

Edward  Eiger 

0 

10 

0 

William  Stashye 

1 

10 

0 

Mrs.  Pierson,  widow 

0 

16 

0 

John  Bond  . . 

2 

0 

0 

Thos.  Collett,  jun.  . .' 

2 

3 

4 

George  Buchenor  . . 

0 

10 

0 

Owen  Skynner 

3 

0 

0 

Eobert  Pyke 

3 

0 

0 

Mark  Fisher 

0 

13 

4 

II  Sackfield  Wade 

5 

0 

0 

Clement  Stevens,  widow  3 

0 

0 

Edward  Gibson 

1 

13 

4 

Fampitford. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

t. 

d. 

f  Mr.  Turre,  clerk  . . 

6 

13 

4 

Henry  Laurence  . . 

8 

0 

0 

*  Lady  of  the  Manor,  called  Pierce,  in  Subsidy  Roll. 

t  A  family  of  this  name  once  had  large  possessions  in  Meldreth,  Malton,  and 
Orwell. 

^  The  Butlers  became  possessed  of  the  Manor  of  Orwell  through  marriage  with 
the  .^lionby  family.  They  exchanged  it  for  Barnwell  Priory  with  Sir  Thomas 
Cbicheley  of  Wimpole. 

§  He  was  probably  paying  for  Chicheley  of  Wimpole  Hall.  In  the  Register 
Transcripts  at  Ely  is  this  entry — “  Mr.  Richard,  son  of  Mr.  Richard  and  Mris.  Dorothy 
Horell,  buried  May  24th,  1636’’  (Gibbons). 

y  Lord  of  the  Manor. 

4  Not  the  Vicar  (P).  Michael  Selbie  “  resigned  ”  in  1646,  and  was  followed  by 
William  Johnson. 


XUM 


108 


THS  SAST  AMOUAM  ;  OK, 


Papworth. 

£.  t.  d.  I 

Sir  Leonard  Farbye . .  3  17  0  |  * * * §  Mr.  Morden 

Rampton. 

William  Essex 

Reache. 

Mr.  Richard  Manneringe 

Roytton. 


£.  «.  d. 
1  10  0 

£.  ».  d. 
3  0  0 


£. 

t. 

d. 

£. 

*. 

d. 

f  Mr.  Thos.  Archer  . . 

2 

0 

0 

George  Day  . . 

1 

0 

0 

Mr.  Thos.  Archer,  sen. 

11 

0 

0 

Thomas  Wilson 

0 

10 

0 

Edward  Mayes 

0 

10 

0 

Robert  Rumbold 

1 

0 

0 

Thomas  Gatward 

0 

13 

4 

Sawiton. 

£. 

». 

d. 

£. 

f. 

d. 

J  Mr.  John  Byeat  . . 

4 

0 

0 

Mrs.  Jefferies,  widow 

1 

0 

0 

Mr.  Blundell 

5 

0 

0 

Great  Shelford. 

£. 

e. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

§  Mr.  Robert  Fatteson 

5 

10 

0 

John  Fatteson 

2 

10 

0 

Mrs.  Shewarde 

3 

0 

0 

Robert  Kemp  . . 

2 

10 

0 

Mrs.  Fuller  Meade  | 

7 

A 

A 

Thomas  Manning  . . 

1 

6 

0 

II  Mrs.  Rose  Meade  ) 

U 

U 

Robert  Fuller 

1 

5 

0 

Richard  Fuller 

2 

0 

0 

Thomas  Howlinge  . . 

0 

13 

4 

John  Fuller  . . 

2 

10 

0 

John  Arnold.. 

0 

6 

0 

Xpofer  Rogers 

1 

10 

0 

Little  Shelford. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Alexander  Dawson  . . 

0 

16 

0 

Henry  Hayward 

0 

10 

0 

^  Mr.Qilbert  Wigmore 

6 

13 

4 

John  Stevinson 

1 

13 

4 

•  Held  the  Manor  or  Papworth  Everard. 

t  He  refused  to  pay  the  forced  loan  of  1626  {$et  Appendix  Tiii.). 

^  In  a  chancery  suit  of  {circa  1634)  he  describes  himself  as  “John  Byatt  of 
Sawston,  gent.,  of  about  three-score  years  or  thereabout.”  He  was  concerned  in 
the  Insurrection  at  Linton  in  1647.  He  was  buried  Slst  October,  1650  (Gibbons). 

§  He  was  Vicar,  1637 — 1673. 

II  Richard  Meade  of  Essex  married  Mary,  daughter  of  John  Fuller  of  Foxton. 
They  had  Fuller  Mead,  who  married  Rose,  daughter  of  Francis  Braken,  Recorder  of 
Cambridge,  and  had  two  sons,  Fuller  and  Edmund  ( Vititation.  Harleian  Society). 

H  Rector,  1641,  October  6th,  to  1682,  August  16th.  Remained  through  the 
Commonwealth.  Daniel  Wigmore,  Archdeacon  of  Ely,  and  ejected  Rector  of 
Wentworth,  died  here  in  1646. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES.  BTC. 


109 


ahtpreth. 


£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Edward  Tjadkyne  by 

William  Brooke 

2 

0 

0 

Henry  Rennells,  of 

Mrs.  Elizabeth  Wendy 

3 

6 

8 

Shepreth  . . 

2 

6 

8 

f  John  Peter 

4 

13 

4 

*  Mr.  John  Ingry  . . 

3 

0 

0 

j  Mr.  Layer  . . 

3 

0 

0 

Thomas  Lancaster  . . 

6 

3 

0 

•  Mrs.  Warren  Ingrye 

2 

0 

0 

Shingay. 

£. 

». 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

John  Stacy  . . 

1 

13 

4 

Thomas  Fay  rechild  . . 

1 

0 

0 

Shtidy  Camp$. 

£. 

$. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

Giles  Paulet  by  John 

Mr.  Thomp  . . 

4 

0 

0 

Furkes  . .  . . 

5 

6 

0 

Mr.  Richard  Archer 

2 

0 

0 

Ann  Briant  . . 

2 

0 

0 

Phillip  Richardson  . , 

2 

0 

0 

Joane  Mynat,  widow 

2 

0 

0 

Snailwell. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

§  Mr.  Roger  Thornton 

Stevine  Jellett 

2 

13 

4 

by  Richd.  Howlett 

13 

0 

0 

Martin  Millar 

1 

13 

0 

John  Warren  . . 

3 

0 

0 

Soham. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

II  Henry  Hunt,  rector 

5 

6 

8 

Thomas  Hobie 

1 

10 

0 

f  John  Fenton,  clerk 

2 

0 

0 

John  Tyler  . . 

2 

10 

0 

Thomas  Cheavley  . . 

1 

10 

0 

Edward  Wake 

1 

6 

8 

Mr.  William  Clarke 

2 

0 

0 

William  Fament 

1 

8 

0 

Mr.  Richard  Peachy 

3 

0 

0 

Ann  Prince,  widow  . . 

1 

3 

4 

Martin  Wilkin 

0 

16 

8 

*  The  Ingrey  family  at  one  time  held  the  Manors  of  Docura  and  Wimbish  in 
Shepreth. 

t  Lord  Petre  possessed  Tyrell’s'  Manor  in  this  village. 

J  John  Ijayer,  Lord  of  the  Manor  of  Shepreth.  Died  1641,  aged  about  65. 
One  of  the  most  industrious  antiquaries  of  the  sixteenth  century.  He  wrote  a 
parochial  history  of  Cambridgeshire. 

§  He  had  a  Manor  here.  In  1626  he  was  reputed  one  of  the  largest  wool* * * § 
owners  in  Cambridgeshire. 

II  'fhe  living  here  was  a  Vicarage  held  at  this  time  by  John  Fenton.  The 
Rectory  belonged  to  Pembroke  Hall,  Cambridge. 

H  Appointed  Vicar  on  the  ejection  of  Roger  Hezteter  alias  Exeter  in  1614. 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAK  ;  OK, 

Stapleford. 


£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

1  Mrs.  Gent  Howlet  . . 

2 

0 

0  Christopher  Ansell  . . 

1 

6 

8 

1  William  Kemp 

1 

0 

0  Robert  Ware 

2 

10 

0 

i  Thomas  Tolney 

2 

15 

0  John  Jacklyn 

1 

0 

0 

i 

Steeple  Morden. 

i 

£. 

». 

d. 

£. 

t. 

d. 

^  *  Mr  Samuel  Kempton 

2 

10 

0  t  Samuel  Gatward  . . 

2 

0 

0 

William  Kempton  . . 

0 

10 

0  John  Pick  Cord 

2 

0 

0 

f  John  Gatward 

1 

10 

0  §  Chapman  Bolnest  . . 

3 

0 

0 

j  J.  G.,  for  Sir  Gren¬ 

II  Thomas  Martin 

3 

0 

0 

ville  Verney 

4 

10 

0  Robert  T  .  ,  u .  .  e  . . 

0 

13 

0 

1 

i 

Stetehworth. 

1 

£. 

«. 

d.  1 

£. 

t. 

d. 

-  John  Bridgman 

3 

6 

8  1  William  Raunew 

2 

0 

0 

! 

Slowquy. 

1 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

j  Robert  Laurence 

8 

0 

0  Thomas  Marye 

3 

0 

0 

Elizabeth  Smith, widow 

1 

10 

0  Thomas  Smith 

1 

0 

0 

J  William  Peek 

1 

6 

8  Thomas  Kage  . . 

2 

10 

0 

i 

Swaffham  Prior. 

r 

t 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

t. 

d. 

^  Mr.  Rant  . . 

10 

0 

0  ft  Mr.  Edward  Drurye 

4 

0 

0 

1  **  Richard  Norridge 

2 

10 

0  Thomas  Nicholas 

4 

0 

0 

5  Roger  Chambers 

3 

0 

0  Anne  Waters 

1 

10 

0 

*  Samuel  and  William  Kempton  were  the  sons  of  Robert  Kempton  (whose  grand¬ 
father  settled  here)  and  Margaret,  great  grand-daughter  of  Sir  Anthony 
Wingfield,  K.G.  ( Vititation,  Harleian  Society). 

t  An  annigerous  family  having  several  branches  in  this  part  of  the  county. 
They  were  related  to  the  Marvells.  One  of  them  was  Recorder  of  Cambridge. 

J  In  1634  Greville  Vemey,  gent.,  was  heir  apparent  of  Margaret,  widow  of 
Richard  Vemey,  Kt.,  who  had  estates  in  Steeple  Morden  and  Longstanton.  He 
died  in  1642,  and  his  son  Greville  in  1648.  Addit.  MSS.  5838,  p.  81,  and 
Clutterbuck’s  Herti. 

$  In  1622  he  held  120  acres  of  land,  called  Phipps,  in  this  village. 

II  He  was  the  grandson  of  another  Thomas,  a  Master  in  Chancery,  who  had  s 
grant  of  arms  in  1557,  and  afterwards  settled  here.  There  are  inscriptions  relating 
to  them  in  the  church  (see  Eatt  Anglian,  vol.  v.,  p.  362). 

H  Lived  at  the  Great  House,  Swaffham  Prior. 

**  He  gave  evidence  against  Richard  Peacock,  ejected  from  the  Vicarage  of 
Swaffham  S.  Cyriac  in  1644. 

ft  This  family  had  been  here  for  three  generations,  and  came  from  Fincham  in 
Norfolk  {Vititation,  Harleian  Society). 


XUM 


NOTE8  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


Ill 


Swaffham  Bulbeek. 

£.  9.  d.  {  £.  (.  d. 


William  Carrow 

2 

10 

0 

Mr.  James  Laurance 

5 

•  • 

0 

0 

Thomas  Green 

4 

0 

0  1 

Swavetey. 

£. 

9. 

d. 

£. 

9. 

d. 

John  Barton.. 

1 

15 

0 

Clark  East  . . 

1 

0 

0 

Edward  East 

1 

0 

0 

Thomas  Rooke 

0 

13 

4 

William  Rooke,  guar¬ 

William  Astwoode  . , 

1 

0 

0 

dian  of  John  Stock¬ 

Frances  Hanscombe 

0 

10 

0 

yard's  children 

1 

0 

0 

John  Asplen . . 

0 

15 

0 

William  Berry 

2 

0 

0 

Thomas  Berrye 

1 

15 

0 

Frances  East,  widow 

2 

0 

0 

John  Newmond 

0 

16 

0 

Tadlow. 

£. 

9. 

d.  1 

£. 

9. 

d. 

Mary  Smyth,  widow 

2 

0 

0  1 

Widow  Smith 

0 

10 

0 

Teversham.  £  ^ 


Ambrose  Turrington  . .  . .  . .  10  0 

Toft. 


£. 

9. 

d. 

£. 

9. 

d. 

♦  Joshua  Eversden  . . 

1 

16 

8 

Thomas  Bazbye 

..  1 

6 

8 

William  Eversden  . . 

1 

0 

0 

Paul  Wayghtes 

..  2 

0 

0 

Richard  Eversden  . . 

1 

0 

0 

Trumpington. 

£. 

9. 

d. 

£. 

9. 

d. 

William  Kilbom 

3 

0 

0 

fMr.  Pitcher 

. .  6 

0 

0 

Triplow. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

£. 

9. 

d. 

J  Mr.  Richard  Prime 

5 

10 

0 

§  Mr.  Carter 

..  2 

10 

0 

Edmund  Goodwin  . . 

1 

16 

0 

j  John  Clements 

..  2 

10 

0 

Richd.  Clemens 

1 

10 

0 

i  11  Mr.William  Reynolds  2 

0 

0 

Edward  Goodwin  . . 

1 

6 

0 

Mris.  Mererill 

..  1 

10 

0 

William  Deering 

0 

10 

0 

1  Hugh  Harvie 

..  1 

0 

0 

*  The  Eversdens  were  an  armigeroue  family.  An  account  of  them  is  in  Adiit. 
MSS.,  5804,  p.  102.  Joshua  was  a  rigpd  puritan.  He  was  chiefly  instrumental  in 
getting  the  Rectors  of  Little  Eversden  and  Toft  ejected. 

t  Probably  Thomas  Pychard,  Lord  of  the  Manor  of  Tincotts.  He  was  Sheriff 
of  Cambs  in  1640,  and  had  trouble  about  levying  ship  money  (see  Eatt  Anglian, 
Tol.  vi.,  pp.  50-2).  His  name  stands  first  on  the  petition  sent  up  to  Parliament 
against  Bishop  Wren  in  1640. 

J  Richard  Pryme,  Esq.,  bought  the  Manor  of  Barringtons,  in  Triplow,  in  1560. 
He  refused  to  pay  the  forced  loan. 

§  Thomas  Carter  was  appointed  Vicar,  24th  January,  1625  {tee  toI.  vi.  p.  376). 
y  Lessee  of  the  impropriate  Rectory  under  Peterhouse. 


112 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


W^ater  beach. 


£.  «.  d. 

*  Agnes  Knight  ..  6  13  4 

Dorothy  WoodrufEe  2  10  0 

Mr.  Robert  King,  LL.D.  4  0  0 

♦  Mris.  Elizabeth 

Knight  . .  . .  8  0  0 

Linton,  Camh.  {To  be 


£.  i.  d. 

Christopher  Wade  . .  110  0 

f  Mr.  John  Robson  . .  8  0  0 

Mr.  Doctor  Stanes  . .  2  6  8 

*  William  Knight  . .  5  6  8 

continued.)  W.  M.  Palmer. 


REPLIES. 

Baptismal  Bason  (p.  79,  &c.). — Sir  Edmund  Ashfield,  who 
held  one  of  the  two  impropriate  parsonages  of  Chesham,  Bucks, 
“  gave  to  the  pish  att  his  owne  charge  one  faire  flont  of  Latten  w***  a 
greate  cover  of  the  same  mettle  graven  and  cutt  And  also  a  faire 
frame  of  timber  for  ytt  to  stand  in  w'**  cost  him  xlvj'  viij^” 

“  The  old  font  bason  &  the  upper  shanke  of  the  stock  ”  was  sold 
to  one  Thomas  Dickens  for  3«.  This  “bason”  may  have  been  a 
baptismal  bason  or  the  lining  within  “  the  upper  shanke.”  (Vide 
Antiquary,  vol.  xxxv.  p.  19).  The  instance  is  worth  recording  side  by 
side  with  those  already  given  in  the  East  Anglian 


The  Stoup  at  Swaffham  Prior. — The  “Stoup”  at  Swaffham 
Prior  turns  out  to  be  of  the  nature  of  a  flagon,  and  can  have  had  no 
possible  connection  with  baptismal  use.  As  it  appears  to  have 
occasionally  been  placed  over  a  fire,  it  may  not  unlikely  have  been 
used  as  a  ringers'  jug.  “Its  place”  in  the  “South  Wall  of  the 
Sanctuary  ”  is  undoubtedly  a  mistaken  one.  If  ever  in  use  for 
ringers’  “  hot-pot,”  or  the  like,  it  is  clearly  out  of  place  there. 


QUERY. 


Nevills  of  Long  Melford. — Can  any  reader  of  the  East  Anglian 
give  me  any  information  about — (1)  Edward  Nevill  of  Long  Melford, 
whose  son  Thomas  was  baptised  1590.  (2)  John  Nevill,  buried 

June  15th,  1614.  (3)  John  Nevill,  married  to  Elizabeth  Haxell, 

October  24th,  1615;  baptised  January  25th,  1589. 

{a)  What  connexion  was  3  to  1  or  2  (if  any),  or  was  2  the  grand¬ 
father  of  1  ?  (i)  Do  they  belong  to  any  known  line  or  pedigree? 

I  descend  from  John,  baptised  1589,  and  should  be  very  glad  to 

Edmund  Nevill. 


Power  stock, 

Melplash  R.S.O.,  Dorset . 


•  William  Knight  was  farmer  of  the  Denny  Abbey  Estate.  The  relationship 
of  these  three  Knights  is  not  clear.  Annis  Hobson  married  William  Knight  and 
had  children,  William  and  Elizabeth  (Cooper’s  Annals,  Clay’s  Waterbeaeh). 
t  Ue  was  lessee  of  the  great  Tithes  in  1655  {Lambeth  MS.  1008.) 


NOTK8  ANP  QUERIES,  ETC. 


113 


FOWLMERE  NOTES.— THE  GREAT  MOOR. 

(Continued  from  p.  26). 

It  is  worthy  of  note,  if  you  ask  the  old  people,  “Where  was  the 
mere  ?  ”  that  not  one  will  understand  your  meaning.  Mere  or  mer 
appears  in  the  name,  but  has  no  place  otherwise  in  the  local 
Tocabulary.  It  is,  for  Fiiwlinere  folk,  always  “the  Moor"  or  “the 
Great  Moor.”  Professor  Skeat  has  told  me  that  this  is  only  to  be 
expected,  as  “no  one  ever  usee  ‘mere’  now  except  in  poetry  or 
locally.”  But.  possibly  from  the  present  fashion  of  visiting  the 
Scob^h  Moors,  which  are  rough  and  broken  hill-sides,  and  from  our 
hearing  of  the  Devon  Moors  as  great  stretches  of  rounded  hill,  most 
people  of  this  generation  are  inapt  to  connect  the  word  with  a  marsh 
or  fen.  “The  mo>>r”  is  a  good  Anglo  Saxon  survival,  which  our 
people  have  forgotten  to  associate  otherwise  than  geographically  with 
“  Fulmer." 

We  may  also  note  that  casual  travellers,  labouring  along  the 
unmetalled  thoroughfare  between  Cambridge  and  London,  were 
prevented  by  the  very  “  lay  of  the  land”  from  associating  a  “mere” 
with  our  “  foul  ”  prefix.  The  rise  of  the  ground  and  the  cottage 
which  occupied,  and  still  occupies,  the  frontage  to  the  turn  of  the 
road,  effectually  screen  the  mere  or  moor  from  the  wayfarer.  Seeing 
no  mere,  or  sheet  of  water,  with  its  flocks  of  wild-fowl  paddling 
among  the  sedges,  they  accounted  for  the  final  syllable  of  our  name 
in  their  own  way,  as  the  Sussex  yokel  accounted  for  Goodwin  Sands 
by  Tenterden  Steeple.  The  mere  was  not  in  evidence ;  the  mtre  was 
only  too  obtrusive :  and  out  of  the  fulness  of  their  shattered  livers 
their  mouths  spake. 

Yet  if  they  had  but  walked  from  their  inn  some  hundred  yards, 
and  passed  up  Barr  Lane  on  to  the  Butts,  they  would  have  seen  the 
ancient  glory  of  our  village  outstretched  before  them.  To-day  we 
can  only  mark  where  it  used  to  spread  its  waters,  but  old  men  love  to 
tell  of  their  young  days  upon  the  Great  Moor. 

The  great  extent  of  the  old  Moor  is,  perhaps,  best  appreciated 
from  the  Butts,  or  the  further  ascent  of  Farthing  Hill.  Thence  we 
see  the  flat  bed  of  the  ancient  waters  reaching,  north-westerly,  far 
into  Melbourn  parish.  About  300  acres  of  it,  and  no  more,  were  iu 
Fowlmere  Parish.  Certainly  as  much,  if  not  a  greater,  area  of  its 
swamp  must  have  been  in  contiguous  Melbourn.  But  so  far  as  its 
geoj-raphy  belongs  to  us,  the  better  view  is.  I  think,  obtained  by 
passing  up  Moor  Lane  on  to  the  old  bed  of  the  swamp,  whence  our 
view  is  up  the  whole  length  of  its  bed.  On  the  left,  southerly, 
“Farthing  Hill”  shoulders  the  ancient  fen.  Just  where  we  stand 
some  slighter  elevations  break  up  the  dead  level  into  bits  of  swamp, 
still  rushy  and  damp.  On  the  right  a  modest  elevation  carries  the 
road  to  Melbourn.  Ahead  of  us,  Melbournwards,  we  catch  a  glimpse 
of  the  old  mill  that  stands  on  “  the  river.”  which  always  flowed 
from  the  Moor  towards  the  Bhee  over  against  Barrington.  Just  in 
front  of  us  the  Moor  is  in  cultivation ;  and  long  lines  ot  ditch,  with 

I 


114 


THE  EAST  AHGLIAN  ;  OR, 


here  and  there  a  bushy  ozier,  reach  across  its  level,  to  give  an  outfall 
to  its  waters.  By  the  further  shoulder  of  “Farthing  Hill”  a  grove 
of  black  poplars  marks  the  site  of  the  hithermost  watercress  bed; 
and  the  darker  belt  beyond  shows  us  the  furthest  limits  of  the 
Moor  in  our  parish  over  against  “  Black  Peak,”  where  the  old  Brant- 
ditch  from  Heydon  Hill  plunged  its  rampart  into  the  morass.  Just 
here  it  is  that  the  perennial  springs  feed  “  the  river,”  as  the  folk 
proudly  call  the  only  constant  stream  that  concerns  the  parish,  though 
it,  indeed,  only  belongs  to  us  under  the  right  bank. 

Such,  then,  is  the  view  of  the  Great  Moor  as  we  get  it  from 
Moor  Lane :  a  triangular  strip  gradually  narrowed  between  two 
moderate  elevations,  dissected  by  ditches,  and  plotted  out  among  three 
different  farms — the  Manor  Farm,  the  Bury,  and  the  Lower — all 
three  at  one  time  part  of  the  manorial  domain,  but  now  alienated. 

To  reach  the  watercress  beds  and  the  springs,  we  must  go  back 
by  Barr  Lane  to  Barr  Field,  along  the  footpath  which  once  led  to 
Melbourn  over  “Farthing  Hill,”  and  which  now  divides  the  manor 
from  the  Bury  farm-land,  to  the  crest  of  the  hill ;  then  sharp  to  the 
right  down  the  driftway  from  the  farmstead,  and  we  stand  on  the 
Moor,  hard  by  the  poplars  we  have  already  seen  from  afar.  Bough 
grass,  wild  mignonette,  and  other  weeds  and  wildflowers,  grow  thinly 
on  the  plain,  here  unsuited  for  agriculture.  It  must  have  been  the 
deepest  part  of  the  mere,  for  no  alluvial  or  vegetable  deposit  covers 
the  chalk  sufficiently  to  carry  the  plough.  Here  and  there  as  we  pass 
from  ditch  to  ditch  will  be  found  pat<hes  of  peat,  showing  where 
sedges  must  at  one  time  have  given  harbour  to  the  teal,  and  bittern, 
and  duck,  and  heron,  and  “  smale  foules.”  But  for  the  most  part 
this  upper  end  of  the  Great  Moor  is  suited  for  no  cultivation,  save 
that  of  watercress,  which  has  here  developed  into  a  tliriving  industry. 
The  beds,  dug  down  into  the  chalk,  stretch  in  two  main  lines,  north¬ 
eastward.  towards  the  mill ;  the  one  line  following  the  main  drain 
through  the  heart  of  the  Moor  from  nigh  these  poplars ;  the  other 
starting  from  the  springs  that  feed  “the  river,”  follow  the  course  of 
that  stream.  Each  bed,  and  there  are  perhaps  a  dozen  of  them,  is 
fed  by  gushing  springs,  for,  I  am  told,  a  bore  has  but  to  be  put  down 
for  about  10  ft.  to  strike  a  never-failing  supply  of  water.  From  these 
beds  a  positively  enormous  trade  is  done  with  Manchester,  London, 
and  other  large  towns  that  hunger  for  the  green  things  of  the  earth. 
At  “  the  river  ”  head,  upon  Melbourn  ground,  stands  a  dark  grove  of 
ash  and  holme-oak  and  pine,  that  gives  a  touch  of  picturesque  gloom 
to  the  otherwise  somewhat  featureless  scene,  whose  general  effect  is 
mainly  that  of  a  breezy  unconveutiouality. 

The  great  Moor  was  only  drained  and  enclosed  in  1846  ;  the  Act 
for  “  Foulmire  Inclosure”  receiving  Royml  Assent,  May  20th,  1845. 
Such  enclosure  had  for  fifty  years  been  merrily  advancing  over  the 
moors  and  commons  of  England.  It  was  justified,  no  doubt,  by  the 
mounting  prices  of  wheat;  but  the  motive  stimulated  thereby  was, 
I  fear,  the  rapacity  of  the  large  landowners.  In  the  shallower  parts 
of  our  Great  Moor,  towards  Paddock  End  and  Church  End,  certain 
hummocks  and  islets  had  always  been  cultivable,  and  eager  minds 


XUM 


N0TR8  AWT»  QTTIfRrRS,  T!TC. 


116 


now  speculated  ou  the  agricultural  wealth  drowned  in  the  flood  of 
surrounding  waters.  The  hopes  thus  raised  were,  no  doubt,  some¬ 
what  dashed  by  the  result :  but,  at  any  rate,  rents  are  received,  crops 
grown,  and  labour  employed  where  once  the  ruffs  and  reeves  preened 
their  feathers.  It  is,  however,  questionable  whether  the  gain  to  the 
community  be  commensurate  with  the  gain  to  the  landlord.  Old  folk, 
perhaps,  as  is  the  way  of  patriarchs,  a  little  liable  to  be  laudatoret 
Uii'p'it  u  acti,  still  turn  their  eyes  regretfully  up  the  tide  of  years,  and 
speak  of  the  happier  days  when  the  waters  covered  the  face  of  the 
Great  Moor,  One  and  all  of  them  declare  the  labouring  class  were 
better  off  then  than  now;  and  an  old  gentleman.  Master  of  one 
of  the  Cambridge  Colleges,  who  recently  passed  to  his  rest,  assured 
me  that  he  had  no  doubt  of  it.  Then  everyone  could  keep  a  cow  or 
two,  pastured  on  the  common  and  the  moor  under  the  village  herdman. 
Then  a  man  out  of  work  could  always  get  a  casual  livelihood  reed¬ 
cutting,  or  fowling,  or  leech-gathering,  or  frog-fishing.  Then  the 
labourer  could  put  on  his  table  ducks  and  geese  of  his  own  raising, 
as  well  as  the  wild  waterfowl  that  homed  and  bred  upon  the  Great 
Moor.  And  all  affirm  that  to-day’s  advance  in  wages  is  not 
compensation  enough  for  the  free  and  common  advantages  of  the  old 
time,  when  George  the  Fourth  was  Eling. 

One  old  Gaffer,  the  senior  of  the  village,  whom  at  the  age  of  91 
I  committed  to  rest  in  the  churchyard  three  years  ago,  used  often  to 
chuckle  over  his  youthful  profits  from  the  Great  Moor  : — 

“  Yer  zee,  zur,  the  young  gen’lemun  from  Cambridge  used  often 
to  send  me  word  as  how  they  wanted  a  day’s  fowling  in  my  punt  on 
the  Moor.  So  I  used  to  get  ready  for  ’em,  ha !  ha !  I  used  to  go  out 
in  my  punt  early  in  the  mornin’, — oh !  lor,  it  du  make  me  laff  to  think 
on  it,  ha  !  ha ! — an’  I  used  to  bag  four  or  five  leash  of  duck  or  teal ; 
ail’  then, — oh!  lor,  oh !  lor;  ha!  ha!  I  wor  ready  for ’em.  Well,  I 
used  to  take  ’em  out,  but  never  a  shot  did  they  get.  Ter  see  I’d 
sceart  all  the  birds  away,  ha!  ha!  An’  arter  pulling  about  up  & 
down,  back’ards  &  forrards,  it  wor  time  for  ’em  to  go  back  to  College. 
And  when  I'd  got  ’em  ashore  agin,  I’d  say  to  ’em,  ‘  Now,  luk  ’ere, 
young  gen’lemen  ;  you’ve  been  pulling  about  for  2  or  3  hours,  an’  you’ve 
paid  me  like  gen’lemen  for  my  trouble,  an’  it’ll  never  du  for  yer  to 
go  back  to  Cambridge  with  never  a  bird  to  show  for  yer  money. 
Now,  I’ve  got  a  few  wild-duck  at  ’ome  as  I  don’t  mind  lettin’  you 
young  gen’lemen  ’ave  for  a  trifle,’  says  I.  Oh !  lor,  oh !  lor,  them 
were  good  old  times  for  us  poor  folk  in  them  days,  ha  !  ha  ! 

“No,  zur;  you’re  right.  O’  course  the  Cambridge  gen’lemen 
didn’t  come  every  day.  "What  did  I  du  on  other  days  ?  Why,  there 
was  alius  some’ut  to  be  done,  cuttin’  reeds  for  thatchin’,  or  shootin’ 
game  for  Cambridge  Market.  Or  some  days  Muster  Thurnall,  from 
Royston,  he’d  come  over  for  an  arternoon’s  frog-fishin’  in  my  boat. 
What  wor  them  frogs  like?  Much  like  other  frogs,  only  girt  big 
fellers  &  more  yellow  on  the  back.  He  an’  I  used  to  catch  a 
mort  o’  them.  Then  sometimes  I  used  to  go  in  an’  catch  leeches. 
How  did  I  du  that?  Well,  I  used  to  take  off  my  breeches  an’  wade 
in.  Yer  used  to  see  ’em  cornin’  at  yer  in  thousands,  girt  black  things, 

I  2 


116 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAH;  OB, 


BO  long  (measuring  off  on  his  finger),  thousands  of  ’em,  I  tell  yer; 
an’  they  used  to  hang  on  to  one’s  legs  in  girt  bunches  ;  an’  1  us^  to 
pull  ’em  off,  handfulls  on  ’em.  Hurt?  ha!  ha!  well,  I  reckon  yer 
used  to  know  where  they  wor.  But  now,  lor’  bless  yer,  what’s  a  pore 
mail  to  do  if  he  is  out  o’  work  ?  ” 

The  edible  frogs  of  Fowlmere,  of  which  my  father  used  to  speak 
in  my  boyhood,  and  of  which  we  have  heard  already  uot  infrequent 
mention,  are  one  of  the  enigmas  of  natural  history.  Was  he 
indigenous,  or  was  he  acclimatised  by  man  ?  Kingsley,  while  leaving 
the  question  open,  seems  disposed  to  the  former,  the  Eneyelopedit 
Britannira  to  the  latter  opinion.*  But  there  he  was  in  such  quantity 
as  to  give  name  to  the  eastermost  corner  of  the  Moor,  near  Moor  Ijane, 
which  still  is  known  as  Frog’s  Norton  (north-end),  and  used  to  be 
styled  in  good  old  English,  Paddock  Frog’s  or  Toad’s)  End. 
To-day  there  is  nut  one  left,  but  I  understand  that  there  are  pools  in 
Suffolk  where  he  is  still  flourishing.  Perhaps  the  strongest  argument, 
that  with  us  he  was  indigenous,  is  the  fact  that  no  feudal  lord  ever 
resided  in  this  his  manor,  that  no  monastic  house  had  ever  auy  footing 
in  the  parish,  and  that  his  virtues  were  said  to  be  unknown  in  our 
neighbourhood  until  1843. 

Long  years  before  the  young  gentlemen  came  with  fowling  piece 
and  punt-gun  to  till  their  bags  with  their  boatman’s  ready-shot  game, 
Fowlmere  must  have  been  a  famous  place  for  sport.  If  James  the  First 
bad  but  left  us  a  diary'  of  his  doings  when  he  came  to  Royston  Palace  on 
frequent  hawking  vent,  we  should,  no  doubt,  have  heard  how  he  and 
bonnie  Prince  Charlie  (afterwards  King  and  Martyr),  and  Steenie  his 
pampered  favourite,  rode  by  Melbouru  Heath,  the  King  upon  that 
wonderful  cantering  nag  of  his,  to  the  Black  Peak  or  to  Farthing  Hill 
for  a  flight  at  the  quarry  that  rose  from  our  Qreat  Moor.  And  ^uire 
Aldred,  no  doubt,  sometimes  met  his  Majesty  at  Brantditch,  and  set 
his  fieldmen  to  rouse  the  quarry  from  the  sedge  and  reeds;  and 
Charlie  and  Steenie  galloped  in  their  sport  across  the  hill  to  Triplow 
Heath,  whence  later  in  one  fateful  year  stout  Cornet  Joyce  set  out 
with  his  dragoons  upon  a  memorable  ride  to  Holmby  House  to  hale  the 
King  over  this  very  ground  to  prison  and  the  block.  And  then  the 
King  and  his  Court  would  ride  buck  to  Royston  Palace  along  the  road 
which  Charles  wa.s  one  day  to  follow,  after  that  Holmby  visit  of 
Cornet  Joyce,  a  prisoner  of  the  Ironsides,  whose  tents  were  pitched 
in  Fowlmere  l>ene. 

Can  we  doubt  that  when  King  Edward  the  Fourth,  on  his  way  to 
Bury,  halted  at  Fulmer  and  held  a  Court  of  Justice  and  issued  writs 
therefrom,  the  table  of  Plantagenet  smoked  with  toothsome  game 
from  off  the  same  Great  Moor  ?  That  the  Veres,  once  Lords  of  the 
Manor,  rode  hither  from  Castle  Camps  or  Newsalls  for  a  day’s  sport 
with  their  falcons?  That  Aluric  the  Manor  Ixird,  tempore  ^git 
Edwardi  (the  Confessor)  sometimes  has  had  his  pastime  therein? 
That  even  Boadicea,  passing  with  her  scythed  chariots  of  war  along 

*  Baron  von  Hugel  recently  told  me  that  they  were  probably  introduced 
by  the  Romans,  as  their  bones  are  met  with  in  Roman  middens. 


NOTES  AND  QUEBIB8,  BTC. 


117 


her  Icknield  Way  on  yonder  Harborough  Hill,  has  turned  aside  for 
a  few  moments  to  amuse  herself  with  spurt  on  Foulmere  Moor? 

These,  it  may  be  said,  are  vain  imsginings.  Well,  gone  are 
these  princes  of  old  ;  gone  are  the  yuung  gentlemen  from  Cambridge; 
gune  are  the  punters  and  leech  gatherers ;  and  gone  are  the  wildfowl, 
the  frogs,  and  the  Moor,  Imagination,  and  imagination  only,  can 
picture  the  scene  that  once  occupied  the  present  dreary  level.  Here 
great  pools  of  flashing  water;  there  great  clumps  of  waving  reed 
and  yellow  iris  flag.  The  waters  rippled  by  some  gliding  coracle  or 
punt,  or  by  the  fowl,  swimming,  diving,  and  stretching  their  wing;s ; 
the  reeds  resounding  with  the  twittering  of  birds  and  the  croak  of 
frogs,  and  overhead,  across  the  dull  gre}’  sky,  would  come  great 
flights  of  geese,  whirring  and  whistling,  to  plunge  headlong  in  a  flash 
of  spray  u|)on  the  shimmering  pools  of  Fowlmere  Moor. 

,  A.  C.  Yorkb. 

Fowlmere  Rectory,  Royeton. 


INSCRIPTIONS  FROM  OTHER  COUNTRIES  RELATING 
TO  EAST  ANGLIA. 

In  Hono  Kono  Cf.metert. 

I  Sacred  to  the  memory  of  |  Richard  Sykes  Syer  |  Admiralty  clerk 
I  of  H.M.  Hospital  Ship  Melville  |  Second  and  beloved  son  |  of  the  | 
Eev.  W“  A.  Syer  1  of  Kedington  Rectory  |  Suffolk,  England  j  died 
27  of  August  1857  |  in  the  25^  year  of  his  age.  | 

In  Bombay  Cathedral. 

A  tablet  to  John  Hammont  Cooper,  midshipman  born  at  North 
Walsham  Norfolk  1807,  died  at  Bombay  1825. 

In  Sbwrbe  Cemetery,  Bombay. 

Serg*  J.  Wright  government  pensioner  bom  at  North  Barsham, 
Norfolk  in  1791  died  at  Bombay  12  October  1869. 

In  Shanghai  Old  Cemetery. 

In  memory  of  W.  W.  Palmer,  bora  in  Norfolk,  England,  Killed 
at  Shanghai  by  the  explosion  of  the  s.s.  Union  Star  June  19'‘‘  1862. 

When  travelling  in  the  East  and  the  Antipodes  in  the  years 
1896 — 8,  I  made  a  collection  of  inscriptions  relating  to  East  Anglia, 
but  unfortunately  the  main  collection  is  lost  and  only  the  above  four 
can  be  found.  The  inscriptions  seldom  give  the  place  of  birth  except 
the  person  be  a  Scotchman.  Irishman,  or  Lancashireman.  The  ceme¬ 
teries  in  some  steaming  towns,  such  as  Colombo,  being  overgrown 
with  dank  vegetation,  are  not  pleasant  places  to  dawdle  in,  and  many 
of  the  tombstones  are  perishing.  Palmer. 


XUM 


118 


THB  EAST  AMOLIAN  ;  OE, 


“PASSIVE  RESISTANCE”  IN  FORMER  DAYS. 

In  a  book  of  Parish  Accounts  belonging  to  St.  Peter’s,  Ipswich, 
it  is  recorded  how  that  in  1721  a  rate  was  made  according  to  the  Act 
(30th  Eliz.)  for  the  support  of  a  Stipendiary  Minister  at  the  rate  of 
!«.  6d.  in  the  pound,  to  be  paid  half-yearly,  which  scheme  appears 
for  some  time  after  to  have  been  continually  resorted  to  for  the 
purpose  of  increasing  the  Inctmibent’s  small  income.  It  would 
appear  from  the  following  that  the  rate  was  ofttimes  exacted  from 
contentious  parishioners  by  a  distraint  upon  their  effects. 

“October  y«  5“*  1706.  Received  of  Horseman  Moliner  &  Thomas 
Bacon  and  John  Clarke  Late  Churchwardens  for  the  year  1704  to 
1705  a  Warming  pan  &  pewter  dish  &  piece  of  Bolster  Tique  & 
another  piece  of  Cloth  which  they  tooke  by  distress  for  y*  Rate  made 
by  y*  Bayliffs  &  portemen  for  y‘  maintenance  of  y‘  Minister  and 
repairs  of  y'  Church  of  Eliz.  Gosling  of  the  parish  and  is  all  the 
goods  w*"**  the  said  Churchwardens  toke  for  the  said  Rate.  I  say 
Received  the  said  goods  to  and  for  the  use  of  the  Eliza  Gosling  and 
I  do  hereby  promise  to  indemnify  the  said  Churchwardens  and 
parishioners  for  or  by  reason  of  the  said  goods  &  from  the  said 
Eliza  Gosling  for  or  by  reason  of  the  said  distress  Witness  this  one 
&  thirty  day  of  October  Anno  1706.  jjoUg 

“  Witness :  Humphrey  Yorke.” 


THE  EDGAR  FAMILY  OF  THE  RED  HOUSE, 
IPSWICH,  AND  THEIR  INTEREST  IN  A  FACULTY  PEW 
IN  ST.  MARGARET’S  CHURCH. 

The  family  is  described  “  Edgarorum,  de  Glemham  Magna  sive 
Boreale,  de  Framsden,  Gyppeswick,  de  Brantham,  de  Combes,  Stow- 
market,  Dynnington  and  Eye  in  Countie  Suff.” 

The  ^gars  affirm  that  they  are  descended  from  Edgar  Atheling. 
It  is  doubtless  an  ancient  family,  and  can  trace  descent,  with  some 
slight  interruption,  from  one  John  Edgar,  of  the  City  of  Dunwich, 
which  he  left  in  a.d.  1237,  and  settled  in  North  Glemham,  the 
Manor  of  which  was  granted  to  William  Edgar  in  the  37th  year 
of  Henry  VIII.  (1545).  Thomas  Edgar,  Esq.,  Recorder  of  Ipswich, 
eldest  son  of  Lionel  Edgar,  of  Framsden,  born  20th  November,  1602, 
married  Mary,  daughter  and  heiress  of  Philip  Powle,  Esq.,  of  London, 
1635,  died  April  12th,  1692,  at  Grimstone  House,  in  Tower  Street, 
Ipswich,  where  he  had  lived,  caused  the  Red  House  to  be  built  in  1658 
(the  wings  were  added  at  a  later  date — the  middle  of  the  1 8th  century) 
for  his  third  son,  Thomas,  previous  to  his  marriage  with  Agatha 
Mileson. 

This  Thomas  Edgar,  jun.,  who  was  a  Barrister-at-Law,  died  at 
the  Red  House  of  small  puz,  and  was  buried  in  the  Church  of 
St.  Mary  at  the  Tower. 


NOTS8  AND  QUKKIB8,  Kl'C. 


119 


Mileson  Edgar  was  baptized  13th  August,  1677,  at  St.  Margaret’s 
Church.  He  died  November  6th,  1713,  and  was  buried  in  the  chancel 
of  St.  Mary  at  the  Tower. 

The  family  is  singularly  fortunate  in  the  possession  of  portraits 
of  its  various  members  and  connections,  some  sixty  in  number.  Most 
of  the  paintings  are  very  fine  works  of  art  and  of  great  interest  and 
value.  Several  are  by  Gainsborough.  Among  the  other  artists  are 
Bogarth,  Hudson.  Sir  Peter  Lily,  Sir  Godfrey  Eneller,  Dahl, 

P.  Mercier,  Cole,  Vender,  Meulen  and  Smart  of  Ipswich.  Two  by 
Lily  of  Sir  Orlando  Bridgman  and  his  wife  are  specially  striking. 
There  is  one  also  by  the  same  artist,  of  his  eldest  son.  Lord  Bradford. 

A  noticeable  portrait  is  one  on  the  staircase,  by  Sir  Antonio  Mori. 

I:  represents  Sir  Thomas  Challoner  weighing  the  Bible  against  the 
spread  of  the  Inquisition. 

The  old  Arms  of  this  family  were : — Gules,  a  chevron  Or  between 
three  leopards’  faces  Ar.  Probably  there  is  an  allusion  in  this  to  the 
Saxon  origin  of  their  family,  the  leopards’  faces  being  the  insignia  of 
the  Saxon  kings  and  used  by  the  Normans  until  Henry  III.  A  new 
Coat  was  assumed  by  patent,  37th  Henry  YIII.,  1545. 

The  late  Sir  William  Page  Wood  (Lord  Hatherly),  Lord  High 
Chancellor,  resided  in  the  Red  House  from  August,  1872,  to  July  10th, 
1881,  and  ifrequently  attended  divine  service  at  St.  Margaret’s  Church 
(chiefly  in  the  afternoon),  occupying  the  open  bench  which  had  been 
assigned  to  the  Red  House  in  lieu  of  a  faculty  pew,  demolished  at 
the  time  of  the  restoration  of  the  Church.  The  following  from  the 
parochial  records  relating  to  the  ^ant  of  this  pew  is  of  special 
interest : —  ' 

St.  Marqarxtt’s' Parish  1  Whereas  it  doth  appear  that  the  said 

Church  nr  Ipswich.  |  parish  and  especially  we  whose  names  are 
ander  written  parishioners  and  Inhabitants  of  the  said  parish  That 
the  house  call^  the  Reddhouse  in  y*  s'*  pish  late  of  Thomas  Edgar 
Esq**  and  now  in  y*  possession  of  Devereux  Edgar,  Gent  his  sonn 
hath  not  any  pew  or  seat  in  y*  said  Church  of  S*  Margarett’s  of  right 
belonging  to  it  and  considering  the  Inconveniencyes  of  the  same  And 
in  consideraSSn  of  the  service  &  benevolence  of  the  said  Devreux 
one  of  the  late  Churchwardens  of  the  said  pish  Hath  Donn  for  y*  said 
pish  Church  in  beautifyeing  the  Roof  thereof  Wee  the  Parishioners 
under  named  att  a  Genall  pish  meeting  in  the  Channcell  of  the  said 
Church  on  Teuesday  the  Eighteenth  day  of  J une  Anno  Dm  1 695  Doe 
appoint  give  A  grant  unto  y*  said  Devreux  Edgar  his  herres  &  the 
owners  &  proprietors  of  the  s'*  Reddhouse  as  their  pper  right  and  to 
goe  along  w^**  &  to  be  annexed  to  the  said  house  one  pew  or  seate  or 
stoole,  situate  in  the  body  of  the  said  Church  Namely  the  West  side 
thereof  abutting  upon  a  ‘Pew  which  joynes  to  the  Passage  leading 
from  the  North  Isle  to  the  Middle  Isle,  The  East  side  joynes  to  a  Pew 
w'^  joyns  to  the  L"*  Viscount  Hereford’s  seat  The  North  head  joynes 
to  a  Pew  wherein  usually  sitteth  M'  John  Philips  M'  Joseph  Colman, 
A  Thomas  King  and  the  South  end  upon  the  middle  Isle  A  conteyne 
in  length  from  North  to  South  six  feet  And  from  East  to  West  three 
feet  two  inches  and  wee  doe  agree  that  the  said  Devreux  his  heires  A 


120 


THB  BAST  ABOLIAN  ;  OK, 


proprietors  of  the  s*  Keddhouse  shall  peaceably  sett  in  &  enjoy  the 
same  pew  or  seat  And  doe  request  this  our  grant  or  consent  may  be 
entered  in  its  proper  place  for  coufirma^u  thereof.  In  testimony 
whereof  we  the  parishioners  of  the  said  parish  have  hereunto  sett 
our  hands  the  day  &  yere  first  above  written. 

Isaac  Willoby 

(Signed)  J.  May 

Kob*  Graves 
Will  Tovell 
francis  Filcher 


Geo.  Stebbing  1  churchwardens 
John  Whiting  | 

Rob*  Kerrington  \  Overseears 
Edward  Hubbard  ] 


the 

Jeremiah  B  Bales 

mark 

Stephen  Willoby 
Henry  Hill 
Joseph  Col  man 
Thomas  King 
John  Tokely 
How^  Quinton 
Thomas  Broocke 


Written  in  the  margin  is  the  following  : — 

Memduii. — M'  Tho.  Banning  whoe  ^tended  an  interest  in  the 
Pew  (before  parted)  being  now  ^sent  did  before  the  subscripcbn  by 
us  underneath  grant  the  within  mentioned  Pew  or  Seat  to  the  s'* 
M'  D*  Edgar  as  w**“in  specifyed  and  made  choyse  of  the  Pew  next 
below  it,  for  his  own  use  &  sitting  in. 

A  further  “  Order  of  the  Vestry  ”  with  reference  to  the  same 
matter  was  subsequently  made  as  follows : — 

Memorandum. — Ipswich  y*  T***  Octo**  1706.  At  a  parish  meeting 
in  S‘  Margarett’s  Church  it  was  unanimously  agreed  and  ordered  by 
us  whose  names  are  hereunder  written  that  whereas  there  was  an 
order  formerly  made  for  the  seat  wherein  Mileson  Edgar  Esq**  now 
sits  to  be  for  y*  use  of  him  and  his  family  and  it  being  incapatious 
and  insufficient  to  contain  his  family  at  his  request  wee  the 
Parishioners  have  granted  and  consented  that  the  seat  wherein 
Mr.  Banning  late  deceas’d  sat  shall  be  added  thereunto  and  that 
Edward  Hubbard  Joyner  of  this  parish  do  forthwith  remove  the 
partition  between  the  s'*  two  seats  and  make  the  same  into  one  seat 
fitt  for  the  use  of  the  8“  Mileson  and  his  family. 


Witness  our  hands, 

Thos.  Brook  )  ou  u  j 

Eob.Kennington  j  Churchwardens 

John  Stevens  i 

Thos.  Turner  >  Overseers 

John  Turner  ) 


Leicester  Martin 
James  Mansur 
James  Sparhawk 
W.  Brooke 
W.  Hopper 
G.  E.  West 
Rob‘  Graves 
Thos.  Gray 
John  Doe 
Rob.  Giles 
Jos.  Willoby 


MOTBS  Ain>  QUBHIBB,  Xl'C. 


121 


SOME  FOUETEENTH  CENTURY  DOCUMENTS  RELATING 
TO  HERRINQSWELL,  CO.  SUFFOLK. 

These  documents,  which  came  into  my  possession  some  few  years 
ago,  are  in  an  extremely  good  state  of  preservation  and  have  suffered 
very  little  from  the  lapse  of  time.  They  are  numbered  from  one  to 
seven  (the  sixth  is  now  missing),  and  in  date  cover  the  whole  of  tlie 
century,  though  at  wide  intervals. 

The  earliest  (which  is  here  printed)  is  dated  1304  and  is, 
I  think,  of  a  kind  not  often  met  with,  being  a  “  terrier,”  or 
“schedule,”  of  the  various  strips  in  the  open  field  forming  a  small 
*  “  parcel  ”  of  land  bought  by  a  certain  John  Wysman,  and  by  him 

conveyed  to  trustees  fur  the  benefit  of  himself  and  his  wife,  as  noted 
in  the  first  and  last  clauses.  It  was  probably  appended  to  the  deed 
relating  to  the  purchase  or  perhaps  to  the  enfeoffment.  It  seems  to 
me  possible  that  we  have  here  a  complete  virgate  changing  hands, 
the  total  area  amounting,  as  far  as  I  have  been  able  to  reckon  it,  to 
about  twenty-five  acres  and  a  messuage  I  am  nut  aware,  however, 
of  the  normal  size  of  the  virgate  in  this  district. 

IThe  remaining  five,  which  I  hope  will  appear  in  these  pages  later 
on,  are  records  of  the  Manorial  Courts,  dated  1318,  1319,  137U,  1396, 
and  1399  respectively,  and  contain  many  interesting  entries. 

I  have  to  acknowledge  my  indebtedness  to  Mr.  Rogers  of  the 
l|j  University  Library,  Cambridge,  for  his  kind  assistance  in  deciphering 
I  some  of  these  documents. 

|j  Hzrbtnoeswxli,  32  Edw.  I. 

.  i^Endortement). 

No.  1.  Tekhibb,  1304.* 

I  tbinke  these  are  lands  in  Herrings  well,  f 
I  Stafford  f 

Pceft  t’r’  ten  q®ud’  Johis  do  [  ]  in  [Heryngeswell]  que 

■i  T  quas  Johes  Wysma  J  pquis  de  p’dco  Johne  de  [Stafford]. 

In  cruft’  in  med’  John  atte  Ijane§  latitud'  j  acr’. 
j  A  pud  Nynerudes  in  med’  tercia  ps  quatuor’  Rod’  &  dj  9t3 

I  j  rod  \  dJ. 

Apud  Halle  Fyueacres  tercia  ps  triu  rod’  in  med’  9t}  j  rod’, 
j  Apud  Stanefeldesty  iux  terr’  Abbatisse  de  Marhih  ||  dJ  acr’. 

*  This  is  in  a  much  later,  perhaps  quite  modem,  hand.  As  there  is  no  date  in 
-  the  document  itself,  it  may  possibly  be  rather  later  than  1304,  though  almost 
certainly  within  the  first  quarter  of  the  fourteenth  century. 

t  These  additions  are  in  an  early  seventeenth  century  hand. 

I  I  It  is  interesting  to  compare  these  names  with  those  appearing  in  the  Subsidy 

k  Boil  for  1327  \^Ea»t  Anglian,  new  ser.,  vol.  v.  p.  136.] 
p  f  “Of  Lakynghethe"  (see  Calendar  of  Feet  of  Fenee,  Suffolk,  p.  19.i). 

I-  II  The  Cistercian  Nunnery  at  Marham,  Norfolk,  founded  in  1249  by  Isabella  de 

IWarenne,  Countess  of  Arundel,  who  endowed  it  with  lands  in  Kentford,  Qaysle 
(Gazeley),  Needham,  and  Herringswell,  among  other  places.  It  was  dedicated  to 
the  Virgin  Mary,  Saint  Barbara,  and  St.  Kdmund  the  King,  and  belonged  to  Ely. 

(,  Some  slight  remains  of  the  buildings  are  still  in  existence.  [Sm  Blomfield’s 
^  Eietory  of  Norfolk  (Parkin),  vol.  viii.  p.  384.] 


‘,122 


THE  BAST  AEOLIAN  ;  0&, 


Itm  ibidm  iux  terr’  q*udm  Gilbti  Scharp  j  rod’  &  dj. 

'  Itm  apud  Stanfeld’  tercia  ps  triu  rod’  in  med’  gty  j  rod*. 

Itm  ex  pte  orient’  de  Stanfelde  iux  terr’  q®udfn  Wifti  Sparke  una 
butt’  lat’  j  rod’  &  dJ  apud  orient’  abutt’  sup  semita  duceute  de 
Wodewey  usqs  forera  de  Blountes.*  * 

Itm  apud  Harde  Gore  silt  apud  le  Potekyne  iux  t’r’  Bid  Sparkf 
ij  rod’  &  V  ped’. 

Itm  apud  Tounesende  iux  terr’  Pson^  rod’  &  dJ. 

Itm  ibidm  j  rod’  int’  terr’  Johis  Wysman  &  terr’  Jobis  atte 
Lane  ex  parte  bruer’. 

Itm  ultra  Threhowes  ex  parte  Occident’  t’r’  Pson  int’  terr’  q®udra 
Gilbti  Scharp  &  t’r’  Johis  Wysman  j  rod’  &  dj  &  iiij  ped’. 

Itm  in  eadm  quarentena  ex  pte  Occident’  dee  terr’  iux  t’r’  q°ud’ 
Bid  Sparkf  j  rod  &  dJ. 

Itm  in  eadih  quarentena  iux  t’r’  Johis  Wysman  abutt’  sr’  t’r’ 
Psoh  j  rod’. 

Itm  apud  Bogereshowe  iux  divisa  Edi  atte  Moor  dJ  acr’. 

ltd  apud  Holhowepat3  iux  divisam  Johis  Skot  dj  acr’. 

Itm  apd  Nedhm  Weye  f  iux  t’r’  Thom  Lykonn  mediet’  j  rod’ 
&  dJ. 

Itm  apd  le  Breche  ex  parte  Austr’  j  acr’. 

Sm 

Apxh)  Middelfeld. 

Apud  Broddeshauedlond  iux  Nedhm  weye  mediet’  dj  acr’  t’r’  ex 
parte  orient’  cont’  j  rod’. 

Apud  Bademere  int’  terr’  Johis  Wysman  ex  utraq}  pte  mediet’  ij 
rod’  &  dj  cont3  xx  ped’. 

Itm  apud  Badem’e  iux  t’r’  abbatisse  iij  ps  triu  rod’  913  j  rod’. 

Apud  Eueledespet  int’  terr’  Johis  Wysma  &  t’r’  qudm  Gilbti 
Scharp  ex  pte  orient’  j  rod’  &  dj  qd  9t3  dj  acr’. 

Itm  in  eadm  quarentena  inter  t’r’  Johis  Wysma  &  t’r’  q’ud 
Simon  Brouster’  uh  unu  capud  abuttat  sup  Southeth  9t3  dj  acr’. 

Itm  in  quarentena  sup  Ouerelangfourlonges  int’  terr’  Edi  atte 
Moor  &  t’r’  Johis  Wysma  long’  j  quarenteh  ad  capd  Austr’  dj  acr’. 

Itm  in  quarenteh  inferior’  de  Eueledespet  iux  t’r’  Johis  Skyleman 
j  rod’  &  dj  long'  ij  quarent’  cont3  ij  rod’. 

Itm  apud  Overelangfourlonges  iux  terr’  Pson  dj  acr’. 

Itm  apud  Seyte  Marie  Mere  in  supior’  quarentena  iux  t’r’  Johis 
Wysman  j  rod’  &  dj. 

Itm  ad  capud  cruft’  Bid  Sparkf  int’  terr’  Johis  de  Norwic  J  &  t’r’ 
Thom  Dycoun  j  rod’  &  dj. 

Itm  apud  Beeshowe  Weye  iux  terr’  Blountes  dj  acr’. 

Sm 

*  This  V  apparently  the  name  of  a  Manor  (see  Calendar  of  Feet  of  Finee, 
Suffolk,  p.  262),  but  I  cannot  trace  the  locality. 

t  Leading  to  the  Hamlet  of  Needham  Street  in  Oaaeley  Parish. 

^  Probably  the  first  John  de  Norwich,  son  of  Walter  and  father  of  the  second 
John  de  Norwich.  He  died  in  1316. 


M0TX8  AND  QUS&IBS,  ITC. 


133 


Estfsld.  j 

Apud  Lytlehowe  iux  terr*  Abbatisse  de  Marbm  &  abutt’  sup 
marisc’  toc’  ^uthmoor  dj  acr’.  i 

Itm  intercia  quarenten  a  marisc’  iux  t’r’  Thom  Dykou  i  ; 

rod’  4  dj.  i 

Itm  ex  part’  orient’  de  Crosdale  iux  terr’  Johis  Wysman  long’  ij 
quarent’  j  rod’  cont3  dJ  acr’. 

Itm  ibidm  in  tercia  quar'  a  bruer’  iux  t’r’  Johis  "Wysman  iij  rod’.  i 

Itm  in  camp  de  Todenbm  apud  Broydelond  mediet’  ii]  rod’ 
ex  pte  Austr’  j  rod’  &  dj’.  , 

It&  apud  Long  Mere  iux  divisam  Monachor^  *  iij  rod’. 

Itm  apud  Lytlehowe  ex  pte  Occident’  in  t’cia  quar’  a  marisc’  iux 
t’r’  Johis  Wysman  &  abuttat  sup  t’r’  q®ud’  Mathey  Beekf  dj’  acr’. 

Itm  apud  Southmorfourlongf  iux  t’r’  Johis  Wysman  &  t’r’  de 
Blountes  j  rod  &  dj’. 

Sm 

Nobthfxld. 

Ad  capud  vift  iux  terr’  q®udm  Nichi  Wysman  j  rod’. 

Apud  Boetheslade  inter  terr’  Johis  "Wysma  &  t’r’  Wi&i  Beek 
j  rod’  &  dj’. 

Itm  apud  Cleypettes  iux  t’r’  Johis  Skylman  t’cia  ps  iij  rod’  &  dj’ 

&  abuttat  sup  Berton  Weye  cont3  in  lat’  j  rod’  ij  ped’  &  dj’. 

Itm  apud  Slyghtefeld  iux  t’r’  q®udm  £di  atte  Moor  tercia  ps 
j  acr’  &  cont3  in  lat’  j  rod  y  ped’  &  dj’. 

Itm  supra  Cleypettes  abutt’  sup’  forer’  Thom  Buhyng  iux  t’r’ 

Johis  Skylman  p  estimac’  dj’  acr’. 

Itm  apud  Melneweye  abutt’  sup  Stokfurlongf  iux  t’r’  Abbat’  de 
Marbm  ex  parte  orient’  mediet’  iij  r^’  cont3  j  rod  &  dj’. 

Itm  in  j  quar’  abutt'  sup  camp  de  Berton  apud  Stenhyl  iux 
quadm  divisam  &  abuttat  sup  forer’  ad  capud  oriental’  que  abuttat  sup 
yiam  de  Berton  iux  t’r’  Johis  atte  I^ane  mediet’  dj’  acr’  t’r’  9t3  j  rod’. 

Itm  apud  Wrodebrodynge  iux  t’r’  de  Blountes  mediet’  dj’  acr’ 
abutt’  s’r  Melneweye  cont3  j  rod’. 

Itm  in  supior’  quarauteh  uh  capud  boria)  abut  tsr’  lynggor’  f  iux 
t’r’  quondih  Puttokes  ex  parte  Orient’  mediet’  dj’  acr’  t’r’  j  r^’. 

Itm  apud  Godemudeshowe  mediet’  iij  rod’  int’  terr’  Psoh  &  t’r’ 

Matil  Mud  et  abutt’  sup  bruer’  de  Berton  cont3  dj’  acr’. 

It&  in  eadm  quar’  ex  j^te  Occident’  t’cia  ps  j  acr’  &  dj’  iux  t’r’ 
q®udm  Qilbti  Scharp  &  abuttt  s’r  bruer’  de  Berton  cont3  dj’  acr’. 

Itm  apud  Cleypettes  iux  t’r’  q'udm  Mather’  Hoy  capit’  Occident’ 
abutt’  sup  Grenehyliys  j  rod’. 

Itm  apud  Halle  Bregge  iux  terr!  Abbat’  de  Marbm  mediet’ 
iij  rod’  abutt’  s’r  forera’  de  Blountes  cont3  j  rod’  &  dj’. 

•  This  may  be  a  reference  to  the  religious  foundation  at  Tuddenham,  the 
adjoining  parish,  about  which  1  can  gather  no  details. 

t  I  think  this  must  be  a  proper  name  for  I  can  find  no  medisval  word 
corresponding  to  it. 


124  THE  BAST  AHGIJAN  ;  OK, 

Itm  in  eadm  quar’  ex  pte  orient  iux  t’r’  q®udm  Agn  Eypedy 
mediet’  dj’  acr’  terr’  cont3  j  rod’. 

Itm  tercia  ps  terr’  subtus  Berton  Doune  ubi  conting  sep  in  medio 
inf  partem  fr’  Johis  Wysman  &  Johis  atte  Lane  que  continet. 

8m 


Plus  in  teroa. 

(In  dorto). 

[M^]  Adhuc  de  [tint]  q“ud’  Jobis  de  Stafford  ut  inf’. 

Itm  mediet’unius  crofti  inter  ciausu  q°udfn  'Ihom  Bunyng  &  clans’ 
q°udtn  Eaterine  de  Southeth'ex  pte  Burial’  unde  capud  Occident’ 
abuttat  sup  Berton  weye  &  capud  orient’  abuttat  sup  Halywelle  strem 
que  cont’  j  acr’  p  estimac’. 

Itm  tercia  ps  mesuag’  q^udm  Johis  Seman*  put  dividif  p  bundas 
inter  aulam  &  ceter’  domos  q'’udm  Alic’  Seman  &  mesuag’  Johis 
Wysman.  Jt  fcia  ps  med’  dil  Worwes}erd  in  medio  inf  pte  Johis 
Wysma  &  ptem  Johis  atte  Lane. 

Itm  ui^  de  octo  acr’  terr’  &  prati  in  quodm  claus’  voc’  le  Bery  que 
q'udm  fuer’  Nichl  Wysman  &  Willi  Fraunceys. 

D’  quib)  q’dm  omib}  tenemf  pd  cSs  Jobhes  {Wysman  feoffav 
Johni  Palfreyman  capeh  &  Audi-’  le  Cockf  de  Ffordhih  ad  refeoffaud’ 
pdcih  Johni  Wysman  &  Aliciam  ux’  eius,  &c. 

„  R.  G.  C.  Livett. 

Fulboum*. 


THE  ACCOUNTS  OF  THE  COLLECTORS  FOR  THE  SCOTCH 
LOAN  IN  CAMBRIDGESHIRE,  1643—1644.  Part  II. 


Continued  from  vol.  vi.,  p.  345. 

[The  names  of  subscribers  in  the  town  of  Cambridge  here 
follow  in  the  original  document.  The  amount  raised  was  £214.  be.  4d. 
There  is  no  mention  of  the  Isle  of  Ely.  The  total  given  in  the 
document  is  £2154.  6«.  4d.] 

Disbubsbmbntb. 


£.  «.  d. 

For  a  paper  booke  . .  ..034 

20  score  acquittances  . .  0  5  0 

For  a  fyrkyne  nayles  & 

porteringe  here  and  there  0  3  3 
t  For  printing  I  do  tickets  ..  0  2  6 

Printing  300  tickets  k  wyare  0  5  6 

I M”  Ledduin  at  Eglene 
ChUde  . 0  18  0 


£.  t.  d. 

2  journeys  to  London  to 
bring  up  the  money  . .  0  15  3 

A  sow^  (P  allowed)  for  gould 

&  dollars  being  to  light  . .  0  2  10 

For  packing  up  next  sum  k 
porteringe  ..  ..  0  2  6 

For  carrying  up  of  £600  , .  1  10  0 

To  M'  Smith  Sollisiter  . .  4  0  0 


*  Of  Barton  ;  a  landholder  in  many  of  the  adjacent  parishea 
t  The  printer’s  name  was  Daniel  Vewant. 

^  The  “hiagle  and  Child,”  now  called  the  “Eagle,”  in  Benet  Street. 


N0TB8  AND  QUERIK8,  BTC. 


125 


£.  «.  d. 

M'  Philip  Smith  Solycyter  2  10  0 
10  score  warrants  ..034 

For  my  horse  hire  &  charge 
to  Ix>nd<in  ..  15  6 

Anthony  Hatton  for  laying 
of  the  tickets  . .  . .  10  0 

To  M'  Smith  Solisy  ter  . .  4  0  0 

P<t  for  acquittances  . .  0  3  9 

For  packing  &  portering  the 
money  . .  . .  ..130 

M'  Smith  Solysitor  . .  10  0 

For  tickets  . .  . .  ..036 

M' Smith. ..  .journey  ..  4  0  0 

My  charges  next  to  London  0  16  6 

•  To  Godfrey  Tinke  . .  112  0 

M'  Harte  forcarriage  of  money  2  12  0 


£.  «.  d. 

Paid  for  paper  . .  ..010 

Paid  for  Bages  . .  ..014 

t  Wages  allowed  me  at  2"* 

in£l  . 17  12  3 

For  carrying  up  last  money 

and  porteringe  . .  . .  7  0  0 

M' Smith  Sollysiter  ..  9  10  0 

Two  journeys  to  London  ..  1  14  0 

M' Smith  Sollysitor  ..10  0  8 

Mrt»  Jane  Smith  ..  ..  2  10  0 

Paper  St,  wvare  . .  ..013 

Mo*  Jane  Smith  ..  ..  10  0 

Receipts  &  warrants  produced 

Total  of  the  disburse-  |  I 

ments  ..  ..  j  ^ 


A  particular  of  the  several  payments  upon  this  accompt: — 

1645. 

April  24th.  Paid  to  Richard  Waringe  &  Michael  £.  i.  d. 

Herringe  at  Goldsmith's  Hall  ..  600  0  0 

June  10th.  More  paid  to  them  ..  ..  ..  370  0  0 

July  23rd.  „  ,,  „  ..  ..  ..  610  0  0 

Aug.  23rd.  ,,  ,,  ..  210  0  0 

Dec.  loth.  ,,  ,,  >1  ..  ..  .•  200  0  0 

1646. 

June  23rd.  ,,  ,,  •>  ••  ••  ..  85  0  0 

Disbursements  ..  ..  ..  71182 


£2146  18  2 


£.  I.  d. 

The  total  of  the  Charge  is  ..  2154  6  4 

So  there  rests  in  my  hands  . .  4  8  2 

[which  is  accounted  for  the  following  memoranda  of  later  date] : — 

1649. 

Oct.  11th.  Paid  to  George  Crompton  and  Nathan  £.  t.  d. 

Stirrop  at  Worcester  House  4  8  2 

Jurat’  coram  Tho’  Richardson  &  Henry  Brand,  7th  May,  1650. 

In  the  Journalt  of  the  Home  of  Lorde,  vol.  vi.,  pp.  279-82,  is  the 
ordinance  for  “raising  £66.666.  13*.  Ad.  by  way  of  loan  for  the  better 
enabling  of  our  brethren  of  Scotland  for  our  assistance  and  defence 
in  the  common  cause  of  our  religion  and  liberty.’’  The  county  of 
Cambridge  with  the  Isle  of  Ely  was  to  raise  £2000,  and  responded 
with  £2154.  6s.  Ad.  Surely  a  remarkable  achievement !  The  ordinance 
gives  no  details  about  assessment  or  collection,  so  we  may  assume  that 
the  old  methods  of  raising  subsidy  or  loan  for  a  king  was  followed. 
But  certain  general  directions  are  given.  No  one  was  to  be  forced 


*  He  WM  one  of  the  bailiffs  who,  when  collecting  ship-money,  got  illtreated  in 
a  riot  at  Melboum. 

t  His  wage  does  not  seem  excessive  when  compared  with  the  £2  and  28«.  a  week, 
which  were  sdlowed  to  the  sequestrators  of  royalists’  estates  and  their  agents 
respectively. 


126  THB  BAST  ABGLIAW;  OB 

to  lend  unless  his  means  exceeded  £1000.  The  greater  loan  was  to  be 
set  upon  the  most  able  and  richest  men,  and  those  who  had  not  “  upon 
this  or  the  like  occasion  of  money  manifested  their  good  affections  to 
the  public.”  Power  of  distraint  was  given  towards  those  refusing 
to  pay,  which  distraint  was  to  be  made  in  the  daytime,  and  distrainers 
were  to  be  allowed  2«.  in  the  £  of  every  sum  for  which  distraint  was 
made.  The  treasurers  in  London  were  Bichard  Waring  and  Michael 
Herring.  The  Parliamentary  Committee  were  to  nominate  in  each 
county,  city,  or  great  town,  three  or  more  persons  of  rank,  who  were 
to  nominate  two  or  more  persons  in  each  hundred.  These  local  people 
were  between  them  to  make  a  return  to  the  committee  of  all  persons 
having  £1000,  and  who  had  not  voluntarily  sent  their  contribution. 
In  the  lists  the  phrase  “  by  him  voluntarily  sent  ”  occurs  frequently. 

W.  M.  Pauibr. 

ZintoM,  Camb$. 


CAMBRIDGESHIBE  SUBSIDY  ROLI^.  No.  XXXII. 


W$»tley  Waterleu. 


£.  *.  d. 

*  Mr.  Robert  Gregory, 

clerk  . .  . .  3  6  8 


Mr.  Thomas  Turner 

(W.  Hall)  ..  ..13  6  8 

Mr.  Samuel  Westley  1  13  4 


Weston  Colville. 


£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

Richard  Thurg^ood  . . 

5 

13 

4 

John  Smith,  jun. 

0 

18 

0 

William  Bridge 

2 

10 

0 

Jeane  Ware,  widow 

2 

0 

0 

t  Mr.  Abraham  Gates 

8 

0 

0 

Thomas  Flack 

1 

5 

0 

John  Smith,  sen. 

1 

10 

0 

West  Wickham. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

£. 

s. 

d. 

t  John  Flack  (Stretley 

J  Jeffery  Flack 

2 

0 

0 

Hall) 

1 

16 

8 

Zackary  Bentham,  by 

John  Allen  . .  . . 

1 

6 

8 

him  voluntarily  sent 

0 

10 

0 

^  Robert  Flack 

0 

10 

0 

*  Vicar  from  1604  until  his  death  in  1648. 
t  Vicar  from  1606  until  his  death  in  1646. 
I  See  under  Horseheath. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 

127 

£. 

Went  W 

s.  d.  1 

'ratting. 

£. 

I. 

d. 

Gilbert  Morden  , .  2 

3 

4 

Robert  Missing 

2 

6 

8 

William  Tilbrocke  . .  3 

0 

0 

Mrs.  Hynnage 

4 

0 

0 

*  Doctor  Andrew  Perene  2 

0 

0 

Thomas  Simon 

2 

0 

0 

Mr.  Dolton,  for  his 
mother, Mrs.Nicholls  6 

0 

0 

Mrs.  Harrington  and 
John  Cooke 

6 

13 

4 

Robert  Woollard,  sen.  2 

10 

0 

George  Blackabye  . . 

0 

16 

8 

Richard  Webb  . .  3 

10 

0 

Dan  Wollward 

1 

10 

0 

John  Flack  (Tenhale)  2 

13 

4 

John  Woollard  .. 

1 

10 

0 

Robert  Woollard,  jun.  1 

6 

8 

J  William  Flack  . , 

2 

6 

8 

1  Mrs.  Mary  Dalton  6 

0 

0 

Dorothy  Brown 

2 

15 

0 

£. 

s. 

JTk 

d. 

cken. 

£. 

». 

d. 

John  Munsey  . .  2 

0 

0 

Peter  Roote  . . 

0 

10 

0 

Peter  Jemoyce  . .  1 

13 

4 

Mrs.  Barow,  widow . , 

4 

0 

0 

Linton,  Combo. 

{To 

he  continued).  W.  M. 

Palker. 

Ths  Seiztire  op  a  Bride  in  Church. — At  8.  Margaret’s  Church, 
Ipswich,  Patrick  May  and  Mary  Capon  were  married  by  licence, 
July  27th,  1826,  by  the  Rev.  C.  W.  Fonnereau,  who  accounts  for  the 
a)>8ence  of  the  woman’s  signature  in  a  note  to  the  effect  that  “  Mary 
Capon  was  prevented  signing  her  name  by  the  forcible  seizure  of  her 
person  by  her  father,  who  took  her  out  of  Church  after  her  marriage.” 
How  far  the  contract  was  imperilled  is  open  to  doubt.  It  would  be 
interesting  to  learn  what  steps,  if  any,  were  taken  to  procure  the 
woman’s  signature ;  and  also  of  the  attitude  of  the  husband  conse¬ 
quent  on  the  father’s. action.  May  and  Capon  are  well-known  names 
in  Ipswich. 


QUERIES. 

Field  or  Meadow  Books. — I  should  be  glad  of  any  information 
respecting  Field  or  Meadow  Books  in  use  in  East  Anglia  previous  to 
the  enclosure  of  Common  land  with  a  view  to  classify  and  register 
references  to  the  various  divisions  of  land,  measurements,  descriptions, 
terms  of  holding,  and  the  like.  A  F  N 


*  He  owned  the  Manor  of  Scarletts  in  this  parish. 

t  Mrs.  Mary  Dalton  was  apparently  the  widow  of  Michael  Dalton,  anthor  of 
the  Compl4t$  Juttiet,  who  died  in  1644.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Sir  Giles  Allington, 
and  died  in  1647. 

{  Appointed  Vicar,  4th  November,  1614.  Remained  through  the  Civil  War, 
but  described  by  Parliamentary  Commissioners  of  1 650  as  “  a  man  very  insufScient 
for  the  plaoe.”  He  retained  possession,  however,  until  his  death  in  1657. 


128 


THE  EAST  AHOLIAH;  OR, 


Mr.  Tottnsbhd,  a  Minister  in  Norwich. — This  worthy  is 
mentioned  in  that  remarkable  compilation,  “  A  Retrospective-glass 
for, the  Quakers”  (p.  493),  by  Francis  Bugg,  who  was  Registrar  to 
the  quarterly  meeting  held  at  Haddenham  in  the  Isle  of  Ely  towards 
the  close  of  the  seventeenth  century.  Mr.  Townsend,  after  defending 
the  doctrine  of  the  Holy  Trinity,  was  assailed  by  George  Whitehead 

in  the  most  insulting  terras  : — “  Blind  beast,  ignorant  of  God . 

thou  priest,  Townsend,  art  reserved  in  everlasting  chains.  &c.,  &c.”) 
What  is  known  of  Mr.  Townsend  ?  It  is  clear  enough  that  suffering 
for  “  conscience  sake  ”  was  not  all  on  the  side  of  the  persecuted 
Quakers. 


“Tratler.” — In  the  Parish  Register  of  St.  Margaret’s,  Ipswich, 
is  the  following  burial  entry  :  —  “  1795.  John  Steward  a  Trayltr  from 
the  Buck — poor — December  the  16.”  Was  the  word  “trayler”  ever 
used  in  the  sense  of  “traveller”  or  “tramp.”  which  is  piobably  the 
meaning  here  ?  The  Running  Buck  is  a  well  known  hostelry  in  the 
parish.  _ 


REPLY. 

The  Nevills  of  Long  Melford  (p.  112). — The  Coat  is.  on  a 
field  Azure,  three  bustards  Or,  volentes  volare ;  also  held  by  the 
extinct  family  of  Nevills  of  Halstead,  and  Nevills  of  Nottingham, 
and  in  Kent's  Heraldry,  1701,  placed  above  the  Abergavenny  ('oat. 
It  is  on  the  tomb  of  Edward  Nevill*  in  St.  Matthew’s,  Ipswich,  and 
on  that  of  Isaac  Nevill  (1693)  in  Lavenham  Church,  impaled  with 
Wiseman,  and  the  crest  an  armed  man.  Isaac  Nevill  was  pricked 
for  High  Sheriff  of  Suffolk  in  his  time. 


A  “Record”  History  of  Suffolk. — We  have  much  satisfaction  in  calling 
attention  to  proposals  lately  put  forward  by  Dr.  Copinger  for  the  issue,  by  subscrip¬ 
tion,  of  a  work  that  cannot  inil  to  prove  of  the  utmost  value  and  importance  to  the 
County  of  Suffolk,  and  particularly  to  those  who  are  workers  in  this  special  field  of 
local  research.  Dr.  Copinger  very  properly  regards  its  history  as  incomplete,  until 
much  more  exactly  disposed  of  by  reference  to  records  and  other  documents  that 
are  practically  beyond  the  reach  of  many  students  owing  to  the  difSculty  of  ascer¬ 
taining  their  whereabouts.  This  veritable  history  of  Suffolk  will  be  gleaned  mainly 
from  MSS  Charters  and  Rolls  in  the  British  .Museum  and  other  public  and  private 
depositories,  the  State  papers.  Record  Commissioners’  publications,  &c.,  Ac.  It  is 
estimated  that  the  work  will  contain  upwards  of  100,000  references,  and  will  include 
a  bibliography  of  Suffolk.  It  will  be  seen  that  this  “  History  of  Suffolk’’  will  form, 
in  a  very  real  sense,  a  “  record  ”  compilation,  the  like  of  which  has  never  so  much 
as  been  attemptei  either  in  East  Anglia  or  outside  its  borders.  Dr.  Copinger’s 
laborious  undertaking  is  one  that  certainly  merits  grateful  acknowledgment,  and  we 
trust,  if  not  already  the  case,  that  the  limited  edition  will  be  wholly  taken  up.  ’I'he 
work  will'  l>e  in  five  vols.,  each  of  400  pp.,  to  be  issued  at  the  suWription  price  of 
£1.  It.  per  vol.  Dr.  Copinger  also  contemplates  the  issue,  through  Mr.  Fisher 
Unwin,  of  a  Manorial  History  of  Suffolk,  which  may  well  find  a  place  by  the  side 
of  Mr.  J.  J.  Muskett’s  valuable  work,  Suffolk  Manorial  Familiet. 

*  There  is  no  description  of  Edward  Nevill’s  tomb  in  Haslewood’s 
“Monumental  Inscriptions  of  St.  Matthew’s,  Ipswich.” — Ed. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


129 


\  CAMBRIDGESHIRE  HEIRESS  OF  THE  EIGHTEENTH 
CENTURY. 

The  Rev.  W.  Cole,  in  the  ninth  volume  of  his  Collections  (Add. 
MSS.,  5810)  relates  the  following  interesting  story  of  the  two  sons  of 
a  Cambridgeshire  farmer  who  mounted  to  wealth  and  position. 

Ik  Wendt  Church. 

On  a  large  freestone  just  in  the  middle,  about  3  ft.  from  the  step 
of  the  altar,  is  the  inscription  : — 

“H.S.E.  I  quod  mortale  fuit  |  Thomse  Revell  |  Generosi  |  Qui 

obiit  Martii  i  |  anno  |  |  1  jtixti  mariti  cineres  | 

Maria  Revell  I  quee  obiit  Aprilis  28— .£t  78.”  | 

Mr.  Revell  was  steward  to  the  present  Lord  Sandys,  and  has  a 
son  in  the  same  employ.  Another  of  his  sons  is  Thomas  Revell,  Esq., 
Member  for  Dover  Port,  and  has  a  place  under  the  Government. 

Writtm  later. 

“This  Thomas  and  Mary  Revell  at  first  were  both  servants  in  the 
family  of  Mr.  Nightingale  of  Kneesworth  in  this  county.  They 
afterwards  married  and  took  a  farm  at  Shengay,  under  my  lord  Orford, 
who,  taking  a  liking  to  their  two  eldest  sons,  Thomas  and  Russell, 
gave  them  an  English  education,  and  got  them  both  places  in  the 
Victualling  Office.  The  eldest,  Thomas,  was  Member  of  Parliament 
for  Dover,  and  dying  (1752)  at  Bath,  as  I  think,  was  buried  at  or  near 
Leatherhead  in  Surrey,  leaving  an  only  daughter  behind  him,  to 
whom  he  left  about  £120,000  or  £130,000.  It  is  thought  she  is  to  be 
married  to  the  present  Duke  of  Bridgewater,  her  cousin,  for  her 
father  married  a  cousin,  or  as  some  thought  a  natural  daughter  of 
the  late  Duke  of  Bridgewater.*  He  was  exceedingly  afflicted  with 
the  gout  all  his  life,  as  was  his  brother  Russell.  In  case  his  daughter 
dies  unmarried  he  has  left  all  his  wealth  got  out  of  the  public  to  the 
Hon.  Mr.  Pelham.  His  brother,  Russell  Revell,  had  a  place  in  the 
Victualling  Office,  and  lived  many  years  in  Port  Mahon,  where  he 
amassed  together  about  £40,000,  which,  leaving  no  children  behind 
him,  though  married  formerly  and  parted  from  his  wife  who  died 
before  him,  he  left  to  a  cousin,  one  Mr.  Gray,  a  Quaker  of  God- 
manchester  and  a  worsted  garter  weaver,  though  he  had  much  nearer 
relations  to  heir  it,  as  in  particular,  an  only  daughter  of  a  younger 
brother  who  held  a  farm  at  Shengay,  and  who  left  about  £2,000  to 
his  daughter,  who  is  going  to  be  married  to  Mr.  Kilborne  of  Malden 
against  the  consent  of  her  uncle,  which  is  sup|M)sed  to  be  the  occasion 
of  altering  his  will.  He  died  at  an  hired  house  at  Hodsdun,  to  which 
he  was  just  removed  about  September,  1752,  and  was  buried  very 

•  Marria«;es  for  the  year  1738  : — “  May  12.  Thomas  Revel,  Esq.,  Commissioner 
of  the  Victuailinfi'  Office  and  Member  for  Dover,  to  Miss  Eg^erton,  niece  to  the  Duke 
of  Bridgewater.’’ — OtntUmm’i  MagaMine,  vol.  viii,,  p.  276. 

K 


I 


130 


THK  BAST  ANOI.IAK  ;  OK, 


grandly  Id  this  church  according  to  his  desire,  though  not  a  relation 
there  to  attend  his  funeral.” 

In  his  will  (P.O.C.)  Thomas  Bevell  bequeathed  to  his  sister 
'  Ann  Warner  £1,000;  to  his  brother  Bussell  Bevell,  for  mourning, 
200  guineas;  to  his  neice  Ann  Bevell,  £1,000;  and  to  his  nephew 
Benry  Warner,  for  mourning,  20  guineas.  Some  of  the  remaining 
bequests  show  that  this  self-made  man  had  many  friends  in  the 
highest  ranks  of  society : — To  the  Earl  of  Scarborough,  Lord  Vere, 
Thomas  Whichcot,  Esq.,  Samuel  Egerton,  Esq.,  William  Cayley,  Esq., 
Bichard  Hall.  Esq.,  to  each  100  guineas;  to  the  Hon.  Mr.  Pelham, 
300 ‘guineas  for  a  ring;  to  William  Bivett  of  the  Temple,  Esq., 
20  guineas;  to  Sir  Bichaid  Lloyd,  20  guineas;  to  each  of  his 
Executors,  Samuel  Egerton,  Bussell  Bevell,  and  Denham  Street,  Esq., 
of  the  Victualling  Office,  300  guineas.  All  the  residue — £120, 000  or 
£130,000  according  to  Cole,  or  £200,000  according  to  the  OentUmen’i 
Magazint,  vol.  xxviii.,  p.  292 — he  left  to  his  daughter  Jane,  with 
remainder,  if  she  should  die  unmarried  before  the  age  of  twenty-one, 
to  his  brother  Bussell  Bevell  and  his  niece  Ann  Bevell.  and  with 
ultimate  remainder  to  the  Hospital  for  the  Maintenance  of  Exposed 
and  Deserted  Young  Children. 

The  testator  realised  that  in  those  days  of  abduction  and  forcible 
marriage  the  position  of  his  child  after  his  death  would  be  of  no 
little  peril,  and  made  careful  provision  for  her  being  put  at  once  in  a 
place  of  safety : — “  If  it  please  God  I  should  not  recover  my  present 
illness,  I  desire  immediately  after  my  decease,  that  my  daughter  may 
be  carried  in  my  coach  by  the  Bev.  Mr.  Warner  and  Mr.  (Charles 
Gascoigne  Bale  to  my  brother  Bussell  Bevell,  Esq.,  at  Hammersmith, 
and  delivered  unto  his  charge  as  one  of  her  guardians,  and  to 
remain  so  until  he  and  Samuel  Egerton.  Esq.,  her  other  guardian, 
shall  consult  together  and  consider  what  will  be  most  proper  to  be 
done  with  her.  And  in  case  she  immediately  remain  under  their 
own  particular  care,  I  then  give  them  leave  to  make  use  of,  if  they 
think  fit.  my  house,  late  Dean  of  Hereford’s,  in  ('leveland  Bow,  ready 
furnished  as  it  now  is,  and  rent  free  to  them  or  either  of  them  so  long 
as  my  daughter  shall  be  with  them.” 

Bevell  had,  apparently,  not  succeeded  so  well  by  niere  luck.  At 
any  rate  he  appreciated  the  importance  of  y'outhful  application  to 
study  and  work: — “I  likewise  make  it  my  request  to  the  said 
guardians  to  keep  my  daughter  for  at  least  three  or  four  years  close 
to  her  grammar  and  other  necessary  learning  and  working  without 
interruption  by  any  unnecessary  pleasure,  because  I  look  upon 
pleasure  and  on  learning  to  be  incompatible  things.” 

But  though  strict  in  his  ideas  respecting  education,  he  was  by  no 
means  niggardly  with  regard  to  the  pecuniary  provision  he  made  for 
her,  directing  his  executors  to  allow  her  such  “decent  maintenance” 
as  they  shall  think  proper,  but  “  not  less  than  £300  a  year  till  she 
arrives  at  the  age  of  13,  nor  less  than  £-IOo  from  13  to  14  years  of  age, 
nor  less  than  £600  from  14  to  15  years  of  age,  nor  less  than  £000 
from  15  to  16  years  of  age,  nor  loss  than  £800  from  16  to  18  years  of 
age,  nor  less  than  £1,200  from  18  to  21  years  of  age.” 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


131 


Probably  the  rumour  of  Miss  Jane’s  engagement  to  her  cousin 
was  a  false  one.  At  any  rate  the  marriage  never  came  off,  for  the 
Duke  of  Bridgewater,  “the  Father  of  British  Inland  Navigation,” 
died  unmarried  in  1803,  the  last  of  his  line.  The  happy  man  who 
won  the  fair  heiress,  plus  her  £200,000,  was  ISir  Qeorge  Warren,  K.B., 
the  last  male  of  an  ancient  family  which  had  held  the  Estate  of 
Poynton  in  Cheshire  almost  uninterruptedly  since  it  formed  part  of 
Earl  Warrenne’s  extensive  possessions  at  the  time  of  Domesday. 
But  the  union  did  not  last  long.  Lady  Warren  was  buried  at 
Stockport,  26th  December,  1761,  three  years  after  her  marriage,  and 
when  but  twenty-two  years  of  age.  Her  only  child,  Elizabeth 
Harriott,  took  the  Poynton  Estate  in  marriage  to  the  last  Viscount 
Bulkeley,  through  whom  it  descended  to  the  Vernon  family,  the 
present  owners.  Doubtless,  Miss  Revell’s  fortune  proved  very 
acceptable  to  her  husband,  who  rebuilt  the  Hall  at  Poynton  on  a 
large  scale,  and  made  numerous  other  improvements  on  the  estate. 

Seagrate  Rectory,  Loughborough.  WaxTER  JoNES. 


HIDDEN  TREASURE  IN  OLDEN  TIMES. 

The  romance  of  buried  treasure,  in  some  form  or  another,  is 
continually  with  us,  but  it  is  seldom  that  the  confines  of  reason  and 
common  sense  are  so  completely  overstepped  that  the  fascination 
attached  to  its  investigation-  is  lost  in  pitiable  absurdity.  Certainly 
the  search  for  hidden  treasure  is  no  new  thing,  but  it  probably  has 
never  assumed  the  pseudo-character  of  hunting  for  that  which  is  well 
understood  never  to  have  been  lost !  Much  treasure  was  necessarily 
hidden  in  the  earth,  in  former  days,  mainly  for  security,  and  the 
discovery  from  time  to  time  of  bullion,  coin,  and  articles  of  value 
never  failed  to  arouse  those  who  would  fain  traverse  a  royal  road 
to  wealth.  The  senseless  project  recently  set  on  foot  by  certain 
enterprising  newspaper  proprietors,  bent  upon  notoriety  and  self- 
advertisement,  in  which  a  metal  disc,  or  some  like  token,  representing 
particular  value  is  hidden  away,  to  be  discovered  by  such  as  are 
successful  enough  to  follow  a  certain  cue,  has  certainly  the  charm  of 
novelty,  and  is  probably  an  original,  if  not  a  very  brilliant  device  for 
directing  treasure  into  another  channel  than  that  supposed  to  be 
intended. 

Although  it  is  reserved  for  the  early  days  of  the  twentieth 
century  to  strike  this  particular  vein,  yet  the  disturbance  of  the  soil 
and  injury  to  property  caused  by  the  pursuit,  together  with  the 
ultimate  punishment  of  the  perpetrators,  and  the  restraint  of  the 
originators,  bears  some  analogy  to  the  course  of  events  in  former 
times.  It  is  recorded  in  the  unpublished  Rolls  of  the  Rectory  Manor 
of  Cottenhain,  Cambridgeshire,  that  in  the  year  1487  Thomas  Qygner, 
Thomas  King.  Robert  Leat,  John  Green,  and  Nicholas  Reynolds  were 
each  fined  twelve  pence  for  digging  in  tearch  of  silver  without  license 

K  2 


13J 


THE  EAST  ANOUAH  ;  OH, 


Oil  laud  called  “Jakes,”  next  to  “Bigyng’s  Croft  end.”  Doubtless 
there  was  good  ground  for  the  exploration,  and  it  is  not  unlikely  that 
the  early  Court  Bolls  of  other  mauors  furnish  similar  particulars  of 
search  and  restraint.  While  there  is  no  clue  to  the  particular 
character  of  the  silver  sought  for  at  Cottenham  in  the  fifteeuth 
century,  it  is  not  a  little  curious  that  in  the  mouth  of  August,  1715, 
nearly  a  thousand  pieces  of  silver  coin  were  found  at  Cottenham,  upon 
“London  Hill,”  about  half-a-mile  from  Bampton,  on  what  is  now 
known  as  the  Bampton  Boad.  The  coin  was  of  the  reign  of  Hen.  II., 
and  was  discovered  by  a  shepherd,  who  found  it  in  a  small  earthen 
vessel,  green  with  age.  Several  people  of  the  town,  digging  a  foot  or 
two  beneath  the  surface,  are  said  to  have  found  similar  pieces  of 
money.  This  latter  incident  (fur  which  we  are  indebted  to  Miss 
Parsons  of  Horseheath)  is  recorded  in  the  Steel  MSS.,  Topog.  Cambe, 
C.  1,  Bodleian  Library,  Oxford,  under  Hampton,  Camht. 

It  would  be  worth  while  to  place  other  like  instances  on  record  in 
these  pages. 


A  CALENDAB  OF  FEET  OF  FINES  FOB  ESSEX.  No.  LXVI. 

Trinity.  7  James  I. 

1.  W“  Tanner  Johane  Haskler  wid.  mess,  in  Chelmesford. 

2.  Henry  Brown wynt  gent,  John  Tayler  arm.  T;  Susan  his  wife 
moiety  of  messuage  1  land  in  Ham  als  Westham. 

3.  Thomas  Whitley  John  Wylde  gent.  Johane  his  wife  mess, 
land  in  Barking. 

4.  Tho.  Branston  T;  Bobert  Branston  Johane  his  wife  land  in 
Bamsden,  Bellowes  Gt.  Buisted. 

5.  Bobert  Bas-se  gent.  Tho.  Tayleford  \  Eliz.  his  wife  mess.  T 

land  in  Stapleford  Tawney,  Stamford  By  vers  High  Onger. 

6.  Tho.  Trotter  John  Fortune  \  Cecilia  his  wife  mess,  in 
Bayloigh. 

7.  John  Gardener,  John  Clarke  gent,  Anne  his  wife  *1  Bic. 
Jennyns  mess,  land  in  Stistedd,  Halstedd  Potteswicke. 

8.  Christopher  Searle  *1  John  Hyndes  als  Haynes  T;  Grace  his 
wife  mess,  land  in  Northweald  Bassett.  Warrant  against  Tho. 
Parrant  brother  of  John  Parrant  dec.  James  brother  of  Thomas. 

9.  Alice  Dune  wid.  Anthony  Cowper  Nathaniel  Burridge 
Eliz.  his  wife  mess.  T;  land  in  Fering. 

10.  Bobert  Hill  Boger  Buckley  *1  Martha  his  wife  mess.  T 
land  in  Gt.  Wareley  'X  Childerdiche. 

11.  W“  Bone  1  Bobert  Hutt  Eliz.  his  wife  mess,  in  Witham. 

12.  W™  Woods  Bobert  Ongham  ais  Offyne  Margaret  his 
wife  mess.  'X  land  in  Great  'X  Little  Baddowe. 

13.  Edward  Hastley,  Geo.  Freind  %  Boger  Sharman  %  Margaret 
his  wife  mess,  in  Maldou. 

14.  Bic.  Browning  jun.  Abell  Clearke  John  Clearke  Manor 
of  Estnewland  with  mess.  *1  land  in  S.  Lawrence. 


xu^ 


I 


IfOTKS  AND  QUERIES,  ETC.  133 

I  15.  Henry  Whiffin  John  Hankin  Eliz.  his  wife  moiety  of 

I  1  mess.  *1  land  in  Wethersfeild. 

^  16.  Tho.  Hackett  Daniel  Holstock  mess.  land  in  Orsett. 

^  17.  Laurence  Campe,  Owin  Davis  Ric.  AUanson  mess.  1  land 

in  Hornchurch. 

[  18.  Tho.  Willowes,  James  Elwicke  jun.  gent,  George  Reynolds 

j  mess,  t  land  in  Gt.  Ciiesterforde  Little  Chesterford. 

19.  Henry  Edes  t  Ric.  Holmested  clerk 't  Eliz.  his  wife  mess.  1 
[  land  in  Rocking.  j 

.  I  20.  Nicholas  Vavasor,  W™  Hanford  Robert  Hall  arm.  Anne 

[  his  wife  mess.  ‘I  land  in  Waltliam  Holy  Cross. 

I  21.  Paul  Bayninge  sen.  arm.,  Paul  Bayning  jun.  Waldegrave 

Abell  arm.  Alice  his  wife  t  John  Abell  gent.  Manor  of  Landeyme 
Hall  with  mess,  lands  rents  in  Thorpe  1  Krbie. 

22.  Sir  W'"  Ryder  knt.  Sir  Tho.  Lake 't  Sir  Baptist  Hicks  knt. 
t  Eliz.  his  wife  mess.  land  in  Leyton  als  Lowe  Leyton, 
j  23.  Henry  Addam  t  Geo.  Aylett  Mary  his  wife  land  in  Hat- 

feild  Broadock  ats  Hatfeild  Regis. 

24.  Robert  Vigorous  t  Ric.  Wenlock  Mary  his  wife  mess,  in 
Langham. 

25.  Edw.  White  Ric.  Baker  *1  Faith  his  wife  mess,  t  land  in 
Thaxted.  Warrant  against  heirs  of  Agnes  Benton  wid.  dec. 

I  26.  John  Gratoner  %  Clement  Devenishe  \  Sarah  his  wife 

Eliz.  Marsh  wid.  land  in  Witham 't  Falkborne. 

27.  Ric.  AUanson 't  Kobt.  Hare't  Jane  his  wife  mess,  in  Romford. 

28.  John  Rowley  jun.  gent.  W“  Rowley,  Edward  Bird,  gent.  ^ 

!  1  Sarah  his  wife  Manor  of  Mulehall  ats  Molehale,  Depden  ats  Debden  i 

i  with  mess,  lands  in  Amberden,  Newport,  Widdington,  Henham, 

!  Ghickney 't  Hicklinge. 

29.  Benj.  Einge  John  Tyffyn  gent.  Andrew  Jenour  t  Anne 

■  his  wife  land  in  8.  Laurence  t  Steple.  / 

!  30.  Tho.  Lawe  Sam.  Coote  Edward  Coote  mess.  T;  land  in 

Debden.  * 

31.  Tho.  Browne  t  Barnard  Whetstone  gent,  t  Margaret  his 
wife  mess,  land  in  Woodford  t  Wansted. 

32.  Tho.  Francis  *1  Eliz.  his  wife,  Ric.  Symons 't:  Eliz.  his  wife 
Manor  of  Lanhams  with  mess,  lands  t  rents  in  Rivenhall  ats  Ruen- 
hall.  Creasing  ats  Kersinge,  Stisted,  Brayntree  Bradwell. 

33.  Sir  W”  Petre  knt.  T;  Francis  Barnard  arm.  Sir  John  Tjrrrell 
knt.  t  Eliz.  his  wife  mess.  1  land  in  Springfeild. 

34.  Henry  Greenwood  gent.  1  Sir  Gamaliel  Capell  knt.  Jane 

this  wife,  Nich.  Waldegrave  arm.  *1  Katherine  his  wife  mess.  land 
in  Brentwood. 

35.  John  Aldrich  gent.,  Samuel  Sotherton,  Tho.  Cory,  John  I 

Scottowe,  Lestrange  Mordaunt  arm.  Manor  of  Wynslowes  ats  Crouch- 
mans  Fee  Roberds  with  mess,  t  lands  in  Hempsted.  liadwyuter, 

Gt.  Sampford,  Fynchingfyld,  Helyon  Bumpsted,  Steeple  liumpsted 
Panfylde. 

36.  W”  Alston  Tho.  Poole  sen.  T:  Tho.  Poole  jun.  mess  *1  i 

land  in  Thaxted. 


XUM 


134  THK  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OR. 

37.  John  Fryth  clerk  Tho.  Rowe  ats  Bustover  Dionis  hi* 
wife,  Benedict  Baseley  Johane  his  wife Kic.  Baseley  mess.  land 
in  Hack  well. 

38.  Robert  Harrison,  Cursitor  in  Chancery  Sir  Tho.  Mildmay 
knt.  *1  Anne  his  wife  Manor  of  Pakenhoe  ats  Pakeuhohall  ats  Paken- 
hall  ats  Patenhall. 

39.  Sir  James  Althain  knt.  Baron  of  the  Exchequer  Robert 

Awdeley  arm.,  John  Darcy  arm.,  Tho . Katherine  his  wife 

mess.  land  in  Peldon,  Aburton  ats  Averton  I^ayer  de  la  Hay. 

40.  Ric.  Man,  John  Denman,  W“  1  )avie8  gent.  Dorothy  hi* 
wife,  John  Alexander  Jane  his  wife,  John  Newton  1  Brigitte  hi* 
wifqland  in  Brentwood  Hatfeild  Peverell, 

41.  Sir  Geo.  Paule  knt.,  Giles  Breame  arm.,  Sir  Tho.  Gardiner 
knt.  1  Jane  his  wife  Manors  of  Abells  ats  Halsted,  Stansted,  Qladsen 
Buys  ats  Dynes Brenthall  with  mess. land  in  Halsted,  Stansted, 
Stysted.  Gosfelde,  Hennyngham,  Toppesfeld,  Foxherd  ats  Foxearth, 
Twinsted,  Pebmershe,  Bulmere,  Midleton,  ('olnengayne,  Alphamston, 
Little  Henney,  Gt.  Henney,  Gt.  Little  Maplested,  Heddingham, 
Sybley,  Fordham  Gestingthorpe. 

42 . SampfordeT;  Mary  his  wife,  Jeffrey  Tanner  Dorothy 

his  wife,  Tho.  Veare  Eliz.  his  wife, . Katherine  his  wife 

laud  in . Mandevill. 

43.  Sir  Hen  Poole  knt.,  Tho.  Mildemay  arm.,  Chris.  Nevill  arm. 
1  Mary  his  wife,  Tho.  Browne  arm.  Margaret  his  wife,  Brigitte 
Darcy  Francis  Darcy  Manor  of  Tolshunt. 

44.  Jane  Shelley  wid.,  Tho.  Spencer  arm.,  Edw.  Coke  gent.  Sir 
Ferdinando  Gorges  knt.  *1  Ann  his  wife,  W“  Bell,  James  Bell  T 
Margaret  Gorges  wid.  mess,  land  in  Writle. 

45.  Sir  W“  Parker  knt ,  Lord  Mounteagle,  W“  Quarles  t 

Thomasine  his  wife.  Geo.  Quarles  Francis  his  wife  Manor  of  Bam- 
don  ats  Barrenden  with  mess.  1  lands  in  Tollshunt  Knights,  Salcots, 
Verley,  Inworth,  Messinge,  Leyre  Britton,  Leyre  Marney  Gt. 
Wigborowe.  continued). 


EXTRACTS  FROM  THE  PARISH  REGISTERS, 
WENDY,  CAMBS. 

The  oldest  register,  a  small  volume,  13  ins.  by  5  ins.,  of  about 
twenty  leaves  of  parchment,  contains  the  baptisms,  marriages,  and 
burials  from  1550  to  1670  inclusive.  The  second  leaf  of  the  book, 
whether  it  was  a  fly  leaf  or  not  it  is  impossible  to  tell,  has  been  cut 
out,  as  also  have  the  two  or  three  leaves  which  correspond  to  the 
greater  part  of  the  Commonwealth  Period,  viz.,  from  1645  to  1654. 
The  whole  of  the  earlier  part,  up  to  the  year  1625,  is  in  the  hand¬ 
writing  of  George  Leathley,  who  held  the  vicarage  from  1575  to  1625, 
and  to  him  we  are  indebted  for  most  of  the  notes  respecting  weather, 
crops,  and  gifts  to  the  church,  which  give  interest  to  these  otherwise 
dull  records  of  the  “rude  forefathers”  of  an  obscure  village. 

Seth  Pavy,  his  successor,  vicar  from  1625  to  1662,  described  in 


XUM 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC 

,  the  Parliamentary  Survey  of  1650  as  “an  able,  honest  man,”  nearly 

[  completes  the  volume,  and,  besides  giving  a  few  more  weather  notes, 

amplifies  the  list  of  parochial  endowments  and  dues  which  Leathley 
,  had  made.  , 

The  living  was  a  poor  one,  valued  at  £5,  10*.  9d.  in  1531,  and 
both  these  vicars,  like  many  of  the  country  clergy,  their  con- 
t  temporaries,  lived  in  very  humble  circumstances.  Leathley’s  ♦  three  j 

,  daughters  were  married  to  farmers  in  Wendy  and  Guilden  Morden,  ^ 

and  he  seems  to  have  had  little  to  leave  behind  him,  besides  the  5*.  ^ 

,  apiece  which  he  bequeathed  to  his  eleven  grandchildren,  and  the  t 

,  three  books  which  he  gave  to  two  of  his  daughters  and  a  clerical 

friend— “  Marsculous  and  comon  places  in  X‘,”  “A  Laten  Salter,”  ■' 

.  and  “A  booke  in  Englishe  called  of  Martine  Luther  his  makeing.” 

I  Pavyt  had  a  little  more  of  worldly  gear,  possessing  a  cottage  and  j 

ten  acres  of  land  in  Bassingbourne  and  small  mortgages  in  Bassing- 
bourne  and  Guilden  Morden ;  but  his  family  was  large,  and  all  the  { 

provision  he  could  make  for  his  wife  was  an  annuity  of  40*.,  while 
’  three  of  his  children  had  to  be  content  with  legacies  of  \2d.  each,  and 

'  the  youngest  was  destined  for  “some  trade,”  if  he  should  “live  to  * 

,  the  age  of  ten  years.” 

,  The  register  booke  for  the  towne  off  Wendve  in  the  Countye  of  Cambrydge 

bye  aucthorytye  comanded  to  be  had  in  parchmente. 

Two  scares  of  land  belonging  to  the  vycaredge  of  Wendve.  One  half  acare 
against  the  meade  ford.  Itih  one  halfe  acare  in  nether  laiigrell  athis  svde  the  first 
I  gripe.  One  halfe  acare  in  the  hyfeld  next  the  bake  lane.  One  land  of  slowes. 

Item  one  other  halfe  acare  in  nether  smalldom  the  bigger  of  the  two.  All  the  1 

,  which  lands  are  tithe  free.  I 

^  -  Aug  10:  1656. 

A  true  note  of  foure  acres  of  aireable  land  in  Wendy  set  over  k  confirmed  by  i 

lady  Dorothy  morisine  I  &  Francis  Russel  §  sometime  Baron  of  Thomshaw  &  lastly  - 

^  earle  of  Bedford  to  the  Vicar  of  Wendy,  in  part  for  the  composition  due  from 

Shingay  to  ye  vicaridg  of  Wendy.  In  nether  langrell  a  halfe  acre  lying  north  k 
I  south,  John  Brown  at  the  inclosure  lying  east  k  Robert  Sanders  west.  Another 

halfe  acre  in  nether  langrell  lying  north  k  south,  Robert  Sanders  at  y*  inclosure 
lying  east  k  Edmund  Slow  west.  A  rood  k  halfe  in  nether  Smaldome,  y'  vicaridg 
land  being  an  halfe  acre  east  k  Edmund  Slow  at  the  inclosure  lying  west,  halfe  a 
rood  in  lapwing  furlong  lying  east  k  west,  Henry  I’hip  at  y'  inclosure  lying  north  k 
Robert  Sanders  south.  Halfe  an  acre  in  y*  high  feild  lying  north  k  south,  a  halfe 
acre  of  gleab  land  belonging  to  the  vicar  lying  east,  Mathew  Andrews  at  y*  inclosure 
lying  west.  Halfe  an  acre  in  long  irons  lying  north  k  south,  Mathew  Andrews  at 
y*  inclosure  lying  both  east  &  west.  Halfe  an  acre  in  Shepread  lying  north  k  south,  ^ 

Mathew  andrews  at  y*  inclosure  lying  east  k  Edmund  Slow  west.  Halfe  an  acre  in 
^  long-hole  lying  north  k  south,  mathew  Andrews  at  ye  inclosure  lying  east  k  a  land 

1  sometimes  Qo<^s  lying  west.  Halfe  an  acre  in  Stone-land  lying  north  k  south,  ^ 

mathew  andrews  at  y*  inclosure  lyng  east  k  west.  Witnesses  hereunto, 

^  Seth  Pavy,  Vicar,  and  John  London  sometimes  churchwarden. 

There  were  allso  foure  cow  coihons  and  ten  sheep  conions  belonging  to  y* 

^  vicaridge  of  wendy  at  the  inclosure. 

.  Wittnes,  Seth  Pavy  Vicar 

.  '  And  all  tith  hay  whatsoever 

John  I/)iidon. 

’  •  Will,  Consistory  Court  of  Ely,  “  314,  Morley.” 

I  +  Will,  Consistory  Court  of  Ely,  “  207,  Robynett.” 

)  t  Dorothy  Long,  widow  of  Henry  Long  of  shingay,  married  Bir  Charles  Morrison  of 

Chshisbnry. 

t  Henry  I/mg’s  danrhter  and  heir,  Elisabeth,  married  Bir  William  Rnsaell,  first  Ramn 
1  Thoruhaugh.  Francis  Uusaell  was  their  sun. 


XUM 


136 


THE  EAST  ANOLIAM;  OK 


The  just  note  for  the  payment  off  the  fyf tenth  or  taske  offe  Wendy e  cfi 
Shingey  aa  it  hay  the  been  oaually  payed  heertofore. 


1622 

s. 

d. 

Off  the  psunadge  of  Wendye 

Itm  of  the  ferme  called  engayne 

•  . 

X 

vij 

i 

Willm  fayrchild. 

Itm  of  gylbert  staltons  ferme 

Itm  of  lyns  lande 

Robert  fipp. 

X 

ij 

ij 

Now  M'  Wells. 

Itm  of  Roger  staltons  ferme 

’Now  M'  Wells. 

ij 

Itm  of  the  lordshyp  lande  . 

viij 

Willm  London. 

ij 

Itm  of  Keypherds  ferme 

viij 

Willm  London. 

Itm  of  Wylshyers  ferme 

vij 

Goodman  Slowe. 

iij**  V* 

ix>*. 

Itm  of  Shingey 

Ij 

viij 

A  note  of  such  dues  as  appertaine  to  the  vicar  of  Wendy  and  are  registered  in 
y<  bishops  office  att  Cambridg. 

'  The  now  vicarage  house  and  ground  it  stands  on  by  estimation  five  roods. 

One  close  called  y*  dovehouse  close  where  some  times  y*  vicarage  house  stood  by 
estimation  one  acre  demi. 

Foure  severall  halfe  acres  of  arrable  land. 

Seaven  bushells  of  wheats  payd  by  y'  farmers. 

Fortie  shillings  yearly  out  of  Bassingbome  parsonage  payd  by  y'  Deane  & 
chapter  of  Westminster. 

Five  nobles  payd  out  of  wendy  parsonage  yearly. 

A  garden  penny,  a  plow  penny. 

And  a  south  alines  penny.  But  noe  smooke  peny,  nor  halfe  penny. 

Written  by  me,  Seth  Pavy,  ao  1637. 

The  timber  trees  with  other  witch  &  elm  on  y‘  outside  of  y'  church  yard  which 
lys  south  &  west  belongs  to  y”  vicar  not  to  the  house  &  ground  next  adjoinyng. 

1675.  francis  hisco  a  black  muore  was  buryed  the  xixt‘>  of  maye. 

1576.  ffrancis  morysyne  the  sone  of  Charles  was  bapti  the  xxvij^  of  June. 
The  said  francos  was  buryed  the  xxviij^  of  June. 

1595.  An  Seynt  Jhone  the  daughter  of  Thomas  seynt  Jhonef  esquier  was 
bapti  the  vjt‘'  of  december. 

1699.  This  yeare  they  begane  harveste  about  the  xvj***  of  July. 

1599.  This  yeare  stover  fur  cattle  was  so  scarce  generallye  in  everye  place  as 
many  wer  forced  to  sell  ther  cattle  at  verye  small  pryces  &  many  died  for  want  of 
meat. 

1601,  August.  Sir  William  Bussell  knyght  &  Ladye  Elizabeth  his  wyffe  gave 
unto  the  towne  off  Wendye  one  byble  of  ye  largest  volume,  ixxv*. 

1601.  This  yeare  one  the  xxiiij^h  of  deceber  was  an  earthquake. 

1601.  Mrs.  Wylliams  did  gyve  a  quishione  of  rede  to  lye  in  the  desko  of  the 
pulpyt  &  M'  gryffyne  $  dyd  gyve  unto  the  pyshe  a  herse  or  beer  to  carry  the  deade 
to  the  plac  of  y'  Sepulture. 

1614.  This  yeare  in  february  was  suche  frosts  and  aboundance  of  snowe  y* 
men  could  not  sow  their  pease  tyll  the  vij^  or  viij^^  of  marche  wh  was  accustoms 
to  be  endyed  by  the  end  of  february  or  before. 

1615.  This  year  1615  the  droughte  was  so  great  y*  very  small  stoore  of  hay 
was  to  be  had  at  anye  place  &  in  very  many  places  barley,  pease  &  oates  wer  very 


•  About  1250  Sir  Robert  D’Engayne  gave  a  manor  in  Wendy  to  the  Hospitallera. 

*  Probably  a  tenant  of  Shingay  Preoepto^.  Sir  William  Russell’s  mother  was  Margaret, 
daughter  of  Hur  John  St,  John,  and  sister  of  Oliver,  Lord  St,  John  of  Bletsnoe. 

t  Steward  to  Sir  William  Russell  of  Shingay. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


137 


scante  &  were  puld  up  by  the  rootee  in  harvest  k  harvest  was  begone  about  the 
mydaet  of  July  k  in  the  winter  before  such  sboundance  of  snowe  fell  in 
lynoolneshyer  in  mtland  k  dyvers  other  places  y*  many  cattle  died  for  want  of  meat 
y*  snowe  cotynued  so  longe. 

1619.  This  somer  1619  was  called  the  drye  somer  &  so  cotynued  tyll  neer 
x4nas  wti'out  any  g^eat  store  of  water. 

1620.  Sipio  Cokynge  the  sone  of  M'  thomas  cockinge*  esquier  was  baptised 
the  zij^  of  septeber  1620. 

1621.  Katheryne  Cockyng  the  dawghter  of  Thomas  was  baptised  the  xxiij'^ 
of  August. 

1622.  Elisabeth  Cockinge  the  dawghter  of  M'  Thomas  Cockinge  was  baptiz 
the  XT**"  of  december. 

1623.  This  yeare  fell  suche  aboundanc  of  snowe  as  hayth  not  been  sen  w^  us 
thes  many  years  k  it  mayd  stover  very  scant. 

1623.  dorathea  the  daughter  of  Thomas  Cocka}me  esquier  was  baptized  the 
xxvj***  day  of  february. 

1627.  Andrew  the  son  of  Thomas  Cockayne  gentlema  was  Ijom  the  third  day 
of  aug^t. 

1628.  Thomas  the  sonne  of  Thomas  Cockayne  gentleman  was  baptized  the 
third  day  of  march. 

1630.  This  yeare  wheate  was  sold  in  Royston  market  for  nine  shillings  and 
sixpence  a  Bushel!  befor  Aprill  and  biu'ley  foure  k  fortie  shillings  a  Quarter. 

1635.  Ye  16  of  aug:  at  night  an  oake  4  yardes  copass  unbarkt  was  smit  to 
shivers  in  a  grove  at  y'  northwest  comer  of  lordshipyard  by  thunder. 

1637.  This  yeare  there  was  some  new  ne  to  be  sold  at  Royston  June  y*  twentie 
one  and  y*  wedensday  following  wheat.  Harvest  began  at  Wendy  July  ye  8. 
Wheat  to  be  reapt  ye  14. 

1637.  Barly  this  year  was  6*  O'*  a  bushell,  wheat  7*  k  rie  5*. 

1642.  Charles  Tripp  t  gentleman  k  Katherine  Cockayne  the  daughter  of 
Thomas  Cockayne  of  ijhingey  gentleman  was  marryed  June  the  fourth  1642. 

1643.  Eathetine  y‘  daughter  of  Scipio  &  Dorothy  Cockayne  was  baptized 
Dec  y*  21. 

1643.  Dorathy  y*  daughter  of  Charles  &  Katherine  Tripp  was  baptized 
March  y'.third. 

1643.  Dorothy  Tripp  was  buried  march  the  twentieth. 

1645.  Charles  y*  son  of  Charles  k  Katherin  Trip  was  baptizd  noveB  y*  30. 

1645.  A  frost  bega  Dec  y<  8  &  lasted  tiU  JhB  y‘  27  this  year. 

1655.  Ann  y*  daughter  of  Thomas  k  Sibbill  Nightingale^  home  October  y* 
sixt  baptizd  octo^r  y'  fifteenth. 

VOL.  II. 

On  a  fly  Uaf. 

In  the  year  1773  there  were  ninety  nine  Inhabitants  in  the  Parish  of  Wendy  and 
Forty  two  in  the  Parish  of  Shingly. 

Georgfe  Leachly  vicar  buried  July  29“'  1625. 

Seth  Pavy  vicar  buried  March  16**'  1662. 

Benjamin  ChKxlall  vicar  buried  Jany  27  1682. 

Richard  Feazar  vicar  buried  Nov  23  1718. 

T.  Ashburner  vicar  &  Fellow  of  Pembroke  Hall  buried  October  20:  1736. 

Richard  Turberville  vicar  huried  May  31:  1760. 

In  the  handwritiny  of  the  Rev.  T.  Aehbnmer,  1718 — 1736. 

N.B. — There  are  due  to  y*  vicar  of  y*  Parish  from  y*  Dean  k  Chapter  of 
Westminister  40*  yearly  wh  sum  is  now  paid  by  Mr.  Pigot  of  Bassingbourae. 
L**  Sandys  pays  40**>*  in  money  k  the  House  k  Lands  are  valued  at  14  Ibe.  a  year 

*  Third  son  of  John  Cokayn  of  Ck>kayne  Hatley,  by  Elizabeth,  daughter  of .  Stacy. 

In  1683-1634  he  bought  the  Manor  of  Hobbledods  and  SOS  acres  in  Tadlow,  oo.  Cambridge,  for 
£1400  from  Edward  Johnson,  Executor  to  bis  brother,  John  Cokayn,  16th  February,  1636-1637, 
Died  before  10th  June,  1642,  He  was  tenant  of  Shingay  Preceptory  House  under  the  Rnssells. 

4  The  Tripps  were  tenants,  under  the  Chicheleys  of  Wimpole,  of  the  Great  House  at  Wendy, 

t  One  of  the  Nightingales’  of  Knees  worth,  a  tenant  of  Wendy  House, 


138 


THB  EAST  ANGUAir  ;  OK, 


more.  Three  of  y*  cloeee  He  to|;eth'  eb*  6  acres.  The  fourth  is  called  y*  Vicarage 
close  containing  ah*  one  acre  &  an  half. 

The  two  closes  on  each  side  of  the  Garden  k  y*  Poor  Houses  adjoyning  to  y* 
Right  Hand  close  belong  to  y'  L**  of  y*  Manour  k  are  Rented  at  4i'>*  p'  annum. 
Taxes  deducted.  'I'he  Rent  of  each  House  is  10*  in  all  30*. 

1696.  The  truly  pious  k  charitable  lAdy  Lsetitia  Wendy,*  widdow  of  S' 
Thomas  Wendy  t  k*  of  the  Bath,  died  at  this  Town  April  the  seventeenth  k  was 
buried  at  Haslingfield  in  the  grave  of  the  said  S'  'rhomas  April  the  twentieth. 

1705.  Martha  Fairchild  A  woman  of  one  hundred  &  eight  years.  Buried 
September  the  sixteenth. 

1710.  Elizabeth  the  wife  of  Richard  Feazar  minister  of  this  Parish  the 
Daughter  of  Robert  Stephens  of  Ardleigh  in  the  County  of  Elssex,  gentleman,  was 
buried  October  the  twenty  eight  1710:  She  was  a  virtuous  Loveing  k  Carefull  wife, 
A  tender  mother  k  Good  Neighbour. 

1718.  Mr.  Richard  Feazar^  Vicar  of  this  parish  was  Buried  yoTember  the 
twenty  third  1718.  » 

1718.  Deo  fidelis  et  Regi  ecclesise  Anglicanse  et  Fidei  orthodoxse  strenuus 
Assertor  omnibus  benignus  et  ipsis  etiam  inimicis  Amicus.  Semper  ad  eum 
concursarunt  (sive  animus  sire  corpus  doluit)  afflicti  nec  quiaquam  frustri 
imploravit  opem. 

1718.  Annorum  et  famm  satur,  amilitante  disceesit  ad  ec.clesiam  triumphantem, 
jamque  in  coelis  agit  triumphos,  coronatus  glorid. 

1742,  Feb  IS***.  Mr.  Thomas  Pierce  buried. 

1742,  Feb  18**‘.  John  Papper  his  labourer.  It  is  very  remarkable  y*  y*  poor 
Fellow,  when  his  Master  was  past  Hopes  of  Recovery,  desired  y*  he  might  be  buried 
with  his  Master  (such  was  y*  affection  he  had  for  him).  Accordingly  he  sick’ned  k 
died  two  Days  after  him,  k  they  were  both  buried  at  y*  same  Time. 

From  th*  Bitkop’o  Tranteripto  at  Ely. 

1653.  Thomas  ye  son  of  Thomas  k  Sybill  Nightingale  baptized  August  ye 
twentie  one. 

Seagravo  Rectory,  Loughborough.  WALTER  JoNBS. 


PARTRIDGE  OF  SHELLEY  HALL,  SUFFOLK. 
(Ooutinued  from  vol.  x.,  p.  91  ^). 

Extracts  fkoic  Parish  Reqisters. 


Stoke-by-Nayland. 

1558 — 1762. 

1601.  The  9  daie  of  ffebruarie  was  christened  John  the  son  of  John  Hankin, 
ctir  and  Viccar.* 

*  Daughter  of  Sir  Francis  Wentworth,  Kt.  Ray  dedicated  to  her  his  “  Wisdom  of  Ood  in  the 
Works  of  the  Creation.”  Will  (P.C.C.,  ‘‘86  Bond,”>  composed  by  herself,  and  full  of  quaint 
particulars  about  her  surroundings. 

v  Of  Haslingfield.  He  bon^t  Wendy  from  Sir  Thomas  Chicheley  in  1665.  The  founder  of 
the  family  was  the  celebrated  Dr.  Wendy,  physician  to  Henry  VIII.,  ^ward  VI.,  Hary,  and 
Elisabeth,  who  received  large  grants  of  Abbey  lands  at  Haslingfield  and  elsewhere  in  Cambs. 

t  Instituted  16th  March,  1683,  Rector  of  Croyden  cum  Clopton,  1676  to  1688.  Will,  Conaiatory 
Court  of  Ely,  “Si,  L’lsle.” 

H  At  p.  90,  under  Baptisms,  1790,  Arabella  should  be  Arabella ;  foot-note  8,  died  there  1768, 
diould  be  died  there  1780 ;  foot-note  5,  Llandfoist  should  be  Llanfoist. 

1  Became  Vicar  in  1600 ;  his  wife.  Avis,  buried  1627  ;  married  Alles  Roote,  widow,  2nd  Nov., 
1628.  He  left  on  record  an  account  of  monuments  and  brasses  then  in  the  chu^  (see  Proeetdmfi 
of  S^oUt  Inetitute  nf  Archeeology,  vol.  iv.,  pp.  188, 189) .  In  1626  his  son  John  marri^  Anne,  widow 
of  Thomas  Partridge. 


NOTU  AND  QUEBI88,  BTC. 


139 


16^.  Jan.  The  xiiij'''  was  bapt.  Thoms  the  sonne  of  Thoms  Partritche. 

1619.  June  The  29  was  was  hiapt.  Klis:  the  daughter  of  Thomas  Partrich. 

1621.  March  The  29  was  bapt.  Mary  the  daughter  of  Thomas  Fatteriche. 

1628.  Dec.  'llie  2  day  was  Christened  Thomas  the  sonne  of  Thomas*  Partrige 
psone  [parson]  of  Ijayerdelay. 

1634  and  1635.  Robert*  Pattridge  co-churchwarden. 

1634.  May  The  22*^  day  was  bapt.  John  sonne  of  Robert  Pattridge. 

1635.  Feb.  The  26th  day  was  Bapt.  Robert  sonne  of  Robert  Pattridge. 

166|.  The  5  day  of  ffeb'‘*  waa  iMptized  Judith  daughter  of  John  Partridge  and 
Judith  his  wife. 

1667.  August  l*t.  Elizebeth  daughter  of  John  Partridge. 

1669.  Sept.  20  :  was  baptiz’d  John  son  of  John  Partridge  and  Judeth  his  wife. 
167f.  Jan:  20  was  baptized  John  son  of  John  Partridge  and  Jiida  his  wife. 

1672.  August  20  :  was  baptized  Mary  daughter  of  John*  Partridge  and  Mary 
his  wife. 

1674.  July  19  :  was  baptized  John  son  of  John  Partridge  and  Mary  his  wife. 

167^.  March  19  was  baptized  Thomas  son  of  John  Partridge  and  Mary  his  wife. 
1678.  March  31  was  baptised  Margarett  daughter  of  John  Partridge  and  Judith 
his  wife. 

July  27  was  baptized  Elizebeth  daughter  of  John  Partridge  and  Mary  his 
wife. 

168}.  January  6  was  baptized  Bridgett  daughter  of  John  Partridge. 

January  10  was  baptized  Elizebeth  daughter  of  John  Partridge. 

1683.  May  13‘‘'  was  baptized  Anne  daughter  of  John  Partridge  and  Juda  his  wife. 

1685.  June  the  28  was  Baptized  Richard  Parteridge  sonn  of  John  Parteridge  and 

Mary  his  wife. 

Novem.  1  was  Baptized  Nathaniell  Parteres  sonn  of  John  Parteres  and 
Judath  his  wife. 

1686.  Ap.  the  26  was  Baptized  Mary  Parteres  dauter  of  Andrew*  Parteres  and 

Elizabeth  his  wife. 


.1692.  Andrew  Partridge  co-churchwarden. 

Not.  27.  Thomas  son  of  Andrew  and  Eliz.  Partridge. 
1694.  John  Partridge  co-churchwarden. 

169}.  Feb.  3*.  Elisabeth  Daughter  of  Jn”  and  Eliz:  Partridge. 

1696.  July  18***.  ,,  „  ,, 

1697.  Oct.  31.  Margaret  ,,  „  „ 


Mar.  5.  Judith  ,,  „  ,, 

Dec.  17.  Margpuett  ,,  ,,  ,, 

May  5.  John  son  of  John  and  Mary  Patridge. 

June  9.  Anne  daughter  of  John  and  Eliz.  Partridge. 
Mar.  1.  Johnson  „  „  ,, 

June  24.  Margarett*  Daught'  of  Sam*  and  Marg*  Strand. 


1705.  Mar. 

26. 

John  son  ,, 

1705.  Jan. 

12. 

James  ,,  ,, 

1701. 

Jan. 

30. 

Arthur  ,,  ,, 

t 

1709. 

Aug. 

14. 

Sarah  daughter  ,, 

» 

1711. 

Sept. 

9. 

Martha  ,,  ,, 

Patridm. 

Partridge. 

Patridge. 

Partridge. 


*  Baptised  at  Higham,  1608;  admitted  Emmanuel  College,  Cambridge,  1619;  B.A.  1622; 
H.A.  1628;  lioenaed,  19th  Sept  ,  1628,  to  Perpetual  Curacy  of  Layer-de-la- Hay,  Essex;  will 
(clerk,  curate  of  the  parish  of  Layerdelahay),  6  Feb.,  168},  leaving  all  to  his  wife,  Elisabeth, 
who  proved  will,  lOUi  April,  1681,  P.G.C.,  40  St.  John. 

t  Afterwards  of  Holton  St.  Mary  Hall.  His  fourth  son,  Daniel,  was  progenitor  of  Partridge 
of  Shelley  HaU. 

*  Fourth  son  of  Richard  Partridge  of  C^jpel  St.  Mary,  who  was  brother  of  Rev.  Thomas 
Partridge  and  of  Robert  Partridge  of  Holton  Hall. 

4  Cannot  be  identified  as  dewsended  from  Thomas  Partridge  of  Higham  and  Capel  St.  Mary, 
1560—1627.  Andrew  Partridge  removed  about  1699  to  Wiston,  where  his  descendants  lived  for 
several  generations,  and  then  at  Breewood  HaU  in  Oreat  Horkealey,  Elmatead  HaU,  Dilbridge 
HaU  (Cmcheater),  and  Witham  House. 

*  Became  wife  of  Thomas  Partridge  of  Layham,  afterwards  of  Shelley  Dairy;  died 
7th  March,  1778,  aged  76— head-stone  in  Layham  churchyard. 


140 


THE  EAST  ANOUAN  ;  OR. 


1714.  May  30.  Marg*  daughter  of  John  and  Eliz.  Partridge. 
1717.  June  2.  Judith  ,,  „  ,,  „ 


Marriage$,  1558 — 1790. 

1626.  John  Mason  ^  and  Eliz.  Hull  wid.  May  2. 

John  Hankin  and  Anne  Fartrich  wid. 

1627.  Ap.  22.  Will™^  Partridg  of  Nayland  and  Jane  Twiller  of  o' pariah. 

1628.  Nov.  2.  John  Hankine  Clarke  and  Allea  Roote  wid. 

1629.  May  12.  John*  Pattrigg  and  Ann  [blank]. 

1634  and  1635.  Robert  Pattridge  co-churchwarden. 

1690.  Sept.  11.  Tho.  Clarke  and  Suaan  *  Partridge. 

1694.  July  12.  John  Partridge  and  Eliz.  Townea. 

1699.  May  11.  William  Beckett  of  Polatead  and  Judith  Partridge  of  Stoke. 
1774.  John*  Partridge  of  Stoke  aingle  and  labourer  and  Eliz.  Griggs  of  Stoke 
aingle  22  May.  (Both  aigned  by  mark). 

1784.  Hugh  Green  of  Stoke  wid'  and  Ann  *  Partridge  of  Stoke  aingle  22  Oct. 
(Bride  aigiied  by  mark). 


Buriala,  1558—1803. 

1623.  Thomaa  the  aonne  of  Thomaa  Paterrig  latlie  deceaaed  waa  bur  the  aame 

day  [30  Ap.]. 

1624.  Dec.  The  12^*>  waa  bur  Thomas  Patrich  the  aone  of  the  widows  Patrich. 
1627.  'The  27***  daye  waa  bur  Avis  the  wyfe  of  John  Hankin  Clarke  &  vicker. 

1634  and  1635.  Robert  Pattridge  co-churchwarden. 

1635.  Dec.  The  31*‘  waa  Bur  the  widdow  Pattridge.* 

1637.  March  The  31**  day  waa  Buryed  Mary  Pattridge  daughter-in-law  [step¬ 
daughter]  of  John  Hankin.  Aug.  The  26**’  day  waa  Bur  Anne  wife  of 
John  Hankin. 

1679.  June  12  :  was  Buried  Mary  daughter  of  Jn"  Partridge. 

168{.  Jan.  6  :  waa  Buried  an  infant  of  John  Partridge. 

1686.  May  the  28  :  was  Buired  infant  parteredg. 

July  1  waa  Buired  Nathaniell  Patteridg  infant. 

Novem:  the  23  waa  Buired  John  **  Parteridg  housholder. 

168f.  ffeb;  the  13  waa  Buired  Mary  Parteridg  widdow. 

16fA.  ffebr  11.  Elizabeth  Daughter  of  Jn*  Partridge. 

169f.  ffebr  19**’.  Eliz:  Partridge. 

1696.  Sept.  30**:  John  ••  Partridge  Sen'. 

170).  Jan.  31.  Judith  Partridge. 

1702.  May  3.  John  Patridge. 

1701^T  Feb.  9.  James  Partridge. 

17)).  Feb.  9.  Judith  Partridge. 

Feb.  19.  Margaret  Partridge. 

1712.  May  27.  Sarah  Partridge. 

1713.  Aug.  28.  Arthur  Patridge. 

1724.  Jan.  23.  Judeth  Partridge. 

172).  Jan.  3.  John  Patridge  from  Nayland. 

1726.  July  9.  Eliz.  Patridge. 


t  Stt  note  e. 

*  Cannot  be  identified  aa  descended  from  Thomaa  Partridge  of  Higham  and  Capel  St.  Mary, 
1560-1627. 

a  Administration  granted  19th  January,  16S),  Archdeaconry  of  Sudbury,  to  John  Mason,  son 
of  Alice  Patteridge,  widow,  late  of  Stoke.  Probably  widow  (third  wife)  of  Thomas  Partridge  of 
Capel  St.  Mary,  who  died  1627. 

10  Fourth  sun  of  Richard  Partridge  of  Capel.  Will  proved.  Archdeaconry  of  Sudbury,  lands 
at  Stoke,  Aasington,  and  Capel. 

n  Eldest  of  the  six  sons  of  Robert  Partridge  of  Holton  Hall.  Will  proved.  Archdeaconry  of 
Sudbury,  lands  at  Stoke  and  Hadleigh. 


NOTES  AND  QUEBIKS.  El'C. 


141 


1732-  Jan.  17.  Elizabeth  Partridge. 

1763.  Feb.  21.  Arthur Partreidge,  an  elder  Man. 

1789.  July  19.  Elisabeth,  wife  of  John  Partridge,  paujper. 

1803.  April  6.  Daniel  **  Partridge — Farmer — from  Wisaing^n. 

Entry  in  Ovtrttert'  Book. 

1681.  Allowed  John  Pateridge  for  hia  paines  in  discovery  of  town’s  land  lost 

00.  10.  00. 

Little  Wenham. 

1691.  Giles  Parker  of  Cobdock  widower  and  Elizabeth  Patridge  of  Capell 
Singlewoman  were  marryed  Apl:  12‘'‘  1691. 

Obuhura  Hill,  Crou  Rittr,  CHARLES  PakTRIBOE. 

SoMlktrn  Nigeria. 


CAMBEIDGESHIRE  SUBSIDY  ROLLS.  No.  XXXIII. 

Wilburton.  £,  t  d 

*  Sir  Michael  Sands  . .  . .  . .  13  6  8 


Great  Wilhraham. 


£. 

«. 

d. 

• 

£. 

8. 

d. 

f  Mr.  Richard  Claydeu, 

Robert  Ballard 

1 

10 

0 

clerk  . .  . .  1 

0 

0 

Thomaa  Smith 

1 

10 

0 

Michael  Hancock  . .  2 

0 

0 

Peter  Ballard 

1 

0 

0 

Robert  Hancock  . .  2 

0 

0 

Thomas  Wrenn,  jun. 

1 

5 

0 

William  Barnes  . .  2 

0 

0 

Edward  Webb 

1 

10 

0 

William  Nelson  . .  I 

0 

0 

J  Sir  Robert  Huddel- 

William  Males  . .  1 

0 

0 

stou 

5 

0 

0 

Little  Wilbraham. 

£. 

». 

d. 

£. 

8. 

d. 

Robert  Ware  . .  4 

0 

0 

John  Scote  , . 

1 

0 

0 

David  Raven  . .  5 

0 

0 

>*  Baptised  12th  October,  1673,  at  Higfaam  !  died  18th  February,  1763,  aged  “ 93 ’’-head-stone 
in  Stoke  churchyard. 

1  s  Ste  note  8. 

1*  Eldest  son  of  Thomas  Partridge,  afterwards  of  Shelley  Dairy  ;  baptised  1726,  at  Polstead ; 
married  Anne  Steward  of  Assington.  Ail  their  children  ob.  s.  p.  except  Ann,  wife  of  Stephen 
Lewis  of  Stoke  and  Polstead. 

Is  Daughter  of  John  and  Judith  Partridge  of  Stoke. 

*  He  was  lessee  of  the  Parsonage  under  the  Archdeacon  of  Ely. 

i  Vicar  from  1627  until  his  death  in  1647. 

t  The  chief  seat  of  this  family  was  at  Sawston,  where  they  still  reside.  The  Manor  of  Great 
Wilbraham  was  given  to  his  ancestor  in  return  for  services  rendered  during  the  attempts  to  make 
Lady  Jane  Grey  queen. 


142 


THE  EART  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


Willingham. 


£.  * * * §. 

d. 

£. 

«. 

d. 

John  Graves,  sen.  . . 

1  0 

0 

♦Mr.  Buck  ridge 

2 

0 

0 

Henry  Aspland 

1  0 

0 

Thomas  Page 

1 

0 

0 

Henry  Marshall 

0  10 

0 

John  Buttery e 

1 

0 

0 

Alexander  Ashman  . . 

2  15 

0 

Mr.  James  Pa.scall  . . 

2 

6 

8 

Richard  Bemond 

1  5 

0 

Thomas  H  oil  well 

1 

3 

4 

Annis  Elssex,  widow . . 

1  0 

0 

Thomas  Proctor 

1 

0 

0 

John  Pierson 

1  10 

0 

Edward  Holly  well  . . 

2 

6 

8 

Thomas  Garnon 

1  16 

0 

Wimpole. 

£.  ». 

d. 

£. 

». 

d. 

f  Mr.  Gibson 

2  0 

0 

Robert  Finch 

3 

10 

0 

i  Thomas  M  alden  . . 

5  0 

0 

WhittUtford. 

£.  «. 

d. 

£. 

a. 

d. 

§  Henry Julyan,  clerk  | 
Leonard  Sadler  I 

1  14 

0 

Michael  Turnar 
Robert  Fitch 

2 

3 

13 

0 

4 

0 

Mr.ThomasNightingale  1  0 

0 

Wood-ditton. 

£.  «. 

d. 

£. 

a. 

d. 

Richard  Dame 

3  0 

0 

John  Martin..  .. 

1 

3 

0 

Ralph  Clayden  , . 

2  10 

0 

Walter  Pratt 

2 

10 

0 

John  Dehiniore 

3  0 

0 

Mrs.  Jane  Bennite  . . 

20 

0 

0 

Mr.  John  Deshrow  . . 

2  13 

4 

11  Reuben  Bridge 
Thomas  Pratt 

2 

0 

0 

Mr.  Wingfield 

2  0 

0 

0 

15 

0 

£.  t.  d. 

Sir  John  Coult,  of  Rickmanswortli  . .  5  6  8 

Linton,  Combo.  {^Concluded).  W.  M.  Paluek. 

*  John  Buckeridge,  Rector,  December  29th,  1630.  He  died  in  1647,  and  was 
succeeded  by  Nathaniel  Bradshaw,  a  zealous  Baptist,  who  was  ejected  at  the 
Restoration,  in  favour  of  Bishop  Wren’s  nephew. 

t  John  Gibson  succeeded  Joseph  Loveland,  who  was  ejected  from  the  Rectory 
in  May,  1644. 

J  A  very  old  yeoman  family,  members  of  which  more  than  a  century  before 
were  able  to  make  considerable  bequests  in  money  and  goods. 

§  I  cannot  find  that  he  was  ever  Vicar. 

II  In  1650,  Robert  I<evitt  and  Reuben  Bridge  served  the  cure  of  Wood  Ditton 
jointly,  the  former  receiving  the  whole  of  the  profits,  lie  had  been  there  since 
1618. 


NOTK8  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


143 


QUERIES. 

East  Andijan  Einoers’  Gotches. — On  15th  October,  1903,  the 
annual  festival  of  the  Norwich  Diocesan  Association  of  Eingers  was 
held  at  Ipswich,  and  at  the  luncheon  the  Chairman,  Eev.  C.  L. 
Kenuaway  of  Qarboldisham,  mentioned  that  when  he  became 
incumbent  of  Garbuldisham  he  found  in  the  belfry  a  ringers’  “  gotch” 
(an  earthenware  drinking  vessel),  which  bore  the  inscription  : — 

“  Come,  jolly  boys,  and  drink  your  fills ; 

All  ye  that  love  a  pipe,  a  pot,  the  bells. 

Let  me  not  empty  long  remain. 

But  if  I  be,  fill  me  again. 

Joseph  Hammond  made  me  Seventeen  hundred  and  three.” 

There  used  to  be  a  ringers’  pitcher  at  Hadleigh.  Suffolk,  and  still 
carefully  preserved  in  the  vestry  of  Hinderclay  Church,  Suffolk,  there 
is  a  fine  specimen  of  one  of  these  ringers’  gotches 

I  should  be  obliged  if  readers  would  record  other  examples  still 
preserved  in  East  Anglia.  Partridoe. 

OMmra  Hill,  Grots  River, 

Southern  Nigeria. 

Edible  Frogs  in  Norfolk  and  Cahbs,  p.  116. — In  a  recent 
article  on  “  The  edible  frog  in  England.”  a  writer  in  Chamhert'  Journal 
says  the  species  was  first  discovered  in  England  at  Foulinire  Feu 
in  1813.  Professor  Newton  found  the  same  species  in  Norfolk  at 
Rockland  in  1853,  and  afterwards  at  Stow  Beden.  It  was  found 
subsequentlj'  to  exist  at  Didlington,  Merton,  Hockering,  and  Foulden 
Fen,  near  Stoke  Ferry,  to  which  place  it  had  apparently  been 
imported  from  France  in  1837  by  Mr.  George  Berney.  It  would 
appear  that  our  climate  is  unsuited  for  the  edible  frog.  Can 
Mr.  Yorke,  or  some  other  East  Anglian  reader,  name  “the  pools  in 
Suffolk  where  the  frog  is  still  flourishing,”  and  give  particulars? 
The  conditions  of  aquatic  life  has  surely  not  undergone  such  changes 
as  to  render  the  existence  of  the  edible  frog  impossible,  whether 
regarded  as  indigenous  or  acclimatised  by  man,  if  the  frog  really 
existed  fortnerly  in  these  parts  for  any  length  of  time.  The  intro¬ 
duction  and  disappearance  of  this  frog  are  alike  mysterious,  but 
scarcely  ought  to  remain^o^ _  Aristophanes. 

Rogation  or  “  Gang-flower.” — Some  years  ago  I  found  the 
Rogation  or  “gang  flower”  in  blossom  in  the  meadows  between 
(.'ombs  and  Badley  Churches.  Suffolk.  I  cannot  recollect  its  botanical 
name.  The  names  I  have  quoted  above  were  given  to  it  because  it 
was  anciently  used  in  the  procession  (A  S.  gangan  =  to  go)  at  the 
festival  of  Rogation.  Can  an}’  reader  supply  further  information  ? 

Obuhura  Hill,  Cron  River,  CHARLES  PARTRIDGE. 

Southern  Nigeria. 


Dandy  or  Daundy  Family. — I  should  be  glad  of  any  information 
about  the  Suffolk  family  or  Dandy  or  Daundy,  over  and  above  that 


144 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


g^ven  on  pp.  131  and  163  of  vol.  i.,  East  Anglian,  first  series.  I  want 

garticularly  to  find  out  if  they  ever  intermarried  with  the  family  of 
arleton  or  that  of  Foster  of  Copdock. 

Old  Buekenhnm  Hall,  Norfolk.  FkbDEHICK  DulEEP  SinQH. 


Nevill’s  of  Long  Melford,  pp.  112,  128. — Their  coat  (on  a  field 
>Az.,  three  bustards  Or,  volentes  volare)  is  held,  as  stated,  p.  128,  by 
the  Nevill’s  of  Nottingham.  Can  any  reader  of  the  East  Anglian 
give  any  clue  to  the  connection  ?  It  was  said  to  have  been  granted  to 
Robert  de  Nevill,  who  joined  Louis  temp.  John,  and  put  to  fiight 
a  body  of  the  enemy.  It  occurs  impaled  with  Wiseman,  and  also 
with  Mudd  in  Lavenham  Church,  Suffolk.  Any  information  will  be 
very  gratefully  received. 


E.  Nevill. 


Powerstock,  Dorset. 


Water-colour  Drawing  of  No^iwich  Cathedral  by  Sir  John 
Gilbert. — In  the  Art  Gallery  attached  to  the  Guildhall  of  the  City  of 
London  is  an  interesting  south-east  view  from  Lifes’  Green,  exhibiting 
the  Cathedral  under  the  conditions  that  prevailed  July  17th,  1846. 
Considerable  repairs  were  in  progress  at  the  time,  and  scaffolding  is 
much  in  evidence.  The  “  Green  ”  is,  of  course,  entirely  open.  The  pear 
tree  (by  the  Beauchamp  Chapel),  familiarly  known  as  “the  Choristers’ 
Pear  Tree  ”  (presumably  owing  to  the  fact  that  the  “  Green  ”  was 
regarded  as  the  Choristers’  Playground)  is  represented  as  little  more 
than  a  sapling.  Has  the  drawing  ever  been  reproduced?  A  copy,  at 
any  rate,  ought  to  be  preserved  in  our  midst.  0  N  B 

Sancroft,  Hearnb  or  Hf.rne. — Mr.  Charles  Marshall  of  German¬ 
town,  Pennsylvania,  has  found  an  old  paper,  which  reads: — “When 
Sarah  (Sarah,  wife  of  William  Herne  or  Hearne),  with  her  husband 
called  upon  her  great  uncle,  the  Archbishop  of  Canterbury,  William 
Bancroft,  to  bid  him  ‘  goodbye  ’  before  leaving  for  America,  he  gave 
her  a  handful  of  gold  pieces,  telling  her  to  buy  a  pair  of  gloves.” 
The  family  settled  in  Philadelphia  in  1684,  and  one  of  the  daughters, 
Sarah,  married  in  1738,  Christopher  Marshall,  great-great-grand¬ 
father  of  Mr.  Charles  Marshall.  There  is  a  family  tradition  that  a 
short  time  before  the  Archbishop’s  death,  which  occurred  at 
Fressingfield  on  November  24th,  1693,  he  wrote  to  the  Hearnes  to 
pay  him  a  visit,  but  they  were  deterred  by  their  recollection  of  the 
first  crossing.  The  family  certainly  was  connected  with  Yai-mouth. 
for  in  1642  Paul  Hearne,  son  and  heir  of  John,  son  and  heir  of 
Richard,  conveyed  a  house  in  Middlegate  Street  to  John  Hagon,  and 
this  Yarmouth  connection  is  in  accordance  with  Marshall  tradition. 
Now,  Archbishop  Sancroft  had  six  sisters — Deborah,  Elizabeth,  Alice, 
Frances.  Mary,  and  Margaret.  Of  these,  Frances  was  twice  married, 
first  to  Anthony  Greenling,  and  secondly  to  George  Borret ;  but  our 
Register  contains  no  record  of  the  marriages  of  the  other  daughters. 
Any  information  on  this  subject  will  be  welcome.  j  j 

Frsstingjuld  Vicarage. 


I 


N0TB8  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


145 


THE  ORDERING  OF  PARISH  WORKHOUSES  IN  THE 
EIGHTEENTH  &  NINETEENTH  CENTURIES. 

The  so-called  “care  of  the  poor”  in  parochial  workhouses  in  the 
eighteenth  and  early  part  of  the  nineteenth  centuries  was  a  public 
scandal.  The  glaring  abuses  arising  from  inefficiency  and.  gross 
neglect  on  the  part  of  those  who  governed,  were  as  nothing  compared 
with  the  system  itself,  which  allowed  individuals  to  farm  the  manage¬ 
ment  of  the  poor  for  their  own  profit.  An  insight  into  the  working  of 
the  system  is  obtained  by  consulting  the  parochial  books  of  account 
and  other  documents  of  the  period.  Thus  in  St.  Margaret’s,  Ipswich, 
in  1756,  one,  John  Jolly,  agreed  to  take  upon  himself  the  care  and 
maintenance  of  the  poor  for  nine  months  at  the  rate  of  £55  per 
quarter,  and  upon  terms  of  contract  made  with  a  predecessor  (James 
Hill)  in  1749,  to  have  the  use  of  garden  and  £20  for  extraordinary  ex¬ 
penses.  In  1761  the  poor  were  “  put  out  to  John  Jolly  ”  at  the  rate  of 
£240  per  annum,  which  was  increased  to  £255  in  the  following  year. 

In  1819  we  find  the  master  and  mistress  of  the  parish  workhouse 
conducting  the  paupers  to  church,  permission  being  granted  to  them 
to  wear  their  own  clothes,  if  over  fifty  years  of  age,  on  Sundays  only. 
This  indulgence,  however,  was  found  to  be  productive  of  evil,  and 
was  a  cause  of  great  discontent  among  the  younger  females  in  the 
workhouse,  and  resulted  in  an  order  for  all  the  indoor  poor  to  wear 
the  parish  clothing  at  all  times. 

About  the  same  time  the  Vestry  called  upon  Mr.  Freeman  and  other 
parishioners  in  St.  Margaret’s  “  to  beg  they  will  refrain  from  using 
the  thrashing  machines  during  the  time  of  the  labourers  being  so  much 
in  want  of  employment.” 

The  number  of  inmates  at  the  workhouse  appears  seldom  to  have 
exceeded  fifty. 

The  scale  of  allowance  to  out-door  poor  in  1819  was  as  follows : — 

Man  and  wife  (including  all  earnings  and  allowance)  to  be  helped 
with  relief,  not  to  exceed  in  the  whole  10/- 

Do.  and  one  child  .  do.  .  10/6 

Do.  and  two  children  .  do.  .  -  12/- 

Do.  and  three  „  .  do.  .  13/6 

Do.  and  four  „  .  do.  .  15/- 

Do.  and  five  ,,  .  do.  .  16/6 

Do.  and  six  ,,  .  do.  .  18/- 

Do.  and  seven  „  .  do.  .  20/- 

In  1821.  6/-,  7/-,  8/-,  9/-,  10/-,  11/-,  12/-  respectively,  the  parish 
paying  no  rents  as  previously. 


£100  was  at  this  time  allowed  by  the  Commissioners  for  sweeping 
the  whole  town,  the  greater  part  of  which  was  done  by  8t.  Margaret’s 


In  1820  Mr.  James  Gooding  was  appointed  to  superintend  work¬ 
men  in  parish  employ,  while  Mr.  Ransome  *  engaged  to  supply  men 
in  the  workhouse  yard  with  plough  breasts  to  grind. 


*  The  founder  of  the  well-known  6rm  of  implement  makers,  &c. 
I. 


146 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


Afterwards  the  in-door  poor  were  taken  by  the  Governor  at  3<.  6d. 
per  head — clothing,  bedding,  linen,  and  funeral  charges  being  pro¬ 
vided.  Twine  to  the  value  of  £l.  5i.  Sd.  was  allowed,  the  same  being 
paid  for  weekly  by  instalments  of  1<.  (for  making  nets). 

In  1821  a  petition  was  forwarded  to  the  House  of  Commons 
complaining  of  those  who  had  the  administration  of  poor  relief  in 
St.  Margaret’s,  which  was  considered  a  gross  and  infamous  imputation 
upon  the  Select  Vestry  of  the  parish.  This  was  signed  by  twenty- 
four,  wlio  complained  “that  they  are  levelled  with  the  victims  of 
infirmity,  indolence,  and  vice  ;  that  they  are  tossed  between  contend¬ 
ing  parishes,  unable  to  pay  for  justice  or  buy  protection  ;  and  left  to 
be  supported  by  Charity,  reluctantly  administered  by  rules  of  law 
unmitigated  in  its  insulting  distribution  by  any  feeling  of  benevolence 
or  aympathy  with  their  affliction,’’  Most  of  those  signing  were,  it  ia 
stated,  under  the  impression  that  the  petition  was  for  the  establish¬ 
ment  of  some  fishery  or  public  work  at  Ipswich  by  the  authority  of 
the  Legislature,  which  would  have  the  effect  of  rendering  them 
independent  of  parochial  relief,  and  entirely  disowned  any  intention 
to  complain  of  harsh  treatment  at  the  hands  of  the  Select  Vestry. 

We  find  the  Governor  of  the  workhouse  subsequently  paid  so 
much  per  head  for  the  inmates,  according  to  the  market  price  of  flour, 
varying  from  2«.  8^d.  to  3«.  5^d.  per  head  =  3<.  Sd.  It  was  afterwards 
proposed  to  pay  the  Governor  and  Governess  £l.  5».  per  week  aa 
remuneration,  and  ten  per  cent,  on  the  earnings  of  the  poor.  These 
were  not  to  be  included  with  the  poor  in  the  house  with  respect  to 
board,  &c. 

'  It  was  ordered  in  1821,  that  on  the  part  of  the  Sunday  in  which 
there  was  no  service  at  St.  Margaret’s  Church,  the  in-door  poor  should 
attend  some  other  church  in  the  town,  accompanied  to  and  fro  by  the 
Governor  or  some  suitable  person.  The  poet  of  Governor  and  Gover¬ 
ness  was  necessarily  filled  by  members  of  the  Church  of  England. 

The  iniquitous  system  under  which  parochial  workhouses  were 
carried  on  culminated  in  what  are  known  as  “  workhouse  riots.”  A 
curious  insight  into  these  disorderly  assemblies  is  furnished  by  the 
following  facts : — 

Two  men  were  tried  21et  March,  1836,  at  the  Bury  Assizes, 
charged  “  with  having,  with  very  many  other  persons,  riotously 
assembled  together  and  begun  to  demolish  and  pull  down  the  work- 
house  of  the  Parish  of  8t.  M  argaret’s.”  Sentence  of  death  was  recorded 
against  both  these  men,  who  went  to  the  county  gaol  after  trial. 
Four  others,  for  a  like  offence  in  connection  with  8t.  Clement’s  Work- 
house,  were  tried  at  the  same  time ;  one  was  sentenced  to  death,  the 
others  were  acquited.  The  names  of  the  8t.  Margaret’s  men  were 
Michael  Terry  and  Robert  Hurren — both  nineteen  years  old.  The 
acting  magistrates  were  Benjamin  Brame  and  G.  H.  Bristo.  The 
sentence  of  death  was  not  carried  into  execution,  but  a  punishment  of 
twelve  months  imprisonment  inflicted  instead. 

The  riot  commenced  at  the  St.  Clement’s  Workhouse  (a  building 
which  stood  in  Fore  Street,  nearly  opposite  Angel  Lane),  caused 
mainly  by  the  im popularity  of  the  Governor — Mr.  Gooding.  The 


X0TS8  AND  QU£B1£8,  KTC. 


147 


mob  stormed  the  building  from  the  outside,  breaking  windows,  &c. ; 
the  inmates  within  welcomed  the  assault,  and  joined  in  despoiling  the 
building.  A  battering  ram  was  brought  from  the  Quay  and  placed 
against  the  wall  facing  the  street.  The  military  were  called  out  (6th 
Iiiuiskillings)  and  charged  the  mob — one  man  was  struck  across  the 
chest  and  was  terribly  wounded.  Then  followed  the  assault  on  St. 
Margaret’s  Workhouse.  The  Governor  at  the  time  was  named  Dale. 

It  was  customary  to  advertize  for  a  workhouse  Master  and  Mis* 
tress  in  similar  terms  to  the  following  : — 

“Wanted . a  proper  man  and  his  wife  to  Farm  the  Poor  in 

the  Workhouse  in  the  Parish  of . by  the  head  per  week,  &c., 

&c  ” —  Ftda  the  newspaper  of  the  period. 

A  hundred  years  ago  the  system  was  in  the  zenith  of  its  working. 
It  is  satisfactory  to  be  able  to  regard  all  these  matters  from  an 
antiquarian  standpoint ;  right  glad  are  we  to  acknowledge  them  as 
“things  of  the  past,”  but  they  are  by  no  means  either  uniustructive 
or  uninteresting. 


NOTES  ON  THE  EARLY  REGISTER  BOOKS  OF 
ST.  MARGARET’S,  IPSWICH. 

V 

No.  I.  Baptisms. 

The  first  Register  dates  from  the  year  1537,  earlier  by  one 
year  than  most  Parish -Registers,  the  mandate  with  regard  to  them 
not  having  been  issued  until  1538.  It  is  a  large  folio  volume,  written 
on  paper  and  bound  in  vellum  boards,  containing  in  all  eighty  leaves, 
numbered  in  Roman  numerals  by  a  late  hand,  and  consists  of 
Baptisms,  Marriages,  and  Burials,  the  three  classes  of  entries  being 
kept  distinct.  Each  is  prefaced  by  a  neatly-written  title  page,  the 
work  of  a  former  incumbent,  the  Rev.  George  Murray,  who  at  the 
cost  of  immense  labour  most  carefully  repaired  what  must  have  been 
a  very  dilapidated  volume.  It  is  with  this  exception  in  an  excellent 
state  of  preservation,  and  one  marvels  at  the  skill  and  ingenuity 
displayed  by  Mr.  Murray  in  his  painstaking  task.  The  handwriting 
throughout  is  very  varied,  sometimes  very  bad,  rarely  very  good,  and 
sometimes  the  entries  are  very  faded.  The  title  page  is  as  follows : — 
This  Book  |  of  Entries  |  of  |  Baptisms  |  iSolemnized  from  the 
15“*  Oct'  1537  to  the  6  Nov'  1615  a.d.  )  in  the  I  Parish  of  Saint 
Margarett  Ipswich  ]  in  the  County  of  Suffolk  |  was  |  Repaired  |  by  | 
George  Murray  C^k  |  Perpetual  Curate  of  S‘Margaretts  |  The  Church¬ 
wardens  for  this  year  (a.d.  1844)  |  in  which  this  Book  was  repaired  | 
being  John  (’lark  |  and  |  George  Singleton  Tovell.  |  Written  this 
Eighth  day  of  October  Anno  Domini  mdcccxliv.  [ 

xix  Deut  14».  “Thou  shall  not  remove  thy  neighbour’s  land 
mark,  which  they  of  old  time  have  set.” 

xxvii  Deut.  17^  “Cursed  be  he  that  removeth  his  neighbour’s 
laud  mark.” 


148 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OB, 


xxii  Prov.  28''.  ‘‘  KemoTe  not  the  ancient  land  mark  which  thy 

Fathers  have  set.” 

xxiii  ProT.  10\  “RemoTe  not  the  old  land  mark.” 


Baptisms. 

The  first  three  entries  (15th  October,  1537)  are  indistinct.  Then 
appear  the  following : — 

’  The  xxvij***  of  Octob'  ther  was  baptized  Mary  Samfor  the  daught' 
of  John  Samfor. 

The  second  of  Novemb'  was  baptized  Mary  Cole  the  daughter  of 
Peter  Cole. 

«  «  «  «  « 

On  page  Q'is  the  following  entry : — 

1548,  20  March.  Petrus  fill  Edmund  Wythypoll.  Hie  ortu’ 
reminiscor  utjam  (?)  et  sic  semper  ipam  diem  ma  (?)  meminisse 
possum.* 

1549,  Marche  9.  Mary  Martha  f  y*  daughter  of  M'  Wythypoll. 

1550,  1  Feb.  Ambrose  y*  sonne  of  M'  Wypoll.  [The  illegibility 
of  this  entry  seem  to  have  induced  someone  to  place  near  it  the 
words,  “Ambrose  Wythypoll.”]  By  the  side  is  written  in  a  more 
recent  and  distinct  hand  : — 

Partus  Ambrosii  Withipauli  generosi  Baptizatus  primo  die 
mensis  februarij  anno  domi  1550. 

Januarye  ano  dom  1553.  Qij  die  was  baptized  Elsabeth  Witty- 
pole  y*  daughter  of  Edmund.  { 

Immediately  above  is  written  in  quite  another  hand  : — 

Ut  mors  sic  sonnes  miseros  defenders  equat  {sie)  per  me  T.  P. 
the  xviij  of  March  do  1573  (?). 

1553.  May  y*  xij^*  daye  was  baptized  John  Hollond  y*  sonne  of 
John . gypswici  proefectus  eode  an®. 

July  ij.  baptisa  est  Bichardus  benet  filius  richar.  Ah*  q* 
mortuus  est  felicis  memorise  Edwoardus  vj  a  coronse  ah®  vj  a 
natiuitatse  Vero  ano  xvj. 

In  the  yere  off  our  Lord  a  thowsand  ffive  hundred  et  liiij. 

The  XV  day  off  Aprell  was  baptysed  Jhon  Breme  the  sonne  off 
Jhon  Breme.  By  the  side  in  a  more  recent  hand,  probably  owing  to 
the  indistinctness  of  the  entry,  there  is  written  ; — 

Joannes  brame  filius  Joannes  breme  baptisatus  fuit  quitd  decimo 
die  mensis  Aprillis  A®  Dmi  1554  ut  patet  in  hoc  libro. 

1555,  October  20.  Benjamin  Wythypoll  y®  dowt'  of  Mr.  Wyth- 
poll  («jc).  By  the  side  is  written,  “  Benjamin  Wythypoll.” 

Anno  Dmi  miffimo  cccc  sexagesimo  secudo . the  Sonne  of 

*  These  Latin  words  are  in  a  different  hand  to  the  foregoing  entry,  which 
is  poorly  written. 

t  'rhe  two  Christian  names  are  remarkable  at  this  early  period. 

X  'I'he  latter  word  is  struck  out  and  there  is  writteu,  “  of  Mr.  Edmund 
Wythypoll.” 


NOTES  AND  QDERtBS,  ETC. 


149 


[Thomas  Seymour  and  of  Alyce  hys  lawfull  Wyfe  was  baptysed  on 
halow  thursday,  the  vij  daye  of  the  moueth  of  Maye. 

Jone  the  daughter  of  Robert  Carpenter  and  of  Elsabeth . 

hys  lawfull  wyfe  for  that  y*  was  in  perell,  was  baptysed  on  the 
munday  the  viij  day  of  June. 

. the  daughter  of  Richard  Caue  and  of  Joan  Buttell  hys 

wife  for  necessarye  cawsys  was  baptysed  on  the  tewesdaye  the  xvj 
daye  of  the  moneth  of  June. 

Robert  the  sonne  of  Francys  Hamond  and  of  Anne  lame  hys 
wyfe  beynge  yn  pyll  of  death  was  baptysyd  at  home  on  the  Saturdaye 
the  xxvij  daye  of  the  moneth  of  June  by  Edmhde  Godynge  of  the 
parrysshe  of  Saynt  mary  tower. 

John  and  Dorothy . beynge  both  borne  at  one  byrth  the 

sonne  &  dowghter  of  Wyftm  Wylson  and  of  Alyce . his  lawfull 

wyfe  upon  reasonable  causes  were  baptysed  on  the  tewysdaye  the  yj 
daye  of  the  moneth  of  Auguste. 

I  The  tenth  day  of  the  moneth  of  Auguste  was  baptysed  Pleasance 

a  base  chylde  the  dowghter  of  Margaret  Noke  a  stranger. 

nr  Dhomas  Bakelar  primo  post  ingressum  servitii  sui  incipit  hie 
baptisare.  [This  appears  in  a  dinereut  hand  to  the  rest]. 

John  the  Sonne  of  Wyllyam  Cartar  and  of  Jone  Wryth  his  lawfull 
wife  beynge  in  perell  of  death  at  the  byrth  was  baptysed  at  home  by 
the  myddewyfe  on  the  Wednesdaye  yn  the  nyght,  the  xrij  daye  of 
the  moneth  of  Februarye. 

1664.  Anno  Dmi  miHimo  ccccc“®  Ixiiij***.  Pawle  Wythypowle 
the  sonne  of  Pawle  Wythypowle  gentyllman  and  of  hys  wyfe 
I  M™  Dorothye  Wentefourde  syster  to  the  honorabyle  lorde  Thomas 
Wentefourde  was  baptysed  on  the  Sondaye  the  xx“*viij  daye  of  the 
moneth  of  Maye. 

1665.  Anno  Dmi  mihiino  quinqentesimo  sexagesimo  quinto. 
John  and  Susan  twynnes  borne  together  at  one  byrth  the  sonne  and 
dowghter  of  Wyllyam  Barbar  and  Jone  hys  wyfe  were  also  baptysed 
on  the  same  Sondaye  the  vj  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Januarye. 

Here  occurs  at  foot  of  page  27  the  signature  of  “  Elizabeth 
Wythypoll.” 

1666.  Anno  dmi  mihimo  quiqentesimo,  sexagesimo  sexto. 
Elsibeth  the  dawghter  of  mayst'  Pawle  Wythypoll  gentleman  and 
of  maystres  Dorothye  Wentfourth  hys  lawfull  wyfe  was  baptysed 
on  the  frydaye  the  xvij  day  of  the  moneth  of  maye. 

Thomas  a  chylde  borne  yn  base  the  sonne  of  one  Alys  Chapman 
was  baptysed  on  the  Saturdaye  the  fyrste  daye  of  the  moneth  of 
I  Marche. 

1667.  Anno  Dm  mihimo  quinqentesimo  sexagesimo  septimo. 
John  the  sonne  of  Edmunde  Warner  and  of  Alys  hys  wyfe  beynge 
yn  danger  of  Deth  at  the  byrth  was  baptysed  at  home  on  the  thurs- 
■  daye,  the  xvij  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Julye. 

[In  the  margin  of  this  page  (30)  there  are  four  or  five  words, 
signed  George  Saberton]. 

JI671.  Anno  dmi  millesimo  Quiqentesimo  Septuagesimo  primo. 
Henrye  a  base  chylde  the  sonne  of  one  Elizabeth  Wryghte  Wydowe 


150 


THR  EAST  ANOLIAK  ;  OR, 


begoten  &  borne  yn  the  trme  of  her  wydowhod  was  baptysed  the  xxj 
daye  of  the  moneth  of  September  beynge  frydaye. 

[At  the  foot  of  this  page  again  occurs  the  signature  “  Elizabeth 
Wythypoll.”  The  probability  is  that  the  transcripts  were  made  by 
this  lady,  although  it  is  difficult  to  see  any  resemblance  in  the  writing. 
There  is  not  a  doubt  but  that  ladies  sometime  performed  this  task. 
The  following  entry  from  the  Peterborough  Begister  (Burn’s  Hittory 
of  Parith  RogMert,  second  edition,  p.  91): — 

“  1569,  August.  Sarah  Stowkes,  the  daughter  of  Henry  Stowkes, 
was  christned  the  x  day,  who  afterwards  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  God  ' 
1699  did  coppye  this  Register  Book  w^*  her  own  bands,  then  being 
the  wife  of  John  Lansdune”]. 

Anno  dmi  millesimo  quiqentesimo  septuagenimo  tertio.  1573. 
James  a  twyune  the  sonne  of  John  robynson  the  brewer  and  of 
Margaret  hys  {tie)  was  baptysed  the  xiij  daye  of  Julye  beynge 
mhdaye. 

«  «  «  «  « 

Edwarde  the  Sonne  of  John  Robynson  the  Smyth  and  of  Margaret 
hys  wyfe.  was  also  baptysed  the  same  xxx’'  daye  of  Auguste  and  the 
same  yeare. 

«  «  «  «  « 

John  the  sonne  of  John  tyldene  and  of  Anne  hys  wyfe,  beynge 
yn  peryll  of  Death  was  baptysed  att  home  by  the  preeste,  the  xxij** 
daye  of  the  moneth  of  Janiiarye  beyge  frydaye. 

Susan  the  dawght'  of  Wyllyam  medows  and  of  Ursula  hys  wyfe 
was  baptysed  att  home  beynge  yn  peryll  of  Death  as  ytt  appered,  the 
xiij  daye  of  the  moneth  of  ffebruarye  beynge  Saturdaye. 

***** 

Marmaduke  Cole  the  sonne  of  John  Cole  and  of  Alys  hys  wyfe, 
was  baptysed  the  thyrde  daye  of  the  moneth  of  marche  for  that  ytt 
was  weake  and  was  thowghte  to  be  yn  peryll  beynge  Wednesdaye. 

Anno  dm  millesimo  quiqentesimo  septuagesimo  quinto. 
1575.  Margarate  the  dawght'  of  Mast'  Phylype  Wentefourth  and 
maystres  Elzabeth  hys  wyfe  was  baptysed  the  xix  daye  of  the  moneth 
of  Marche  beynge  mndaye. 

The  form  of  the  entries  change  in  1579,  and  are  in  a  different 
hand.  The  first  of  these  is : — 

Edmond  Jenymyer  the  Sone  of  rychard  Jenymyer  &  Johan  his 
wyffe  of  this  pisshe  was  bapt3’S8ed  the  fyrst  daye  of  nouemb'  being 
on  the  Sondaye  a°  1579  an”  of  R*  R'  Ez.  xxj”. 

The  last  entry  in  the  same  handwriting  is: — 

Elizabeth  Couellis  (?)  the  dawght'  of  Andrew  Conellys  and  John 
his  Wyff  of  this  pisshe  wast  bapyssed  at  the  dwellenliowse  of  the 
foresaid  Andrew  Cornwallys  being  lyeke  to  Dye  the  xv***  daye  of 
January  being  on  y'  frydaye  in  1579  an”  of  the  R‘  R'  Elizabeth  xx!]"*. 


!(OTE8  AND  QUERIK8,  ETC. 


lol 


The  following  is  the  style  of  many  of  the  entries  that  follow  : — 
Die  martis.  Elizahetha  W3’thipoll  filia  ambrosii  Withipoll  huius 
prochie  Qenerosi  Baptizabatur  Duodecimo  Die  mensis 
Septebris  anno  regni  Kegno  vicessimo  secundo  anno 
Domi  1580, 

Die  Sabbati.  *  Margarita  Mullener  filia  Henrii  Mullener  etc. 

Primo  die  mensis  Aprilis  Anno  Begni  Kegnu  Vices¬ 
simo  . . .  tio  1581. 

Die  Solis.  Maria  Wentworth  filia  Philippi  Wentworth  generosi 
huius  prochie  Baptizatu  fuit  sexto  die  mensis  aprilis 
anno  regni  Begnie  Yincessimo  rtis  1581. 

Antonius  Wyngfield  filius  Henrii  Wyngefield  generosi  huius 
prochie  baptizatur  fuit  vicessimo  septimo  die  mensis  Septembris 
anno  domini  1581. 

.  1 582.  Johannis  a  base  borne. 

mensis  Febbris. 

Wyllyam  y*  Sonn  of  y*  people  and  of  y*  Wyddow  pomreard  was 
baptysed  that  day  (21  Feb.  1582). 

Nathaneell  nortonne  y'  Sonne  of  M'  Bob‘ Nortonne  f  Doctor  of 
Divinitie  &  of  Jone  his  wifie  was  baptised  y‘  29  daie  of  June  1583. 

Anne  and  Cecelie  i  ?)  daughters  to  the  Worshipful  M'  Phillipp 
Wentworth  were  baptised  the  xxvj  daie  of  June  1583. 

Thomas  the  sonne  of  Mary  Patrick  a  Child  of  Base  was  baptized 
the  X  day  of  doceber  pdicto  1584. 

1660.  Thomasin  Paul  bastard  daughter  to  John  Paul  &  Sara 
man  was  baptized  the  IQ"*  of. October. 

Tobiah  Booty  sonne  to  Jhon  Boi)ty  was  baptised  the  26*'’  of 
October.  Tobiah  was  borne  in  the  house  supposed  to  be  of  the 
parish  of  8*  Clement  in  w‘^'‘  house  his  father  wa-s  at  this  tyme  an 
inhabitante. 

1603.  Elisabeth  Carter  the  daughter  of  Thomas  Carter  minister 
of  this  pish  was  borne  in  S^  Mathews  pish  upon  Thursday  the  24*** 
of  November  &  baptised  in  this  pish  the  27  of  the  same. 

1604.  Elisabeth  Withipoll  the  daughter  of  S'  Edmund  Withipoll 
Knight  was  baptised  ffebruary  the  4*'*, 

1605.  Thomas  Carter  Son  of  Thomas  Carter  minister  of  this 
pish  was  baptised. 

1607.  Decemb  6.  John  Carter  Son  of  Thomas  Carter  minister 
of  this  pish  was  borne  in  S‘  Mathews  pish  &  baptized  here. 

The  Baptisms  end>in  1615.  The  last  few  pages  are  very  badly 
written.  They  are  entirely  without  interest. 

{To  he  continued). 


*  Sometimes  and  more  often  written  Die  Solis. 

t  This  Dr.  Norton  was  appointed  town  preacher  in  the  eighteenth  year  of 
Queen  Elizabeth's  reign,  haring  for  his  stipend  £50  yearly,  he  being  obliged  to 
reside  continually  in  Ipswich.  As  far  as  we  can  ascertain,  this  was  the  first  regular 
appointment  of  the  kind,  which  afterwards  became  an  institution  and  known  as  the 
town  lectureship. 


152 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR. 


ESSEX  MEMORANDUMS,  ANECDOTES,  &o.,  A.D.  1759  &  1760, 
BY  THE  REV.  WILLIAM  COOPER.* 

The  Rev.  William  Cooper,  of  Trinity  College,  Cambridge,  the 
compiler  of  these  notes,  was  the  only  brother  of  Sir  Grey  Cooper, 
Baronet  (extinct),  of  Gogar,  N.B.,  who  was  M.P.  for  Rochester  in 
1765,  and  a  Secretary  of  the  Treasury  under  Lord  North’s  adminis¬ 
tration.  Thazted,  in  Essex,  appears  to  have  been  his  first  incumbency, 
but  bis  book-plate  gives  these  further  particulars  of  him : — 

“  William  Cooper,  D.D.,  F.R.S., 

Archdeacon  of  York, 

Prebend  of  Norwell  Overhall, 
in  the  Church  of  Southwell, 

Co:  Nottingham, 

Rector  of  Eirkby  upon  Wiske, 
and 

Vicar  of  Manfield,  Yorksh: 

1778.” 

*  Archdeacon  Cooper  was  an  accomplished  scholar,  and  wrote 
excellent  English  verse.  There  is  a  fine  portrait  of  him,  in  his 
archdeacon’s  robes,  by  Dance,  now  at  Evington,  Kent,  the  seat  of 
Sir  John  Honywood,  Bart. 


- Sbdnuno,  de  FAons  Ltvionibus. 

June  12.  1759. 1  arrived  at  Tliaxted  in  Essex,  where  having  first 
in  y*  most  solemn  manner  implored  that  God  would  favour  and  assist 
me  in  y*  great  charge  which  I  had  undertaken,  I  paid  a  visit  to  my 
Church,  to  which  I  was  conducted  by  M'  Bowtell  y*  Parish  Clerk,  a 
very  Rev**  Greyheaded  old  Man ;  after  having  taken  a  sufficient  survey 
of  y*  Church  (which  for  y*  elegancy  of  its  structure  far  exceeds  any 
in  that  part  of  y*  county),  I  enter'd  into  a  long  confabulation  with 
my  new  acquaintance  y*  Clerk,  who  gave  me  very  satisfactory  answers 
relative  to  y*  questions  which  I  put  to  him.  He  drew  y*  characters 
of  M'  Heckford.  y*  squire  of  y*  place,  and  many  of  y®  neighbouring 
gentlemen  extremely  well,  and  accurately  described  them,  such  as  I 
afterwards  found  them  to  be.  Some  days  elapsed  before  I  had  an 
opportunity  of  being  acquainted  with  anyone;  at  last  I  received  a 
very  Polite  Card  from  L*  Maynard  inviting  me  to  dine  with  him  at 
Easton  Lodge :  accordingly  I  waited  upon  his  Lordship :  he  received 
me  with  great  civility,  and  at  parting  desired  that  I  might  meet  him 
on  y*  Tuesday  following  at  Dunmow  Bowling-Green. 

On  y*  Tuesday  following  I  went  to  Dunmow,  where  his  Ix)rd8hip 
took  particular  notice  of  me,  and  very  obligingly  introduced  me  to 
gr  Maynard,  S'  George  Beaumont  (who  afterwards  became  my 
very  intimate  and  particular  Friend),  y*  Hon’’’*  M'  Hervey,  and  many 

*  Ths  oripnal  MS.,  of  which  this  is  a  copy,  is  in  the  possession  of  Mr.  St.  David 
M.  Eemeys-Tynte,  Esq.,  of  Bath,  to  whose  courtesy  we  are  indebted  for  this 
interesting  journal. 


NOTB8  AND  QUERIES,  BTC. 


153 


others ;  from  that  day  I  soon  got  an  almost  universal  acquaintance, 
and  was  in  y*  space  of  a  few  months  better  known  in  y*  County  than 
many  gentlemen  who  had  lived  there  several  years. 

As  y*  several  offices  and  duties  of  my  Parish  demanded  my 
strictest  care  and  attention,  y*  greatest  part  of  my  time  was  taken 
up  in  a  constant  and  punctual  performance  of  them ;  every  morning 
I  visited  y'  sick  and  y®  poor,  and,  to  y*  utmost  of  my  AbUities  and 
Power,  aided  and  assisted  them  both ;  every  afternoon  (without  some 
particular  business  prevented  me)  I  rode  out  to  Easton,  Dunmow, 
Ashdon,  or  some  of  y*  Neighbouring  seats,  where  I  agreably  spent 
my  time  with  those  whose  Integrity  and  good  Sense  might  be  of 
Service  to  me  in  my  further  progress  through  y*  World. 

Here  let  me  remark  that  I  never,  either  before  or  after,  have 
been  so  perfectly  happy  as  I  was  during  my  residence  at  Thaxted, 
being  conscious  to  myself  that  I  was  doing  all  y®  good  that  men  in 
my  profession  ought  to  do ;  that  I  was  not  (as  God  knows  too  often 
is  y®  case)  avariciously  hoarding  up  y*  income  or  profits  of  my  Cure, 
but  at  intervals  disposing  of  it  to  those  whose  needs  and  distresses,  as 
they  came  under  my  own  eye,  more  particularly  required  my  help  and 
assistance. 

As  L**  Maynard  was  one  of  my  first  acquaintances  in  y®  county 
of  Essex,  I  shall  in  y*  first  place  draw  a  short  sketch  of  his  Lordship’s 
character,  and  then  describe  y*  situation  of  his  Lordship’s  house  at 
Easton,  his  private  Chappie,  and  his  Parish  Church,  at  which  y* 
Rev^  M®  Forester  officiates  as  Vicar. 

His  Lordship  is  far  advanced  in  Life,  being  now  in  his  year, 
yet  you  do  not  perceive  in  him  any  of  those  infirmities  and  incon¬ 
veniences  which  generally  attend  men  of  his  age :  Exercise  and 
Temperance  (for  no  man  can  live  more  temperately  than  his  Lordship) 
keep  him  in  constant  health  and  spirits.  In  his  duty  towards  God  no 
man  is  more  punctual :  Divine  service  is  performed  in  hie  own  Chapel 
morning  and  evening,  at  which  he  causes  all  his  Domesticks,  upon 
pain  of  his  displeasure,  regularly  to  attend. 

Fortune  has  not  bless’d  his  Lordship  with  a  very  considerable 
Income  without  acquainting  him  how,  and  in  what  manner,  he  most 
properly  may  use  it.  He  has  entirely  at  bis  own  expense,  repair’d 
and  beautifyed  y*  several  Churches  of  Thaxted,  Little-Easton  and 
Much-Easton;  y®  Poor  of  which  Parishes  frequently  feel  y*  good 
effects  of  his  kindness  and  benevolence.  Hence  he  is  \miversally 
beloved,  admired  and  esteemed. 

Easton  Lodge  is  situated  in  a  very  large  and  extensive  Park 
containing  upwards  of  three  hundred  head  of  Deer :  from  y®  dining¬ 
room  Windows  you  have  a  most  noble  and  delightful  prospect :  y* 
romantic  Tilty  *  (for  so  it  properly  may  be  call’d)  adds  not  a  little  to 
y*  grandure  of  y*  scene.  Altho’  Easton  Lodge  is  very  judiciously 
laid  out,  yet  y*  chapel,  which  contains  some  paintings  wonderfully 
well  executed  upon  glass,  and  y*  Library,  which  contains  a  very  fine 
collection  of  books,  are  best  deserving  the  notice  of  y*  curious. 

*  A  Tillage  about  a  mile  distant. 


XUM 


154 


THX  EAST  AEQLIAE;  OB, 


little  Easton  Church,  Maynard’s  Parish  Church,  is  extremely 
neat  in  erery  respect ;  there  is  a  small  gallery  at  your  entrance  into 
y<  Church,  which  contains  about  40  Pews  well  made  and  painted: 
y*  Altar  peice  is  decorated  with  4  Colums,  in  which  you  read  y* 
L**  Prayer,  y*  10  Commandments,  and  y*  Beleif.  Y*  Monument 
which  his  Lordship  has  erected  in  this  Church  to  y*  memory  of  his 
Kelations,  and  which  cost  upwards  of  £1,000,  is  highly  finished,  and 
well  worth  seeing.  The  Monumental  inscription  is  as  follows : — 
Within  this  vault  lie  interred  y*  bodies  of 
>  Y*  Eight  Hon****  W“  Maynard,  who  died  Feb.  3.  1698  .fflt  76. 
And  of  y*  Lady  Dorothy,  hie  wife,  daughter  of  8'  Rob‘  Banistre  Kngfe, 
Who  died  Octob'  30,  1649,  aged  Twenty-seven. 

And  of  y*  Hon*^  Banister  L*  Maynard,  their  Son,  who  died 
March  4.  1717.  Mt.  76. 

And  of  y*  Lady  Eliz.  Grey,  his  Wife,  y*  daughter 
of  Henry,  Earl  of  Kent, 

Who  died  September  y*  Twenty-fourth,  1714. 

And  of  y*  Hon“*  W“  Maynard,  their  eldest  Son,  who  died  unmarried. 
May  y*  8“*  1716.  .ffit.  60. 

And  of  y*  Et.  Hon'*‘*  Henry  L*  Maynard,  their  next  surviving  Son, 
Who  died  unmarried,  Dec.  7.  1742.  .®t.  70. 

And  of  y*  Eight  Hon“*  Grey,  L*  Maynard,  y*  successor  of  his  B'  Henry, 
Who  died  unmarried  April  27th,  a.d.  1745.  65. 

And  of  y*  Hon'*'*  Eliza  Maynard,  their  Sister,  who  died 
also  unmarried, 

Octob'  4.  1720,  aged  43. 

To  y*  memory  of  all  These, 

His  most  worthy  Ancestors,  Parents,  Brothers,  &  Sisters, 

By  whose  care,  &  thro’  whose  bands, 

Y*  honors  &  estates  of  y*  family, 

After  a  splendid  hospitable  &  charitable  lue  of  them. 

Have  successfully  been  transmitted  to  Him 
Y*  E*  Hon“*  Charles,  L**  Maynard, 

Y*  youngest  Son  of  Banister,  Lord  Maynard, 

And  of  y*  Lady  Elizabeth,  his  Wife, 

In  Testimony 
of 

His  Piety,  Love,  and  Gratitude, 

Erected  this  Monument. 

A.D.  1746. 

Having  made  mention  of  L**  Maynard’s  house  at  Easton,  his 
Chapel,  Parish  Church,  &c.,  I  must  not  here  forget  my  Particular 
friends,  y*  Rev**  M'  Pinsent,  and  y*  Rev"*  M'  Forester,  his  Lordships 
Chaplains.  M'  Pinsent  lives  in  y*  house,  and  is  a  constant  Com¬ 
panion  to  L*^  Maynard ;  he  talks  little,  but  eats  much ;  the  fat 
of  his  Lordships  venison  has  fed  him  to  a  very  considerable  size. 
M'  Forester  is  a  very  good  natur’d  well-bred  man,  not  overstock’d 
with  polite  literature,  yet  serves  properly  enough  for  y*  office  of  a 
Country  Rector:  his  house  is  situated  in  L^  Maynards  Park,  from 
whence  you  have  y*  same  views  as  from  Easton  Lodge.  He  has  in 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  BTC. 


155 


his  garden  a  very  pleasant  Arbour  in  which  he  sometimes  reads  a 
peice  of  Divinity,  a  sometimes  a  News-paper;  also  a  fish-pond  well 
Bupply’d  with  Tench,  which  however  he  is  not  remarkably  expert  in 
catching. 

His  House  contains  six  Bedchambers,  a  Parlour,  Drawing-Boom, 
Hall,  Kitchin,  and  other  conveniences. 

Here,  as  I  have  mention’d  some,  g^ratitude  will  not  permit  me  to 
pass  over  others  of  my  Essex  friends  with  whom  I  have  spent  many  a 
chearful  and  agreable  Hour.  Particularly  S'  W"  &  Lady  Maynard, 
8'  George  &  Lady  Beaumont,  y*  Rev*  M'  Mangey,  M'  Wyatt, 
L*  Maynards  Steward,  y*  Rev"*  M'  Drake,  y*  Rev^  M' Allen,  y*  Rev* 
M'  Crane,  y*  Hon***  M'  Hervey,  M'  &  M'*  Sparrow,  M'*  Burrows  of 
Great  Samford,  &c.,  &c.,  &c.,  &c. 

S'  W"  Maynards  seat  at  Ashdon  is  most  beautifully  situated ;  it 
is  9  miles  distant  from  Thaxted,  and  fourteen  from  Cambridge :  from 
S'  W*“  you  plainly  see  L*  Godolphins  house  upon  Hogmagog  Hills. 
Y*  Walks,  y*  Partirres,  y*  Avenues,  are  laid  out  with  great  taste  and 
judgement ;  y*  whole  house  is  very  elegantly  furnished ;  in  it  there 
IS  one  room  which  cannot  fail  of  attracting  y*  Eyes  of  y*  beholders, 
as  y*  furniture  of  it  is  remarkably  splendid,  and  y*  Paper,  y*  finest 
India  paper,  I  ever  saw.  In  this  room  you  see  a  very  good  picture 
of  L*  Maynard,  done  by  Wills,  who  some  years  afterwards,  being 
touch’d  in  his  pericranium,  quarrell’d  with  his  Art,  and  commenced 
a  Parson. 

- Nemo  quam  eihi  tortem 

Seu  ratio  dedent,  teu  fort  oljeeerit  illi 
ConUntut  vivat! 

Here,  by  way  of  anecdote,  let  me  observe  that  if  any  Person  at 
any  time  should  take  it  into  their  heads  to  say  “You  play  very  well 
upon  y*  Guittar,  Billy,”  such  a  person,  making  such  and  so  very 

I'udicious  an  observation,  must  immediately  be  informed  “that  it  is 
ly  no  manner  of  means  to  be  wonder’d  at,  as  y*  Player  bad  y*  honor 
of  receiving  his  first  Instructions  necessary  to  his  Improvement  on 
that  sweet,  delicate  Instrument,  from  y*  pretty  mouth,  and  fair  hand 
of  Lady  Maynard,  one  of  y*  Handsomest  Women  he  ever  beheld.’’ 

M"  Burrow’s  house  stands  opposite  to  y*  great  Church  in  Ham- 
ford  :  it  is  well  built  and  furnished ;  in  y®  Parlour  there  are  some 
good  peices  of  Painting,  easpeacially  one  of  a  Sea-peice,  by  Yanderveld, 
and  another  of  an  Arabian  Horse  by  a  very  eminent  Master.  From 
y*  walks  in  M'*  Burrow’s  gardens  you  have  a  view  of  “  Squire  Stanton’s 
House” :  Squire  Stanton  and  M'  Mangey  are  y*  two  only  Musical  Folks 
I  met  with ;  Musick  is  very  much  neglected  in  y*  County  of  Essex : 
Guittars  indeed  may  flourish,  but  y*  more  noble  Instruments  are 
almost  entirely  forsaken.  Y*  Church  at  Samford  does  not  look  like 
“a  house  of  Prayer,”  nor  its  vicar  like  “a  man  of  God”:  y*  In¬ 
habitants  forget  to  repair  y*  Church,  and  y*  Vicar  forgets  to  instruct 
his  Parishioners.  Y*  Vicar’s  name  is  Watson:  his  ill-conduct  and 
dissolute  behaviour  is  universally  known,  and  therefore  he,  with  great 
justice,  is  universally  Detested.  His  own  Clerks  account  of  him  to 
me  was  Characteristic :  Sir  (says  y*  Clerk)  our  Vicar  makes  nothing  of 


156  THE  EAST  AEOLIAN  ;  OR, 

missing  ten,  twelve,  sometimes  twenty  verses  at  a  time  when  he  reads 
y*  Lessons.  In  y*  Chancel  of  this  Church  lie  interr’d  all  y*  family  of 
y*  Burroughs ;  and  in  y®  Church-Yard  lies  interrd  y*  body  of  a  very 
remarkable  Personage — a  Colonel  Watson :  he  was  originally  of  a 
mean  extraction,  but  going  into  y*  Army  when  very  young,  he  there 
distinguished  himself  so  much  by  his  uncommon  bravery,  that  from 
a  common  Soldier,  he  arose  to  y*  dignity  of  a  Colonel.  He  died  in 
his  passage  from  Carthagena,  but  in  his  last  moments  requested  that 
his  remains  might  be  brought  over  to  England,  and  deposited  near  to 
those  of  his  Poor  Parents. 

"  Malo  pater  Tibi  tit  Thtrtitet,  dummodo  Tu  tit 
^acidoe  timilit,  Vuleaniaq.  arma  eapettat, 

Quam  T»  Thertita  timtlem  produeat  Achillet'' 

Juv.  Sat.  8th. 

Journey  from  Thaxted  to  Colchester. 

I  set  out  from  Thaxted  on  y*  Sunday  Even,  after  Prayers,  and 
lay  that  night  at  S'  George  Beaumonts ;  next  morning  about  9 
M'  Forester,  M'  Mangey  and  I  began  our  Journey. 

Cambden,  in  his  Britannia,  says  that  from  Dunmow  (which 
formerly  had  y®  appellation  of  Coessaromagus)  to  Colchester  there 
are  many  Roman  remains,  which  highly  merit  the  Attention  of  every 
learned  Traveller.  Whether  our  understandings  were  unequal  to  y* 
Task,  or  whether  someone  more  judicious  than  ourselves  had  removed 
them  thence  since  Cambden’s  days,  I  will  not  pretend  to  determine : 
certain  however  it  is,  that  there  were  none  of  them  visible  to  us 
during  our  whole  peregrination.  As  we  travell’d  with  great 
composure,  making  every  observation  that  there  was  a  possibility 
of  making,  we  were  two  hours  and  twenty-two  minutes  in  going  from 
Dunmow  to  Braintree,  altho'  it  is  but  eight  miles. 

Here  M'  Mangey  advised  us  to  put  up  at  y*  Fleece,  but  we 
imprudently  slighted  his  advice  by  which  means  we  got  a  bad  dish 
of  Coffee  at  y'  White  Hart.  At  Braintree  y'  Church  is  tolerably 
large:  Y*  Vicar’s  name  is  Morgan;  y'  Curate’s,  Caley:  M'  Caley, 
says  y®  Sexton,  is  a  charming  Preacher,  Sir;  his  voice  is  so  loud, 
Sir,  you  may  hear  him  a  quarter  of  a  mile  out  of  y*  Church.  What 
mistaken  notions  y®  vulgar  entertain  concerning  y®  powers  of  true 
Eloquence ;  what  mistaken  notions  y®  generallity  of  Mankind  enter¬ 
tain  concerning  them :  even  of  those  whose  understandings  are 
improved  and  strengthen’d  by  y*  means  of  a  better  and  more  polite 
Education.  They  may  have  riches,  they  may  have  honors.  Fortune 
may  abundantly  have  poured  her  treasures  upon  them ;  yet  are  y®  odds 
very  considerahle  whether  in  this  point,  or  no,  she  will  prove  equally 
indulgent.  Quern  vit  media  true  turbd,  pitch  upon  anyone :  cause  him 
to  rehearse  a  speech  out  of  Hamlet,  or  to  read  a  paragraph  in  y* 
News  Paper,  ’tis  five  hundred  to  one  whether  he  rehearses  y®  first,  or 
reads  y*  last  with  any  kind  of  Propriety. 

In  this  part  of  y®  country  there  are  three  very  large  Woolen 


XUM 


W0TR8  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


167 


Msnafactories,  one  at  Braintree,  another  at  Coggeahall,  and  a  third  at 
Colchester :  y*  two  first  deal  with  y*  Portuguese,  y*  last  with  Spain. 

From  Braintree  we  crept  on  to  Coggeshall,  where  we  dined ; 
Coggeahall  is  a  large  Town,  and  y*  Market  place  belonging  to  it  very 
much  resembles  that  at  Tuxford.  Before  dinner  we  amused  ourselres 
with  reading  y®  Inscriptions  upon  y®  Tomb-Stones  in  y*  Church- 
Yard  (none  of  which  appeared  to  be  remarkably  curious),  and  in 
examining  y*  Church,  which  is  large,  and  contains  a  monument 
tolerably  well  executed,  which  was  erected  to  y*  memory  of  Colonel 
Robert  Totonehend. 

Y*  Person  who  travells  thro’  this  part  of  y*  country  will  be 
amazed  to  see  y*  large  quantities  of  Onions  which  grow  in  almost  all 
y*  Fields  near  Coggeshall;  he  likewise  will  be  amazed  to  see  y* 
Vineyards  within  y*  Town  (for  so  they  may  not  improperly  be 
term'd)  every  house  almost  being  clothed  from  top  to  bottom  with 
Vines. 

If  I  was  to  give  my  advice  to  Travellers,  no  one  should  pass  thro’ 
this  place  without  paying  a  visit — not  to  y*  Vicar,  altho’  he  may, 
upon  occasion  for  ought  I  know,  be  able  to  produce  a  very  good  bottle 
of  Port — but  to  y*  Clerk,  who  is  indeed  a  very  sensible,  ingenious 
Fellow  :  by  trade  he  is  a  Clockmaker,  and  at  his  business  universally 
accounted  remarkably  expert ;  unhappily  for  him  however  he  thinks 
himself  very  expert  also  in  making  Musical  Instruments,  in  y* 
composition  of  which  he  has  indeed  shew’d  very  little  skill  or  know¬ 
ledge.  How  few  people  in  any  situation  or  condition  of  life  exactly 
know.  Quid  valeant  Humeri,  quid  ferre  reeueent ! 

Our  Dinners  being  wash’d  down  with  a  bottle  of  y®  best,  we 
mounted  our  horses,  and  leaving  Coggeshall  proceeded  on  our  way  to 
Colchester.  In  our  way  thither  we  pass’d  thro’  Stanway  and  Lexden : 
Lexden  is  a  very  pretty  Country  Town :  near  this  place,  in  y*  year 
— 44,  there  was  a  great  Camp.  I  cannot  say  that  y*  road  from 
Coggeshall  is  by  any  means  pleasant  till  you  come  upon  y*  turnpike 
road,  which  is  about  five  miles  from  Colchester;  here  you  have  a  fine 
open  Country,  and  see  many  fine  Villas,  belonging  to  y*  Inhabitants 
of  Colchester. 

Markstay,  a  seat  belonging  to  Lady  Beaumont’s  sister,  is  very 
pleasantly  situated.  In  my  return  home  I  staid  here  for  a  few  days, 
and  was  agreably  entertained.  About  seven  in  y*  evening  we  finished 
our  journey ;  we  then  proceeded  to  y*  Kings-head,  where  we  were 
rejected,  every  room  being  secured  on  account  of  y*  Oratorio,  which 
was  to  be  performed  y*  day  following :  what  could  be  done  ?  Our  next 
Attempt  was  to  secure  a  habitation  at  y®  White  Hart.  Here  we 
succeeded,  tho’  not  exactly  to  our  Wishes.  Y*  Inkeeper  receiv’d  us 
indeed  in  a  very  polite  manner :  he  told  us  we  might  have  beds  &c, 
however  being  cross-examin’d  he  inform’d  us  (our  Horses  being 
conducted  into  y®  Stable)  that  we  possibly  could  have  no  more  than 
two:  this  amazed  us  a  little,  however  contentment  being  a  virtue 
which  we  frequently  recommended  to  others,  it  would  seem  strange 
did  we  not  practice  it  ourselves,  accordingly  having  bespoke  a  couple 
of  Fowls  for  Supper,  we  with  smiling  faces  enter’d  y®  Coffee-Eoom, 


158 


THE  BAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


where  we  soon  espied  a  Brother  of  the  Cloth,*  but  he  being  an  Author, 
and  in  his  own  Eyes  a  man  of  great  Consequence,  took  little  or  no 
notice  of  Us;  Liter atos  fugiunt  illiterati,  subrio$  iiihaculi. 

Colchester  is  a  large,  well-paved  Town  :  its  Castle  was  famous  in 
y*  Civil  wars ;  M'  Gray  has  fitted  up  several  rooms  in  it — a  Gallery 
in  y*  taste  of  y*  building,  a  small  Koom,  and  a  Library  which 
contains  some  of  Arch-Bishop  Harsenett's  Books.  At  y*  (vliapel  in 
this  Castle  it  is  said  first  (.'hristian  service  was  performed,  in  y* 
Empress  Helena’s  time,  who  was  born  here. 

(End  of  the  Diary). 


TO  THE  SUBSCRIBERS  AND  CONTRIBUTORS  OF  THE 
“EAST  ANGLIAN.” 

It  is  incumbent  upon  me,  both  as  Promoter  and  Editor  of  the 
Eatt  Anglian,  to  preface  the  following  very  considerate  and  seasonable 
words  of  our  good  friend  Dr.  Jessopp,  conveyed  to  me  in  the 
spontaneous  and  kindly  manner  so  characteristic  of  him,  by  a  few 
remarks  of  my  own.  I  had  intended  with  the  December  part  of 
1903  to  append  a  few  words  bearing  on  the  general  subject  of  the 
Ea»t  Anglian,  which  I  had  omitted  to  do  at  the  close  of  the  previous 
volume  ix.  (December,  1902),  in  the  form  of  the  customary 
“  Editorial,”  this  was  owing  to  the  difficulty  experienced  in  the 
punctual  issue  of  the  monthly  parts.  Month  by  month  the  pub¬ 
lication  has  continued  to  appear  late,  so  that  I  find  myself  in  April, 
1904,  revising  the  proofs  of  the  previous  October  number.  This, 
of  course,  is  unfortunate,  but  it  is  unavoidable  when  suitable  matter, 
for  the  supply  of  which  the  subscribers  must  themselves  be  held 
responsible,  is  not  forthcoming. 

It  was  in  1884,  while  Hon.  Secretary  of  the  Suffolk  Institute  of 
Archaeology,  that  the  idea  of  resuscitation  of  the  former  Eatt  Anglian 
(edited  by  Tymms),  was  broached,  and  of  the  many  who  urged  and 
highly  approved  the  project  (foremost  among  whom  were  my  old 
friends  the  late  Revs.  C.  R.  Manning  and  W.  H.  Sewell),  I  was  alone 
in  taking  the  necessary  steps  for  its  revival,  incurring  both  the 
pecuniary  and  literary  responsibility.  Very  many  of  these  my 
esteemed  colleagues  of  former  days  have  passed  away,  leaving  so 
many  gaps  which  have  never  altogether  been  filled.  From  the  first 
inception  of  the  Eatt  Anglian  it  has  been  left  to  the  subscribers  to 
promote  its  interests,  in  making  the  publication  known  and  in  con¬ 
tributing  to  its  pages.  As  a  consequence  it  can  scarcely  be  said  that 
the  Eatt  Anglian  has  ever  ceased  to  possess  a  constituency  of  interested 
and  sympathetic  helpers,  but  this  has  been  by  no  means  commensurate 
with  the  requirements,  neither  can  the  interest  be  said  to  have  been 

*  Dr.  Keddington,  a  man  famous  indeed  lor  a  Panltry  sermon,  and  a  wretched 
Panegyric  on  old  Homer. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


Ifi9 


at  all  adequately  sustained.  It  can  therefore  easily  be  imagined  that 
something  more  in  the  way  of  continuous  effort  is  needed  if  the 
EaU  Altaian  is  even  for  a  little  longer  to  be  maintained.  Dr.  Jessopp, 
it  may  be  said,  has  voiced  the  feeling  of  a  large  number  who  have 
expressed  their  warm  appreciation  of  the  Ka»t  Anglian,  and,  where 
possible  discontinuance  has  been  so  much  as  hinted  at,  their  unfeigned 
regret. 

Since  the  first  publication  of  the  Ea»t  Anglian  several  local 
publications,  having  somewhat  similar  aims,  have  been  started  in 
East  Anglia,  notably  the  Estex  Review  and  the  late  Hon.  Mary 
Henniker’s  Eattern  Countiee'  Magatine  (which  came  to  a ‘close  upon  her 
lamented  death),  not  to  mention  the  columns  set  apart  in  newspapers 
of  the  “  Notes  and  Queries "  type,  which,  however,  appeal  more  to 
the  popular  than  to  the  professed  antiquarian  side.  We  believe  one 
or  more  of  these  newspaper  efforts  are  reprinted  in  serial  form,  but  it 
must  be  obvious  that  the  labour  and  cost  of  production,  to  say  nothing 
of  the  literary  value  and  importance  of  a  publication  like  the  ^»t 
Anglian,  cannot  for  a  moment  be  brought  into  comparison.  It  has 
been  the  object  of  the  Ea»t  Anglian,  while  avoiding  trivial,  common* 
place,  and  stale  topics,  to  give  permanence  to  matter,  hitherto 
unprinted,  likely  to  be  of  enduring  interest  and  service ;  it  is 
satisfactory  to  feel  that  this  has  been  fully  recognized.  It  has  been 
pointed  out  that  there  is  room  for  each  class  of  publication  ;  this  may 
be  so,  but  it  must  be  evident  that  a  journal  like  the  Eaet  Anglian,  if  it 
is  to  hold  its  own,  requires  an  increase  of  literary  and  financial 
support.  I  trust  this  measure  of  help  will  be  promptly  given.  I  am 
neither  so  young  nor  as  vigorous  as  when  twenty  years  ago  I  projected 
the  Ea»t  Anglian,  but  I  am  not  indisposed  to  carry  on  the  work  for  a 
little  longer  if  some  such  assurance  is  forthcoming.  Although  not 
without  its  toil  and  occasional  anxiety  the  conduct  of  the  Eaet  Anglian 
has  brought  with  it  much  that  has  tended  to  render  it  pleasurable, 
not  the  least  agreeable  feature  being  the  many  friendships  which  have 
been  formed,  personal  and  other.  It  would  be  with  no  small  regret 
that  I  should  relinquish  so  pleasant  a  connection  before  the  time  when 
I  might  feel  no  lunger  able  to  continue  it. 

It  only  remains  for  me  to  say  a  few  words  in  regard  to  the 
Indices  to  Vols.  vii.,  viii.,  ix.,  x.  (now  current).  I  regret  to  say  that 
the  Nommum  and  Locorum  portions  are  still  in  couree  of  preparation  only, 
by  friends  who  have  been  good  enough  to  be  answerable  to  the  extent 
of  compiling  them,  and  I  fear  it  may  be  some  time  still  before  they 
are  complete.  I  have  the  Rerum  portions  practically  ready  for  the 
printer,  and  these  could  be  issued,  with  title  pages,  &c.,  at  the  end  of 
the  present  year,  if  thought  desirable ;  they  might  prove  serviceable 
to  those  subscribers,  who,  while  not  requiring  the  Xominum  and  Locorum 
pages,  wish  to  have  their  parts  bound  in  volume  form.  Butin  any  case 
the  cost  of  printing  must  he  fully  met.  The  financial  aspect  is  one  that 
cannot  be  overlooked.  To  quote  from  a  former  prospectus:  “  While 
“  no  pecuniary  advantage  is  anticipated  it  is  absolutely  necessary  that 
“  no  loss  should  be  incurred.”  It  has  not  a  little  harassed  me  that 
several  have  from  time  to  time  received  a  subscription  copy  of  the 


160 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


Eatt  Anglian,  post  paid,  for  two  or  more  years  without  payment, 
sometimes  ignoring  repeated  applications  or  contenting  themselves 
with  an  unfulfilled  promise  or  excuse,  until  the  extra  cost  of  postage 
has  only  resulted  in  an  increase  of  the  debt.  My  Publisher  in  this 
matter  (as  in  all  else)  has  done  his  utmost  by  the  assistance  he  has 
given  me,  but  it  has  become  absolutely  necessary  to  enforce  the  rule 
and  to  require  that  the  yearly  subscription  be  paid  in  advance  follow¬ 
ing  the  receipt  of  the  December  part.  ^  Evelyn  White. 

Tht  Rectory,  Rampton,  Cambridge. 

April  4M,  1904. 


I  have  just  received  the  225th  number  of  the  Eatt  Anglian  (Notes 
and  Queries),  which  Mr.  Evelyn  White  has  been  editing,  at  a  cost  of 
great  labour  and  care,  for  more  than  twenty  years. 

East  Anglian  antiquaries,  and  many  others  too,  owe  a  very  great 
debt  of  gratitude  to  Mr.  Evelyn  White  for  his  most  generous  and 
chivalrous  labour  of  love,  undertaken  with  no  hope  of  any  remunera¬ 
tion,  and  carried  through  with  no  such  substantial  or,  adequately, 
even  unsubstantial  recognition,  as  he  would  undoubtedly  have  received 
if  he  had  belonged  to  any  other  than  the  clerical  profession. 

It  seems  to  me  that  we,  whom  Mr.  Evelyn  White  has  laid  under 
such  great  obligations,  should  not  allow  our  friend  and  (I  must  need 
call  him  so)  benefactor  to  slip  out  of  life  without  receiving  at  least  an 
expression  of  our  cordial  thanks,  and  something  more,  for  his  most 
valuable  services,  rendeied  entirely  gratuitously  for  half  a  lifetime. 

What  form  such  an  expression  of  our  sympathy  should  take  by 
and  by,  if,  when  some  more  representative  person  than  I  am  should 
take  up  this  matter,  I  will  not  presume,  at  this  present  stage,  to 
suggest.  I  hope  it  will  be  taken  up  in  a  generous  spirit  in  the  near 
future. 

But  in  the  meantime  I  have  one  proposal  to  make  to  the  sub¬ 
scribers  to  Mr.  Evelyn  White’s  Eatt  Anglian,  whereby  they  themselves 
will  be  gainers. 

If  I  understand  a  notice  in  the  part  just  issued,  the  Indices  to 
vols.  vii.,  viii.,  and  ix.  are  actually  completed,  and  waiting  only  for  a 
sufficient  number  of  subscribers  to  pay  for  the  printing  of  those 
certainly  necessary,  but  almost  essential,  adjuncts  to  the  real  comple¬ 
tion  of  the  volumes  in  book  form. 

I  can  hardly  believe  that  any  difficulty  will  be  felt  in  getting 
together  a  sufficient  number  of  subscribers  to  guarantee  the  cost  of 
printing  these  Indices  and  something  more. 

As  somebody  must  take  the  first  step,  I  am  prepared  to  contribute 
a  subscription  of  £l  towards  the  object  in  view,  in  the  hope  that  when 
once  started  the  subscription  may  develop  into  something  more  worth 
acceptance  by  Mr.  Evelyn  White  than  of  merely  enabling  him  to  do 
another  piece  of  hard  work  for  us,  which  shall  cost  him  no  money 

Augustus  Jessopp,  D.D. 

Seaming  Rectory,  E.  Dereham, 

March  10<A,  1904. 


>OXES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


161 


REPLIES. 

Bogation  or  “  Gako-Flowbr  ”  (p.  143). — In  Gerardo’s  Herhall 
(1597)  the  following  mention  is  made  of  it: — “Milkewoort  is  called 
Ambarvalis  flos  :  so  called  because  it  doth  specially  flourish  in  the 
Crosse  or  Gang  weeke  or  Rogation  weeke ;  of  which  flowers  the 
maidens,  which  use  in  the  countries  to  walke  the  procession,  do  make 
themselves  garlands  and  nosegaies :  in  English  we  may  cal  it  Crosse 
flower,  Gang  flower,  Rogation  flower,  and  milke  woort,  of  their 
vertues  in  procuring  milke  in  the  brests  of  nurses.” 

Miss  Anpe  Pratt  gives  a  full  account  of  it  in  her  Flowering  Plants, 

of  Great  Britain.  j  ^  Millard. 

Shimpling  Rectory,  Scale. 

The  Gang-Flower  otherwise  Cross-Flower. — This  is  the  milk¬ 
wort  {Polygala  Vulgaris).  It  blooms  about  Rogation-tide  and  was 
largely  used  in  making  up  the  garlands.  Its  name  “Cross-flower” 
refers  to  the  festival  of  the  Invention  of  the  Cross  (May  3rd),  which 
falls  in  Rogation  Week. 


The  “Poalb”  Bearer,  &c.  (p.  64). — In  the  Hundred  Rolls,  the 
Pole-bearer — a  manorial  officer — is  evidently  referred  to,  e.g.,  “  Item 
dicunt  quod  Heuricus  de  Hapeland  jam  XV.  annis  elapsis  subtrazit 
quandam  consuetudinem  scilicet  portandi  virgam  (carrying  the  rod)  et 
firmam  domiui  Regis  colligendi  et  summoniciones  et  attachian  enta 
faciendi  que  consuetudo  spectat  ad  tenementum  quod  tenet  in 
Luthingland.” 

{Jtotuli  Hundredorum,  Luthyngelond  in  SuSolchia). 

Another  instance  from  the  same  is  as  follows: — “Symon  de 
Dunston  ....  presentatus  fuit  ad  portandum  virgam  (to  carry  the  rod)  et 
summonicionem  faciendam  pro  tenemento,”  etc.,  etc. 

Similarly  the  “Cock-bearer”  is  presumably  a  servant  attached 
to  the  Manor.  ^ 


QUERY. 

Gilds  and  Ecclesiastical  Censure. — The  medieeval  gilds  at 
Bottisham  and  Swaflham,  Cambs,  had,  as  one  of  their  objects,  “the 
relief  of  the  poor  whilst  resting  under  ecclesiastical  censure.”  What 
was  the  character  of  (1)  the  particular  “relief”;  (2)  the  “ecclesias¬ 
tical  censure  ”  ?  Is  such  a  course  known  to  have  been  prescribed 
elsewhere  ? 


BOOK  NOTICES. 


(I.)  Wbst  Stow  Parish  Reoibtbr.  1658 — 1850,  Wordwbll  Parish  Register, 
1680 — 1860  (viii.,  pp.  344);  (II.)  Rcshbrook  Parish  Register,  1567 — 1850, 
with  the  Jehmyn  and  Davers  Annals  (viii.,  pp,  486).  Woodbridge :  George 
Booth,  1903.  The  valiiHble  series  of  Suffolk  Parish  Registers  lor  which  we  are 
indebted  to  the  Rev.  Sydenham  H.  U.  Uervey  of  Bury  St.  Edmonds,  has  been 


XUM 


162 


THB  EAST  ANOLIAN  ;  OE, 


further  aag;mented  by  the  issue  of  these  two  hendsome  volumes,  which  contain,  in 
addition  to  the  Register  entries,’  monumental  inscriptions,  subsidy  lists,  briefs, 
lists  of  Rectors,  wills,  family  history  and  biographies,  acc'ountsof  mansions,  owners 
and  tenants,  papers  on  Roman,  Saxon,  and  other  antiquities,  topographical  papers 
and  extensive  short  memoranda  and  notes.  The  volumes  bear  abundant  evidence 
throughout  of  uncommon  pains  having  been  bestowed  upon  them,  involving  research 
of  no  slight  character,  and  the  Indexes  are  full  and  precise.  We  must  not  omit  to 
mention  the  numerous  fine  portraits  and  other  illustrations,  which  are  exceptionally 
good  and  interesting  repr(^uctions ;  there  are  also  several  woodcuts  of  heraldic 
shields.  We  refrain  from  touching  many  points  of  interest  which  appeal  to  us, 
simply  from  want  of  opportunity  and  space.  We  should  be  sorry  however  to  pass 
by  the  aRusion  to  tbe  character  of  the  greatly  maligned  Bishop  Nix  of  Norwich.  At 
Bury  he  was  all  that  was  good  and  very  charitable,  elsewhere  the  same  much  abused 
prelate  was  cruel,  vindictive,  and  amassed  great  wealth,  blaster  Jerfiiyn  (a.d.  1535) 
had  a  good  opinion  of  him.  As  Mr.  lierrey  says.  “  a  man’s  character  may  be  drawn 
according  to  whether  the  drawer  of  it  is  in  sympathy  with  him  or  in  oppoeition 
to  him.” 

Thb  Fikst  Rroistrk  of  St.  Mart’s  Church,  Bockiho,  Essrx  (a.d.  1658— 
1639),  transcribed  from  the  original  for,  and  privately  printed  by  James  Junius 
Goodwin  (xii.  pp.  276),  I9>'3.  Mr.  Goodwin  gives,  by  way  of  preface,  Morant’s 
account  of  the  Church  of  Booking,  followed  by  a  few  architectural  notes.  Further 
notes  inform  us  of  the  circumstances  that  led  to  the  discovery  of  this  early  Register 
after  extended  search  that  lasted  for  many  years.  The  satisfaction  experience  by 
Mr.  Goodwin,  especially  in  regard  to  furthering  investigations  relating  to  the  family 
of  that  name,  will  in  no  small  degree  be  felt  by  a  large  number  of  interested 
persons  who  are  able  to  avail  themselves  of  this  well-printed  Register.  A  view  of 
Rocking  Church  and  village  (‘‘  not  a  Town,”  says  Morant)  forms  a  frontispiece  and 
there  is  a  further  view  of  the  church  and  a  good  index  of  names,  among  which  we 
note  the  following  for  their  singularity  : — Pirowne,  Garter,  Paretree,  Pigbone,  Pittie, 
Roman,  Shotbolt,  Spiltember,  Spiltimber,  Sweetbone,  Thimble. 

PF.niOHKB  OF  Rat  of  Denstoh,  Wickhambrook  and  othrr  Placrs  in 
Suffolk,  by  Grey  Milner-Gibson  Cullum,  F.8.A.  (pp.  40).  lyindon ;  Mitchell  Sc 
Hughes,  190.3.  There  are  also  included  in  this  genealogical  volume  the  families 
of  Oakes  of  Kowton,  Rawlinson  of  Stowlungtoft.  Heigham  of  Hunston,  Hasted, 
and  other  Suffolk  fMtnilies.  The  several  fine  portraits.  See.,  lend  additional  interest 
to  this  carefully  compiled  pedigree. 

How  TO  Decipher  and  Studt  Old  Documents,  by  E.  E.  Thoyts,  with  an 
Introduction  by  C.  Trice  Marri-n :  second  edition.  liondon  :  Elliot  Stock,  1903. 
There  is  much  valuable  informatioii  in  this  little  guiiie  to  the  reading  of  ancient 
MSS.,  and  we  recommend  it  to  the  notice  of  any  who  may  be  desirous  of  acquiring 
the  very  desirable  power  of  unravelling  tbe  mysteries  of.  old  writings.  The 
attempt  to  read  character  by  means  of  hand  wi  lling  is  a  little  foreign  to  the  subject 
with  which  such  a  work  as  this  is  supposed  to  uc^I.  Miss  'I'hoyts  should  have 
resisted  the  temptation.  The  writing  of  the  proff..<NioT«al  scribe  of  days  long  past 
can  hardly  be  said  to  bear  traces  of  character.  The  personAljty  of  such  writer  must 
necessarily  be  somewhat  obscured,  if  not  altogether  indiscerniHe,  by  reason  of  the 
hard  and  fast  nature  of  the  exercise,  the  stiff  form  of  the  letters,  There  is  also 
additional  information  relating  to  parochial  life,  in  connection  with  th;}  chapters  on 
parish  registers,  parish  officers  and  their  books,  &c.,  which  also  is  a  little  oi>t.'itle  the 
domain  of  paleog^phy  and  might  lie  well  spared.  Occasional  oxpiunations  of  a 
verv  trivial  character,  erroneous  or  of  doubtful  imjiort,  are  given,  r.g.,  ”  rails  (speii 
usually  ‘rayles’),”  ‘‘ the  origin  of  Church  Collections  is  oWiire,”  4c.,  4c.  That 
this  book  has  reached  a  second  edition  indicates  both  the  need  of  such  a  work 
and  an  appreciation  of  what  Miss  Thoyts  has  attempted. 

Hikrukoia  Anolicana  :  Documents  and  Extracts  Illustrative  of  the 
Ceremonial  of  the  Anglican  Church  after  the  Reformation:  New  Edition, 
revised  and  considerably  enlarged  by  Vernon  Staley,  I’rovost  of  Inverness  Cathedral. 
Ijondon  :  Alexander  Moring,  the  De  la  More  Press,  2  vols.,  1903.  Originally 
issued  in  parts  at  irregpilar  periods  (1843-1848),  under  the  auspices  of  the  old 


NOTKS  AND  QUERIKS,  ETC.  163 

Cambridga  Camden  Society  and  in  Boroewhat  disjointed  form,  this  esteemed 
publication  which  had  become  somewhat  scarce  has  b^n  re>prodaced  in  an  enlarged 
and  revised  edition  forming  two  choice  volumes  of  the  Library  of  Liturgiolog^  and 
Ecclesiology.  We  cannot  speak  too  highly  of  the  way  in  which  the  work  has  been 
carried  out,  alike  creditable  to  Editor  and  Publisher.  There  is  abundance  of  fresh 
material,  such  extracts  being  distinguished  by  an  asterisk,  while  the  many  additional 
fine  illustrations  are  a  distinct  gain.  The  original  design  of  the  work  in  furnishing 
a  clear  insight  into  post-reformation  usages  is  steadily  followed  with  the  best 
results,  so  that  for  fulness  and  effectiveness  of  illustration  it  is  rendered  singularly 
complete.  Uf  course,  numerous  other  instances  could  have  been  given,  but  those 
selected  are  most  representative.  In  a  third  volume  which  we  understand  may  be 
looked  for  soon,  additional  matter  of  importance  relating  to  Funeral  Customs,  See., 
that  may  be  gleaned  from  our  own  pages  and  similar  publications  will  doubtless 
find  a  place.  Several  East  Anglian  allusions  occur  in  these  volumes  and  we  must 
not  omit  to  mention  an  excellent  view  of  the  “Glorious”  font  cover  at  Ufford. 
The  recurrence  of  entries  in  the  Ely  Cathedral  accounts  twice  yearly  for  a  period  of 
forty  years  (1708-1747),  of  a  quarter  uf  a  puuu  i  of  frankincense  (mentioned  in  the 
recent  Cau  for  Ineemt)  is  noteworthy.  But  whether  associated  or  not  with 
ceremonial  use,  we  are  a  little  curious  to  know  why  the  practice  began  in  1708 
and  came  to  be  discontinued  in  1747.  This  was  a  dead  period  in  Cathedral 
Churches  as  elsewhere.  Prebendary  Green’s  complaint  of  head-ache  is  alleged 
for  its  discontinuance !  Although  we  have  the  Briefe  Compariion  of  the  Liturgie 
with  the  Meu%e-Book  (A.D.  1641),  yet  we  had  overlooked  the  word  reelinatoriee'’ 
which  that  tract  further  tells  us  were  “  for  confessions  within  the  Chancel,”  until 
we  found  it  quoted  in  the  Hierurgia.  We  only  know  the  word  reclinatorium  used 
in  the  sense  of  a  staff  or  standing  desk  upon  which  the  ordinary  worshipper  could 
lean — clearly  shriving  stools  are  meant.  It  would  be  a  useful  adjunct  to  the 
Eierurgxa  if  notes  upon  such  words  could  be  added.  We  should  also  like  to  see  an 
index  of  the  different  authorities  who  are  quoted,  and  a  somewhat  fuller  general 
index  would  be  decidedly  advantageous.  The  work  is  singularly  free  from  errors 
of  every  kind.  We  have  long  known  and  valued  the  original  Edition,  but  this  new 
issue  is  certainly  calculated  to  supplant  the  old. 

A  List  of  HIonvurmtal  Brassrs  remaining  in  the  County  of  Suffolk,  by 
the  Rev.  Edmund  Farrer,  F.S.A.  Norwich :  Agas  H.  Goose,  Rampant  Horse 
Street,  1903.  Some  years  ago,  Mr.  Farrer  compiled  a  similar  list  of  Norfolk 
brasses,  and  many  will  be  glad  to  possess  the  present  catalogue  of  those  in 
Suffolk.  The  arrangement  is  excellent,  and  by  a  judicious  disposition  of  type  and 
fulness  of  description  the  several  accounts  are  rendered  bMutifully  clear  and 
inviting.  It  is  no  dry  catalogue  but  an  interesting  collection  of  notes,  in  which 
genealogy  finds  a  prominent  place,  together  with  numerous  references  that  are  most 
useful.  Appendixes  give  lists  of  brasses  missing,  of  which  rubbings  are  extant, 
brasses  in  private  possession,  and  a  chronological  list  of  figure  brasses.  It  scarcely 
need  be  said  that  the  work  is  finely  printed.  The  illustrations  are  many  and  good, 
and  Mr.  Farrer’s  **  Introduction  ’’  admirable. 

Samuel  Pepts  ;  Lover  op  Musiuub,  by  Professor  Sir  Frederick  Bridge,  Mus. 
Doc.  Ixindon :  Smith,  Elder,  &  Co.,  1903.  The  two  apt  quotations  from  the 
famous  diary,  acquainting  us  with  Pepys’  devotion  to  “  musique  ”  are  all  sufficient 
to  indicate  the  interest  that  attaches  to  these  lectures  delivered  at  the  Royal 
Institution,  and  now  presented  in  an  enlarged  and  attractive  form.  In  the 
preparation  of  Dr.  Bridge's  work  the  Pepysian  Library  at  Magdalene  College, 
(Cambridge,  has  been  laid  under  contribution,  and  from  this  source  the  Profes.sor 
has  drawn  Pepys’  song,  “  Beauty  Retire,”  which  with  other  airs  are  here 
skilfully  arranged.  Some  out  of  the  way  information  relating  to  old  country  dances, 
musical  instruments  of  a  former  period,  Ac.,  is  valuable  matter.  It  is  curious  to 
find  Pepys’  musical  acquaintance,  an  Italian  named  Morelli,  counselling  him  to  cure 
5.  fever  with  sympathetical  powder,  the  chief  ingredients  in  which  were  to  be  “  the 
pi  urioirhs  of  the  nailes  of  both  your  hands  and  your  foots,  and  three  locks  of  hair 
of  the  l:o>  of  your  crown.  I  hope  with  the  grace  of  God  it  will  cure  you.”  This 
Morelli  was  clearlv  something  more  than  a  musician  !  A  portrait  belonging  to  the 
Corporation  ot  i'rinity  House  serves  as  a  frontispiece. 


164 


THB  8A8T  ANGLIAN;  OS, 


Thi  Hcndrbd  Rolls  and  Extracts  thbrsfkom  made  bv  authority  of 
2  Edw.  i.  (Lothingland,  Suffolk),  with  a  translation  by  the  late  Lord  John  Uervey. 
Ipswich  :  8.  &  W.  J.  King  (pp.  121),  1903.  We  are  glad  to  have  this  portion  of  the 
Hundred  Rolls,  and  only  regret  to  find  from  the  useful  preface  which  Lord  Francis 
Hervey  writes  that  this  is  all  his  lamented  brother  prepared,  and  even  this  does  not 
seem  to  have  received  final  correction  at  Lord  John  Hervey’s  hands.  Anyone 
contemplating  a  search  in  the  Hundred  Rolls  will  find  this  exeerpta  and  translation 
very  serviceable.  Suffolk  people  will  of  course  welcome  the  book  as  a  valuable 
contribution  to  county  history.  The  general  index  might  with  advantage  have  been 
enlarged  ;  there  are  many  interesting  items  that  should  have  been  thus  specified. 

Norfolk  Churches  :  Hundred  of  South  Qreenhoe,  by  J.  Hugh  Bryant. 
Norwich:  Mercury  Office.  1903.  Some  excellent  work  is  being  done  by  Mr. 
Hugh  Bryant  in  the  issue  of  compendious  accounts  of  the  several  Churches  of 
Norfolk,  with  an  expressly  prepared  illustration  of  each  Church,  which  alone 
invests  the  publication  with  uncommon  interest.  This  is,  we  believe,  the  twelfth 
“  Booklet  ”  (we  do  not  like  the  term  ;  besides,  a  well  printed  and  finely  illustrated 
book  like  this — 10  in.  X  6  in. — suitably  bound  and  containing  well  nigh  300  pages, 
deserves  a  more  appropriate  name),  and  we  congratulate  both  Editor  and  Publisher 
upon  a  conspicuous  success.  Any  future  historian  of  a  Norfolk  parish  may  turn 
to  these  Volumes  with  feelings  of  thankfulness. 

Gran’ha’s  Jane,  by  Mary  E.  Mann.  I,ondon :  Methuen  and  Co.,  1903. 
This  is  a  very  delightful  story,  and  to  those  who  passed  their  childhood  and 
school  days  in  Norwich  during  the  “  fifties”  and  soon  after,  the  tale  is  reminiscent 
of  associations  which  Mrs.  Mann’s  story  will  awaken  very  pleasantly,  if  a  little 
sorrowfully.  The  Norwich  of  half-a-century  ago  is  not  the  Norwich  of  to-day, 
and  we  acknowledge  the  fact  a  little  painfully.  But  while  this  is  of  course  true  of 
most  densely  populated  centres,  it  seems  specially  to  be  the  case  in  regard  to 
Norwich  with  its  peculiarly  old  time  manners  and  customs  of  centuries,  which  it 
has  been  apparently  left  for  the  close  of  the  nineteenth  century  to  dissipate.  We 
value  Mrs.  Mann's  charming  picture  of  the  days  that  are  no  more,  particularly 
on  this  account.  The  homeliness  of  the  story,  free  from  the  extra vagence  of 
the  novelist,  is  very  pleasing,  and  here  and  there,  especially  at  the  close,  its 
pathos  is  very  touching.  Norwich,  its  Castle  Keep,  Tombland  Fair,  “Snap” 
of  Guild  Day  Fame,  St.  Valentine  observance,  Indies’  Schools,  Theatre,  Parties, 
&c.,  to  say  nothing  of  its  streets  and  scenes,  is  made  to  live  again,  while  the 
very  characters  introduced  to  our  notice  seem  all  to  be  the  very  people  that 
we  used  to  know.  The  old  house  on  Orford  Hill,  similar  to  so  many  a  middle- 
class  dwelling,  that  was  also  a  business  house,  had  its  principal  room  on  the 
second  front  floor  and  it  was  called  a  “  tea-room,”  familiar  to  many.  We  fancy 
the  term  so  applied  was  peculiar  to  Norwich.  The  Norfolk  farm-house  or 
“  Old  Hall  ”  is  as  faithfully  delineated  as  the  Norwich  house,  and  the  life 
and  Burrounding^s  of  both  are  very  precisely  pourtrayed.  We  have  but  one 
fault  to  find,  and  that  is  with  the  title.  The  title  will  never  recommend  the 
book,  but  the  book  notwithstanding  its  title  will  never  need  any  other  recommen¬ 
dation  than  its  intrinsic  worth,  whether  as  a  literary  work  or  an  uncommonly 
good  local  story. 

Thomas  Shadwbll.  London:  T.  Fisher  Unwin,  1903.  Shadwell’s  play, 
“  Bury  Fair,”  has  been  reprinted,  with  three  other  plays  by  the  same  writer,  in  a 
recent  volume  of  the  Mermaid  Seriei,  edited  with  an  Introduction  and  Notes  by 
George  Saintsbury.  The  coarseness  of  these  plays  would  never  lead  us  to 
recommend  them,  but  Shadwell  was  of  Norfolk  extraction,  and  of  Caius  College, 
Cambridge,  and  his  “  Bury  Fair,”  which  we  are  told  “  is  quite  Shadwell’s  l^t 
thing,”  is  of  interest  to  East  Anglians,  exhibiting  as  it  does  the  manners  and 
customs  of  the  second  half  of  the  seventeenth  century,  and  containing  many  local 
references  and  phrases.  The  expression  “  Thetford  music,’’  described  as  “  the  best 
music  in  England,”  draws  from  the  Editor  the  remark  that  “  the  Thetford  fiddlers 
had  been  in  great  request  when  Charles  II.  kept  Court  at  Newmarket.” 


i 


NOTES  AND  QUEBIB8,  ETC. 


CALENDAE  OF  FEE-FARM  RENTS.  No.  I.  NORFOLK. 

In  presenting  the  following  transcript  of  the  Calendar  or  Index 
of  Lands,  Pensions,  &o.,  formerly  belonging  to  the  monasteries 
dissolved  by  Henry  VlII.,  and  granted  subject  to  Fee-farm  Rents 
reserved  to  the  Crown,  we  do  so  with  some  diffidence.  We  trust, 
however,  it  may  be  of  service,  and  not  altogether  without  interest.  We 
are  conscious  that  it  has  shortcomings,  and  is  not  free  from  errors. 
If  readers  of  the  Eatt  Anglian  will  mark  the  quotation  from  the 
learned  Bacon  appearing  on  the  face  of  the  cover,  they  will  be  good 
enough  to  note  any  deficiencies  with  a  view  to  due  rectification  in 
these  pages. 

Beside  the  rolls  here  indexed,  there  are  other  documents  at  the 
Public  Record  Office  containing  particulars  preparatory  to  the  grants. 
There  are  also  two  similar  series  of  rolls  relating  to  the  lands  sold 
in  fee  simple,  and  separate  series  relating  to  the  colleges,  hospitals, 
gilds,  fraternities,  chantries,  free  chapels,  Ac.,  and  many  other  sources  of 
information.  Some  of  the  membranes  forming  these  rolls  are  clearly 
written ;  some  are  not.  When  stained  or  damaged  they  are  difficult 
to  decipher,  and  where  fragments  are  torn  off  one  cannot  always 
venture  to  suggest  what  has  disappeared.  The  spelling  of  the  names 
of  places  is  often  deplorably  inaccurate,  rendering  the  identification 
somewhat  difficult.  Occasionally,  the  place  is  found  tacked  on  to 
the  wrong  county.  Where  convenient,  this  is  set  right  in  our  tran¬ 
scripts  by  amending  the  original  form.  Where  we  are  not  certain 
the  names  have  been  allowed  to  stand  ;  consequently,  a  supplemental 
list  of  corrections,  &c.,  may  be  necessary,  in  which  can  be  included 
such  places  at  present  appearing  under  the  title  of  other  counties. 

A  grant  at  a  fee-faim  rent  (“  farm  ”  or  “  ferme  ”  =  “  rent  ”),  it 
may  be  remarked,  is  a  grant  of  the  freehold  in  perpetuity  at  a  rent 
more  or  less  nominal,  vide  the  paper  on  Fee-farm  Rents  [^Eaet 
Anglian,  vol.  viii.,  pp.  177-180),  where  there  is  much  interesting 
information  on  the  subject.  Biden 

Hilda  A.  Weight. 

Calendab  OB  Index  to  the  PABTicxn.AB8  of  Fee-fabm  Rents 
IN  THE  County  of  Nobfolk  besebved  upon  Gbants  fbou  the  Ceown 

AND  BEHAININO  IN  THE  AUGMENTATION  OFFICE. 

Plaoes.  PremisM  charged.  Grantees.  BoUs  No. 

Ayleswitborpe  *  .  The  Manner  .  .  Thomas  Mildmay  .  7,  9 

Avlesham  .  .  ,,  .  .  Alexander  Mather  .  19,  27 

Abbots  Thorpe  -  .  The  Manor  part  of  St.  Giles  Bridges  &  als.  34,  89 


Aslackton 
Asheley  t 
Blaokborough  . 

Barton  Buryale 
Bredcar  . 


Premiaaa  charged. 

.  The  Manner  . 

.  The  Manor  part  of  St. 
Edmund’s,  Bury, 
late  Monastery 
.  See  Thetford  . 

.  Site  of  the  Demeans 
of  the  late  Priory 
.  The  Manor 
.  See  Thompson 
*  t  Aahwellthorpe. 

M 


Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk  66,  132 

. .  65.  132 

Bishop  of  Norwich  .  5,  6 

Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse  6,  7 

Edmd.  Enivett  .  6,  8 


XUM 


166 


THS  KA8T  AMOLIAir;  OB, 


FUew. 

FremiMs  charged. 

OtaatcM. 

BoUsKo. 

Bromeholme  . 

Site  of  the  Manor  . 

Thos.  Woodhouse  . 

8,  11 

Baokton  .  .  . 

See  Bromeholme 

M  tf 

8.  11 

Bygraye  . 

The  Manner  . 

s  s  s  s 

10,  14 

Burneham  Westgate 
ala.  Bameham  St. 
Mary’s 

Bumeham  Oyery  . 

The  Market  and 
Fair 

Edmd.  Bennicke  . 

12,  16 

The  Manor  &  Bents 
of  Assize 

Edwd.  Ditchfield  A 
als. 

13,  17 

Bagthorpe 

See  Castle  Acre 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

15,  20 

Banner  . 

9f  tf  •  • 

If  If  11 

15,  20 

Barsham,  West 

The  Manner  & 
Bectory 

The  Manner  . 

Miles  Spencer 

15,  20 

Bowthorpe 

16,  23 

Blofielde  .  . 

Sir  (P)  Thos.  Pastou 

18,  26 

Brandeston  als. 

Brampston 

A  portion  of  Tythes 
out  of  the  Bectory 

27.  51 

Bromstnorp 

See  Coxford  . 

Edwd.,  K  of  Oxford 

28,  54 

Bradfield  . 

See  Budham,  West . 

Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford 

28,  55 

Burnham . 

See  Budham,  East  . 

28,  56 

Bircham,  Newton  . 

A  third  of  the  Manor 
A  Sundrys 

Jas.  Hussey  A  al.  . 

29,  60 

Baborough  . 

The  Manor 

Alexr.  Mathor 

32,  71 

Brancaater  .  . 

The  Manor 

Sir  Bich.  Southwell. 

33,  77 

Bilney,  West  . 

The  Manner  . 

Bichd.  Fulmorston . 

33.  78 

Beeston  . 

The  Site  A  Demeans 
of  the  late  Priory 

Sir  Edwd.Wyndham 
AaL 

34,  82 

Bynnham 

The  Site  A  Demeans 
of  the  late  Priory 

Sir  Thos.  Paston 

34.  85 

Barney  . 

The  Manor  A  Bectory 

19  99  * 

34,  94 

Batley 

The  Manor,  etc. 

Wm.  Ford  .  .  | 

39, 

40,  107 

Bretenham 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Bakenesthorpe. 

tt  99  •  • 

99  99  99 

55,  132 

Beethorpe 

99  99  *  * 

99  99  99 

55,  132 

Bangham. 

99  99  •  • 

99  99  99 

55,  132 

Beighton .  , 

The  Manor 

Sir  Thos.  Paston  .  | 

60,  149 
65,  179 

Barton  All  Saints’ 
als.  St.  Andrew  in 
Barton  Bendish 

A  Pension  out  of 
the  Bectory 

. 

62,  160 

Bilough.  . 

A  Pension  out  of 
the  Bectory 

. 

63,  175 

Banham  . 

A  Pension  out  of 
the  Bectory 

. 

64,  177 

Banber  . 

A  portion  of  Tythes 

s  s  •  s 

64,  178 

Bretenham 

The  Manor 

Henry,  E.  of  Surry 

256,  559 

Barwicke . 

A  TOrtion  out  of  the 
Bectory 

64,  179 

Briston  al.  Boeston  . 

The  Manor 

Wm.  Butts 

228,  521 

Cassewicke 

See  Bromeholme 

Thos.  Woodhouse  . 

8,  11 

Oley. 

See  Langwad  . 

Sir  Thos.  Bedingfield 

14,  19 

Calcott  . 

liie  late  Priory 

14,  19 

Castleacre 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

15,  20 

Cisteme  . 

See  Castleacre. 

II  II  II 

15,  20 

Croke,  South  . 

•  • 

99  99  99 

15,  20 

NOTES  AST)  QUEUES,  BTC. 

167 

FUoes. 

Premises  charged. 

Grantees. 

Bolls  No. 

Catts  Fenner  . 

The  Mannor  . 

Sir  Thos.  Clerk 

25,  34 

Carleton  . 

Certain  Lands. 

(P  Clere) 

26,  40 

Carbrooke 

The  Manor 

Edwd.  North,  Kt.  . 

19,  roi 

Coxford  . 

Sundry  Lands. 

26,  43 
28,  54 

Site  of  the  late  Priory 

Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford 

Carhow  . 

&  Sundries 

The  late  Priory 

Sir  John  Sholdon  . 

33,  74 

Cheiigham,  Little  . 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Colston  . 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Cotton  als.  Colton  . 

A  Pension  out  of 

63,  170 

Dikewood 

the  Bectory 

See  Castleacre. 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

15,  20 

Darsingham  . 

The  Manor&  Bectory 

Various  Orantees  .  | 

9,  12 
26,  41 

Dickleborough. 

A  portion  of  Tythes 

•  •  •  • 

27,  52 

Deerchant,  East 

out  of  the  Bectory 
The  Park,  &c. . 

Thoa  Crompton&als. 

35,  100 

Denham  . 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Deerham,  West 

The  Site  of  the 

Thoa  Deerham  & 

63,  164 

Densons  . 

Manor  &  Orange 
The  Manor  &  Sun- 

wife 

Bichd.  Freeston 

230,  523 

Ditton 

drys 

See  Thetford  . 

Thoa,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Eaton 

The  Mannor  &  Bec¬ 
tory 

See  Tuddenham,NtL 

Various  Orantees  . 

16,  21, 22 

Elsing 

Jas.  Hussey  &  al.  . 

29,  64 

Ehnham,  South 

The  Mannor  . 

Various  Orants  .  | 

[  36,  102 

1  37,  103 

Emneth  .  .  . 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Ennes 

The  Marsh 

Sir  Wm.  Paston  .  j 

f  60,  147 
[  65,  182 

Edinthorpe 

The  Mannor  . 

Sir  Wm.Woodhouse  | 

[  60,  152 

1  65,  181 

Finsham  . 

A  Pension  out  of 

sees 

26,  38 

Fouldeu  . 

the  Bectory 

Lands 

Bichd.  Fulmerston . 

27,  47 

Filby  . 

A  portion  out  of 

.... 

27,  48 

Folsham  . 

the  Bectory 

See  Budham,  East  . 

Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford 

28,  56 

Felthams  als.  Felt- 

The  Manor  & 

Jaa  Hussey  &  als.  . 

29,  63 

ham 

Framsham,  Little  . 

Premises 

The  Mannor  . 

Bich.  Andrews 

31,  70 

Fourdham  .  , . 

See  Benhall  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk  | 

f  34,  99 
[  63,  166 

Framlingham  . 

See  Thetford  . 

..  »  » 

55,  132 

[Note. — Some  of  the  rents  reserved  by  these  grants  were  after¬ 
wards  sold.  A  list  of  the  sales  will  subsequently  appear,  giving 
further  particulars  and  disclosing  interesting  variations  in  the  spelling 
of  the  names. 

When  two  rolls  were  given  (#.y.,  Fourdham),  and  only  one  grantee, 
it  does  not  follow  that  he  is  the  grantee  in  both  cases.] 

(To  be  continued), 

M  2 


XUM 


168 


THB  EA8T  ANQUAN  ;  OB, 


WILLS  OF  THE  HUNDEED  OF  ARMINQFOED,  GAMES 
{Preterved  at  the  Peterborough  Probate  Regietry). 

•  AbINOTON  PiaOTTS,  OTHEBWI8S  ABI»QTON-JTJXTA-8HI»aAY. 

I. — Proved  in  the  Consietory  Court  of  Ely. 

(1)  Pygott  John  1449-1597  I  (3)  Punter  Richard  Zii^r  x.  219 

(2)  Warde  Thomas  „  „  |  (4)  Wiggs  Edward  ZiJrr  z.  18 


II. — Proved  in  the  Court  of  the  Archdeacon  of  Ely.* 


(5)  Pigott  Thomas  -  i.  45 

(6)  Oostling  Elizabeth  ii.  92 

(7)  Pigott  Robert  -  ,,  16 

(8)  Upchurch  Henry  -  iii.  125 

(9)  Batte  John  -  -  ,,124 

(10)  Morriss  John  -  ,,  215 

( 1 1 )  Robinge  Seth  -  ,,  275 

(12)  Batte  Thomas  -  ir.  12 

(13)  Davis  William  -  ,,  324 

(14)  Batt  Matthew  -  „  350 

(15)  Greenell  Thomas-  „  364 

(16)  Stiles  Thomas  -  v.  223 

(17)  Barfoote  Francis  -  vi.  46 

(18)  Mott  Nathan  -  vii.  156 

(19)  Wells  William  -  ,,  237 

(20)  . Thomas  -  viii.  118 

(21)  Sadler  Nicholas  -  ,,221 

(22)  .  -  „  257 

(23)  Carter  John  -  ,,  312 

(24)  Warren  John(torn 

out)  -  -  „  412 


(25)  Carter  Martha 

ix. 

108 

(26)  Chapman  Thomas 

111 

(27)  Greenell  Sarah  - 

19 

28 

(28)  Adams  Richard  - 

X. 

379 

(29)  QoodgameWilliam 

99 

398 

(30)  Jacklyn  Thomas  - 

99 

14 

(31)  Marsh  Ann - 

99 

25 

(32)  Piggott  Ann 

99 

131 

(33)  Slade  (?)  George  - 

99 

316 

(34)  Smith  Robert 

99 

392 

(35)  Warren  John 

99 

139 

(36)  Ward  William  - 

99 

152 

(37)  Savill  Mary 

xi. 

36 

(38)  Smith  John 

99 

186 

(39)  Smith  John 

99 

2G6 

(40)  Fenn  Charles 

xii. 

372 

(4 1 )  ChristmasWilliam 

xiv. 

229 

(42)  Hart  Richard 

99 

206 

(43)  Wilson  Rachel  - 

99 

179 

An  earlier  volume  (1550-59),  kept  at  the  Archdeacon’s  Registry 
at  Cambridge,  has  for  Abington . Ward. 

(1)  John  Pygott.  Dec.  12  1579.  Rector  of  Abyngton.  To  be 
buried  in  the  chancel  of  St.  Michael  of  Abyngton.  To  the  Friars 
Minor  of  Cambridge  3*  4^.  “Item  legat  cuilibet  filiorum  et  filiolarum 
Buarum  unium  medium  ordei.’’ 

(4)  Edward  Wigg^.  Proved  22  June  1615.  Small  bequests  to 
relations. 


*  Archdeacon’s  Court. — General  date  of  the  volumes : — 


Vol.  i.  1629—1644. 

„  ii.  1644—1669. 

„  iii.  1669—1682. 

„  iv.  1682—1691. 

„  v.  1591—1697. 

,,  vi.  1697—1611. 

„  vii.  1611-1623. 


Vol.  viii.  1623—1639. 
(Folios  407  to  end  missing). 
„  ix.  1639—1661. 

„  X.  1661—1694. 

„  xi.  1694—1723. 

„  xii.  1724—1736. 

„  xiii.  1736—1766. 

„  xiv.  1766—1768. 


XOTS8  Ain>  QUSBIXS.  XTC. 


169 


(5)  Thomas  Pygote.  Dated  3  April  1632.  “Esquyer.”  To  be 
buriM  at  Abington.  To  the  high  Altar,  for  tithes  forgotten  x*; 
reparacion  of  church  xx*;  rood  light  iij*  iiij^;  sepulchre  light  iij*  iiij*; 
maintenance  of  bells  one  quarter  of  malt.  To  Steeple  Morden  Church 
vj*  viij^ ;  Litlington  Church  x*.  To  the  four  orders  of  frairs  in  Cam¬ 
bridge  :  to  the  gray  freers  xx*,  to  the  black  freers  xiij*  iiij**,  to  the 
austons  ft  to  the  wyght  freers,  to  each  of  them  vj*  viij**.  I  will  that 
Sir  Robert  Norwise,  Knyght,  Lord  Cheif  Justice  of  the  Com  pleice 
in  Westmynster,  John  Wentworthe  esquier  sen.  heire  apparent  of 
8'  Roger  Wentworth,  Enyght,  John  Tirell.  esquier,  8'  Giles  Abyngton, 
Enyght,  Philip  Paris  esquier,  Thomas  Perient  Esquier,  John  Newport, 
gentleman,  William  Sewster,  gentleman,  be  my  Feoffees,  nowe  being 
in  lyffe,  to  the  use  ft  pformans  of  my  last  will,  of  the  manors  in 
Abyngton,  Lytleing^on,  Steple  Morden,  ft  Gilden  Morden;  ft  shall 
be  seized  of  them  for  the  terme  of  ten  yeares  after  my  decease  to  the 
use  of  this  my  last  will  for  the  maryag  of  Elizabeth  Pygote,  maude 
Pyg^ote,  ft  Philice  Pygote,  my  daughters,  ft  for  the  pferment  of  Robert 
Pygfote,  ft  John  Pygote,  ft  William  Pygote,  my  younger  sons.  Also 
to  be  seised  of  his  manors  ftc.  in  Litlington  for  8  years,  except  those 
lands  which  he  himself  had  purchased.  Henry  Pygote  his  son  ft  heir. 
To  each  servant  a  quarter’s  wages,  ft  to  John  Wenham,  his  servant, 
the  house  where  he  dwelleth  for  life.  For  seven  years  a  priest  “  to 
syng  for  my  soul  ” ;  his  salary  8  marks  sterling ;  Sir  John  Smarte 
to  have  the  preferment.  John  Newport  of  Sandy,  Esq.,  William 
Sewster,  gentleman,  and  John  Sewster,  gentleman,  his  son,  appointed 
Executors;  with  “my  Lord  Norwiche”  as  supervisor.  “To  mistres 
Elizabeth  Smarte,  my  mother,  oon  quarter  of  whete  ft  a  quarter  of 
make.  To  my  sister  Dorothe  Sewster  iij  quarters  of  whete  ft  iij 
quarters  of  make.”  Witnesses: — “  Sir  Seth  hallewell,  preste,  curate 
of  Abyngton,  8"^  John  Ely,  vycar  of  Steeple  Morden,  John  Sewster  of 
Ashwell,  gentleman,  Thomas  hynton,  John  Bolnest,  S'  John  Smarte, 
preste,  John  Bushe  of  Steple  Mordon,  Alexander  Wenham,  ft 
Willyam  Dryver.” 

6  May  1632.  “To  Henry  Pygote  my  son,  all  my  rayment,  all 
my  sylver  plate,  as  gobletts,  salts,  ft  all  other  plate.”  Small  legacies 
to  his  daughters  Elizabeth  ft  Maud,  to  Sir  Seth  Hallewell,  to  Margery 
Maston,  to  Alexander  Wenham,  to  William  Deyn  his  “  Bayle,”  ft  to 
Phylis  Colwylde  his  aunt. 

[This  Thomas  Pigott  was  great  grandson  of  John  Pigott,  mer¬ 
chant,  of  London,  who  bought  the  Abington  estate  in  the  reign  of 
Edward  IV.  The  whole  parish  still  belongs  to  his  descendant,  Mr. 
Graham-Foster-Pigott.  The  testator  was  related  to  the  Chicheleys 
of  Wimpole  and  the  Cloptons  of  Clopton  ;  his  eldest  son  Henry 
married  Margaret,  daughter  of  Lord  Rich.] 

(8)  Henry  Upchurche.  Dated  3  Jan.  1670.  Yeoman.  “To  the 
poor  men’s  box  of  Abington  x*.”  Legacies  of  money  and  furniture 
to  wife  ft  children.  Proved  20  Feb.  1670. 

(7)  Robert  Pygott.  Gent.  Administration  to  Henry  Pygott,  his 
brother.  Proved  4  Oct.  1 644. 

(17)  Francis  Barfoote.  Labourer.  Numerous  bequests  to  distant 


170 


THE  BAST  AKOtilAH;  OR, 


relations  and  friends,  amounting  to  no  less  than  £25.  Proved 
10  March  1598. 

-  [This  ^ebian  name  of  Barefoot  is  identical  with  that  of  the 
aristocratic  Warwickshire  family  of  Bereford  or  Beresford,  who  held 
a  manor  in  the  neighbouring  parish  of  Olopton  in  the  fourteenth 
century.  I  have  noted  the  following  different  'spellings,  which 
mark  its  degradation : — Bereford,  Berford,  Barford,  Barforth,  Barfoot 
Barefoot.] 

(19)  William  Welles.  Nuncupative.  A  poor  man.  Proved 
20  March  1618. 

(32)  Anne  Piggott.  Dated  15  Feb.  1670.  Widdow.  To  my  son 
Thomas  “halfe  the  brass  &  the  pewter  in  the  garret,  &  also  a  chest 
with  all  y*  things  in  it  that  stands  under  my  chamber  windowe.  To 
my  cozen  John  Lynd’s  son  John,  a  press  in  y*  gallery.  To  my  grand¬ 
son,  John  Pygott,  a  cabinet  that  standeth  by  my  bedside.  To  my  * 
granddaughter,  Margaret  Piggott  the  cabinet  in  my  closet,  the  great 
trunke  in  my  chamber.  To  Granado  Piggott,  my  grandson,  y*  deske 
upon  y*  cupboard  that  stands  neare  the  chimney.  To  my  grandson, 
Francis  Piggott,  the  chest  which  stands  by  my  bedside,  and  a  trunke 
under  my  bed.  All  the  other  things  in  my  chamber  &  closet  which 
are  not  here  mentioned,  with  a  Still  &  Lymbecke  in  y*  garret,  I  give 
to  my  daughter  Mary  Piggott,  except  a  deske  in  my  closset,  which 
I  give  to  my  eon  John  Piggott.  To  the  poore  people  of  the  towne 
of  Abington  xl*.”  Son  John  executor  &  residuary  legatee.  Proved 
19  April  1671.  . 

[The  old  Manor  House  of  Abington  has  been  little  altered  since 
Anne  Piggott’s  time,  and  since  the  death  of  the  Hev.  W.  Graham- 
Foster- Pi  gott,  who  occupied  the  Pectory  house,  has  again,  after  long 
use  as  a  farm-house,  become  the  residence  of  the  Pigott  family.] 

(35)  John  Warren.  15  Nov.  1671.  Yeoman.  Mentions  his  wife, 
Anne,  his  mother  Anne  Mainard,  &  his  daughters  Anne  and  Elizabeth 
Warren.  Proved  17  Dec.  1671.  Walter  Jobes. 

Seagrav*  Rectory. 

{To  he  eotitinued). 


SAXON  PLURAL  SUFFIX  IN  USE  IN  NORFOLK. 


Crossing  the  district  road  from  Fomcett  St.  Mary  to  Tharston  and 
Tasburgh  runs  the  River  Taas.  During  the  rainy  autumn  and  winter 
of  1903  so  full  of  water  was  it  that  it  was  difficult  for  horses  to  wade 
the  ford,  while  the  traveller  on  foot  found  only  a  submerged  footpath, 
putting  the  inhabitants  of  the  houses  close  by  to  much  inconvenience 
through  not  being  able  to  cross.  This  ford  is  named  on  the  Ordnance 
Survey  Map  “  Horsen  Ford.”  The  plural  forms  “  oxen  ”  and 
“housen”  are  common,  but  the  survival  of  “horsen”  is  worth  noting. 
The  ford  is  approached,  not  only  by  the  ordinary  roadways,  but  also 
by  various  lokes,  driftways,  and  footpaths,  from  Tacolneston  and 
Fundeuhall  on  the  turnpike  from  New  Buckenham  to  Norwich,  and 


NOTBS  Ain>  QTTEBIBS,  BTO. 


171 


from  the  Fomcetts  and  Hapton.  One  of  the  lanes  leading  to  this  ford 
takes  the  foot  passenger  to  a  place  marked  on  some  maps  as  Low 
Inn”  Common.  This  is  locally  called  “Lound”  Common,  and  would 
more  properly  seem  to  be  a  contraction  of  ‘‘Low  End,”  not  Low  Inn. 
It  is  a  marsh  at  the  extreme  north-east  of  Fomcett  St.  Mary, 
adjoining  Tharston,  partly  bounded  by  a  beck  called  ‘‘The  Bun.” 
There  is  no  tradition  of  an  ‘‘  inn  ”  being  placed  there. 

HapUm.  A.  E.  BxTHP. 


!  INSCRIPTIONS  IN  OTHER  COUNTIES  RELATING 

i  j 

TO  EAST  ANGLIA.  ,  | 

Loho  Ashton  Churchtaxd,  Somimnt.  | 

A  marble  cross,  on  the  steps  of  which  is  the  following  insciip-  j 

'  tion ; —  I 

In  Loving  Memory  of  |  Emma  Marshall  |  who  died  May  4“*  f 

1890.  I  ‘‘They  shall  obtain  joy  and  gladness  |  and  sorrow  and  | 

■  sighing  shall  flee  away.” 

[Mrs  Emma  Marshall,  the  well-known  authoress,  was  the  seventh  ' 

child  of  Simon  and  Hannah  Martin  of  the  Old  Bank  House,  Norwich,  I 

;  and  was  bom  at  Northrepps’  Hill  House,  near  Cromer,  in  1830.  She  | 

I  wrote  many  stories,  three  of  which  specially  deal  with  Norfolk,  viz., 

I  In  the  Eatt  Country  with  'Sir  Thomat  Brown;  Winifrede't  Journal:  a  ■ 

^  Story  of  Exeter  and  Norwich  in  Bishop  Halts  Days  ;  and  Castle  Meadow ;  | 

:i  a  Story  of  Norwich  a  Hundred  Tears  ago.  Her  life  has  been  written  by 

her  daughter,  and  though  she  spent  many  years  in  Clifton,  and  died  1 

there,  her  early  life  was  spent  in  Norwich,  and  she  may  justly  be  j 

claimed  as  a  Norfolk  authoress.  A  memorial  brass  was  erect^  to  *' 

'  her  memory,  shortly  after  her  death,  in  Bristol  Cathedral.]  ^ 

I  Atnhob  Chtjbohyabd,  Binbubt.  ' 

: 

Marble  recumbent  cross  with  the  following  inscription  round 
the  edges : — 

Edward  Meyrick  Goulbnra,  D.D.,  D.O.L.,  sometime  Dean  of 
Norwich.  Died  2“*  May,  1897,  aged  79  years. 

“  Thou  shalt  come  to  thy  grave  in  a  full  old  age,  like  as  a  shock  I 

of  com  cometh  in  his  season.” — Job.  v.,  26. 

?  “For  so  He  giveth  his  beloved*  *n  sleep.” — Ps.  cxxvii.,  2.  ? 

j  “  The  Souls  of  the  righteous  are  in  the  hands  of  God,  and  there  1 

shall  no  torment  touch  them.” — Sol.  iii.,  1.  | 

Fkedxriok  T.  Hiboakx. 

1,  Rodney  Flaee, 

Clifton,  Bristol. 

I  *  Margin  at  Eevised  Version. 


XUM 


172 


THE  BAST  AEaLIAN  ;  OR, 


Durham  Cathedral. 

In  one  of  the  recesses  between  the  arches  separating  the  north 
and  middle  aisles  of  Durham  Cathedral  is  a  blue  slab  containing  a 
brass,  on  which  is  the  following,  now  very  much  worn,  inscription : — 
Depositum  Anne  ....  cti  (?)  ....  Barwell  LL.D. 

Cancel  ....  ces  (?)  Dunel  ....  Hen.  Chapman 
De  Buria  8t.  Edmund’s  agro  Suffol  gens 
virgo  fuit  casta  uxor  pudica  mater 
chara  pproximis  benigna  egenis  benefice 
ortbodoxee  religionis  Integra  oratione. 

Fervens  expiravit  martii  27®  1639. 

[^The  three  letters  “cif”  (so  they  seem  to  be)  favour  the  sup¬ 
position  that  the  word  may  be  if  so,  the  omission  in  the 

second  line  must  be  In  the  list  of  the  chancellors  of  Durham 

there  is  no  name  Barwell,  but  there  is  one  Thomas  Burwell,  M.A., 
1631 — 1673.  He  died  in  1673,  and  was  buried  in  St.  Margaret’s 
Church,  Westminster,  25th  March.  If  this  be  the  same,  Anne  could 
not  be  “  relicti,”  seeing  she  died  1639  and  the  chancellor  in  1673. — Ed.] 


REGISTER  EXTRACTS,  GROTON,  CO.  SUFFOLK. 

A  FEIGNED  BURIAL. 

The  following  entries  are  copied  from  the  register  of  Groton, 
Suffolk,  by  permission  of  the  Rector,  the  Rev.  J.  W.  Wayman.  The 
annotations  given  below  in  inverted  commas,  are  by  a  later  hand  than 
that  of  the  original  entries : — 

1568.  Avice  Lapadge  the  Daughter  of  Thomas  Lapadge  was 
baptized  the  firste  day  of  Aug^t.  “  Shee  was  maried  to  William 
Dogget  her  cosen.” 

1571.  Alyce  the  daughter  of  Sr  John  Spenncer  Lorde  Maior  of 
London  and  Alyce  his  wife  was  baptized  the  25th  of  September. 

1578-9.  Pryssylla  Alabastar  the  daughtere  of  Roger  Alabaster 
and  his  wife  was  baptized  the  1 5th  day  of  Marche.  ”  Shee  was 
maried  to  John  Banckes  esquire.” 

1580.  John  Alabaster  the  sonne  of  Roger  alabaster  (and)  Briget 
his  wife  was  baptized  ye  4  of  Decembr.  ”  He  was  killed  in  warre  in 
the  lowe  countries.” 

1582.  Thomasing  Clopton  the  daughter  of  Mr.  Willm.  Clopton 
gennt  and  of  mistress  margery  his  wife  was  baptized  the  18th  day  of 
ffebruarye.  “  Shee  was  maried  to  John  Winthrop*  &  died  in  child 
bed  1616.” 

1583.  Zachary  Yintener  the  sonne  of  hennery  Yintener  and  of 
Alls  his  wife  was  baptized  the  21th  day  of  May.  “  He  was  hanged- at 
Burie  for  burglarie.” 

1586-7.  Roger  Cooe  the  sonne  of  John  Coe  and  Ag^es  his  wife 


*  Afterwards  Governor  of  Massachusetts. 


nOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


173 


was  baptised  the  27t}i  day  of  february.  “  He  was  drowned  at 
Stratford  bridge.” 

1563.  Bichard  Spenser  was  buryed  the  10th  of  September,  first 
in  the  ni^ht,  and  afterwardes  in  a  Coffin  with  a  logge  onlie  in  it, 
in  the  Daie. 

Can  any  reader  of  the  Eatt  Anglian  throw  any  light  on  this  last- 
named  extraordinary  occurrence  ?  ^  3  Hutohieson. 

37,  Lowtr  Brook  Strut, 

Ipuoieh. 

[The  last  entry  seems  to  point  to  a  secret  interment,  the 
subsequent  burial  of  a  “  coffin  with  a  logge  onlie  in  it  ”  being  a 
ruse,  not  altogether  unknown  at  different  times.  The  recent  Druce 
(Duke  of  Portland)  investigation  furnishes  a  case  in  point.  The  then 
Sector  of  0roton  was  presumably  privy  to  the  arrangement.  Anyhow 
it  would  be  most  interesting  to  learn  the  circumstunces  of  the 
strange  proceeding. — Ed.] 


NOTES  ON  THE  EARLY  REGISTER  BOOKS  OF  . 

ST.  MARGARET’S,  IPSWICH  {continued  from  p.  151). 

Marriages. 

The  Marriages  are  preceded  by  a  similar  title  page  to  that 
prefixed  to  the  Christenings,  dating  in  this  case  from  “  23'^  Jun  1539 
to  12“*  April  1615  a.d.” 

A*  m“*ccccclx.  Edward  Lawrence  &  Susanna  Wythypoll  xiij  July. 

Anno  dmi  miilimo  quinqentesimo  sexagesimo  quinto.  John 
Porrsye  and  Sarah  Raymer  both  Single  persons,  by  dyspensacyon  of 
Mayster  Doctor  Eelke  granted  upon  consyderacyons  for  the  avoydynge 
of  further  ynconvenyence,  were  maryed  together  on  the  thursdaye  the 
XX j“  daye  of  the  moneth  of  marche. 

Anno  domi  miltimo  quinqentesimo  septuagesimo  secundo. 
Mayst'  Roberta  Kynge  one  of  the  porte  men  of  the  towne  of  Ypswich 
Wydower  and  Maystres  Anne  Wythypoll  Esquyer  {sic)  syngle  woman 
were  maryed  together  the  xxiij“  daye  of  the  moneth  of  December 
being  tewysdaye. 

Anno  dmi  miliimo  quiqentesimo  septuagesimo  tertio.  Andrew 
Comelyus  a  Ducheman  and  Joan  Swear  both  syngle  persons  were 
maryed  together  the  xij“  daye  of  the  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Maye 
beyne  Whytsontewysdaye. 

Anno  dmi  millesimo  quinqentesimo  septuagesimo  septimo. 
John  Eerye  and  Margarete  uckyngtrappe  both  single  persons  and 
both  of  thys  parysshe  were  maryed  together  yn  Saynte  Helenes 
Churche  by  the  mynyster  there  the  vj  daye  of  the  moneth  of  November 
beynge  Wedneedaye. 

1580.  Barnarde  Churche  Sin^  man  &  anne  Symon  {sic)  Bennett 
and  Alyce  Fitches  Servaunt  at  y*  Worshipfull  M'  Edmund  WythipoU 


XUM 


174 


THE  EAST  AHGLIAN;  OR, 


Esquire  were  married  y*  fifth  daie  of  may  beinge  Sondaie  anno  regin 
Begnie  Elizabeth  viccessimo  secundo. 

Dewike  Wild  was  maried  to  y*  Widows  Carpenter  the  xv  daie  of 
noTember  anno  domini  1580. 

John  Farmer  of  Capell  was  maryed  unto  Elizabeth  Eymball  the 
vj  daie  of  Decmbre  bavin  ge  a  Lycence  By  the  Doctor  Bedman 
ComisBarie  of  Suff.  in  A?  1585. 

On  page  22  is  the  signature  Johannes  Gleeon. 

Thomas  Bransby  of  S*  Margets  Single  mam  &  Margery  Eadyell 
now  married  the  4“"  of  ffebruary. 

BwriaU 

From  20*’’  Nov^  1538  to  24“*  May  1615  a.d.  ^ 

(Similar  title  page  ais  preceding). 

May  19  die  was  buried  Margeri  Scotte  y*  wife  of  Bobert  Sutor 
Yestiarius. 

On  top  of  page  4  : — 

Anno  Dihi  rn’miPzlvij  p  me  John  Slogh  OuraL 

On  page  8  : — 

November.  —  Ffoxe  wych  have  g^ven  a  diapur  towell  to  y* 
Churche. 

Anno  dihi  millimo  quinqentesimo  sexagesimo  tertio.  John  the 
Sonne  of  John  Bardell  Departynge  at  father  Whyghts  bys  grande- 
father  was  buryed  on  the  frydaye  the  ix***  daye  of  the  moneth  of 
Apryll. 

John  Whyghte  a  poore  olde  man  was  buryed  on  the  Sondaye, 
the  Eyghtenth  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Apryll. 

^ger  Fonder  preest  and  parson  of  great  Yeldam  yn  the  Countye 
of  Essex,  Departynge  yn  thys  parrysshe  yn  hys  brother  yn  lawes 
bowse  Gylbert  Styrruppe,  was  buryed  yn  thys  Churche  on  the  mudaye, 
the  xxvj**  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Apryll. 

Alyce  a  yonge  gyrle  the  Dawght'  of  Wyllyam  Barber  and  of 
Jone  Marysshe  hys  wyfe  was  buryed  on  the  Sondaye  the  ix^  daye'  of 
the  moneth  of  Maye. 

Thomas  Cockeshed  a  poore  maryed  man  was  buryed  on  the 
mndaye  the  xx^  daye  of  the  moneth  of  September. 

George  Hotson  a  yonge  man  unmaryed,  was  buryed  on  the 
Wednesdays  beynge  the  xxix“  daye  of  the  moneth  of  September. 

Mathewe  Swear  and  Annie  Swear  hvs  dawghter  were  buryed 
together  both  yn  one  grave  the  iiij‘**  daye  of  the  moneth  of  December. 

Anno  Dihi  millimo  cccoclxiiij**.  Henrye  Deynes  prentyse  w*  John 
Lessye  Coverlydde  wever,  was  buryed  on  the  thursdaye,  the  viij‘*  daye 
of  the  moneth  of  June. 

Bobert  Warren  a  ladde  was  buryed  on  the  mundaye,  the  iij  daye 
of  the  moneth  of  Julye. 

Danyell  the  sonne  of  the  forsayde  Bycharde  Stowe  an  ynfante 
and  brother  to  the  sayde  Wyllyam  Stowe  l^th  borne  together  at  one 


NOTKS  AND  QTmtIBS,  STC. 


t7a 

bjrth,  was  also  buryed  on  the  mndaye  the  vj  daye  of  the  moneth  of 
Auguste. 

Chrystne  peerson  an  ancyente  Wydowe  was  buryed  on  the  thurs- 
daye  the  riij  daye  of  the  moneth  of  December. 

John  an  ynfante  the  Sonne  of  Chrystyne  francys  Wydowe  latelye 
the  Wyfe  of  John  francys,  beynge  begoten  &  borne  yn  the  tyme  of 
her  Wydowhode,  was  buryed  on  the  Wednesdaye,  the  xix  daye  of  the 
moneth  of  December. 

Wyllyam  an  ynfante  the  sonne  of  the  sayde  Chrystyne  francys 
and  brother  to  the  sayde  ynfante  John  francys  beynge  t Wynnes  and 
both  home  at  one  birth,  was  buryed  on  the  Saturdaye  the  xxij  daye 
of  the  moneth  of  December. 

Anno  dm  mifiimo,'  quiqentesimo,  sexagesimo  sexto.  Jacobbe 
Humber  a  Duche  man  Stranger  departynge  at  Mathys  Steuens,  was 
buryed  on  Ester  Even  the  xiij  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Aprylle. 

Anno  dm,  miSimo,  quinqentesimo,  sexagesimo  septimo.  William 
Ryvett  an  ancyente  man  was  buryed  yn  thys  Churche  on  the  fry  daye, 
the  XX  daye  of  the  moneth  of  June. 

Marye  Rocke  Syngle  woman  Syster  by  the  mother  syde  to  Mast' 

Antonye  Russhe  was  buryed  in  the  Churche  yn . on  the  frydaye 

the  xxvij*'  daye  of  the  moneth  of  June. 

Roose  bobbetts  an  ancyente  Wydowe,  was  buryed  on  the  tewys- 
daye,  the  xxij  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Julye. 

Jaffreye  Twynleye  an  olde  blynde  man  was  buryed  on  the 
tewysdaye,  the  iv**'  daye  of  the  moneth  of  December. 

Anno  dm  mittimo  quinqentesimo  septuagesimo.  John  Caterson 
Srvante  to  M'  John  Smyth  &  a  Smyth  by  occupacyon  was  buryed  the 
xxij**  daye  of  the  moneth  of  maye  beynge  mndaye. 

Anno  dm  millesimo  quiqentesimo  Septuagesimo  primo.  John 
Bettes  wourkynge  &  dyggynge  gp^vell  yn  a  gravell  pytte  to  have 
gravell  to  amende  wyth  the  hyghe  way  (accordyng  to  the  Statute) 
the  xiij  daye  of  the  moneth  of  June  was  slayne  owte  of  hande  yn 
the  same  gravell  pytte  by  myschance  the  same  thyrtene  daye  of  June 
and  was  buryed  the  xiiij  daye  of  the  same  moneth  of  June. 

Anno  dm  millesimo  quiqentesimo  septuagesimo  secundo.  Nycolas 
Sadberye  beynge  Sextene  of  thys  paryshe  departed  the  thyrde  daye 
of  the  moneth  of  Apryll  and  was  buryed  the  iiij  daye  of  the  same 
moneth  of  Apryll  beynge  frydaye. 

Susan  the  dawght'  of  Mathewe  Goodwyne  sumtyme  porteman  yn 
thys  towne  and  of  Joan  hys  wyfe  was  buryed  the  xix  daye  of  the 
moneth  of  Maye  beynge  mndaye. 

Danyell  Derycks  a  prentyse  w*  John  Hulynge  a  cowpar  was 
buryed  the  same  daye  and  the  same  year  (6***  July). 

Elizabeth  Batty  11  an  olde  ancyente  Wydowe  was  buryed  the 
laste  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Auguste  beynge  Sondaye. 

Nycolas  Yongeman  a  Stranger  departynge  att  John  Lessyes 
coverlyddewever  was  buryed  the  xvj“  daye  of  the  moneth  of 
November  beynge  frydaye. 

Henry  Warner  an  olde  man  and  byenge  longe  bedred  was  buryed 
the  xix***  of  the  moneth  of  Januarye  beynge  mondaye. 


176 


THE  BAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


On  the  top  of  page  23 : — 

Ne  quid  ntmu. 

Anno  dmi  millesimo  quiqeutesimo  septuagesimo  tertio.  Wyllyam 
Dawson  an  ancjente  baclielar  was  buryed  the  xzij  day  of  the  moneth 
of  Apryll  beynge  Wednesdaye. 

Joan  an  infant  &  a  twynne  the  dowght'  of  John  Robynson  the 
brewer  &  of  Margarete  hys  wyfe  was  buryed  the  ziij  daye  of  the 
moneth  of  Julye  beynge  mhdaye. 

Kycharde  Steveson  a  syngleman  &  Srrante  to  ladye  Candysshe 
was  buryed  the  xv  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Julye  beynge  Wednesdaye. 

Bartholmewe  Wythypoll  the  sonne  of  mayster  Edmude  Wythy- 
poll  Esquyar  and  of  maystrea  Elsabeth  hys  wyfe  was  buryed  yn 
thys  Churche  the  xx“vj  daye  of  the  moneth  of  November  beynge 
Thursedaye. 

Anno  Dmi  millesimo  quinqentesimo  septuagesimo  quarto. 
Edwarde  a  yonge  ladde  the  Sonne  of  M'  Roberte  bailee  and  of 
Margarete  hys  wyfe  was  buryed  the  viij*^  daye  of  the  moneth  of 
Apryll  beynge  thursedaye. 

Robert  Dameron  the  oldeste  of  that  name  beyng  an  aged  man, 
was  also  buryed  the  same  daye  and  the  same  yeare  the  viij'''  daye  of 
the  moneth  of  Apryll  beynge  frydaye. 

Agnes  Cockeshed  a  single  woman  the  dowght'  of  Roberte 
Ciockshed  by  Anne  hys  fyrste  wife  was  buryed  the  xv*^  daye  of  the 
moneth  of  maye  beynge  Saturdaye. 

One  Thomas  Sharpe  a  Stranger,  a  man  besyde  himselfe  and  not 
beynge  yn  hys  ryght  mynde  did  drowne  hymself  yn  one  of  mayster 
Wythypoll’s  pondes  the  xxiij  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Julye  beynge 
frydaye  and  was  buryed  the  xx**!!]'  daye  of  the  same  moneth  of  Julye. 

Anno  dmi  millesimo  quinqentesimo  septuagesimo  quinto. 
Rycharde  myddelton  dwellynge  w‘  mayst'  Wythypolle,  was  buryed 
the  xxvj  daye  of  the  moneth  of  June  beynge  Sondaye. 

Roberte  llille  a  constable  and  one  of  the  Churchwardens  of  thys 
parysshe  was  buryed  the  ix***  daye  of  the  moneth  of  September  beynge 
frydaye. 

1675.  peter  merowe  a  ducheman  was  buryed  the  xii^**  daye  of 
the  moneth  of  marche  beynge  mndaye. 

1576.  Anno  dm  millesimo  quiqentesimo  septuagesimo  sexto. 
Wyllyam  Frende  a  Stranger  whose  dwellynge  was  yn  the  Countye  of 
Kente  departynge  yn  thys  parysshe  was  buryed  the  x***  daye  of  the 
moneth  of  Maye  beynge  thursadaye. 

1577.  Anno  dm  millesimo  quiqentesimo  septuagesimo' septimo. 
Marye  the  dowght'  of  John  Gardenar  the  younger  and  of  mary  hys 
wyfe  by  myssfortune  beynge  drowned  the  xix  daye  of  the  moneth  of 
Auguste  and  was  buryed  the  xx*‘  daye  of  the  same  moneth  beyge 
tewysdaye. 

1578.  Anno . octavo.  Wyllyam  Elsonne  the  sonne 

of  Thomas*  Elsonne  and  of  Elsabeth  hys  wyfe  beynge  slayne  by 
myssefortune  yn  a  sande  pytte  was  buryed  the  ix***  daye  of  the  moneth 
of  Maye  beynge  frydaye. 

Anno  domini . nono.  Thomas  Warde  a  lytle  poore 


jrOTES  AND  QUEBIB8,  ETC.  177 

lame  ladde  was  buryed  the  zv*^  day  of  the  moneth  of  July  beynge 
Wedneadaye. 

Page  30 : — 

1579.  Annes  Clarke  the  wyfe  of  Boberte  Clarke  of  thya 
parjaahe,  beynge  condemned  for  wytchecrafte  a<!Cordynge  to  the 
fourme  ft  order  of  the  lawea  of  thya  realme,  waa  executed  att  balton 
galowea*the  zzij  daye  of  Auguate  anno  dm  1579  ft  waa  buryed  yn 
thya  Churchy arde  the  aame  daye  and  yeare. 

M'  PouUe  WithipoUe  the  Sonne  and  hayer  of  Edmonde 
WithipouUe  waa  buryhed  the  iz  daye  of  Decembr  beinge  on  the 
thuradaye  an”  Dm  1579  an*  of  y*  B*  £z.  vincealmo. 

In  thia  year  begin  Latin  entriea,  e.g. — 

Die  martia.  Elizabetha  WithipoU  filia  Ambroaii  Wythipauli  Gent(?) 

aepulta  fuit  viceaaimo  die  menaia  ^ptembris  anno 
Begni  Begne  viceaaimo  aecundo  1580. 

Die  marcurij.  Martha  tailer  filia  Edmundi  tailer  huiua  prochie  Curat 
aepeliebatur  Duodecimo  die  menaia  octobria  anno  Begno 
Begnie  **  1580. 

Die  Solia.  b'icolaua  Baaen  perigrinua  aepeliebatur  Dmini  octavo 
die  menaia  marti j  anno  doraini  1581. 

Die  lune.  Edmundua  WithipoU  mUea  huiua  huiua  (<10)  prochie 
aepeliebatur  viceaaimo  primo  die  menaia  maij  anno 
regni  Begniae  24  1582. 

The  following  ia  written  beneath  in  a  later  hand : — 

Oh!  monatroua.  Thia  waa  the  fyrat  Knighte  of  that  Howae  ft 
waa  buried  in  Ann*  1618  Anno  Begni  Jacobi  16‘‘‘. 

Widow  Butler  an  old  woman  waa  buried  the  zvj  daie  of  Novemb 
anno  dmi  1582. 

Paulua  Chanler  huiua  prochie  famulua  Domini  Withipauli 
aepeUebatur  decimo  nono  Die  menaia  Decembria  anno  dom  1582. 

y*  z  day  of  March  waa  bured  a  Stranger  named  maashynger. 

The  WorahipfuU  M'  Philip  Wentford  deceaaed  at  Chriata  Church, 
ft  waa  buried  at  Nettelatead  the  x  of  October  Anno  1583. 

Januarye  1583.  Jerome  Scott  a  dutchman  waa  buried  the  vj  day 
of  Januarye  1583. 

Anno  Dm  1584  Anno  Begni  Begnie  mra  Elizabethe  26.  Elaabeth 
Wythipoll  the  wife  of  the  WorahipfuU  M'  Edmimd  WythipoU  waa 
buried  the  third  day  of  Aprill  1584. 

June.  Willm  Punyard  a  chUde  a  baae  waa  buried  the  z***  day  of 
June  1584. 

M'  Ambroae  WithipoU  gentillman  waa  buried  the  zzij  daye  of 
the  moneth  of  January  friday. 

1585.  Anthony  Duchman  of  thia  pariahe  waa  buried  the  zviij 
day  of  July  1585. 

Marie  tillett  A  nurae  childe  waa  Buryed  the  zz‘‘‘  daye  of  JuUe 
1586. 

Mother  Harrold  the  wife  of  Walter  Harrold  waa  buried  the  laat 
day  of  March  1585. 

*  Bolton  gallowa  waa  in  thia  pariah  of  St.  Margaret,  probably  on  Bolton  Hill, 
now  known  as  Fonnereau  Hoad. 


178 


THE  BAST  ANOUAir;  OK, 


Willyam  Seare  Irishman  was  buried  the  day  of  feabruarie 
A*  1695. 

M'  Paule  Wythipoll  was  buryed  the  xv  day  of  Aprill  1585. 

1587.  Thamazyn  Myls  the  daught'  of  Edward  Myls  a  traveler 
was  buried  y*  x  of  Janueye. 

The  xij**'  of  June  was  buried  w*hout  baptsime  the  sonne  of 
Rob*  Hunt. 

B . Alijoy. 

1588.  Edward  Boose  had  A  Child  (beinge  not  baptized)  buried 
the  xviij***  daye  of  November. 

Leonard  Tolstab  had  a  Child  (beinge  not  baptized)  buried  y* 
xviij***  day  of  November. 

John  Alderton  had  A  sonne  (being  not  baptized)  buried  y*  second 
day  of  March. 

Anno  Domini  1590.  John  Tauerner  (?  Curate). 

The  28***  of  y*  same  moneth  (Maye)  was  buryed  John  Dennye 
the  butcher. 

The  vj***  of  June  was  buried  Erauncis  Smith  Weaver. 

1591.  the  13“*  of  May  was  buried  mistris  margeret  Wittipol  the 
wife  of  M^  Ben j  amen  Wittipoll. 

the  27  of  february  was  buried . Heard  a  Stranger. 

On  top  of  page  42  : — 

Johannes  Baldwinus . (1592). 

On  top  of  page  43 : — 

1595.  Johannes  Qleson . 

1596.  Philip  Thomson  labourer  was  buried  on  Bartholmew  day 
Aug  24. 

Samuell  Lucas  the  sonn  of  John  Lucas  a  Sawyer  was  buried 
the  same  daye. 

1597.  Jeames  Hockett,  a  Stranger,  was  buried  8  Octob: 

Joane  Coppin  Stranger  was  buried  the  6“*  of  february. 

Edmundus  Galaway  minister  (on  top  of  p.  45,  1697). 

Anno  Domini  1599.  Marget  Wolnowe  the  wyfe  of  Charles 
Wolnowe  a  Stranger  was  buried  the  28“*  of  Aprill. 

Mary  Peverell  daughter  to  mother  peverell  was  buried  the  20“*  of 
Januarye. 

Anno  Domini  1600.  Joseph  Dameryn  bastard  was  buried  the 
20“*  of  October. 

Willyam  Middelton  gentellman  a  Stranger  was  buried  the  1 6  of 
Auguste. 

Martha  Spinke  the  daughter  of  Mary  Spinke  bastarde  was  buried 
the  4“*  of  februie. 

Anno  Domini  1602.  The  widdowe  Jorden  Stranger  was  buried 
!•*  of  May. 

Thomas  Bransby  the  Sonne  of  Tho.  Bransby  was  Buried  the  8*^ 
of  June. 

M'  Willya  Bourcher  Stranger  was  buried  the  19“*  of  August. 

ao  dm  1603  Tho:  Carter. 

Anno  primo  Begni  celeberrimi  principio  Jacobi  Dei  grac®  Anglie 
Scotia  ffrannce  et  hibemie  Begis  fidei  Defendere. 


i 


NOTES  AKB  QtTEBISS,  BTC. 


179 


1 

1603.  Wi&m .  Serrant  to  Tho:  Day  a  Smith  buried  ^ 

Novb  16“*.  1 

M”  Warren  widdow  Died  at  the . &  was  buried  at  S* 

Mgets  January  27“*  1605. 

August . Soster  the  wifie  of . foster  a  Stranger 

departed  at  the  dwelling  howse  of  Thames  Cawtter  of  this  pishe  was 
beyed  the  xij“*  day  of  Auguste. 

September.  Jeamies  Wate  prentis  withe  Nicolas  Brame  bewed 
y*  vij^  day  of  September. 

Dece*"  7.  Thomas  Wells  a  Smith  was  buried. 

January  25.  Elsiabeth  Styles  a  Stranger  was  buried. 

ffebruary  25.  Rob  Stigoll  a  Stranger  was  buried. 

A.  1606,  June  15.  Robert  Snow  an  old  man  was  buried. 

1607,  May  20.  M’'  Asom  of  Londin  was  buried. 

The  entries  about  this  time  are  very  brief  and  indistinctly 
written. 

1609,  Deceb:  30.  Old  mother  Bate  of  the  foundation. 

1611,  July  2.  Old  mother  Tidbury  of  the  foundation. 

1612,  Feb.  17.  Old  mother  Coale  of  foundation. 

1613,  Mar.  31.  Adam  Chapman  a  gardener. 

1614,  June  18.  Old  Abes. 

June  19.  Old  mother  Ponder. 

Feb:  14.  Old  father  dun. 

There  are  many  other  entries  of  a  similar  kind,  and  in  1615  this 
first  book  ends. 

{To  he  continued). 


PoBLiOATiON  OP  Marriaqe  Banws  AT  THE  Market  Cross. — The 
following  extracts  from  the  register  of  St.  Mary's,  Bury  St.  Edmund’s, 
illustrate  the  above  custom : — 

1654,  May  15.  “  ffrances  Bradley  of  Cockefeild,  widdower,  and  Mar- 

giret  Kembold  of  the  same,  singlewoman,  were  published  at  the  Markitt 
rosse,”  April  26  and  3  and  10  May,  “  And  they  were  married  the  15''*  day 
of  May  in  y*  p'sents  of  Justice  Smyth.” 

1654,  Oct.  17.  “John  Kembold  of  ffelsham,  singleman,  sone  vnto 
William  Eembold  of  the  same,  and  Mary  hatfeild  of  Elmswell,  singlewoman, 
daughter  vnto  William  hatfeild  of  the  same,  were  published  at  the  Crosse,” 
Sept  27  and  Oct  4  and  12,  ”  and  they  were  marri^  the  H"*  of  Octob*  in 
the  p'sents  of  Justice  Boroughs.” 

Another  example  from  the  register  of  St.  James’,  Bury  St. 
Edmund’s : — 

1652  Mar.  5.  Publication  at  the  Market  Cross  of  a  contract  of  matri¬ 
mony  between  “John  Yero  a  singleman,  dwelling  in  Hartist,  y*  Son  of 
Will*  Yero  of  y*  same,  and  Margaret  Keene  a  singlewoman,  dwelling  in 
Whepsted  with  John  Copping  her  ffather  in  Law”  [?  step-father],  Jan.  9, 16, 
and  23,  “  and  married  5  March  165|  by  Thomas  Smith,  Qent.  Justice  of  the 
Peace.” 


T.  R.  0.  L. 


180 


THE  EAST  AMaUAH  ;  0&, 


QUERIES. 

“Hocke.” — The  followlog  bequest  occurs  in  the  will  (P.C.C., 
99  Byrde)  of  Olivar  Murdun  (Morden)  of  Exninge,  Suffolk,  dated 
4  April,  1621  : — “I  give  to  the  towne  of  Exnynge  eightene  lether 
bucketts  and  one  hocke  fitt  for  the  pulling  downe  of  a  howse  when 
anie  casualty  shall  happen  by  fyre :  and  these  to  be  laid  in  a  place 
fittinge.” 

What  is  the  meaning  and  etymology  of  “  hocke  ”  ?  The  “  place 
of  fittinge”  was  perhaps  the  parish  church.  j,  Mann 


dislodging  a  mass  of  inflamable  material.  Such  hooks  and  buckets 
and  other  appliances  were  usually  kept  in  the  tower  of  the  parish 
church,  both  in  town  and  coimtry,  in  the  seventeenth  and  eighteenth 
centuries. — Ed.]  _ 


Pillar  oohmemokatino  a  Norfolk  Duel. — The  Daily  Mail  of 
21  Jan.,  1904,  quoting  from  The  Car,  contained  the  following  para¬ 
graph,  entitled.  “  Unique  Duel  Pillar”  : — “Many  as  are  the  places  in 
England  which  have  been  the  scenes  of  duels,  only  one  is  marked. 
This  is  a  part  of  all  that  now  remains  of  Cawston  Heath,  in  Norfolk, 
on  which  stands  a  small  pillar  to  Sir  Henry  Hobart,  Bart.,  who  was 
killed  on  this  spot  in  a  duel  with  swords.” 

Can  any  reader  supply  a  copy  of  the  inscription  on  the  pillar  (if 
any)  ?  Where  can  I  find  an  account  of  this  duel?  What  other  sites 
of  East  Angliau  duels  are  still  commemorated  in  tradition  ? 

Obubura  Hill,  Southern  Siyeria.  CHARLES  PartrIDOE. 

[The  duel  was  fought  with  Mr.  Oliver  le  Neve,  a  left-handed  man, 
2 let  August,  1698.  Sir  Henry  was  buried  at  Blickling,  the  seat  of 
the  family. — Ed.] 


REPLY. 

The  Cock-bearer,  Pole-bearer,  etc.  (pp.  64,  161). — These  were 
unquestionably  manorial  officers,  to  whom  were  assigned  such  func¬ 
tions — whatever  they  may  have  been — indicated  by  the  name.  In  the 
one  case,  the  Falconer ;  in  the  other,  the  Catch-pole  or  bailiff,  had  each 
his  distinct  holding.  We  find  in  certain  manorial  extents  instances  of 
similar  holdings,  e.g.,  “the  Steward’s  meadow,”  “the  Constable’s 
meadow,”  &c.  _ 

Dr.  Jessopp’s  Appeal. — We  have  to  acknowledge,  with  many 
thanks,  the  following  contributions  : —  £.  «.  d. 

Rev.  Canon  Raven,  d.d.,  f.s.a.  . .  10  0 

,,  J.  R.  Olorenshaw  . .  . .  10  0 

„  E.  J.  Wild .  10  0 

Miss  Barney  . .  . .  . .  10  0 

Four  subscribers,  viz..  Rev.  J.  R.  Olorenshaw  and  Messrs.  J.  G. 
Mannings,  T.  F.  Hibgame,  and  J.  E.  Foster  have  kindly  undertaken 
the  necessary  work  in  connection  with  the  compilation  of  the  Indexes 
that  remain  to  be  completed. 


r 

MOTU  QUJCK1K8,  n-C. 

r. 

181  1 

1  CALENDAR 

OF 

FEE-FARM  RENTS.  No.  I.  NORFOLK  | 

{continued  from  p 

167). 

1 

1  FImm. 

Premises  charged. 

Qiantees. 

BoUaNo.  1 

1  Forneaett 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Fretton  . 

»>  >»  *  • 

II  II  • 

55,  132  1 

Floredon  . 

•»  >>  •  • 

II  II  II  • 

55,  132  i 

Ferfield  . 

»>  »»  •  • 
The  Manner  . 

Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford 

55,  132 

Geywood 

4,  4  i 

Oracys  in 

Nor- 

The  Manor  part  of 

John  Spilman 

34,  84  i 

1  borough 

Pentney  Priory 

^  Ooodwicke 

, 

The  Manor  part 

Sir  Thos.  le  Strange 

34,  86  \ 

( 

of  Westacre,  late 
Priory 

I  Gatesthorpe 

See  Thetford  . 

Thoa,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132  1 

1  Garboldersham 

A  Pension  out  of 

II  II  II  • 

55,  132  ; 

1  Griinatou 

63,  171  1 

the  Bectory 

1  Gishinge 

A  Pension  out  of 

. 

63,  174 

the  Rectory 

9  Heckham 

See  Castleacre 

Thos.,D.  of  Norfolk 

15,  20  ) 

1  Heringshaw 

»  »  •  • 

»  »  » 

15,  20 

Houghton 

See  Coxford  . 

Edwd.,E.  of  Oxford 

28,  54, 56  1 

29, 69  " 

1  Hillington 

Sm  East  Budham  . 

II  II  II  * 

28,  54  i 

1  Hestwick 

II  11  II  • 

28,  56 

1  Harpely 

>1  »  „ 

. 

28,  56  { 

30,  67  1 

1  Horsham 

The  Manor 

Bichd.  Southwell  . 

28,  58 

1  Hockering 

See  Tuddenham,  N. 

Jas.  Huss^  &  al.  .. 

29,  64  ) 

1  Helghton 

See  Bighborough,  Lt 

Sir  Thos.  Townsend 

33,  73  t 

7  Hempton 

The  Site  &  Demeans 

Sir  Willm.  Fermor  . 

33,  75  i 

of  the  late  Priory 

j  Hylton  . 

Sundry  Lands 

Wm.  Staunton 

38,  105  1 

i  Hanworth 

The  Bectoi-y  &  Sun- 

Various  Grantees  . 

63,  117  ; 

I 

drys 

55,  132  J 

i  Horsie 

The  Bectory  . 

Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse 

63,  119  j 

1  Hicklinge 

The  Manor 

II  II  II  •  j 

53,  122,  |i 

123  1 

1,  Hawhall  . 

See  Bunwell  . 

•  •  •  • 

54,  126  'j 

j  Hallwicke 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132  ; 

Hodney  . 

>1  •  • 

»  II  II 

55,  132  ] 

Hookeham 

an  •  • 

II  II  II  * 

55,  132  j 

Hales 

»  •  • 

W  II  II  • 

65,  132  •  1 

Harloston 

M  •  • 

II  II  II  • 

55,  132  ! 

1  Holkham 

Sundry  Lauds 

Bichd.  Branthwaite 

63,  165 

&  als. 

1  Helgay  . 

A  Fisherry,  Ac. 

Wm.  Shipwith 

63,  166  1 

1  Janeholme 

The  Marsh 

Sir  Wm.  Paston  .  | 

60,  147 

65,  182  ; 

1  Eetteringham 

The  Rectory  . 

Bobt.  Baynebott 

10,  13  ; 

I  Eempston 

See  Castleacre 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 
Sir  Thos.  IjO  Strange 

15,  20  t 

1  Einsted  in  Holm 

The  Manor,  part  of 

34,  90  i 

Ramsey,  late  Mon¬ 
astery 

w 

) 

I 

_ _ 1 

XUM 


182 


THE  EAST  AEQUAN  ;  OE, 


Places. 

Kilverstou 

Kenholme 

Kirby  Bedon  . 
Langwad 

Ling 

Lynn 

Looe 

Larlingford 
Linford  . 

Lecham  als.  Lacbam 
Letton 

Massiugham,  Little . 

Methwold 

Melton 

Monk  Tbetford 
Massingbam  als.  tbe 
Monk 
Mattishall 
Massingbam,  Great . 
Mooreball 


Multon  . 
Middleton 

Marshland 
Newton  . 
Norwold  . 

Norwibe  . 
Norwich  . 
Norton  . 

Norwich  City  . 

Nortbrepps 


Oxborowe 
Ormesby . 
Oxwicke  . 
Pickenham,  South 
Pontney  . 

Popenhoe 


Premises  charged. 

See  Tbetford  . 

Tbe  Marsh 

Tbe  Rectory  &  Ty  thes 
The  Manor 

Tbe  Manor  &  Sun- 
drys 

See  Coxford  . 

A  Waterman  &  Sun- 
drys 

The  Manor 
See  Tbetford  . 

ft  ft  •  • 

ft  ft  •  • 

See  Castleacre 

Cockfield  Manor 
Site  of  the  late  Priory 
Tbe  Manor  & 

Premises 

See  Tuddenbam,  N. 
Sundry  Premises  . 
Tbe  Manor  part  of 
Walsingham,  late 
Priory 

See  Tbetford  . 

The  Rectory  &  Sun* 
drys 

Sundry  Lands 
See  Castleacre 
The  Manor  &  Sun- 
drys 

See  Tbetford  . 

See  Melton 
n  n  •  • 

Sundry  Premises  . 

A  Rent  of  Assize 
from  the  free  & 


Qrantees. 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 
Sir  Wm.  Paston  .  j 

Sir  Thos.  Beding- 
field  (P) 

Sir  An  ty.  Dennis  . 

Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford 
Edwd.  Ferress  &  als. 

Henry,  E.  of  Surrey 
Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

ft  ft  ft  • 


Richd.  Fulmerston . 
Jas.  Hussey  &  als. . 

ft  ft  ft  • 

•>  ft  >1  • 

Sir  Jacob  Bullcine 
&  wife 

Thos.,D.  of  Norfolk 
Fras.  Mortice  &  als.  . 


Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 
Edwd.  Ditchfield  & 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 


customary  Tenn¬ 
ants  of  the  Manor 
Sundry  Premises  . 
Tbe  Lordship  . 

See  Rudham,  East  . 
Tbe  Manor 
The  Demeans  of 
Ashwood 

The  Manor  part  of 
Ramsey,  late  Mon¬ 
astery 


SirThos.  Bedingfield 

Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford 
Michl.  Stanhop 
Thos.  Mildmay 

Sir  Richd.  Southwell 
&  als. 


Bella  No. 
55.  132 
60,  147 
65,  182 

63,  137 

14,  19 

27,  49, 

64,  125, 
126 

28,  34 
35,  101 

256,  559 
55,  132 
55,  132 
55,  132 

15,  20 
30,  66 

16,  20 
235,  531 

27,  46 

29,  62 

29,  64 

30,  65 
34,  87 


55,  132 

56,  134 
63,  167 
63,  168 
15,  20 
20,  28 

55.  132 
235,  531 
55.  132 

58,  139 

59,  144 
140,  141 

5.  6 

63,  163 


14,  18  19 
25,  36 
28,  56 
18,  23 

33,  76 

34.  91 


NOTES  AN1>  QUEKISS,  ETC. 


183 


FUom. 

PiemiMs  charged. 

Ghanteea. 

BoUaNo. 

Plumsted 

The  Manor  •  . 

Sir  Thos.  Cowarden 

34,  92 

Pawling  . 

The  Manory  ft  Bec- 

Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse 

53,  120 

Parham  . 

to^ 

The  Bectory  . 

ft  tf  ft 

53,  120 

Porringland,  Great  . 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Poswi^e . 

The  Manor 

63,  169 

Budham,  West 

See  Gastleacre 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

15,  20 

Bunshall  als.  Bun- 

Sundry  Premises  . 

P  Edwd.,E.  of  Oxford  | 
John  Carrell  . 

28,  54 

5,  6,  7 
25,  33 

ham 

;  28,54,5,6 
'  29,61 

Budham,  East. 

See  Coxford  . 

Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford  j 

Bighborough,  Little 

The  Manor 

Sir  Thos.  Townsend 

33,  73 

Bowdham 

The  Manor  ft  Bec- 

Thos.  Woodhouse  . 

34,  97 

Bavenham 

to^ 

See  Herringfleete  . 

Sir  Hy.  Jerningham 

39,  106 

Bysinge  . 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

B^lesworth  . 

>1  • 

tt  ••  ft 

55,  132 

Bavenshall 

The  Marsh 

Sir  Wm.  Paston  .  ' 

1 

(  60,  147 
[  65,  182 

Bunten  als.  Bonton 

A  portion  of  Notley 

Francis  Morrice  & 

63,  167 

al8.NorthBownton 

Bockland 

Tythe 

A  Pension  out  of 

als. 

63,  172 

Biehhorough,  also  in 

the  Bectory 
'The  Manor  ft  Lands 

Wm.  Bulls 

228,  520 

Suflolk 

Bighborough,  Little, 

The  Manor  ft  Lands 

it  tt  •  • 

228,  520 

also  in  Suffolk 

Bushworth,  also  in 

The  Manor  ft  Sites 

Henry,  E.  of  Surrey 

256,  559 

Suffolk 

Snettisham 

of  the  ColleM  of 
St.  John  the  Evan¬ 
gelist  ft  Sundrys 
The  Bectory  ft  Sun¬ 

Sir  Christ.  Hatton  . 

3,  3 

Sheringbam  . 

dry  Lands 

See  Langwad  . 

Sir  Thos.  Bedingfield 

14,  19 

Shropham 

The  Hundred  ft 

Various  Grantees  . 

17,  24 

Shipdbam 

Sundrys 

The  Manor  ft  Park 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 
Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse 

55,  132 
23,  31 

Smethes  . 

ft  Sund^s 

See  Catts  Fennes  . 

Sir  Thos.  Clerk 

25,  34 

Spenoers  . 

ti  »>  n  • 

n  n  1)  • 

25,  34 

Stokeabie  als.  Stopes-  The  Manor  .  .  ....  25,  35 

ley 

Saxlingham  .  .  A  portion  of  Tythes  .  .  .  .  27,  50 

out  of  the  BMtory 

Sidersterne  .  .  See  Budham,  East  .  Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford  |  29’  ^ 

Saules  .  .  .  The  Manor  part  of  Sir  Jacob  Bullcine  34,  87 

Walsingham  late  &  wife 
I^ory 

Note. — The  name  of  the  grantee  under  228  520  appears  as 
“Bulls”  and  “ Butts.” 

{To  he  continued). 

N  2 


164 


THR  KA8T  ANGLIAN;  OR 


rOWLMERE  NOTES.— THE  HEATH 

{continued  from  p.  117). 

The  heath  of  Fowlmere  parish  was  “  Triplow  Heath,”  that  being 
the  next  village  and  head  of  the  Hundred.  It  was  part  of  that  great 
stretch  of  waste  and  wilderness  that  stretched  from  the  Chiltems,  past 
Rojston  to  Newmarket ;  and  it  survived  as  a  heath,  with  rights  of 
commonage  for  the  copyholders  and  free  tenants,  down  to  its  enclosure 
in  1 845-8 ;  but  its  area  had  been  much  encroached  upon  before  that 
date.  It  had  evidently  in  earlier  days  embraced  all  the  land  in  the 
parish  to  the  south  of  Markmoor  in  Fulmer-dene,  the  modern  Water- 
drain.  Perhaps  we  may  except  a  few  acres  adjoining  Chrishall 
Orange,  which  once  were  the  belongings  of  the  Abbott  of  Tilty. 
With  that  exception,  from  the  Duxford  boundary  on  the  east  to  Bran- 
ditch  on  the  west,  the  heath,  subject  to  the  lord’s  right  of  warren  over 
part  of  it  {Hundred  Rolls,  1279),  had  reached  from  Markmoor  to  the 
Essex  boundary,  and  from  the  boundary  of  Duxford  and  Triplow 
parishes  to  the  Bran  ditch.  But  on  the  Heath  Farm  a  large  part  of 
the  land  is  still  known  as  “no  man’s  land;”  somewhat  to  the  con¬ 
fusion  of  those  who  do  not  know  that  that  term  is  a  corruption  from 
Saxon  niman  or  neoman  (to  take,  seize),  and  means  “  grabbed  ”  land, 
held  against  the  rights  of  the  commoners.  From  the  Field  Book 
(1639)  it  is  evident  that  this  seizure  was  already  well  established,  and 
that  it  had  been  made  in  the  interests  of  the  Ixirdship  which  held  the 
major  part  of  the  wrongful  enclosure.  We  shall  not  be  very  wide  of 
the  mark  if  we  put  down  the  total  area  of  heath,  originally  in 
commonage,  at  about  500  acres. 

It  was  traversed  by  the  Harborough  Way,  leading  to  Essex  and 
the  south;  by  the  Icknield  Way,  from  west  to  east;  and  on  the 
south-west  side  was  skirted  by  the  Old  Walden  Way,  which  formed 
the  boundary  of  Cambs.  and  Essex  almost  all  the  way  from  Ickleton. 
Of  this  last  way  I  have  spoken  in  my  notes  on  our  ways,  and  have 
shown  how  by  ignorance  of  its  existence  antiquaries  had  fallen  into 
error  about  the  course  of  Icknield  Way.  Ignorance  of  this  way, 
which  existed  at  the  time  of  enclosure,  and  is  shown  in  the  award 
map,  and  the  name  “  Triplow  ”  applied  to  the  whole  extent  of  heath 
between  Duxford  and  Melbourn  parishes,  have  combined  to  deprive 
the  parish  of  Fowlmere  of  an  incident  famous  in  English  history. 
The  Parliamentarian  army,  in  June,  16t7,  had  rendet-voused  at 
Walden,  and  their  officers  for  some  weeks  met  in  the  church  there  to 
discuss  their  grievances  against  their  masters  at  Westminster.  The 
troops  were  billeted  in  the  neighbourhood,  at  Littlebury,  Ickleton, 
and  Hinxton.  At  last  it  was  decided  to  march  on  I^ondon,  and  a 
rendet-vous  for  the  scattered  regiments  was  given  on  Triplow  Heath. 
The  troops,  20,000  strong,  formed  their  camp  “in  a  plain  meadow 
four  miles  from  Royston.”  If  those  four  miles  were  of  statute 
measurement  the  distance  is  just  that  from  Royston  to  Branditch, 
where  the  Cambridge  and  London  road  is  crossed  by  Icknield  Street, 
by  the  modem  Newmarket  Road,  and  by  the  old  Walden  Way.  If 
the  measurement  is  by  long  miles  the  position  would  be  at  the  eastern 


XUM 


NOTES  AND  QUSKIB8,  ETC. 


185 


end  of  Markmoor  on  the  borders  of  this  and  Triplow  parishes.  The 
intersection  of  roads,  and  the  supply  of  water  from  the  brook, 
distinctly  favour  the  former  position.  There  is  in  fact  nothings 
against  this  conclusion  except  a  tradition  that  Cromwell  stayed  in  the 
old  Manor  homestead  at  Triplow;  but  we  have  a  like  tradition  as 
regards  our  Chequers  Inn  at  Fowlmere,  and  of  the  billeting  of  some 
of  his  officers  in  a  cottage  which  still  stands  near  the  blacksmith’s 
shop.  The  old  tumuli,  which  once  were  conspicuous  on  our  eastern 
boundary,  and  which  dated  from  Roman  times,  are  spoken  of  by  old 
folk  as  being  of  Cromwell’s  constitution ;  an  error  which  may  point  to 
their  use  as  tribunes  for  the  orators  who  addressed  the  army,  and, 
no  doubt,  one  or  other  would  form  an  admirable  pulpit  for  the 
Rev.  Ezekias  King,  whom  the  Parliamentary  Committee  had  ^pointed, 
on  the  nomination  of  Mr.  La  Motte,  lord  of  the  Manor,  to  Fowlmere 
Rectory  in  the  previous  year. 

King  Charles,  who  was  haled  by  Cornet  Joyce  and  his  dragoons 
past  the  site  of  this  camp,  must  have  been  familiar  with  the  heath ; 
across  which  he  and  Steeuie  must  have  often  galloped  on  their 
hawking  excursions  from  Royston  Palace ;  and  across  which  he  had 
no  doubt  often  travelled  with  his  pedantic  father  to  the  excitement  of 
Newmarket.  Across  this  heath,  on  Tuesday,  April  28th,  1646, 
Charles  in  company  of  Mr.  Ashbumham  had  slunk  in  disguise  on  his 
flight  from  Oxford  to  the  Scots  army.  It  was  a  favourable  country, 
for,  no  doubt,  “  the  way  was  desert.”  Triplow  Heath  thus  knew 
Charles  as  the  gay  heir  apparent,  as  fugitive,  and  as  captive. 

What  other  tragedies  were  played  on  the  Heath  in  old  days  we 
know  not.  Possibly,  as  so  many  wastes  were  infested  by  highwaymen 
and  footpads,  deeds  of  darkness  have  been  wrought  there.  Mr. 
Conybeare  {Hittory  of  Camht.,)  suggests  that  at  times  it  abounded  in 
lawlessness.  The  lordship  gallows  in  Hangman’s  Piece,  on  Fawdon 
Hill,  would  be  a  conspicuous  object  on  the  grey-line,  north  of  the 
heath  frontage  to  Markmoor.  Out  in  the  desolate  heath,  on 
October  28th,  1689,  one  William  Ingrey,  “  who  drowned  himself 
wilfully,”  was  buried ;  and  some  entries  in  the  registers  show  that 
not  infrequently  tramps  were  found  dead  upon  its  dreary  bosom : 
as  thus,  “Sept'  1624.  A  strange  man  was  found  dead  in  Fowlemere 
field.”  But  the  only  recorded  crime  in  its  immediate  neighbourhood 
was  the  murder  on  the  London  Road  beside  Markmoor.  It  is  thus 
entered  in  the  register  of  burials:  “July  12th,  1775.  Andrew  Nunn 
(labourer,  aged  ab‘  20  years)  supposed  to  come  from  or  near  Bury  St. 
Edmund’s  in  the  County  of  Suffolk,  who  was  murdered  and  most 
barbarously  mangled  by  two  brothers  of  Great  Wilbraham  in  this 
county  (named  Stickwoods)  on  his  return  home  out  of  Middlesex, 
where  he  had  been  to  work  during  Hay-harvest,  on  July  10th,  1775, 
in  Loudon  Lane  in  this  Parish  of  Foulmire.  One  of  the  above 
brothers  was  executed  at  Cambridge  for  this  murder.  The  other 
turned  King’s  evidence.”  In  Mr.  Bowes’  Catalogue  of  Cambridge  Book* 
(p.  490,  No.  2925),  is  entered  the  published  confession  of  John 
Stickwood,  with  a  note  recording  that  his  brother  James  was 
discharged  “  with  an  admonition  from  the  judge.” 


XUM 


186 


THB  SA8T  AlfOLIAN  ;  OK, 


Forty  years  later  the  Heath  was  famous  for  its  prize  fights ;  the 
situation  on  the  verge  of  two  counties  rendering  it  a  convenient  tryst 
for  such  orgies.  An  old  resident,  bom  in  Fowlmere  seventy-nine 
years  ago,  well  remembers  the  disorderly  crowds  that  followed  to  these 
'  exhibitions,  and  tells  me  that  on  one  occasion  one  of  the  pugilists  was 
killed  by  his  antagonist. 


Foiolmert  R$etory,  Roy$ton. 


A.  0.  Yorkx. 


[Notb. — For  Triplow  Heath  in  the  Civil  War,  authorities  will  be 
found  in  Kingston’s  Anglia  and  the  Great  Civil  JFar\  and  the  same 
Author’s  Herte  during  the  Civil  WarJ] 


WILLS  OF  THE  HUNDRED  OF  ARMINGFORD,  CAMB8. 
{continued  from  p.  170). 

BASSmOBOURN. 

I. — Proved  in  the  Coneietory  Court  of  Ely. 

(1)  Bulnest  Agnes.  (11)  Lynne  Jo. 

(2)  Dowce  Jo.  (12)  Edlinn  Job.  161  Bury 

(3)  Hubbert  Jo.  (1667-83^ 

(4)  Hownorth  Jo.  (13)  Francis  Hen.  169  Bury. 

(5)  Bussye  Hen.  (14)  Hampton  Lauren.  16  Roby- 

(6)  Beaton  Rob.  net  (1660-7). 

(7)  Cundall .  (15)  Quilton  Mary,  84  Wood- 

(8)  Lynne  Tho.  gen.  ward  (1727-34). 

(9)  Lilly  Jo.  sen'.  (16)  Wiggs  Richard,  287  Roby- 

(10)  Pink  Will,  (little  book).  net  (1660-7). 

(1)  Agnes  Bolnest.  Widow.  Dated  24  March  1528.  To  be 

buri^  in  the  church  beside  her  husband,  John  Bolnest.  To  high 
altar  2* ;  bells  6*  S'* ;  Trinity  Gild  6*  8'*.  To  Thomas  Bolnest,  my  son’s 
son,  all  my  part  of  the  lands  A  tenements  called  Stonebarae,  at  the 
age  of  21 ;  till  then  to  remain  to  John  Bolnest,  his  brother,  he  finding 
Thomas  at  school  till  15;  if  Thomas  dies  under  age,  remainder  to 
John ;  in  default  of  heirs  to  be  sold  as  by  my  son  Robert  Bolnest’s 
will.  To  Thomas  Bolnest  a  carved  Hutch  &  the  writings  in  it,  &c., 
2  silver  spoons  &  20  nobles.  To  Agnes  Bolnest  my  best  gown,  2 
silver  spoons,  Ac.  To  Margery  Bolnest  my  harness  girdle  A  26*  S'*. 
To  Joan  Shirmyn  my  red  coverlet.  To  Joan  Taylor,  my  god-daughter, 
my  furred  gown,  my  violet  cap,  Ac.  To  Alice  Rundall  a  kercher,  Ac. 
To  Sir  John  Dewys  to  pray  for  my  soul  20"*.  A  cow  to  be  bought  for 
my  husband’s  obit  A  my  own,  A  for  the  health  of  my  father  A  mother, 
A  Sir  Thomas  Bolnest  my  son,  A  to  remain  with  John  Bolnest  A  his 
heirs  for  ever  to  bestow  yearly  12'*  to  the  vicar  for  dirige,  Ac.  rThe 
Bolnests  were  a  yeoman  family  of  some  prominence,  who  held  a 
considerable  estate  at  Eneesworth  till  1597,  and  bestowed  on  the 
parish  church  plate  and  vestments]. 


NOTK8  Ain>  QUERIES.  ETC. 


187 


(2)  Sir  John  Dewce.  Clerk,  of  Bassingboume.  Dated  16  Not. 
1527.  Body  to  be  buried  in  the  chapel  of  our  blessed  lady  in  the 
church  of  88.  Peter  and  Paul  in  Bassingbome ;  to  which  church  6*  S'* ; 
high  altar  20^;  Brotherhood  of  the  Guyld  of  Bassingbome  20*.  To 
my  brother  Rogier  Droce  £3.  6*.  8d.  To  Rogier’s  wife  my  second 
gowne.  To  Jone  King,  my  sister,  £3.  6<.  8d.  and  my  best  gowne.  To 
my  brother.  Miles  Dewce  £3.  6<.  8d.,  and  one  of  my  gownes,  and  to 
Thomas  Dewce  his  son,  my  masure.  To  William  Dewce,  my  brother, 
£3.  6<.  8d.  To  Robert  liawrence  and  Katherine  his  wife  my  house  for 
life,  remainder  to  my  brother  Roger.  To  Oswald  Rylye,  clerk,  3*  4*. 
Item,  to  a  Pryest  4  marks  to  sing  for  my  soul,  and  my  friends.  One 
ohyt  in  Bassingbome  church  for  the  souls  of  John  Dewce,  clerk, 
Peter  Dewce  and  Alice  his  wife,  &  Peter  Dewce,  clerk  “two  milche 
Beasts  of  Keene” ;  to  the  which,  the  vicar  there  10<’,  clerk  I**,  sexton 
1*,  to  the  Brotherhood  wardens  3^,  to  the  light  1^,  to  the  bread  &  ale 
H**.  Executors  &  residuary  legatees  Tho.  King  and  Robert  Laurence. 
Witnesses : — Oswald  Rylye,  clerk,  John  Bolnest,  Job.  Mode, 
Rob.  Lawrence.  Proved  25  Sept.  1540.  [Dewce  was  not  vicar  of 
the  parish.  Probably  he  was  priest  of  the  Trinity  Qild]. 

(3)  Sir  John  Hubard,  priest  of  Trinite  Gilde  in  Bassingbome. 
Dated  1  June  1518.  To  be  buried  by  my  mother  in  the  South  Porch 
there.  For  the  Buriall  and  grownde  ther  breaking,  and  Payment 
raising,  and  again  repairing  4*.  For  a  marble  ston  with  our  namys 
graved  therupon  to  be  laid  over  our  graves,  for  all  Manor  costs  40*. 
For  my  Principal!  a  Kow.  To  rep.  of  bells  &  books  in  the  church 
13*  4'*.  To  Torches  at  my  bur.  &  month’s  day  3*  4“*.  For  the  Hearse 
Tapers  all  v  days,  for  iiij  Tapers  of  the  sepulchre  L.  ther  3*  4'*.  My 
best  surplice'&  two  pair  of  my  best  sheets  to  the  church,  viz.,  the  best 
sheet  to  the  high  altar  for  an  Altar  cloth ;  the  second  best  sheet  to 
our  Ijady’s  altar  &  St.  John  Baptist’s  altar,  for  each  an  altar  cloth ; 
&  the  other  ij  sheets  for  two  Lectur  Cloths  in  the  Quere.  To  Sir 
Walter  Lorkin,  Priest  of  Kneesworth  Chapel,  to  pray  for  me,  &  to 
give  out  of  it  3*  4^  for  the  repairs  of  Kneesworth  Chapel,  my  best 
gowne.  Item,  my  second  surplice  to  the  said  chaplain.  My  obit  in 
Bassingbome  church  to  be  kept  for  ever  out  of  the  lands  I  purchased 
of  Robert  Tadlow  &  Margaret  Lyon,  widow ;  4*  yearly  to  the  Vicar 
for  dirige,  mass  of  requiem.  Bedroll,  &  ofierings,  praying  for  me, 
Jhon  Tadlow  my  father  in  law,  &  for  my  own  father  &  mother,  & 
Margaret  Lyon,  to  be  done  with  notes  15^;  to  the  brother  priest  4<>, 
to  the  parish  church  2“*,  sexton  I"*;  for  lights  about  the  hearse  2^;  to 
clerks  &  children  that  can  read  &  sing  G** ;  to  the  warden  of  the  Gilde, 
every  of  them  2^;  to  bread  &  ale  15^;  rest  of  the  profits  of  the  land 
to  go  to  Trinity  Gilde  there,  to  be  prayed  for.  In  default  of  keeping 
this  obit  a  year  &  a  month,  the  churchwardens  to  enter  on  the  land  & 
sell  it,  &  buy  three  milch  kine  to  keep  it  with  ;  &  the  residue  to  build 
a  new  porch  of  lime  &  stone  over  my  mother’s  &  my  body.  To 
Jhone  Bolnest,  my  brother’s  daughter  3*  4'*.  To  John  Hynon,  &  each 
of  his  brothers  &  sisters  20'*.  To  their  mother,  Alice  Hynon,  widow, 
12'*.  All  my  household  stuff,  brass.  Pewter,  Maselyn,  &c.,  to  my  two 
sisters  Jhoane  &  Isabel.  To  Mr.  William  Malery,  my  godson,  3*  4^. 


188 


THE  EAST  AITOLIAK;  OH, 


To  Mr.  Tho.  Lyn  &  Mrs.  Margaret  Lyn,  to  each  20'*.  To  Mr.  William 
Lorken,  to  pray  for  me,  20''.  To  Sir  John  Ay  worthe  12'',  &  my  maser 
Bedys  To  sir  Ric.  Pynke  12'*.  To  Sir  Ric.  Wilde  my  silver  spoon 
that  is  broken.  For  a  trentall  to  be  sung  within  a  month  in  Bassing- 
borne  church  1 0».  To  Robert  Tadlow,  of  my  charity,  &  of  no  duty,  a 
quarter  of  barley  &  3*  8'*.  The  residue  to  buy  a  single  vestment  for 
Bassingbome  church,  if  it  will  extend;  or  else  to  the  image  of 
St.  Qoorge.  Executors : — Giles  Ashwell  &  Robert  Bolnest.  Super¬ 
visor  Sir  William  Newton,  Yicar  of  Bassingbome  &  Dean  of  Shing^ay 
Deanery.  Witnesses : — John  Bentley,  John  Pinke,  Qefifraye  Hubard. 
Proved  12  June.  [Hubbard  was  prompter  at  the  mystery  play  “The 
Holy  Martyr  St.  George,”  which  was  performed  at  Bassingbourne  on 
St.  Margaret’s  Day  1511,  an  account  of  the  expenses  of  which  is 
contained  in  the  old  Churchwarden’s  Book  of  the  parish.] 

(4)  John  Hawnorth.  Dated  4  Jan.  1540.  To  the  high  altar  20*. 
To  the  parish  church  ij  kyen  and  vj*  vlij**  for  a  yearly  obit  at  the 
Dirige  of  my  grandfather  Job  Ramerycke,  to  be  delivered  to  the  Gilde 
Wardens,  who  are  to  let  them  out  for  iiij*,  &  the  said  Guy  Id  Wardens 
to  see  that  my  obit  be  kept.  To  the  Vicar  4'*,  clerk  1**,  sexton  1^. 
To  the  light  I"*.  To  the  poor  folks  most  needy  1 0*,  and  IC  yearly  to  1 0 
poor  folks  on  Good  Friday,  &  in  Bread  and  Ale  13'*.  To  the  Gylde 
Wardens  8*.  To  Jone,  my  wife,  20*,  paid  out  of  the  Tenement  on  the 
north  side  of  Gowse  Lane,  and  halfe  an  acre  of  saffron  ground.  To 
Jone,  my  wife,  all  the  linen  Gear  that  belongeth  to  her  own  Body,  a 
Pot,  a  Panne,  a  Possonet,  &c.  Alexander  Cundsdl,  executor.  Master 
Thomas  Lynne,  gent..  Supervisor.  Residue  to  son,  John  Hawnorth. 
Witnesses: — Syr  Oswald  Ryllye,  curate  [elsewhere  called  Ridley], 
William  Gosselyn,  Joh.  Meade,  William  Wryght.  Proved  1  Feb.  1540. 

(8)  Thomas  Lynne.  “  Generosus.”  Dated  16  Aug.  1594. 
“Esquiyer.”  “My  body  to  the  service  of  the  King’s  majesty 
warrys.”  To  my  wife,  Jone,  my  house  at  Bassingbome,  where  I 
now  dwell,  with  yards,  and  bowses,  closse,  orcherd,  and  all  other 
free  lond  thereto  belonging,  which  I  guess  to  be,  beside  the  said  close 
&  orchard,  abowte  52  acres ;  also  my  hole  moyte  of  the  castell  in 
Bassingbome,  for  the  term  of  her  life.  To  Phyllyp  Lynne,  my 
eldest  son,  the  bed  in  the  grete  chamber,  the  feather  bed,  bolster, 
ij  pillows  of  down,  ij  pillowberys,  ij  blanketts,  a  counterpaynte,  pair 
of  sheets,  hangings  about  the  bed  wall,  hanging's  belongfing  to  the 
same  chamber,  cupboard,  great  chest  &  chayer.  The  cupboard  in  the 
parlour  and  the  portall  in  the  same  shall  stond  styll  for  my  ye'.  The 
executors  shall  take  of  Chissnes  revenues,  and  profits  of  “my  howse 
at  London  called  the  newe  woUe  kepe  wher  the  Custom  howse  is 
kept,”  £20  yearly  for  1 1  years  next,  &  out  of  this  shall  pay  to  Alice 
Lynne,  my  eldest  daur  unmarried  £100,  and  when  this  is  paid,  to 
Elener  Lynne,  my  younger  daur  £100,  and  to  my  son  John  £20; 
these  rents  to  be  put  out  to  interest  by  the  advice  of  my  wife,  my 
brother  Parys,  Phyllyp  Lynne,  William  Turpyn,  and  John  Bonest. 
My  copyhold  lands  in  Bassingbome  delivered  into  the  hands  of 
Robert  Lawrence,  one  of  the  king’s  tenants  of  the  said  lordship,  in 


MOTES  AKD  QUBBIB8,  BTC. 


189 


the  presence  of  William  Turpra  and  William  Wryght,  being  tenants 
of  the  said  lordship,  &  Philip  Paris  of  Lynton,  esquyer,  to  the  use  of 
Jone  my  wife,  charged  with  the  pajrment  to  Alice  &  Eleanor  Lynne, 
my  daurs,  of  1 2  qrs.  of  barley,  and  1 6  ewys,  and  I  ^  stone  of  wolle 
apiece,  and  to  John  my  son  of  20*  a  year  till  he  is  of  the  age  of  2 1 , 
towards  his  ezhibi68n.  To  Kichard  Umfrey  of  ...  in  co.  Northampton, 
Esq.,  £66.  1 3t.  4rf.,  which  I  owe  him  for  the  marriage  of  my  daur 
Jane.  To  Margery  Willson  half  an  acre  of  barley;  to  Jannys  Parke 
the  same  ;  to  Thomas  Bussye  3  quarters  of  barley.  Besidue  to  Jone 
my  wife.  Wife  executrix.  William  Turpyn,  gentleman  and  John 
Bonest,  yoman.  Supervisors,  the  former  having  26*  S'*,  and  the  latter 
13*  4^  for  their  pains.  Witnesses: — Phyllypp  Parys  Esquyer, 
William  humffrey,  gent.,  William  Turpyn,  gent.,  John  Bonest, 
yoman,  William  Hurmer,  Thomas  Bastey,  William  Taylor, 
Bobert  lawrence.  Proved  26  Ap.  1550.  [The  Lynne  family  bought 
a  moiety  of  the  manors  of  Castelmanoir  and  Bouses  in  1488,  and 
Seymours  manor  in  1554,  and  resided  in  the  old  Manor  House,  a  few 
yards  from  the  church.  The  testator  married  Jone,  widow  of  Thomas 
Cotton  of  Connington,  daughter  of  John  Parris  of  Little  Linton  and 
sister  of  Sir  Philip  Parris.  His  father.  Bichard  Lynne  of  Passing- 
borne,  who  died  3  Jan.  1509,  was  vicechamberlain  to  Henry  VII.’s 
mother,  the  Princess  Margaret,  Countess  of  Bichmond  and  Derby. 
His  aunt,  Elizabeth  (daughter  of  William  Steward,  farmer  of  the 
tithes  at  Ely),  widow  of  Edward  Lynne  of  Bassingbouriie,  married, 
as  her  second  husband,  Hubert  Cromwell,  and,  by  him,  became  the 
mother  of  Oliver  Cromwell,  the  Protector.  Amongst  the  episcopal 
records  at  Ely  there  is  a  bundle  of  quaint  love  letters,  dated  1590, 
between  Elizabeth  Lynne  and  William  Becke.  (Sfe  Gibbons’  jF/y 
Epiteopal  Beeordt,  p.  422.)] 

( 1 3)  Henry  Frances.  Yeoman.  Dated  27  July  1671.  Mentions 
wife,  liUcy ;  son  in  law,  Thomas  Gatward  of  Boyston,  maltster ;  son 
in  law,  John  Waterman  of  Wapping  in  the  city  of  l^ondon,  cooper, 
and  Ann  his  wife.  Witnesses: — John  East,  Jos.  Docrer,  John 
Dodkins.  Proved  10  Sept.  1671. 

Seagram*  Rectory,  Loughborough.  WALTER  JoMES. 

{To  he  continued). 


A  GENTLEMAN  PBISON  BBEAKEB 
(from  Addl.  MS.  5821,  p.  204). 

“  A  letter  to  Sir  Edward  Wingfeild,  Knt.,  from  Thomas  Stanley, 
a  notable  Thefe,  who  broke  the  Castell  of  Cambridge,  and  depart^ 
from  the  same  with  six  more  of  his  companions.  4  June,  Anno  xxxix., 
in  the  Tyme  of  Anthony  Cage,  Esq.,  Sherife  (1596). 

“ .  Yet  can  they  not  here  of  poore  Tom  Stanley,  who 

lieth  in  his  Bedd  drinking  a  cup  of  warme  sacke  to  comforte  his 
vitalls  withall  laughinge  at  their  Follies.  I  hear  that  Mr.  Cage  doth 
Fret  and  rage  and  offerethe  thousandes  to  bringe  me  in  the  compass 


1 


XUM 


190 


THE  EAST  AEOLIAN;  OS, 


of  an  Egg  Pie ;  though  we  Lancashire  Ladds  love  the  meate  well,  yet 
a  Plag^ue  one  the  Crust  }’t  is  hard  in  the  chawinge.  I  made  yet  a 

reasonable  shifte  with . one  Justice  Wendye:*  the  Report 

goeth  his  Substance  is  very  honeste,  he  taketh  it  very  grevoslie 
because  in  a  teste  I  reported  in  the  Castell  to  binde  my  Tjo:  chefe 
Justice  to  the  good  Behaviour :  I  sent  him  worde  I  had  Reason  to  doe 
it  because  I  stoode  in  Danger  of  my  Lyfe  ;  he  said  my  Lord  woulde  tie 
me  up  in  a  Rope  for  it :  I  answered,  it  stood  in  my  Pleasure,  and  1 
hoped  ere  it  were  long  be  woulde  be  of  a  new  mynde.  Then  starts 
up  M'  Pigottf  with  a  Paire  of  eyes  as  though  they  woulde  leape  oute 
of  his  Head  for  fear  of  his  witt :  yet  methinks  they  should  not  be  so 
timerous  for  in  my  conscience  he  hath  no  more  than  he  needeth  :  he 
walketh  up  and  downe  in  his  Castle  Maleperdus :  but  Robyn  Davinson 
whoe  came  out  of  the  oulde  Colledge  with  me,  hath  vowed  on  his 
soule’s  Health  that  he  will  warme  him  with  a  Fire  Brande  ere  it  be 
longe :  and  then  the  formall  gentleman  may  walke  upon  the  Downes 
with  good  Fellowes  for  company,  for,  as  I  here,  he  hath  no  more 
Houldes.” 

In  another  old  hand  is  added  the  following : — 

“  This  Stanley,  after  much  searche,  att  last  was  taken  in 
Worcestershire,  and  brought  to  Newgate,  when,  condemned  and 
adjudged  to  be  hanged,  was  notwithstanding  ^terwards  by  the  means 
of  the  Lo:  Chefe  Justice  pdoned  and  by  him  pferred  to  be  one  of  the 
overseers  or  Maysters  of  Bridwell,  and  last  of  all  was  hanged  at 
West  Chester  1630,  when  he  was  Ixx  yeares  at  the  least,  for  a 
Robberie  done  by  his  man  and  himself.”  Walter  Jones. 

Stagrave  Rectory,  Loughborough. 


NOTES  ON  THE  EARLY  REGISTER  BOOKS  OF 

ST.  MARGARET’S,  IPSWICH  {continued  from  p.  179). 

BOOK  n. 

This  volume  is  of  parchment,  in  an  excellent  state  of 
preservation,  rebound,  as  appears  from  a  note  in  the  handwriting 
of  Rev.  George  Murray  in  the  year  1849. 

Baptisms  from  7^**  May  1615  to  29  March  1716. 

Marriages  from  11***  June  1615  to  17“*  Feb:  1716. 

Burials  from  12“*  April  1615  to  10“*  Mar:  1716. 

•  Thomas  Wendy  of  Haslingfield  was  nephew  of  Dr.  Thomas  Wendy,  the 
royal  physician,  and  inherited  his  ancle's  large  estates  in  Cambridgeshire,  &c.  He 
was  Sheriff  of  Cambs  and  Hunts  in  1573-4,  1585-6,  and  1602-3,  and  added  a  gift  of 
land  in  Barrington  to  his  ancle's  endowment  of  Gonville  and  Cains  College.  In 
1586-7  he  was  in  trouble  with  the  Privy  Council  for  refusing  the  oath.  In  com¬ 
pliance  with  a  direction  contained  in  his  uncle's  will  he  marri^  Dr.  Wendy’s  eldest 
step-daughter,  Elizabeth  Atkins.  He  died  in  1612,  and  is  commemorated  by  a 
mural  monument  of  marble  and  alabaster  on  the  south  wall  of  the  chancel  of 
Haslingfield  Church. 

t  John  Pigott  of  Abing^ton,  second  son  of  Henry  Pigott  and  Margaret, 
daughter  of  Rid^d,  Lord  Rich.  He  was  buried  21st  January,  1613. 


i 


N0TS8  AITD  OTTSBIXS,  CTC.  191 

There  ia  a  blank  in  the  Kegister  of  Marriages  from  14th  Feb., 
1640  (1  ?),  to  the  30th  of  Dec.,  1646,  and  from  the  29th  Jan  ,  1646  (7  ?), 
to  the  SOth  Oct.,  1650.  The  marriages  from  the  30th  Oct.,  1650,  to 
2nd  April,  1654,  appear  to  have  been  irregularly  entered. 

Ipswich. 

A  Hegzr  Booke  of  ChTstninges  &  Manages  &  Burialls  in  the 
parish  of  S'  Margarets  begun  at  Easter  Ann**  1615. 

The  first  entry  among  the  “  Baptizinges  ”  is  as  follows  : — 

May  7.  Abigaill  the  daughter  of  Thomas  Carter  of  this  pish 
was  baptized. 

1617,  June  22.  Ane  Dawter  of  —  Qirlyng. 

In  large  characters  there  is  entered : — 

Auguste  18.  Elizabeth,  Dautour  of  Jeremy  Barbur. 

The  name  of  Parkhurst  placed  by  the  side  of  the  entries  is  that 
of  Mr.  Parkhurst,  Curate. 

August  23.  Francis  Sonne  of  George  Archer. 

1623,  August  22.  William  base  borne  of  Thomas  Bowles  Wive’s 
daughter. 

1624,  July  16.  Mathew  and  John  Twinnes  of  Philip  Noyse, 
baptized  at  y*  Tower.* 

1627,  August  19.  John  Sonne  of  John  Watton  baptized  at  the 
Tower. 

1629,  Novemb:  22.  Julitte  Daughter  of  M*  Robert  Clyatt  the 
name  was  mistaken  at  the  Baptisme,  and  called  Julidde. 

1630,  Januarii  2.  Samuel  Sonne  of  Joseph  Kirke  at  the  Tower. 

Anne  Daughter  of  Beniamin  Neve. 

Februarie  20.  Abel  {tie)  Daughter  of  William  Hurtle.  He  saide 
after  it  was  baptized,  the  name  should  have  beene  Mabel,  it  may  be 
he  meant  Mirabel. 

1633,  May  17.  Anthonie  Sonne  of  S'  Anthonie  Wingfelde. 

1634,  Feb:  25.  Edmund  the  Sonne  of  S'  William  Withipoll 
Knight. 

May  12.  John  the  Sonne  of  S'  Anthony  Wingfield  Knight. 

1 635,  Sep:  1 7.  Anne  the  daughter  of  S'  Anthony  Wingfield  & 
the  Lady  Anne  his  wife. 

1637,  Sep:  10.  Elizabeth  daughter  of  S'  Anthony  Wingfielde 
Kt  A  Baronet  and  Ann  his  wife. 

1639,  May  1.  George  the  Sonne  of  William  Geast  and  Hannah 
his  wife. 

Feb:  9.  A  child  of  George  Longscarth  and  Rose  his  wife 
baptized  at  the  Church  of  S.  Mary  Key. 

1649,  May  22.  Katharine  daughter  of  John  Arnold  Gent  A 
Katharine  his  wife  was  babtized  at  y*  Tower. 

The  entries  of  1 650  are  signed  by 

Nath“  Bacon  )  , 

Jo:  Arnold  1  Churchwardens. 

1652,  October  24.  Nathan  Son  of  John  Turner  IV  in  Physick  A 
Mary  his  wife. 

*  St.  Mary  le  Tower,  Ipswich. 


XUM 


192 


THB  EAST  AEOLIAN  ;  OK, 


Nov:  15.  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Walter  Devereux  Esq**  &  Anne 
his  wife. 

1654,  July  9.  Ann  daughter  of  Thomas  Hagges  and  Ann  his 
wife  of  the  Tower  parrishe  was  babtised  the . 

Baptitingt. 

Octob.  11.  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Gabriel  Boughtitout  &  Anne 
his  wife  Octob'  11,  1654. 

1656,  April  9.  Margaret  daugt'  of  Walter  Devereux  Esq:  &  M'* 
Anne  his  wife. 

September  28.  Elizabeth  daught'  of  William  Whittacur  and 
Elizabeth  his  wife. 

March  23.  Dorothie  daught'  of  Walter  Devereux  Esq  &  Anne 
his  wife. 

BapUtings. 

1 657,  January  5.  Lady  Elizabeth  daught'  of  Leicester  Devereux 
L"*  Vicout  Hereford  and  Elizabeth  Vicontesse  his  wife. 

January  26.  Christopher  Sonne  of  John  Goodall  and  Judith  his 
wife  who  coming  from  London  bigge  with  childe  was  delivered  &  y* 
childe  baptized  in  this  parrish. 

1659,  January  3.  Anne  daught'  of  Walter  Devereux  Esq:  &  M'* 
Anne  his  wife. 

February  15.  Lady  Francis  daught'  of  Leicester  Devereux  L'' 
Viet  Hereford  and  Elizabeth  Vicontesse  his  wife. 

1660,  Novemb'  22.  Caroline  daught' of  Walter  Devereux  Esq: 
AM”  Anne  his  wife. 

1662,  Decemb'  14.  Leicester  Sonne  of  Walter  Devereux  Esq:  & 
M'*  Anne  his  wife. 

1663,  August  14.  Maria  pocthuma  daught'  of  Mary  Wathwhet 
Widd*. 

1668,  July  7.  Isaac  Jacob  &  Sarah  (all  three  at  a  birth)  children 
of  Will  Bivers  &  Mary  Elizabeth. 

July  15.  William  a  child  of  base  of  Elizabeth  Wilkinson. 

1672,  Nov'  23.  Israel  John  &  Mary  (all  at  a  birth)  children  of 

Israel  Sherwood  & . his  wife. 

1673,  November  2.  Lessester  Sone  of  Lessester  Lord  Viscount 
Hereford  and  the  Lady  Viscountis  prissilla  his  wife  babtised  at  Herford. 

1676,  Apr:  20.  Edmund  Son  of  I^  Andrew  Clench  &  M"  Bose 
hie  wife. 

1687,  Aug:  15.  Temperance  daughter  of  M'  Devereux  Edgar 
and  Temperance  his  wife. 

1698,  July  3.  Elizabeth  Mills  was  baptizd  26  years  old. 

Edm^  Beeston — Curate. 

1710,  June  15.  Mary  daugh'  of  M'  Tho:  Cornwallis  Clark:  & 
M'*  Mary  his  wife. 

1712,  Decemb:  11.  Marabella  daught'  of  M'  Alexander  de  brok: 
lolada  &  M'  Agatha  his  wife  from  London. 

Feb:  4.  Christopher  Son  of  Christopher  Swarbrigg  &  Ann  his 
wife  from  Chelsea  Collidg. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


193 


1716,  January  8.  Walter  Son  of  Walter  Plunkett  &  Winifred 
his  wife :  y*  Scotch  Dragoons. 


1615,  Janar  22.  John  Morgan  &  Alice  Holden  Servants  w^ 
Lady  Gray. 

1625,  September  6.  Quintilian  Tayler  and  Mirabel  Felgate. 

August  15.  Thomas  Courtuppe  &  Anne  Grande. 

1626,  August  31.  M'  Robert  Kirbie  &  M"  Rebecca  Sackeforde. 

November  6.  John  Davy  &  Elizabeth  Estrupp. 

1635,  August  18.  Roger  Wentworth  Esquire  and  Elizabeth  the 
daughter  of  the  Lady  Susan  Barker. 

1650.  Nath*  Bacon,  Churchwarden. 

The  publication  of  this  marridg  began  the  22  Jan:  &  ended  the 
6^**  of  Feb: 

1653,  February  6.  Thomas  Clarke  and  Elizabeth  Cooper  ware 
maryed  the  6^  Seb:  by  Justice  Brandling  at  bis  house. 

February  7.  John  Gosling  was  maryed  the  T"*  of  Feb:  to  a 
Widow  of  Nicholas  parrishe  by  Justice  Brandline. 

John  Frank  was  marryed  to  a  maid  ffrom  M'  Cusones  30  March 

1654. 

Nicholas  Cole  of  Trimly  Widower  and  Ann  Chapman  of 
Margarets  parishe  Single  woman  war  mareyed  the  16“*  of  January 
1654  by  M'  Knights  and  before  M'  bayliefe  Smither. 

The  four  foregoing  with  sixteen  others  similar.  Signed  in 

1655,  June  25.  Henry  Sherman  Singleman  and  Susan  Trannam 
Singlewoman  both  of  this  parisli  wer  maried  by  a  minister. 

October  2.  William  Whiticur  Singleman  and  f]lizabeth  Searles 
Siuglewoman  both  of  this  parrish  wer  married  by  y'  Justice. 

October  16.  Richard  Knights  Singleman  of  Filings  parish  and 
Mary  Boggass  Singlewoman  of  this  parrish  wer  maried  by  the 
minist'  and  Justice. 

December  24.  John  Brum  well  Singleman  and  Margret  Hewson 
Singleweman  both  of  this  parrish  wer  maried  by  y*  Min*'"  before 
y*  Justice. 

As  far  as  1657,  persons  were  “married  by  y*  Justice.” 

“Stoke,”  “Laurence,”  “y*  Tower  parrishe,”  “  Hellings,” 
“  Climmonds,”  “ye  Key,”  “peters,”  respectively  distinguish  certain 
Ipswich  parishes. 

The  names  about  this  time  are  very  strangely  rendered. 

1682 . (Fairfax). 

Aug:  26.  Samuel  Hill  Singleman  &  Remembrance  Frost 
Singlewoman. 

1 699,  March  2.  S'  Ralph  Hare  Baronet,  Singleman,  &  M"  Susan 
Norburn  Singlewoman 

1700,  29  Oct.  M'  Leicester  Martin  Gent.  Singleman  &  y*  Hon**'* 
M**  Anne  Devereux  Singlewoman  {tie). 

{To  be  continued). 


194  XHS  KA8T  AKQUAM;  OK, 

COLLEOnONS  ON  BRIEFS  MADE  IN  THE  PARISH 
OF  BARHAM,  CO.  SUFFOLK. 

Barham.  Mat,  1690. 

Gathered  by  Srances  Weeks  towards  y*  2*  Irish  brief  &  pd:  to  ffran:  £.  «.  d. 

Edg^  ..  ..  ..  .,  ..  ..  3  :  19  :  0 

Ives  in  Huntingtonshire  gathered  by  ffr:  Weeks  &  pd:  to  ffr.  Edgar  0  :  6:8 
Southwark  in  Surrey  was  gathered  by  ffr:  Weeks  &  pd:  to  Henry 

Walker  ..  ..  ..  ..0:1:8 

Stafford — gathered  by  flrances  Weeks  &  pd:  to  Henry  Walker  . .  0  :  0:10 

Morpeth— gathered  by  ffr:  Weeks  &  pd:  to  Henry  Walker  .,  0  :  1  :  6 

Lavington— gathered  by  ffrances  Weeks  A  pd:  to  Henry  Walker  ..  0  :  2  :  6 

Teignmouth — gathered  by  ff ranees  Weeks  &  pd:  to  Gabriel  Bradden 

Sep'  23:  91  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..0:1:6 

Bealt  brief  gathered  by  ffr:  Weeks  &  pd:  to  Vaughan  Fowel 

Sep'  23:  91  ..  ..  ..  ..0:1:1 

Tunbridge  brief  gathered  by  ffran;  Weeks  & . 

Mar:  30^^  1707.  Collected  upon  tbe  brief  for  a  fire  at  North  Marston 

in  the  County  of  Bucks  . .  . .  . .  . .  6:3 

April  27***  1707.  Collected  upon  the  Brief  for  fire  at  Towcester  in  the 
County  of  Northampton  by  Jos:  llaymond  curate.  Church¬ 
warden  Will:  Orford  ..  ..  ..  ..  4:0 

Rec^  the  Briefs  above  with  the  sums  thereupon  collected  being  in  all 
nine  shillings  and  three  pence. 

May  12,  1707.  J.  Henry  Walker. 


June  22'^  1707.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  a  fire  at  Hartley 

Green  in  the  County  of  Stafford  . .  . .  . .  2:6 

June  22<’  1707.  Collects  then  upon  the  Brief  for  a  fire  at  Spilsby  in 

the  County  of  Lincoln  . .  . .  . .  . .  2:8 

July  2<‘  1707.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  Broseley  Church  in 

the  County  of  Salop  . .  . .  . ,  1:0 

Aug'  lO***  1707.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  a  fire  in  Shire-lane 

in  the  County  of  Middlesex  . .  . .  . ,  . .  3:0 

Sept'  28''’  1007.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  the  fire  at 

Littleport  in  tbe  Isle  of  Ely  . .  . .  . .  . .  3:0 

by  J.  Raymond  Curate,  tho:  bugg  churchwarden. 

Pd:  Henry  Walker. 

December  7**'  1707.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  a  fire  at 

Southern  in  Warwickshire  ..  ..  ..  3:6 

Janr  26'*'  UOJ.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  Dursley  Church  in 

the  County  of  Gloucester  . .  . .  . .  , .  2:8 

Febr  13'**  170%.  Collected  then  to  a  Brief  for  Orford  Church  in  the 

County  of  Suffolk  . .  . .  . .  . .  . .  2:4 

J.  Raymond  Curate.  Tho:  Bugg  Churchwarden. 


Received  the  Briefs  above  &  the  summs  thereupon  collected  being  in 
all  eight  shillings  and  sixpence.  Hen:  Walker. 

March  7'**  170g.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  building  a  Church 

in  Oberbt^en  in  Germany  . .  . .  . .  6:0 

March  21*'  170}.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  a  fire  at  S'  Paul’s 

Shadwell  in  the  County  af  Middlesex  . .  . .  . .  2:8 

April  11'*'  1708.  Collected  then  upon  the  Brief  for  a  fire  in  Charles 

Street  in  Westminster  ..  ..  ..  2:2 


J.  Raymond  Curate,  tho:  bugg  churchwarden. 

Received  the  Briefs  above  with  the  sums  thereupon  collected  being  in 
all  ten  shillings  and  ten  pence.  David  Uird  Coll'. 


XUI 


:<0T£8  QUSULES,  ETC. 


195 


W 


May  30^  1708.  Collected  then  upon  a  brief  for  a  fire  at  Domey  in  t.  d. 

tiie  County  of  Bucks  . .  . .  . .  , ,  3:0 

June  20^  1708.  Collected  then  upon  a  breife  for  a  fire  at  Wincanton 

in  Somersetshire  ..  ..  ,,  2:0 

J.  Raymond  Curate,  tho:  buffg  churchwarden. 

October  !!<*>  1708.  Received  the  briefs  abovementioned  k  the  sums 
thereupon  collected  at  Barham  being  in  all  four  shillings. 

July  11^  1708.  Collected  then  upon  a  brief  for  a  fire  at  Lisburne  in 

Ireland  . .  . .  . .  . .  3:2 

Aug*  22*'*  1708.  Collected  then  upon  a  brief  for  a  fire  at  Alconbury 

cum  Weston  in  the  County  of  Huntingdon  ..  ..  2:8 

Sep'  26***  1708.  Collected  then  to  a  brief  for  a  fire  att  Bewdley  in 

the  County  of  Worcester  ..  ..  ..  ..  2:4 

Ootobeer  ll***  1708.  Received  the  briefs  abovementioned  and  the  sums 
thereupou  collected  at  Barham  being  in  all  eight  shillings  k 
twopence. 

January  2<*<‘  1709.  Collected  then  upon  a  brief  for  a  loss  by  fire  at  the 

head  of  Cannon  Gate  of  Edingburg  in  North  Brittain  ..  2:4 

April  10,  1709.  Collected  then  upon  a  Brief  for  the  fall  of  Brenchley 

Church  in  Kent  . .  . .  . .  . .  2:0 

May  16,  1709.  Collected  then  upon  a  brief  for  a  fire  in  the  Strand  in 

the  County  of  Middlesex  . .  . .  , ,  . .  2:1 

John  Steward  Curate.  David  Hird  Collector. 

Henley  Vicarage.  Wm.  0.  PbaR80». 


Quaint  Epitaph  in  Stowmarket  Church. — On  the  floor  of  the 
nave  of  Stowmarket  Church,  Suffolk,  lies  a  slab,  the  inscription  on 
which  is  now  all  but  indecipherable,  but  just  enough  remains  to  show 
it  is  what  Davy  has  recorded  at  fo.  1924  of  vol.  xxx.  of  his  Suffolk 
Collections  (Add.  MS.  19106).  He  transcribed  it  from  a  copy  taken 
in  1721  or  1756. 

Here  lyes  t*  Body  op  Hiohard 
Pbrnhau  Bachelor  in  Divinity 
Yiccar  sometime  of  this  p’ishe 

WHO  DIED  Y»  FIRST  OF  FEBRUARY 

1627. 

Thus  tyme  and  death  doe  earth  to  earth  restore 

The  sonne  w . mo . st  reposeth 

And  he  that  liv. .  a . divine  before 

Lyes  here  interr’d,  a  grave  a  grave  incloseth. 

None  will  I  hope  so  sacreligious  prove 
To  robb  him  of  his  due  desert  and  merritt, 

But  with  his  virtues,  if  they  fall  in  love 
And  covett  such  rare  je wells  to  inheritt, 

Know  y*  this  stone  makes  to  the  world  relation 

He  left  them  in  her . self  for  imitation 

He  (?  two  words). 


196 


Tus  KAar  ▲NaLiAH  ;  ok, 


Richard  Pemham  became  vicar  on  10th  Nov.,  1625,  and  was 
buried  at  Stowmarket  on  4th  Feb.,  162|.  His  successor  was  Thomas 
Younge,  tutor  to  the  poet  Milton. 

Can  any  reader  complete  the  second,  third,  tenth,  and  last  lines 
of  the  above  rhyming  epitaph  ?  Chablm  Pkbtrido.. 

OMur*  Hill,  8«utk0rn  Nigtrx*. 


REPLY. 

Ediblb  Frogs  in  Norfolk  and  Cambs.  (pp.  116,  143). — I  make 
my  apologies  to  “  Aristophanes  ”  for  this  tardy,  and  I  fear,  unsatis¬ 
factory  reply.  Of  my  own  knowledge  I  cannot  point  to  a  place  in 
East  Anglia  where  Rana  eieulenta  awaits  the  epicure.  The  article 
referred  to  by  A.  in  Ckamheri  Journal,  and  the  statement  that  the 
creature  “  is  found  in  England,”  made  in  the  sober  pages  of  Enclye. 
Britan,  {art.  Frog)  led  me  to  jump  to  conclusions.  Nor  am  I  able  to 
^eak  about  the  influence  of  our  climate  upon  the  creature’s  survival. 
He  was  discovered  in  our  moor  in  1843.  He  was  caught  and  eaten 
until  the  moor  was  drained  by  Act  passed  1845;  only  two,  at  most 
three,  brief  years  of  positive  testimony.  Can  we  learn  anything  from 
indirect  testimony?  Cambridgeshire  being  a  nightingale  county,  it 
would  seem  as  if  the  jest  about  “  Cambs.’  nightingales  ”  would  die  of 
inanition  in  less  than  two  years;  at  any  rate  that  it  would  not  be 
remembered  to-day  unless  of  considerable  antiquity.  But  on  the 
bleak  and  treeless  heath  the  nightingale  was  not.  The  traveller  was 
in  Cambridgeshire,  and  all  the  sound  he  heard  was  the  croaking  of 
frogs.  The  phrase,  too,  is  evidently  a  parody  on  that  of  ”  Dutch 
nightingale.”  Another  phrase  “  Whaddon  organs”  is  suspicious. 
Whaddon  men  would  not  be  puffed  up  by  the  possession  of  a  Church 
organ  in  1843.  The  present  instrument,  a  “Father  Smith,”  was 
placed  in  1857.  Now  to  have  point,  the  jest  must  apply  either  to  a 
famous  and  unique  possession  of  long  standing,  or  to  the  pride  of 
novelty.  I  am  inclined  to  think  that  the  phrase  indicates  the  boast  of 
Whaddon  Churchmen  in  a  recently  acquired  barrel-organ.  These 
suspicions  seem  confirmed  to  certainty  when  we  remember  that 
Whaddon  and  Fowlmere  are  separated  by  the  width  of  the  Rhee 
Valley.  To  spread  to  one  from  the  other  the  Rhee  and  all  its 
tributaries  in  the  neighbourhood  must  have  been  first  stocked.  From 
the  upper  Rhee  is  fair  waterway  right  down  to  Denver.  If  the 
creature  was  indigenous,  or  of  ancient  acclimatisation,  why  was  he  not 
known  throughout  the  Rhee  Valley  ?  and  why  does  he  not  survive  in 
Wicken  Fen?  The  conclusion  to  which  one  is  led  by  this  indirect 
evidence  is  that  the  Fowlmere  and  Whaddon  frogs — rana  eteultnta — 
were  in  1843  of  comparatively  recent  introduction.  No  doubt  A. 
knows  Kingsley’s  use  of  their  discovery  {Prote  IdylU:  The  Fene,  p.  101 ), 
He  assumes  that  they  were  indigenous. 

Fowlmere  Rtelory,  Royeton.  A.  G.  YoRKE. 


MOTB8  AMU  4U1UIUS,  XTC. 


WILLS  OF  THE  HUNDRED  OF  AEMINGFORD,  CAMB8. 
{eontinwd  from  p.  189). 

BAssnroBoxmK. 

II  — Proved  in  the  Court  of  the  Archdeacon  ef  Ely. 

(17)  Bentley  John  1.(1529-44)  20  I  (56)  Turner  Henry  (1559-85)  237 


(18)  Badcock  William  „  80 

(19)  Bell  Robert  „  121 

(20)  Brobent  William  „  186 

(21)  Crane  John  „  35 

(22)  Dawbree  John  „  143 

(23)  Qoelynge  John  „  204 

(24)  Watt  John  „  149 

(25)  Creede  Thomas 

ii.  (1544-59)  41 

(26)  Callett  Jo.  „  41 

(27)  Beton  Agnes  „  148 

(28)  Bolnest  William  ,,  152 

(  29)  Condall  Alexander  ,,  73 

(30)  Ey worth  John  „  71 

(31)  Good  Thomas  «  ,,  81 

(32)  Good  Alice  „  97 

(33)  Good  William  „  152 

(34)  Goatling  John  ,,  103 

(35)  Bell  Thomas  „  133 

(36)  ChamberlaynThos.  ,,  106 

(37)  Hubbert  John  „  120 

(38)  Waller  or  Warren 

Richard  „  148 

(39)  Ponnock  William  ,,  157 

(40)  Norwich  William  „  59 

(41)  Nele  William  „  74 

(42)  Pinke  Thomas  ,,  27 

(43)  Wrotte  Thomas  ,,  21 

(44)  Watte  Thomas  ,,  41 

(45)  Weston  William  „  41 

(46)  Wellar  William  „  41 

(47)  Laurence  Robert  „  174 

(48)  Good  William 

iii.  (1559-85)  54 

(49)  Aswell  William  ,,  59 

(50)  Millbanks  William  „  119 

(51)  Ey  worth  Francis  ,,  146 

(52)  Mallory  William  ,,  158 

(53)  Badcock  John  ,,  159 

(54)  Phillipps  John  ,,  177 

(55)  Ey  worth  Francis  ,,  144 


(57)  Waller  John  ,,  238 

(58)  Groyne  Henry  „  244 

(59)  Basslye  John  „  247 

(60)  Crane  Joan  ,,  262 

(61)  Condall  Anthony 

(Eneesworth)  „  265 

(62)  Kynge  Robert 

(Eneesworth)  ,,  278 

(63)  Brocke  John 

(Eneesworth)  ,,  288 

(64)  Curtise  John  ,,  304 

(65)  Dock wraye  William  „  310 

(66)  Goslen  William  „  322 

(67)  Tadlowe  Thomas 

(Eneesworth)  323 

(68)  Courtes  Elizabeth 

yid.  „  32.. 

(69)  Boondocke  William  „  386 

(70)  Badcocke  Margaret  „  337 

(71)  Bussie  Henry  „  361 

(72)  Wright  WilUam 

iy.  (1582-91)  52 

(73)  Curtis  Richard  ,,  116 

(74)  Buxton  Alice  „  125 

(75)  Watts  Henry  „  148 

(76)  Parker  Robert  ,,  158 

(77)  Pynke  Joan  ,,  161 

(78)  Waller  Eatherine  „  190 

(79)  Goode  William  „  196 

(80)  Bygraye  John  ,,  277 

(81)  Norman  Robert  „  287 

(82)  Wynne  Henry  „  342 

(83)  Adams  Agnes  y.  (1591-7)  2 

(84)  Wenham  John 

(Eneesworth)  ,,  9 

(85)  Wright  Agnes  ,,  16 

(86)  Wilsonne  Robert  ,,  132 

(87)  Hyer  Agnes  „  133 

(88)  Bowman  John  „  219 

(89)  Ayler  als.  Allin 

yi.  (1597-1611)  55 


198 


THB  KA8T  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


(90)  Bustle  Henry  (10^)  Pape  Lucy  (1 697-161 1)  189 

(1597-1611)  110  (105)  Smith  ale.  Lane 

(91)  Hill  Robert  Richard  „  24 


(Knees  worth) 

)) 

200 

(106)  Amys  Robert 

(92)  Cundall  Elizabeth 

f  • 

— 

vii.  (1611-23)  143 

(93)  Cundall  John  . 

>» 

122 

(107)  Angood  Robert 

>1 

162 

(94)  Dickon  Jane 

n 

328 

(108)  Ayworth  John 

99 

280 

(95)  Fuller  John 

40 

(109)  Bolnest  Robert 

99 

249 

(96)  Grave  John 

103 

(110)  Dates  William 

99 

3(4) 

(97)  Hitch  Thomas 

25 

(111)  Good  William 

99 

1 

(98)  Hockley  Richard 

'(112)  Gotte  Edward 

99 

2 

(Kneesworth) 

n 

28.. 

(113)  Gibson  William 

99 

30 

(99)  Kefford  John 

112 

(114)  Goode  Giles 

99 

220 

(100)  Nicholson  Richard 

102 

(115)  Playstead  Anne 

99 

157 

(101)  Porter  Thomas 

45 

(116)  Key  ford  Katherine 

34 

(102)  Page  James 

»» 

— 

(117)  Turpin  John 

99 

289 

(103)  Porter  Edward 

M 

176 

(118)  Willimot  Mary 

268 

(18)  William  Badcock.  Dated  4  June  1535.  To  Margaret,  my 
daughter,  a  brass  potte  the  price  iij*  iiij**,  a  ketyll  iij*  iiij*,  an  iron 
spite  Tii]**,  a  brasse  pan  x**,  a  hutche  lij*.  To  Thomas  Brande  of 
Shepreth,  my  first  cote,  an  old  buckskyn  doublet,  my  violet  cote,  a 
rede  gerkyn.  Also  mentions  his  brother  John  Badcock,  his  father 
in  law  Thomas  Wrotam,  his  wife  Joan,  and  John  Hech.  Proved 
5  Feb.  1535. 

(19)  Robert  Bell.  Dated  29  August  1538.  No  children.  John 
Whytacres  executor.  Proved  15  Nov.  1638. 

(21)  John  Crane.  Dated  25  July  1532.  To  each  child  a  sheep. 

To  Sisle  my  wySe  my  house,  gardyng  and  close,  lying  in  fenne  ende 

in  Basingborne,  by  Frenchebridge,  till  Henry  my  souue  come  to  the 
age  of  20  ;  to  fell  no  trees  except  for  reparations,  nor  make  no  strippe 
or  waste  of  the  grounde  or  of  the  wood ;  not  withstanding  they  may 
loppe  the  bowis  for  begging  or  to  breh,  as  hath  ben  uside  in  timys 
past.”  To  wife  all  copyholds  till  heir  come  of  age.  To  Sybill  my 
daughter  a  swarm  of  bees.  Residue  to  wife.  Witnesses: — Robert 
Tailor,  parish  priest,  John  Bolnest,  Will  Laurence. 

(22)  John  Dawbre.  1539.  Administration  granted  to  Agnes 
his  wife. 

(23)  John  Qoslynge.  Dated  26  Feb.  1542.  Mentions  John  elder 
and  John  younger,  sons  ; .  and  Joan,  Alice,  and  Margery,  daughters. 
Inventory,  £27.  10*.  4rf.  List  of  household  utensils.  Witnesses: — 
William  Turpyn  gent,  Roger  Cotton  gent  and  steward  of  the  King’s 
court,  Thomas  Paxton  priest.  Proved  11  March  1.543. 

.  (24)  John  Watt.  Dated  10  Aug.  1540.  Mentions  Katheryn, 

wife;  John  Thomas,  and  William,  sons;  and  Joan  and  Cycely, 
daughters.  Proved  3  Sept.  1540. 

(28)  William  Bolnest.  Dated  16  March  1557.  To  John  my  son, 
my  house  in  Bassingborne,  holden  of  the  Castell.  Also  mentions 
Richard  his  son,  Alice  his  wife.  Elizabeth  his  daughter,  and  William 
Dockerell  his  brother-in-law.  Proved  18  June  1557. 


KOTSS  AN1>  UUKHIBS,  XTO, 


199 


(SI)  Thomas  Goode.  Husbandman.  Dated  11  Sept.  1550.  To 
William  my  son,  9  acres  of  copyland  bought  of  the  late  William 
Qery,  gent.,  also  acres  of  sa&on,  &o.  To  my  wife  Alice  the 
house  1  now  dwell  in  with  9  acres  of  land  belonging  to  it,  &o.  Also 
mentions  Margaret  and  E^zabeth  his  daughters,  and  Gyles  Everard. 
Witnesses: — William  Turpyn,  gent.,  John  bolnes,  yoman,  and  the 
vicar  of  the  same  towne.  Proved  25  Got.  1550. 

(32)  Alis  Goode.  Dated  14  July  1553.  Widow.  Leaves 
furniture  to  relations  mentioned  in  Fier  husband’s  will,  above. 
Witnesses : — William  Wright,  Bicharde  Fyuke.  Proved  3  Mar.  1553. 

(33)  William  Goode.  Dated  3  May  1557.  To  my  son  William 
all  my  copyhold  land  in  Bassingbome,  according  to  the  surrender 
given  into  the  hands  of  Bichard  Pynke.  Wife  Elizabeth,  daughter 
Betteryse.  Giles  Ewes  to  have  his  chamber  with  “  free  increase  and 
outgreese,”  and  meat  and  drink,  as  he  hath  had,  for  life.  Witnesses : — 
William  Wright,  Bichard  Pynke,  Edward  Howe.  Proved  12  June 
1557.  Inventory,  £42.  12<. 

(38)  Bichard  Warren  als.  Waller.  Dated  28  March  1557.  To 
my  son  Bichard  the  house  I  live  in ;  also  Charters,  Moryces,  and 
Atkinsons;  a  messuage  called  John  Ashwells,  and  another  called 
Bandall  lyn  and  Qarnys;  a  close  called  Frenchebrydge-cloee,  Bowse’s 
mead  ;  also  my  lease  of  the  Bury  for  years  ;  the  cupboard  and  table 
in  the  hall,  ij  buffet  stoles  and  a  maser.  To  my  son  Nicholas  the 
messuages  at  Goose  Styll,  and  Willmotts  abutting  on  Walton  Grene. 
To  my  son  Henry  my  house  at  Fen  end  holdeu  of  Mr.  Moore.  To 
Alice  my  daughter  £10,  and  a  garnish  of  pewter  worth  63*  4'*. 
Mentions  his  wife  Alice.  Proved  2  May  1557.  Inventory,  £49.  2«.  2d. 

(42)  Thomas  Pynke.  Dated  12  July  1545.  Mentions  wife 
Margaret,  son  William,  brother  Bichard  Pinke,  and  Bichard  Spycer. 
To  my  wife  the  best  chamber  in  the  hoiue  and  the  dove  house,  for 
life.  Thomas  Be  veil,  supervisor.  Witnesses  : — William  Balforde, 
vicar,  Bicbard  Waller,  John  Spynke.  Proved  18  Jan.  1545. 

(48)  William  Goode,  the  elder.  Dated  6  June  1563.  Mentions 
Elizabeth,  wife ;  sons  William  (eldest)  and  Thomas ;  daughter  Alice  ; 
children’s  children;  grandson  Gabrieli;  wife’s  sons,  George  and 
William  French ;  Bobert  Godfrey,  late  servant,  “  The  little  house 
with  the  yerde,  by  my  farme,  next  to  William  Aswell.”  Copyhold 

land,  also  51  acres  of  free  land  lately  bought.  Proved  8  . 

1565. 

(57)  John  Waller  als.  Warren.  Dated  5  April  1575.  My  house 
called  Copte  Hall  to  my  son  Bichard,  to  the  use  of  William  Pynke, 
who  is  to  pay  his  mother  Agnes  By  water  20*  yearly.  Mentions 
William  Bolnest,  brother-in-law  ;  Katherine,  wife  ;  William,  brother. 
Witnesses : — George  Beaumont,  vicar.  Bichard  and  William  Waller. 
Proved  80  June  1576. 

(64)  John  Courtice.  Husbandman.  Dated  16  March  1576.  “I 
have  surrendered  into  the  hands  of  William  Bondocke  and  William 
Docrell  tenaunts  to  the  quene  my  house  and  all  the  lands  holden  of 
the  queue’s  manner  that  I  have  within  the  parish  of  Bassingbome,  to 
the  use  of  William  my  sou  and  his  heirs.”  10*  to  the  poore  of 

o  2 


200 


THK  KA8T  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


Bassingborne.  Mentions  wife,  Elizabeth ;  sons,  Thomas,  John, 
Kichard  and  Bobert ;  daughter  Anne ;  William  Bussie,  the  younger. 
To  son  Bichard,  erasmus  paraphrases.  Supervisors : — Richard  Waller 
and  William  Bonest.  Witnesses: — George  Beamont,  vicar,  Gower 
pelset,  gent,  William  bussie  and  Henrie  bussie.  Proved  29  April 
1677.  Inventory,  £68.  13*.  \i. 

(65)  William  Dockwraye.  1580.  Mentions  wife,  Katherine; 
sons  Robert,  William,  and  Jeremie.  Proved  3  Dec’’  1580. 

(73)  Richard  Curtis.  Dated  7  March  1681.  Mentions  brothers 
William,  Thomas,  and  Robert;  sister,  Anne  Curtys;  William  & 
Nicholas  sons  of  William  my  brother  ;  Raphe  Bonest,  Richard  Waller 
thelder.  Witnesses: — Henrie  Pycke,  vicar,  Robert  Beeton,  Richard 
Nicholson.  Proved  8  May  1585. 

(77)  Johane  Pincke.  Widow.  Dated  24  Dec.  1586.  To  youngest 
daur,  Margaret  Pincke,  “  fyve  newe  paynted  clothes,  whereof  the  one 
is  a  hawlinge,”  a  saffron  peck,  and  30  lb.  of  pulled  hemp.  Witnesses: — 
Raphe  Bonest,  John  Warde  senior,  John  Caldacott.  Proved  6  May  1 687. 

(78)  Katherine  Waller.  Widow.  Dated  22  May  1586. 
Daughters: — Joyce,  wife  of  William  Pynke ;  Margaret,  wife  of 
John  Bonest;  Elizabeth,  wife  of  Ralf  Boolness;  Richard,  son; 
Joan  and  Mar)’  daughters  of  William  Pink.  Witness,  Henry  Picke, 
vicar.  Proved  8  July  1587. 

(79)  William  Goode.  Husbandman.  Dated  14  June  1587.  To 
wife  Elizabeth  £40  and  furniture.  Rest  to  sons,  Thomas  and 
William,  equally.  Mentions  Susan  Rychemon  and  Elizabeth  Holle- 
well.  Witnesses : — Mr.  Henry  Picke,  vicar,  Thomas  Lylley  of  Guilden 
Morden,  and  Thomas  Thurgood  of  Steeple  Morden.  Debts: — To 
Thomas  Lylley  of  Guilden  Morden  £6.  2*.,  Mr.  Hagger  of  Borne  £22, 
Robert  Norman  22  quarters  of  barley,  John  Ey worth  of  the  same 
town  22  quarters  of  barley,  John  Semon  20  quarters  of  barley, 
William  Manuynge  20  quarters  of  barley,  William  Adams  of  Crawden 
in  rightof  his  wife  £13.  6«.  8d.,  Mrs.  Turpyn  40*.  Proved  20  July  1587. 

(91)  Robert  Hill.  30  Aug.  3  Jas.  1.  Nuncupative.  Witnesses: — 
Thomas  Tadlow,  John  Blyghton. 

(109)  Robert  Bolnest.  Husbandman.  Mentions  son,  Barnard; 
Mary  Bolnest,  daughter  of  Barnard  and  his  wife  Alice;  daughter, 
liuoe  Bolnest,  the  daugliter  of  Bartholomew  Elflicke  of  Beckenham, 
Kent;  wife,  Agnes.  Proved  7  Jan.  1629. 

(Ill)  William  Good.  Yeoman.  Dated  11  Oct.  1611.  Mentions 
wife,  Alice ;  daughters,  Dennys  Coomberland,  Sara  Cammie,  and 
Anne  Good.  Witnesses : — Francis  Lynne,  Edward  Good,  Robert 
Good,  Robert  Angood,  William  Good  the  younger.  Proved  19  Oct.  161 1 . 

(114)  Giles  Goode.  Wheelwright.  Dated  14  April  1618.  To 
my  wife,  Margaret,  £9,  and  for  her  habitation  for  life  two  rooms  in 
my  house  where  I  now  dwell,  that  is  to  say  the  kitchin  and  the  little 
butterie,  with  liberty  to  go  to  and  from  the  same  through  the  yard. 
Mentions  son.  Gyles ;  daughters,  Alice  and  Mary.  Witnesses : — 
Henrie  Warde,  William  Condall.  Proved  27  June  1618. 

(117)  John  Turpin.  Gentleman.  Dated  24  April  1621.  To  my 
wife,  Levinia,  £40,  together  with  all  the  Lynnen  that  she  hath,  the 


NOTK8  AND  QUEKIK8,  BTC. 


201 


standing  bed  that  I  bought,  with  featiier  bed  and  all  the  furniture. 
All  the  rest  of  my  goods  to  Edward  Turpin  my  son.  I  appoint  my 
father,  Thomas  Turpin,  gentleman,  executor.  Witnesses : — Allise 
Wright,  John  Parke.  Proved  20  July  1621.  [The  Turpins  lived  in 
Bassinghourne  more  than  two  centuries.  The  Herald*'  Visitation 
pedigrees  begin  with  John,  the  inscription  on  whose  tomb  in  the 
chancel  is  given  by  Layer  as  follows  : — “  Hie  jacet  Johannes  Turpin, 
et  Margareta  uxor  ejus,  sexque  Pueri  eorundem,  qui  quidem  Johannes 
obiit  sext  die  mensis  Octobris  aho  llhi  1468.  Quorum  animabus 
propitietur  Deus.”  The  testator  was  the  second  son  of  Thomas 
Turpin,  by  his  first  wife  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Christopher  Waters 
of  Lincolnshire.] 

(118)  Maria  WiUimot.  Widow.  21  Feb.  1618.  Mentions  sons, 
John,  William,  Henry;  grandchildren,  Jeremy.  Francis,  and  Elizabeth 
Bird  ;  granddaughter  Margaret  Willimot,  daughter  of  eon  William  ; 
son  Henry’s  children.  To  son  William  ‘‘  my  corded  bedstede  which  I 
lay  in,  with  the  paynted  clothes  over  and  about  it.”  Witnesses 
Robert  Chamberlayne,  Raphe  Bowlnest,  no'^  pub.  Proved  24  July  1620. 

Stagrase  Rectory,  Loughborough.  WalTBK  Jomes. 

( To  he  continued). 


NOTES  ON  THE  EARLY  REGISTER  BOOKS  OF 
ST.  MARGARET’S,  IPSWICH  {continued  from  p,  193). 

Buriall*. 

1615,  April  13.  Adam  Lingtrad  an  old  man. 

1616,  May  27 . Darrell  an  old  woman. 

June  2.  Edward  Lormes  Servant  to  M'  Lany. 

July  3.  Sammewell  Browne  of  Saint  Petere’s  pish. 

October  23.  Widdowe  Bokile  from  the  foundation  Key  pish. 
Janewary  24.  Robert  Sone  of  John  Lany. 

Janewary  28.  Mary  Payne  Servant  of  Thomas  Layton. 

1617,  May  29.  Thomas  Redrege  Ane  ould  minester  of  the  word 
of  God. 

November  16.  Edward  Nokes  a  Stranger. 

1618,  Novemb:  30.  John  Chapman  of  wolton  in  Cownes  hundred. 

1619,  Septemb:  3.  M'  Stiven  hedge. 

Septemb:  28.  Elizabeth  Smith  which  dwelleth  in  the  Key  pish. 
November  25.  Sur  Edmond  Wittepalle  Knite. 

March  25.  A  poore  woman  a  Stranger. 

1620,  Appereil  9.  Ane  bumbell  brete. 

Appereil  18.  Willyam  Sone  of  Willyam  Pevinge. 

1621,  Septeber  27.  John  Martin  Servant  att  y*  grahounde. 

1622,  May  2.  Robart  monday  a  Stranger  he  departed  at  the 
Grayhownd. 


202 


THS  BAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR. 


December  30.  William  Cadge  an  owld  man. 

1623,  September  24.  John  Butler  Servant  to  my  Lady  Withipol. 
March  9.  A  Stranger  founde  dead  in  Whitinges  Bame,  whose 

person  and  name  was  unknowns. 

1624,  July  9.  Katherine  Daughter  of  George  Turnbull  Minister. 
March  5.  Thomas  Commonly  called  poore  Thomas. 

Septemb:  6.  The  Lady  Francis  Withipol. 

Februarie  27.  M"  Francis  Withipol. 

1628,  April  13.  A  still  borne  childe  of  Robert  Hawes. 

1634,  March  3.  Eldmund  the  Sonne  of  S'  William  Withipoll 
Knight. 

1635,  March  24.  A  Stranger  that  was  drowned. 

1638,  October  13.  John  ffinsur,  musitian. 

1640,  July  21.  A  Still  borne  childe  of  the  Tapster  att  the 
Oreyhond. 

Thomas  ffastolt  gent,  was  buried  the  second  day  of  ffebruary 
Anno  Dni  1644. 

1645,  September  23.  S'  William  Withipoll  Knight. 

November  29.  The  Widdowe  Dawson  whoe  dyed  in  the 

ffoundation.  * 

1646,  September  5.  Laday  . Devereex. 

1648,  March  26.  Nicolas  Tooly. 

1649,  October  19.  Nicholas  Stanton  minister  of  This  parish. 

1650,  ffebruary  30.  The  Wife  of  Ambrose  Hardy  called  falsly 
M"  Otter. 

1651,  February  14.  Lady  Mary  Broke  (dyed  Feb:  12). 

1652,  October  8.  M' . Rme  Minister. 

October  10.  A  Dutch  Seaman. 

'1654,  August  31.  A  chille  («tc)  of  John  Rackham  &  Sarah  his 
wife  was  buried. 

1657,  October  25.  Robert  Deveruz  Esqre  Sonne  &  heire  of 
Leister  Deveruz  L^  Viscount  Herreford  and  Elizabeth  Viscountis 
his  wife  was  buried. 

January  16.  Elizabeth  daughter  of  Lester  Devaruz  Viscount 
Hereford  &  Elizabeth  Viscountis  his  wife. 

1658,  May  22.  M"  Dorithy  daughter  of  Walter  Devoruz  Esq. 
and  M"  Ann  his  wife. 

March  1 4.  the  wife  of  goodman  ffangett. 

1659,  March  y*  28*'*.  petter  Elliss  one  of  y*  Sicke  Souldgeres 
that  came  out  of  y*  fleat. 

March  26.  John  Grene  A  Soulger. 

June  17.  Henry  Willett  border  at  y*  Lord  of  Herefords. 

1660,  June  25.  Nicholas  Julian  a  Stranger  dying  at  y*  Gray- 
hound  was  buried. 

August  7.  John  Deall  Kingsman  to  Master  Griges  of  the  Tower. 

1663,  July  6.  A  childe  of  goodwf  Chaltoms. 

August  16.  ,,  of  Goodm  Goslins. 

1664,  Feb'  3.  Jerimiah  Startup. 


NOTES  AND  QUSKIBS,  BTC. 


203 


pen’d  an  extraordinary  Pestilenes 
36  so  great,  as  is  to  be  seen. 


1665.  Memorand. 

That  is  this  prsent  yeer  there  hap 
caused  the  numb'  of  the  dead  to 

August  27.  Maria  posthuma  daughter  of  Ma^  Washwhet. 
Saptember  20.  Old  Qoody  Banks. 

„  20.  A  man  at  Goody  Dayes. 

„  24.  Goodman  Banks  the  Elder. 

GkK>dy  Titterson  the  Elder. 

„  30.  A  Mayd  at  John  Warners. 

„  31.  A  cliilde  of  the  Widdow  Boltitouts. 

Norember  13.  Goodman  Gildersleve  &  his  wife  &  childe. 
December  30.  A  fflemming  at  the  Widdow  Coopers. 

Tot:  394. 

1666,  March  29.  Arthur  Conaway  porter  to  Lord  Yicount 
Hereford. 

1671,  Nov:  26.  Thomas  Cade  D.D.  Hector  of  Tremly. 

May  30.  John  Harrold — he  hanged  himselfe. 

The  names  of  such  persons  of  S*  Margarets  parish  in  Ipswich  as 
were  confirmed  by  the  Eight  Reverend  Father  in  God  Matthew  Lord 
Bishop  of  Norwich  August  the  15^  Anno  Dni  1636. 


John  Wingfield 
William  Wingfield 
William  Greene 
John  Smith 
John  Knap 
John  Newton 
John  Nitingale 
Thomas  Humfry 
William  Hesker 


Thomas  Barwicke 
Nicolas  Tooly 
John  Warner 
Robert  Nitingale 
Robert  Smith 
Francis  Archer 
William  Baddison 
John  Tailor 
Thomas  Moore 
Abigail  Wines 

1667,  Aug:  5.  M'  Edmund  Miles,  Proc'. 

,,  26.  M'  Charles  Brinckhunt,  Insigpi. 

Mar:  12.  M'  Christopher  Son  of  Christopher  Milton*  Esq. 
Buried  at  S^  Nicholas. 

1671.  Phil  Bacon  Armig:  (is  a  Chwdn). 

1672,  August  1'^  M'  Nicholas  Phillips. 

There  is  a  gap  from  1685  to  1707. 

1708,  Octob'  4.  Sarah  Beck  Relick  of  oure  Clrk. 

1712,  Feb'  20.  Nattha*  Bacon  Affidavit  made  &  due  Return^. 

Edm^  Beeston,  Curate. 


*  Chriitopher  Milton,  brother  of  John  Milton  the  poet,  wea,  in  22  Charles  n. 
(1670),  elected  Town  Connsel.  He  is  said  to  have  resided  in  a  house  in  Tacket 
StrMt,  where  it  is  believed  he  died.  Annexed  to  his  residence  was  his  private 
chapel.  He  is  entered  as  Churchwarden  of  8t.  Margaret’s  in  1667  ;  he  signs  as 
such  conjointly  with  William  Smith.  This  Christopher  Milton  was,  on  the 
Restoration,  appointed  in  the  new  Charter  of  Ipswich  Recorder  of  the  Town. 
He  was  sworn  a  Baron  of  the  Exchequer  the  very  day  he  received  the  Coif  (26th 
April,  1686)  being  then  aged  71.  Un  the  17th  April  in  the  following  year  he  was 
removed  to  the  Common  Pleas,  and  on  the  6th  July,  1688,  being  then  73,  he  had 
a  Writ  of  Ease  with  a  continuance  of  salary  on  account  of  age. 


304 


THE  EAST  AHOLIAH;  OR, 


M'  Gyles  my  Lord  Derruckes  Steward  was  buried  July  19***  1654. 

Edmundus  Goulaway  Minister.  1597. 

Olid  Attlebridge  was  buried  August  19. 

Johannes  Baldwinus.  1595. 

Johannes  Gleson.  1595. 

1708.  Februa  5.  Male  a  child  of  Nicho  Sibly — Affidavit. 

March  7.  Betrix  Scarlett  Affidavit  made. 

1709,  March  7.  Charles  Pleasure — Seaman  from  London. 

1711,  July  20.  Penelopy  Salter — Affidavit  made. 

Sep'  3.  Easter  a  child  of  Roger  Rochester  Affid  made. 

,,  22.  Easter  Rochester  Affidavit  made. 

No'  22.  Bridgett  Beast  Affidavit  made  &  return**. 

1715.  Novemb  18.  Pleasant  a  cliild  of  Joseph  Tokely . 

Traphania  Cullington. 

M'  Gyles  my  Lord  Derrickes  Steward  was  buried  July  9***  1 654  (sie). 
A  youth  of  Goodman  fleets  was  buried  the  29  August  1654. 
Goodwife  Citterson  was  buried  August  11***  1653. 

17**"  July.  John  Smith  buried  from  the  Woolpacke. 

2***  of  October  was  buried  a  girle  of  the  Widdow  Marrets. 

Goody  Holmes  was  buried  the  17***  of  October. 


FAMILY  OF  CLAYTON  OF  SOUTHOLT,  BEDFIELD,  ETC. 

The  greater  part  of  the  following  pedigree  of  Clayton  has  been 
gathered  from  old  papers  in  my  father’s  possession.  '  These  papers 
state  that  they  are  themselves  copied  from  "  Rev.  Robt.  Clayton’s 
Book.”  He  was  the  Rector  of  Caister,  mentioned  below.  Some  of 
the  notes  in  it  must  have  been  added  by  his  son,  Robert  Clayton  of 
Yarmouth,  and  his  grandson,  Benjamin  Lane  Clayton  of  Norton. 
Probably  the  original  no  longer  exists.  I  believe  it  passed,  with 
other  family  papers,  to  the  eldest  son  of  Dr.  Plowman  Young,  who 
had  settled  in  Australia  ;  and  that  all  of  these,  in  fact  everything  that 
he  had,  were  lost  by  shipwreck. 

Can  any  readers  of  the  Aoxf  Anglian  help  me  with  further  infor¬ 
mation  about  this  family  ?  (1)1  want  the  connecting  link  with  the 
Lancashire  Claytons — Exton,  where  the  first  Robert  Clayton  is  said 
to  have  been  bom,  I  take  to  be  Euxton,  in  the  midst  of  the  Clayton 
country;  the  arms,  “argent,  a  cross  engrailed  sable  between  four 
torteaux,”  are  given  by  Burke  to  Clayton  of  Norfolk ;  by  Davy,  to 
Clayton  of  Bedfield,  and  were  borne  by  the  Claytons  of  Adlington 
and  other  Lancashire  branches.  (2)  1  should  like  to  know  something 
of  the  parentage  of  the  different  matches,  in  the  direct  line  especially. 
(8)  Where  is  Hobbeschurch  ? 

1  have  added  a  few  points  from  Davy’s  Suffolk  Colleetiont,  chiefly 
dates,  but  not  from  personal  inspection. 

1 .  Robert  Clayton  was  bom  at  Exton  in  Lancashire ;  came  to  live 
in  Suffolk,  and  was  married  to  Sutan  Pulham  of  Stradbrook,  spinster, 
October  17th,  1603 ;  two  sons,  Robert  and  Thomas,  were  born  at 


VOTES  AVI)  QTTSSTSS,  BTC. 


205 


Stradbrook.  They  afterwards  live')  in  his  own  estate  at  Southolt, 
where  a  third  son,  John,  was  born. 

2.  Robert  Clayton,  eldest  son,  married  And/ry  Wattling  of  Wor- 
lingworth ;  by  her  came  the  estate  called  “  Bull’s  Hall,”  lying  in 
Bedfield  and  Worlingworth.  -  They  hsd  a  numerous  issue :  Davy 
gives  six  sons  and  five  daughters,  with  the  dates  of  baptism,  all  at 
Bedfield ;  the  Rector  of  Caistor  gives  eight  in  all,  without  dates,  prob¬ 
ably  omitting  those  who  died  in  infancy,  they  were : — 

(o)  Robert,  baptised  December  16th,  1632;  by  business  an  iron¬ 
monger  in  Norwich;  Sheriff  of  that  City  in  1672,  the  year  of  his 
death ;  he  was  married,  but  died  s.p.  A  trade  token  of  his,  bearing 
date  1663,  is  illustrated  in  Norfolk  Arehaology,  vol.  v.  Davy  misses 
a  generation  by  making  this  Robert  Clayton  to  be  Rector  of  Bedfield 
instead  of  his  nephew,  thereby  making  the  latter  to  be  forty-seven 
years  older  than  his  wife. 

(A)  William,  baptized  November  16th,  1634. 

(r)  John,  baptized  March  8th,  1638  ;  died  in  London,  unmarried. 

(d)  Jamet,  baptized  September  21st,  1637  ;  died  young. 

(«)  James,  baptized  July  18th,  1647  ;  an  ironmonger  in  Norwich, 
where  he  died,  1699,  unmarried  ;  buried  at  Southolt. 

(/)  George,  baptized  1650;  probably  died  young;  buried  at 
Southolt. 

(a)  Anne,  baptized  November  27th,  1631.  Perhaps  she  was  the 
wife  of  William  Crabb,  M.D.,  of  Norwich.  See  Genealogiet. 

(A)  Mary,  baptized  March  9th,  1640;  probably  died  young; 
buried  at  Southolt. 

{o')  Audry,  baptized  June  23rd,  1642. 

\d)  Elitabeth,  baptized  1645  ;  buried  at  Southolt. 

(s)  Lydia,  bom  1650. 

S.  William  Clayton,  the  second  son,  was  by  business  a  hosier. 
He  married  Elizabeth  Johnson,  by  whom  he  had  two  children,  one  who 
died  young,  and 

4.  Robert  Clayton,  Re(;tor  of  Bedfield,  owner  of  the  Manor  of 
Bull’s  Hall  there.  He  married  Susan,  daughter  of  Rev.  Peter 
Basford;  she  was  bora  March  8th,  16|^,  and  married  August  29th, 
1695.  Peter  Basford  was  Rector  of  Earl  Soham ;  he  was  married 
on  December  31et,  1678,  at  Creating  St  Mary,  to  Susan,  daughter  of 
Henry  Stebbing,  Cent.,  of  Brandeston,  and  Susan,  his  wife,  daughter 
of  William  Raleigh,  Cent,,  of  Wood  Dalling,  Norfolk.  Mr.  Clayton 
died  November  22ud,  1708  ;  his  widow  afterwards  became  the  wife  of 
William  Lord,  Gent ,  of  Bedfield.  She  died  October  18th,  1770,  and 
was  buried  by  the  side  of  her  first  husband  in  the  chancel  of  Bedfield 
Church.  In  Mr.  Clayton’s  will,  dated  March  25th,  1704,  mention  is 
made  of  two  sons,  Robert  and  Peter,  and  a  daughter  Susan.  Peter 
was  born  May  22nd,  1700,  and  Susan,  June  21st,  1702  ;  the  elder  son 

5.  Robert  Clayton,  born  at  Bedfield  February  16th,  169^,  was 
Rector  of  Caistor-next-Yarmouth  for  fifty-six  years.  He  died  there 
in  September,  1781,  and  was  buried  in  the  Church  Porch.  The 
following  notes  are  from  “  Rev.  Robert  Clayton’s  Book  — 

”  Rebecca,  the  daug'  of  Henry  Young  &  Sarah  his  wife,  was 


20« 


THS  BAST  ANOLTAN  ;  OR, 


born  the  25^  of  March  A  baptized  April  1**  1705,  by  Ben.  Jos.  Ellis, 
Minister  of  8t.  Peter’s  Hungate,  Norwich.” 

”  Robert  Clayton,  Clerk,  singleman,  &  Rebecca  Young,  single 
Woman,  were  married  at  Hobbeschurch  on  Tuesday,  7  Sept.  1725, 
according  to  the  new  style  their  wedding  day  is  IS***  September." 
(Davy  gives  the  date  as  1724). 

”  ^becca  Clayton,  Wid*-  &  relict  of  the  late  Rob*  Clayton, 
Rector  of  Caister,  died  on  Tuesday  mom*  ab*  4  o’clock  1**  of  May 

&  was  buried  in  the  Church  Porch . by  the  Rev.  Mr.  Salmon 

on  Sunday  morn*  following  being  e**"  day  of  May,  aged  87  years 
1  month.  N.B. — Paid  Mr.  Salmon  5  guineas — he  w"*  have  had  lOg*.” 

Mr.  Clayton  gives  the  dates  of  birth  and  baptism  of  five 
children,  viz  : — 

(а)  Ann«,  bora  September  25th,  baptized  October  Pith,  1726. 
She  was  married  on  February  26th,  1756,  to  Benjamin  Lane,  grocer, 
of  Yarmouth,  but  had  no  issue. 

(б)  Robert,  born  January  11th,  baptized  January  15th,  1727. 

{e)  Samuel,  bora  July  24th,  baptized  August  12th,  1731.  See 
Burlu't  Landed  Gentry  for  1846  under  the  title  Clayton  of  Norfolk. 

{d)  Thomae,  bora  December  15th,  baptized  December  22nd,  1737 ; 
died  young. 

(f)  Reheeed,  bora  March  29th,  baptized  April  3rd,  1743.  She  was 
married  at  Caistor  by  her  father  on  November  20th,  1770,  to  John 
Olley,  woolcomber,  of  St.  Martin’s  by  the  Bishop’s  Palace  in  the  City 
of  Norwich.  She  died  May  30th,  1772,  and  was  buried  in  Caistor 
Church  porch. 

6.  Robert  Clayton,  the  eldest  son,  is  described,  both  by  Burke 
and  Davy,  as  having  died  s.p.  The  Rector  of  Caistor,  however, 
mentions  the  birth  and  baptism  of  four  sons;  three  of  them  were 
baptized  by  himself,  the  second  by  the  Rev.  Mr.  Manclarke,  Minister 
of  Yarmouth.  One  of  these,  at  any  rate,  would  seem  to  have 
survived  his  father. 

(a)  Robert,  born  May  29th,  baptized  May  30th,  1761. 

\b)  Thomae Leath,  bora  February  1 6th,  baptized  February  1 7th,  1 763. 

(«)  Benjamin  Lane,  born  July  29th,  baptized  July  30th,  1765; 
buri^  at  Caister  on  December  8th,  1765. 

{d)  Benjamin  Lane,  bora  October  3rd,  baptized  October  7th,  1767. 

”  Mary  Ann,  daug.  of  Thos.  Leath  and  Anna  Maria  his  wife  was 
bora  March  20*^  Bapt.  April  29*^  1735;  this  is  a  true  copy  from  the 


Register  Book  of  Acle ;  . married  to  Kubt.  Clayton  of  Yarmouth, 

June  6"*  1759;  .  Died  at  South-town  near  Qt.  Yarmouth,  on 


Thursday  21**  Aug.  1800,  aged  65  years  &  5  months, .  &  was 

buried  on  Wednesday  following  in  Gorlestone  Churchyard  in  a  vault 
near  Lieut.  . . .  Bromedge.” 

”Mr.  Thomas  Leath  late  an  eminent  surgeon  &  accoucheur  at 
Qt.  Yarm*^  A  Father  of  the  above  Mary  Ann  Clayton,  Died  on 
Saturday  afternoon  about  2  o’clock,  being  16*^  of  March  1793  A  was 
buried  in  Acle  Church  the  Friday  following,  (by)  the  Rev^  Mr.  Pancher, 
Rector  of  Birlingham,  being  the  22*^  day  of  March,  in  the  88*^  year 
of  his  age — he  practised  his  profession  till  he  was  78  years  old.” 


HOTES  AND  QUEIIIS8,  KTC. 


207 


“Bobert  Clayton  began  business  at  Yarmouth  in  the  year  (1754?) 
being  27  years  of  age  in  the  house  &  shop  facing  the  old  Broad  Row — 
now  Mr.  TruUer’s,  the  Grocer ;  after  living  there  better  than  1 8 
years,  removed  to  the  Market  Bow,  where  he  purchased  the  house — 
now  Mr.  Hunt’s,  Draper — at  which  house  he  followed  business,  as  a 
respectable  and  honest  man  for  23  years  as  woolen  A;  linen  draper,  in 
the  whole,  36  years;  afterwards  declined  business  and  bought  a 
House  upon  the  Wrestler’s  Plain,  now  Nelson’s  8q.)  where  he 
removed  with  his  mother  till  May,  1 792,  after  her  decease  removed  to 
Southtown.  In  the  year  1793  sometime  in  Sept'  he  rode  to  London  in 
a  Taxed  Cart  in  company  with  his  neighbour  Mr.  (S.  Sarke?)  in  the 
68*''  year  of  his  age.  In  the  79"*  year  of  his  age  he  died  gpreatly 

afflicted  for  a  year  or  two  previous .  and  was  buried  in  the 

vault  with  my  dear  &  much  revered  mother  in  Gorlestone  Church¬ 
yard.  He  died  Sept'  23"*  &  was  buried  Oct.  1“  1806.” 

Of  the  two  eldest  sons  of  this  Bo.bert  Clayton  I  know  nothing 
further ;  the  youngest  son 

7.  Benjamin  Lane  Clayton  was  a  medical  man  at  Norton,  near 
Bury  St.  Edmund’s.  He  married  Ann  Maria,  daughter  of  Peter 
Chambers. 

“Tuesday  last  («.«.,  Sept.  15'*')  died  suddenly  at  Norton,  near 
Woolpit,  in  the  81**  year  of  his  age,  Peter  Chambers  esq'  one  of  the 
Capital  Burgesses  of  the  Corporation  of  Bury,  which  office  he  filled 
many  years  with  the  strictest  fidelity,  &c.,  &c. — Iptwieh  Journal, 
Sept.  19th,  1888. 

“  Ob.  May  28th  1819.  At  Norton,  co.  Suffolk,  B.  L.  Clayton,  Esq., 
an  eminent  surgeon  &  apothecary.” — Gentleman' e  Magaaine. 

8.  Ann  Maria  Clayton,  only  child  of  the  above,  was  bom  in  1797  ; 

she  was  married  to  Plowman  Young,  M.D.  (baptized  Awil  26th,  1796, 
at  Mildenhall,  son  of  William  and  Sophia  Young).  He  practised  at 
Norton,  and  afterwards  at  Bury.  He  died  15th  July,  1840,  at  the 
Baths  of  Lucca.  Italy,  whither  he  had  gone  for  his  health ;  buried  at 
Leghorn;  and  left  a  large  family.  H^is  widow  died  5th  May,  1862, 
at  Gk>dmanchester,  and  was  buried  there.  Evelyn  Youno 

Fen  Dreyton  Pereonofe, 

Cmwtirulfe. 


GLEANINGS  FROM  ESSEX  AND  SUFFOLK  PARISH 
REGISTERS. 


Little  Clacton,  Essex. 

1592.  Nicholas  Lambert  of  Clacton  Lodge  was  buried  the  xxijth 
of  June. 

1592.  Clement  Fenn,  singleman,  and  Prudence  the  late  wyfe  of 
Nycholas  Lambert,  w'ch  dwelt  in  little  Clacton  Lodge,  were  maryed 
uppon  Tewsdaye  the  xvth  day  of  Aug^ust ;  but  she  (most  accursed 
creature)  did  the  verye  next  morning  deeperatelie  hang  her  selfe,  to 


208 


THK  BAST  ABOUAN  ;  OK, 


the  intolerable  g^effe  of  her  new  maryed  husband,  &  the  dreadful! 
horror  and  astonishment  of  all  the  Countrye. 

1592.  Prudence  Fenn,  now  the  wife  of  Clement  £fen,  &  late  the 
wyfe  of  the  above-named  Nicholas  Lambert,  was  buried  out  of  the 
compas  of  Christian  Buriall,  in  ye  furthest  side  of  the  Churchyard 
nortnward ;  uppon  the  xvijth  daye  of  August ;  for  that  shee  most 
accursedlie  hanged  her  selfe. 

WiCKHAMBBOOK,  8x77FOI.K. 

1628.  Marye  ye  daughter  of  Thomas  Claye  and  Marye  Partridge 
was  baptized  ye  5  of  March. 

Mbhoranduh. — yt  ye  above-named  Marye,  the  daughter  of 
Thomas  Claye  and  Marye  Partridge,  which  was  baptized  ye  5  of 
March,  Anno  Domini  1628,  is  since  yt  time  confessed  to  bee  the  base 
cbilde  of  Margaret  Simons,  one  of  ye  daughters  of  John  Simons  of 
Cavenham  in  ye  Countie  of  Suffolk,  and  to  be  borne  in  ye  sayd  towne 
of  Cavenham. 

Clarb,  Sutfolk. 

1689  (margin).  Memo. — Mr.  Phillip  Havers  who  kept  a  bam 
conventicle  in  this  towne  did  baptise  very  many  in  private  houses ; 
&  therefore  their  names  are  not  here  registered. 

Groton,  Suffolk. 

1563.  Willm.  Mildmaye,  Esqr.,  &  Annis  Winthropp,  widowe, 
was  Maried  the  7th  day  of  June.  Thomas  his  son  A  Alice  her 
daughter  the  xijth  of  the  same  monethe. 

Tuhstall,  Suffolk. 

1717.  The  limbs  of  Eliz.  Fryer  and  Sarah  Hillen  who  were 
Burnt  att  Dunningworth  Hall  wer  Buryed  July  ye  24th. 

Blythburoh,  Suffolk. 

1720.  Tho.  Meadows  of  Mills  Hamlett  in  the  parish  of  venhaston 
in  this  County  Buried  in  a  wait  9  foot  deep  Aprill  23. 

“Bills  indented”  for  the  Parish  of  Stutton,  Suffolk. 

1718.  Christenings.  Thomas  Anise’s  child  baptized  by  I  know 
not  whom,  nor  when ;  I  fear  not  at  all. 

“  Bills  indented  ”  for  the  Parish  of  Elvbdon,  Suffolk. 

In  the  Towne  of  Ellden  1639  : — 

Buryed,  none :  That’s  God’s  goodness. 

Baptiz’d,  none :  That’s  not  my  fault, 

Maryed,  none :  That  your  charge. 

(Signed)  Daniel  Colby,  min’r. 

37,  Low*r  Brook  Strut,  M.  B.  HuTCHINSON. 

Ipneiek. 


JI0TE8  AWP  QUIRIKS,  ETC. 


209 


CALENDAE  OF  FEE-FARM  RENTS.  No.  I.  NORFOLK 

(^continued  from  p.  183). 


PImm. 

Fiemiaea  charged. 

Orantees. 

BoUa  No, 

Stanford 

See  Tottington 

Various  Grantees  . 

34,  96 

Southrey 

The  Manor 

Jacob  Hawe  . 

34,  98 

Sutton  . 

See  Hicklinge 

Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse 

53,  122, 
123 

63,  122, 
59,  123, 

Staleham 

See  Hicklinge 

f»  »f  M  •' 

60,  142, 
65.  152, 

.  181 

Sawton  . 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Snareshill 

•  • 

»>  »»  »>  • 

55,  132 

Susted  . 

»>  »»  •  • 

»»  »♦  •>  • 

55,  132 

Saham  . 

»•  >»  •  • 

>1  >>  >•  • 

55,  132 

Sturaton . 

•  • 

>>  »»  >>  • 

55,  132 

^uthfield 

>>  **  •  • 

*9  »>  • 

55,  132 

Shefanger 

•  • 

Edwd.  Ditchfield  & 
als. 

55,  132 

Swaffham 

The  Manor  &  Hon¬ 
ours  of  Richmond 

57,  137 

*Tidd  St.  Giles 

The  new  Rents 

a  a  •  a 

25 

Thorpe,  near  Nor¬ 
wich 

The  Manor 

Sir  ilios.  Paston 

8,  10, 
60,  150 

Thomeham 

The  Manor 

Wm.  Bustle  &  Wife 

11,  15 

Toftres  . 

See  Castleacre 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

15,  20 

Thetford  Monke 

Seits  of  the  late 
Priory 

Richd.  Fulmerstou  . 

27.  45, 
34.  95 

Taverham 

A  Pension  issuing 
out  of  the  Rectory 

. 

27,  47 

Thorpe  Market 

See  Rudham,  East  . 

Edwd.,  E.  of  Oxford 
James  Hussey  &  als. 

28,  56 

Tuddeuham,  North, 
als.  St.  Clearee  . 

The  Manor  &  Sun- . 
dries 

29,  64 

Titteshall 

The  Manor,  part  of 
St.£dmuud’sBury 
Monastery 

Sir  John  Cornwallis 

34,  88 

Thurston 

See  Barney 

Sir  Thos.  Paston 

34,  94 

Tottington 

The  M.anor,  Rectory, 
&  Sundries 

Various  Grantees  . 

[  34,  96, 

[  65,  132 

Thorpe  Croft  . 

liands,  part  of  Flix- 
toii  late  Priory 

John  Lyme 

37,  104 

Thorneham,  Qt. 

Sundry  Lands 

Thos.  Wiseman 

41,  108 

Thetford . 

The  Site  of  the  Mon¬ 
astery  of  St.  Mary, 
&  Sundrys 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132, 
63,  176 

Tacoliieston  . 

See  Thetford  . 

,,  ,,  ,, 

55,  132 

Threkestoii 

»♦  *1  •  • 

»>  >1  •»  . 

55,  132 

Trostou  . 

M  •  • 

.>  >1  » 

55,  132 
i  56, 135, 
(  136 

Terrington 

Sundry  Premises  . 

. 

Thompson 

Site  of  the  College 
&  Manor 

Edmd.  Enivett 

6,  8 

Thornedge 

The  Manor 

Wm.  Butts 

228,  521 

Upwell  . 

See  Muston  .  .  .... 

*  In  CamhridgcshiTS. 

63,  267 

210 

THE  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OR, 

Plaoes. 

Premieee  charged. 

Granteaa. 

BoUaNo. 

Wigenhall  Si  Mary’s, 
als.  Wignall  St. 

Sundry  Premises  . 

Various  Grantees  .  ( 
Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk  ( 

2,  2,  16, 
20,  26,  29 

Mary’s 

Worsts  . 

The  Manor 

John  Spencer 

ThoB.  Woodhouse  • 

6,  6 

Witton  . 

See  Bromeholme 

8,  11 

Westwalton  . 

See  Castleacre 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

15,  20 

Walsoken 

l>  »  • 

M  M  ff  * 

16,  20 

Walpole  . 

if  • 

. 1 

16,  20, 
60,  169 

Wymondham  . 

Site  of  the  late  Mon¬ 
astery  &  Sundries 

Various  Grantees  .  j 

21,  29, 
24,  32 

Woolverstou  . 

The  Manor 

Geoflkey  Cobb 

26,  42 

Westcotts 

Sundry  Premises  . 

26,  44 

Wellingham  . 

A  portion  of  Tythes 
out  of  the  Bectory 

27,  53 

Woodnorton  . 

See  Budham,  East  . 

Edwd.,  £.  of  Oxford 

28,  66 

Waybome 

The  late  Priory 

Henry  Leydon 

34,  83 

Wo^hawe 

The  Manor,  part  of 
Bamsey  late  Mon¬ 
astery 

TheManorof  Boy  land 

Jacob  and  Henry 
Howe 

34,  93 

Waltham,  North 

Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse 

63,  118 

Wheatacre 

Sundry  Lauds 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

63,  121 

Wotton,  als.  Muuk- 

See  Thetford  . 

65,  132 

wike  in  Watton 

Waketon. 

ff  if  *  • 

>>  »»  9t  • 

66,  132 

Welles  . 

if  ^  if  •  • 

tf  ft  • 

66,  132 

Wynfarthing  . 

if  If  •  • 

tt  ft  • 

65,  132 

Windham 

The  Manor 

JohnViscount  T dsley 

1  68,  138 
>  69,  143 

Wynbottesham 

The  Manor 

Bobt.  Miller  . 

1  60,  161 
66,  180 

Wooditton  .  .  See  Thetford  .  .  Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

[Page  181,  fur  Kinatend  in  Holm  read  Rineteed]. 

63,  176 

Calendar  to  the  Counterparts  of  the  Deeds  of 
Sale  of  Fee-farm  Bents  reserved  upon  Grants  from  the  Crown. 

Otantet*  of 

Place*.  Premiee*.  Grantee*  of  Premiee*.  the  Fee-farm 

Kent  A  No. 

£.  *.  d. 

Ashwood  in  The  Lordship  Tho.Mildmay  2  9  6^  Cobbott,  18 
Petney 

Alston  .  .  The  Manor  .  .  SirJohnButler  3  17  11  „  „ 

Ailswithorpe.  „  .  .  Tho.Mildmay  6  0  0  Juzon  1 

Beeston  .  .  Wm.  Butts  .  SeeTboruey  Bacon  14 

Bagthorpe  .  ,,  .  .  Thos.,  D.  of  See  Castle-  Crossman  6 

Norfolk  acre 

Banner  .  ,,  .  .  »  » 

Barsham,  W.  The  Manor,  Bee-  ,,  ,,  .  .  ,,  „ 

tory,  &  advowson 
of  the  Vicarage 

Birlingham  The  advowson  of  „  „  .  .  „ 

Si  Peter’s  of  the  Church 


N0TB8  AMD  QUERIES,  BTC. 


211 


FUom.  Premins.  Ormnteea  of  PremiMO  th« 

Bont  k  No. 

Brandon  The  Toll  of  ye  TheMayor,&o.,  See  Thet-  Croseman  6 
Ferry  Bridge  of  Thetford  ford 

Braucaster  .  The  Manor  .  .  SirBch.South-  4  4  10^  Cobbott  18 

well 


Bilney,  West 

The  Manor  . 

Bich.Fulmer- 

ston 

2  10  0 

ft 

Boyland 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of  the 
Manor 

•  * 

1  3  5f  Juxon 

1 

Beeeton,  als. 

The  lAirdship  or 

Thos.  Herriot 

20  0  0  Marriott 

14 

BeestonKings 

Manor  with  the 

Juo.  Shelbury 

&  als. 

Bennett’s,  St. 

Appurts. 

A  ]Mnt 

2  0  0  Moyer 

11 

Bunwell  8c, 
Horn  Hale 

The  Manors 

SirAnty.Denny 

4  16  Webb 

3 

Cley 

Ijangwad  Manor 
8c  sundry  other 
Premises  there 

A  Bent 

SirThos.  Bed- 
ingfield 

1  13  4  Crossman 

16  8 

6 

Galcott . 

Lands,  &c.,  there 

Sir  Thos.  Bed- 
ingfield 

See  Cley  ,, 

99 

Castleacre  .  > 

The  Monastery  & 
Site  there  of  the 
Manor,  Bectory, 
&  advowsons  of 
the  Vicarage 
with  divers  other 
Manors,  &c. 

Thos.,  D.  of 
Norfolk 

44  19  OJ 

99 

Cesteme 

The  Manor  . 

Thos.,  D.  of 
Norfolk  • 

See  Castle-  „ 

acre 

99 

Creek  e,  South 

The  Bectory  & 
advowsonsof  the 
Vicarage 

»  W 

99  99  »» 

99 

Colneston 

The  Advowsons  of 
the  Church 

»9  99 

99  99  *» 

99 

Carrow . 

All  lands  belong¬ 
ing  to  the  Priory 

Sir  John  Shel¬ 
ton 

3  14  3  Cobbott 

18 

Catts  . 

The  Manor  &  also 
the  Manors  of 
Fennes,  Smithes, 
8c  Spencers 

Sir  Thos.Clere* 

2  7  5:1  Legate 

8 

{To  he  continued). 

The  Mistress  op  Queen  Charlotte’s  Dairy.— In  Acton  church¬ 
yard,  Suffolk,  stands  a  headstone,  inscribed : — 

Saered  to  the  Mimory  of 
M”  Mary  Sanderson, 

Late  of  the  Queen  House  London: 

And  Mistress  of  Her  Majesty’s  Dairy 
Who  departed  this  Life  8“*  Feb'^“1783 
Aged  38  Years. 

*  ElMWhore  called  “  Clerk.” 


212 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAK;  OB, 


This  Stone  was  erected  bj  her  disconsolate 
Friends,  as  a  small  token  of  the  respect  they 
owe  to  so  Aimiable  [<«'«]  a  Woman. 

In  Love  she  liv’d ;  in  Friendship  died : 

Her  Life  was  ask’d,  but  Ood  denied. 

We  boast  no  Virtues  nor  beg  we  any  Tears. 

Tet  Header,  if  thou  hast  but  Eyes  and  Ears. 

It  is  enough.  Oh !  tell  me  why 
Thou  com’st  to  gaze  ?  Is  it  to  pry 
Into  our  loss  ?  or  borrow, 

A  copy  of  our  sorrow  ? 

Or,  dost  thou  come 
To  learn  to  Die 
Knowing  not  whom 
To  practise  by  ? 

If  this  be  thy  desire. 

Then  draw  thee  one  step  nigher. 

Here  lies  a  Precedent,  a  fairer 
Earth  ne’er  shew’d  nor  Heav’n  a  rarer 
[bottom  of  stone  buried^. 

Near  by  stands  another  headstone  in  memory  of  Edward 
Sanderson,  who  died  10th  July,  1780,  aged  22. 

Can  any  reader  supply  any  further  information  relating  to  Queen 
Charlotte’s  Dairy  Mistress  ?  Pabtbidge,  ton. 

Stowmarktt,  Suffolk. 


REPLY. 

Meadow-book,  Pole-beaber,  etc.  (pp.  64,  127,  161,  180). — At 
Alwalton,  Hunts.,  there  is  an  ancient  Meadow-hook  which  contains  the 
different  marks  of  the  proprietors  measured  by  the  fourteen-foot  pole. 


QUERY. 

Grass  Widows. — In  the  Register  of  Stoke-Nayland  the  following 
entries  occur : — 

1579.  John  Clarke  &  Avis  Boone  gras  wedowe  maried  24  Sept. 

1622.  The  23rd  daie  (of  July)  was  mar?  Amye  Wright  grasse 
widowe  and  Nathaniell  Ratcatcher. 

1 638.  The  27th  (Oct.)  Anne  Tayler  Grasse  Widdow  (was  buried). 

What  wa.  a  graa.  widow  f  jj  j  Horotraaow. 

37,  Lower  Brook  Street,  Ipewieh. 

[The  term  “  Grass-widow  ”  was  probably  applied,  in  former  days, 
solely  to  one  who  was  a  widow  by  courtesy  only — it  was  an  act  of 
grace  (Italian,  grata),  so  to  style  her.  The  term  is  now  used  for  a  wife 
temporarily  parted  from  her  husband. — Ed.] 


In  rexpoDBe  to  Dr.  Jessopp's  appeal  we  have  to  acknowledge,  with  thanke,  a 
donation  of  £l  from  Mies  C.  B.  Parsons  of  Horseheath,  Camhe. 


r 


NOTES  AND  QUBBIBS,  BTC.  213 

WILLS  OF  THE  HUNDRED  OF  ARMINGFORD,  GAMES. 

{continued  from  p.  201). 

Bassinoboubn. 

m. — Proved  in  the  Coneietory  Court  of  Ely. 


(119)  Witham  John 

vii.  (1611-23)  286 

(120)  Bolnest  John  „  296 

(121)  Castle  Ann 

Tiii.  (1623-39)  8 

(122)  Simson  John 

(Knees  worth)  ,,  14 

( 1 23)  Meade  Thomas  ,,  15 

(124)  Waller  als.  Warren 

Agnes  ,,  35 

(125)  Brooke  John  „  73 

(126)  ...  .rade  Francis  ,,  101 

(127)  Brock  Anthony  ,,  105 

(128)  Norman  Jonas  „  158 

(129)  Warren  als.  Waller 

Richard  „  163 

(130)  Badcock  John  ,,  191 

( 1 3 1 )  Quilton  Giles  „  198 

(132)  Francis  John  ,,  200 

(133)  Snaples  Robert  206 

(134)  Wood  Samuel  ,,  221 

(135)  Harison  Robert  „  . . . 

(136)  Amy  Richard  „  305 

(137)  Big  Thomas  ,,  317 

(138)  Lucas  als.  Harrison 


(Eneesworth)  „  320 

(139)  Pearce  Clement  ,,  329 

(140)  Goodchild 

Alexander  ,,  357 

(141)  .  369 

(142)  Starr .  „  369 

(143)  Perrocke  Elizabeth ,,  379 

(144)  Carter  William  ,,  379 

(145)  Mead  Mary  ,,  381 

(146)  Gott  Robert  ,,  384 

(147)  Badcocke  Sarah  ,,  305 

(148)  Cropwell  Thomas  ,,  415 

(149)  Ayworth  Walter 


ix. (1639-61)  39 

The  earlier  volume  at  the 
has  Ashwell,  Layne. 


(150)  Amey Martha  (Enees¬ 

worth)  ix.  (1663-61)  76 

( 1 5 1 )  Abbey  Thomas  ,,  145 

(152)  Badcock  William  ,,  1 

(153)  Basse  Grace  ,,  10 

(154)  Carelesse  Robert  ,,  82 

(155)  Francis  Jane  ,,  99 

( 156)  Fasket  William  „  144 

(157)  Qreenell  Robert 

(Eneesworth)  ,,  78 

(158)  Go<^e  Giles  ,,  142 

(159)  Gray  Nicholas  ,,  163 

(160^  Hatton  Walter  „  9 

(161)  Hauxton  Laurence,,  153 

(162)  Moore  John  „  9 

(163)  Meade  John  „  41 

(164)  Reynolds  William  ,,  156 

(165)  Sherman  Thomas  ,,  26 

(166)  Stanford  Edward  ,,  160 

(167)  Waller  Magdalen  ,,  162 

(168)  Archer  Richard 

X.  (1661-94)  158 

(169)  Adams  George  ,,  307 

(170)  Ayworth  Francis  ,,  313 

( 1 7 1 )  Barnes  Nicholas  ,,  35 

(172)  Baker  Robert  ,,  175 

(173)  Bannister  William 

(Eneesworth)  ,,  274 

(174)  Cundall  Thomasine,,  37 

(175)  Coxall  William  „  222 

(176)  Dennis  Michael  „  218 

(177)  Dodkin  John  „  258 

(178)  Dodkin  Edward  „  326 

(179)  Dodkin  William  ,,  333 

(180)  French  William  ,,  91 

( 181)  Fairchild  Thomas  ,,  270 

(182)  Goode  Edward  ,,  11 

(183)  Goode  Sarah  ,,  33 


Archdeacon’s  Registry,  Cambridge, 


214  THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR.  ♦ 

(119)  John  Witham.  Yeoman.  1615.  To  be  buried  in  the 

church.  To  Mary  my  wife  all  my  moveable  goods,  and  one  lease 
called  Chamberlins,  which  house  of  Chamberlins  couteyneth  fower 
acres  of  arable  land,  and  a  half  two  acres  of  pasture,  for  life ;  then 
to  William  Witham  my  nephew,  son  of  Hernolde  Witham  of 
Kaysberry  in  Bucks.  To  Christopher  Hudson  of  Royston  my  dogges. 
Mentions  brother  Hercules  and  Agnes  and  Margery  Witham  his 
daughters,  Isbell  Story  of  Royston,  Edward  Croutch,  John  Mace, 
Mary  Lincey,  Thomas  Banister  nephew.  To  Walter  Pilgrime  the 
elder  one  holland  sheet.  To  poor  of  Bassingborne  ‘iO*.  “10*  unto 

Walter  Pilgrime  the  younger  for  to  make  a  sermon  at  my  fuuerall.” 
Wife  Mary  executor.  Witnesses: — Walter  Pilgrim,  minister,  John 
Campion.  Proved  16  June,  1621. 

(120)  John  Bolnest.  Nuncupative.  “  Being  dangerously  visited 
and  afflicted  with  the  small  pox,  so  that  few  or  none  durst  visitt  him 
in  his  sickness”;  “upon  the  Monday  before  St.  Thomas  his  day 
anno  dhi  1621.”  To  Elizabeth  his  only  child  £10.  Residue  to  wife 
Anne.  Witnesses : — Edward  Wray  of  Steeple  Morden,  and  Anne 
Bolnest  his  wife.  Proved  6  Feb.  1621. 

(122)  John  Symson  of  Eneesworth.  Victualer.  To  wife  this 
messuage  or  cottage  for  life;  then  to  John  Eeffer  and  his  heirs,  he 
paying  to  his  brother  Thomas  EeSer  of  Bassingborne  £5,  and  to 
Thomas  Eeffer  son  of  John  Eeffer  £3.  Robert  and  Henry  Simson  of 
Royston,  and  Arthur  Griffen.  Witnesses : — Francis  Halfhead, 
Pattricke  Trumble.  Proved  22  June  1624. 

(124)  Agnes  Warren  als.  Waller.  Widow.  3  Jan.  1624.  “My 
debts  are  more  than  my  estate.”  Mentions  daughter  Mary  Sell, 
grandchild  Mary  Sell,  eon  Henry  Waller,  brothers  Mr.  Edward 
Waller  and  William  Gray.  Witnesses Thomas  Bowneet,  Edward 
Waller,  William  Curtis,  Daniil  ETiug.  Proved  12  Feb.  1624. 

(129)  Richard  Waller  als.  Warren.  Yeoman.  7  April  1727. 
Mentions  wife  Anne;  sons  Richard  and  Francis;  daughter  Mary, 
wife  of  William  Eing  of  Barley.  To  my  wife  “the  close  or  pightle 
of  pasture  adjoining  unto  the  Feu.”  Witnesses : — John  Addams, 
John  Abby,  Richard  Waller.  Proved  1  March  1627. 

(132)  John  Francis.  Yeoman.  10  April  1630.  Mentions  wife 
Jane;  sons  Henry,  John,  Thomas;  daughter  Susan.  Witnesses: — 
Fra.  Lynne,  William  Stallibras,  William  Blowe,  John  Pearse. 
Proved  17  April  1630. 

(136)  Richard  Amy  of  Bassingbourue  vel  Eneesworth.  Yeoman. 
Dated  17  March  1633.  Mentions  wife  Martha;  eldest  son  William, 
second  John,  third  Richard,  youngest  Robert ;  eldest  daughter  Susan, 
second  Mary,  youngest  Anne.  Witnesses: — Fra.  Lynne,  William 
Hinton,  Edward  Ay  ton.  Proved  7  April  1634. 

( 1 50)  Martha  Amy  of  Eneesworth.  Widow.  Dated  20  Nov.  1 646. 
Mentions  eldest  son  William,  youngest  Robert ;  daughters  Mary,  wife 
of  William  Nightingall,  and  Anne  Amy ;  latter  to  have  “  half  the 
pullen  and  fowlen  in  the  yard,”  20*  every  year,  and  meat,  and  drink, 
and  apparell  in  such  decent  manner  as  her  sisters  and  herself  used  to 
have.  Sou  William’s  eldest  son,  my  godchild ;  cousin  Edward  Ayton’s 


yOTES  AND  QUEUIES,  ETC. 


215 


5  children ;  cousin  Thomas  Fairchild’s  eldest  son,  mj  grandchild ; 
brother  Alexander  Fairchild.  Witnesses : — Edward  Ayton,  William 
Aymy,  John  Ayton.  Proved  15  Dec.  1646. 

(155)  Jane  Francis,  widow.  Dated  23  March  1647.  Mentions 
sons  John  Wiggs  and  Edward  Wiggs ;  son  in  law  Henrie  Francis. 
Witnesses : — Thomasin  Cundell,  Elizabeth  Prane.  Proved  6  May  1 648. 

(158)  Giles  Goode.  Wheelwright.  20  May  1659.  -  To  be  buried 
in  church  or  churchyard.  To  wife  Dinah  the  house  and  grounds 
wherein  I  now  live.  Kesidue  to  son  John.  “  My  will  is  that  my 
sonne  shall  provide  a  sermon  and  a  coffine  for  my  body,  and  give  to 
ye  poore  20‘.”  Witness,  Thomas  Bayes.  Proved  27  Oct.  1 660. 

(159)  Nicholas  Gray,  yeoman.  Dated  21  Oct.  1655.  To  my 
wife  Margaret  the  lease  of  all  those  tenements  called  Brat’s  Corner. 
To  my  son  Nicholas  £5  and  all  the  20  acres  of  land  lately  bought  of 
Bichard  Goodridg.  To  my  son  Thomas  the  messuge  where  I  now 
live,  and  the  tenenment  next  adjoining  sometime  Eobert  Hornwell’s, 
and  the  tenement  with  all  the  free  land  that  I  bought  of  Henry  Lynn 
Esquier,  and  one-half  acre  of  customary  land  next  adjoining  to 
Henry  Sayyer,  and  the  parcel  of  ground  next  to  that  half  acre  holded 
of  the  rectory  of  Bassingborne,  and  all  my  lands  in  the  fields  of 
Bassingborne  both  customary  and  free.  Mentions  daughter  Mary 
Man,  her  sou  Nicholas  Man,  and  her  four  other  children;  grand¬ 
children  Francis  and  Henry  Gray,  sons  of  John  Gray  deceased. 
Witnesses: — Eichard  Heron,  Edward  Goode.  Proved  11  May  1661. 

(165)  Thomas  Hherman  of  Kneesworth.  Yeoman.  Dated 
2  Feb.  1641.  To  be  buried  in  church  or  churchyard.  Mentions 
sons  Leonard  eldest,  and  Henry  ;  daughter  Dorothy  ;  maid  Katherine 
Steeds ;  brother  Edward  Sherman ;  brother  in  law  George  Cole. 
Witnesses: — John  Nightingiell,  his  mark,  Thomas  Hocssllie.  Proved 
27  April  1642. 

(168)  Eichard  Archer.  Gent.  Dated  23  May,  1673.  To  son 
Thomas  and  his  heirs  the  estate  of  lands  called  Berrylands  with  the 
lease  of  them  given  me  by  my  late  father  Thomas  Archer.  Mentions 
wife  Elizabeth ;  eons  Eichard  and  John  ;  daughter  Mary  Jennings. 
Witnesses: — Thomas  Brown,  Mary  Quilton.  Proved  23  May  1674. 

(175)  William  Coxall.  Labourer.  Dated  19  Jan.  1678.  To  my 
wife  Susan  the  house  I  dwell  in  and  the  ground  belonging  to  it, 
for  life ;  then  to  my  eldest  sou  Thomas  on  condition  that  he  pay  my 
sou  Eichard  £12  when  of  age.  Witnesses: — Francis  Dockwray, 
Henry  Abbey,  Eichard  Archer.  Proved  1  March  1678. 

(177)  John  Dodkin.  Dated  4  Nov.  1680.  Mentions  wife  Joan  ; 
sons  William,  Nicholas,  Edward ;  daughter  Joan  Campion ;  grand¬ 
children  Joan  Palmer  and  John  Palmer;  William  Campion,  Samuel 
Campion.  Witnesses : — Francis  Docwra,  Eichard  Archer,  Oliver 
Pangbourne.  Proved  28  Dec.  1680. 

(178)  Edward  Dodkin.  Husbandman.  Dated  28  April  1684. 
Mentions  brothers  Nicholas  and  William ;  brother  in  law  Samuel 
Kampkin;  Kinsman  John  Palmer;  Joan  Palmer.  Witnesses: — 
Francis  Dockwra,  Eichard  Archer,  Timothy  Atkinson.  My  mother 
to  have  35*  a  year  for  life.  Proved  22  May  1684. 

P  2 


216 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


(179)  William  Dodkin.  Husbandman.  Dated  20  Oct.  1684.  ■ 

Mentions  wife  Mary;  mother  Joanna  Dodkin;  sons  William  and 
Edward;  daughters  Mary,  Elizabeth,  Joanna,  Anne.  Witnesses: —  ■ 

Thomas  Tingge,  Philippus  Sutton  de  Bassiugborue.  Proved 
80  Jan.  1684. 

(181)  Thomas  Fairechilde.  Yeoman.  Dated  10  July  1681.  My 

copyhold  lauds  holden  of  the  manor  of  Bassingborn  Bichmond  to 
my  sister  Alice  Fairchild  and  her  heirs;  remainder  to  William 
Fairchild  of  Shepreth,  and  William  Fairchild  of  Orwell.  Mentions 
brother  in  law  George  Wilkinson  of  Hitchin  ;  Francis  Docwra  of  i 
Bassiugborne ;  Alice  Howard,  Jane  Cooper  widow,  William  Griggs  { 
and  William  Swann,  all  of  Orwell;  Robert  Smith  of  Shiugay. 
Witnesses  : — William  Good,  Robert  Stock,  Thomas  Browne.  Proved 
20  Jy.  1681.  i 

(182)  Edward  Good,  yeoman.  Dated  17  March  1661.  Mentions  j 

wife  Sarah;  daughters  Mary  Walls  of . in  the  county  of  Kent  ! 

w’idow  (husband’s  name  Richard),  Joane  Goode  spinster ;  grand-  ' 
children,  Sarah  Walls  spinster,  Margaret  Sarah  and  Anne  Gray;  | 
Cousin  Thomas  Goode  of  Bassingbourn,  singleman ;  son  in  law 
Nicholas  Gray  of  Bassingbourne,  yeoman ;  Henry  and  Francis 
Netcham.  Witnesses: — John  Pedley,  John  East  sen',  William 

Fench.  Proved  26  March  1661. 

(183)  Sarah  Good,  widow.  Dated  5  July  1663.  Mentions  son 
in  law  Nicholas  Gray  and  his  daughters  Margaret,  Sarah,  and  Ann ; 
sons  Henry  (eldest),  John  Netlun;  daughters  Mary  Walls  widow  ) 
and  her  daughter  Sarah  Walls,  Jane  wife  of  Thomas  Lawrauce  clerk  ; 
son  in  law  Prosper  Fenton  or  Felton  who  married  my  daughter 
Frances ;  nephew  Thomas  Good  son  of  brother  John ;  Luke  Mills  i 
son  of  Mary  Netlen.  Witnesses: — William  Scarlett,  Henry  Francis, 
John  Goode.  Proved  18  July  1663. 

Seagrave  Rectory,  Loughborough.  W^ALTER  JoNES. 

(7b  he  continued). 


A  KELSALE  DEED  OF  1549. 

I 

This  deed,  the  abbreviated  Latin  of  which  I  have  extended,*  is  ! 
now  in  my  possession,  having  been  given  to  me  by  the  late  well-known 
autograph  dealer,  Mr.  John  Waller  of  Westbourne  Grove,  W.,  who, 
according  to  No.  679  of  the  East  Anglian  Miscellany,  was  born 
1815-16,  and  came  of  a  Wickham  Market  family. 

William  Grey,  Loi-d  Grey  de  Wilton,  whose  signature  appears  on 
this  deed,  was  the  thirteenth  peer.  He  distinguished  himself  in  the 
war  against  France  under  Henry  VIII.  In  1549  (the  deed  bears 
date  28th  July,  1549)  he  assisted  in  quelling  the  disturbances  in 

*  Italics  represent  marks  of  abbreviation. 


k 


m 


N0TK8  AND  QtTERIBS,  ETC. 


217 


Oxfordshire,  Devonshire,  and  Cornwall.  He  was  one  of  those  who, 
in  1553,  attempted  to  place  Lady  Jane  Grey  on  the  throne,  but  was 
pardoned.  In  1558  he  was  made  a  Knight  of  the  Garter.  He 
married  Mary,  daughter  of  Charles  Somerset,  first  Earl  of  Worcester, 
died  in  1562,  was  buried  in  Cheshunt  Church,  Hertfordshire,  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  Arthur,  who  thus  became  fourteenth  peer.* 

The  lands  specified  in  the  deed  were  part  of  a  forfeited  property 
of  “  Thome  nup#r  Ducis  ^orSolciensi  de  alta  prodicjone  attinct*  et 
conuictt.”  Thomas  Howard,  third  Duke  of  Norfolk,  born  1473,  was 
found  guilty  of  high  treason  and  attainted  20th  Jan.,  154f.  whereby 
all  his  honours  became  forfeited,  and,  though  by  the  King’s  decease 
(28th  January)  sentence  of  death  was  not  carried  out,  he  continued  a 
prisoner  during  Edward  VI. ’s  reign,  not  being  released  till  Queen 
Mary  entered  London  on  3rd  August,  1553,  on  which  day  he  was 
fully  restored.!  He  died  at  Kenninghall  in  1554,  and  was  buried  at 
Framlingham. 

He  was  son  of  the  second  Duke  by  his  first  wife,  Elizabeth 
Tylney,  first  cousin  of  Sir  Philip  Tylney,  the  founder  of  the  family  of 
Tylney  of  Shelley  Hall,  Suffolk.  The  second  Duke’s  second  wife  was 
Sir  Philip’s  sister  Agnes,  whom  he  married  in  1497.  Apparently, 
Sir  Philip  lived  at  Kelsale  before  going  to  Shelley,  for  in  Kelsale 
Church  there  was  formerly  an  altar-tomb  for  “  Dame  Margaret 
Tilney  [first]  wife  of  Sir  Phil.  Tilnye,  Kn*,  da'  of  Sir  Tho.  Brewes, 
Kn*,  about  1 500.”  J  Their  grandson,  Frederick  Tylney  of  Kelsale, 
died  there,  26th  January,  154^,  §  and  his  son  Philip,  who  entertained 
his  kinswoman.  Queen  Elizabeth,  at  Shelley  Hall  in  1561,  was 
baptized  at  Kelsale.  The  Tylneys  lived  at  Kelsale  probably  as 
tenants  of  their  relations  the  Howards. 

The  list  of  witnesses  endorsed  on  the  parchment  is  of  especial 
interest. 

(Bmntbus  ipi’  [Christi]  fidelibus  ad  quos  presens  Carta  Inden- 
tata  p«ruen«rit  Wills/mus  Grey  Miles  DomtnMS  Grey  de  Wiltonw  et 
Johanaes  Bannaster  armiger  Salutem  in  Dommo  Sempiternam. 

quod  Nos  prefati  Domfnus  Grey  et  Johannes  Bannaster  virtute 
vigors  et  auctoritate  licencie  Regie  ad  infrascription  fiendum  prius 
habit«  et  obtents  ac  pro  quadam  pecunie  sum^na  nobis  p«r  Wili«fmu;n 
Honnyng  armigeruw  vnu»»  Olmcorwm  priuati  Consilij  Do»nini  Regis 
premanibuf  p^rsoluta.  De  qua  quidem  Summa  fatemur  nos  pleuarts 
esse  satisfacto*  et  p«r8oluto«  eundemqwtf  WilD/mum  heredes  executors 
et  administrators  suos  inde  acquietatoo  et  exonerates  esse  por  prsontes, 
vendidimus  bargainsauimus  tradidimuo  feoffauimus  deliberauimus 
et  hac  presenti  Carta  noo^a  indentata  confirmauimus  profato  WilL/mo 
Honnyng  totum  illud  Dominium  et  Manerium  nostrum  de  Kelsall  alias 
dictum  Kelshall  cum  suis  iuribui  membrio  et  psrtinsntiius  vniuorsis  in 
Oomt^a^u  SuSoleiensi  nupor  parcellam  terrarum  possessionum  et  heredi* 

•  CompUt*  Peeragt  by  O.  E.  C.,  vol.  iv.,  p.  113. 

t  Complett  Pttrage  by  Q.  E.  (J.,  vol.  vi.,  p.  49,  60. 

t  M8.  Church  Notes  penes  Sir  J.  Blois,  p.  76,  quoted  in  Add.  MS.  19,092, 
fol.  64b. 

\  Pstsr  Ltmgtoft’s  Chronielt,  edited  by  Tho.  Heame,  1726,  vol.  ii.,  p.  671. 


218 


THE  EAST  AiratlAN  ;  OR. 


tameutorum  Tliome  nup«r  Ducis  Norfio/c/en<(  de  alta  prodiciune  attincti 
et  conuicti.  Ac  aduocaciunem  donactonem  liberam  disposicut/t  et  Jus 
pa^ronattM  Rtfc^orie  et  ecclf<ie  parocbialis  de  Kelsall  alias  dictum 
Kelshall  in  dtc<o  ComtYa^u  SuffofciVn«i.  Ac  totuni  ilium  parcum 
no«^rum  de  Kelshall*  alias  Kelshall  in  Kelshall f  in  dtc^o  ComiVahi 
Suffo/ciVnst.  Ac  totam  logea»i  neti^ram  et  Stagnum  ihtd«m  et  totam 
illam  parcella/H  siue  peciam  terre  no«^ani  infra  eundsm  parcum  impar- 
catam  siue  inclusam  vocatam  Tuxford  ende  et  totam  illam  parcellam 
siue  peciam  terre  et  hosci  not^ram  in  eod«m  parco  similiter  imparcatam 
de  nuprro  priore  et  conuentu  nup«rt  Monasterij  de  SibtoniV  alias 
Siptonir  in  dtc^o  ComtVa^u  SnSolciensi  prrquisita  et  obtenta  ac  nupm* 
parcellam  pussessionum  et  herediamentorum  dicti  nuprr  Thome  Ducis 
Norffolciemi.  Ac  eciam  omnes  illos  hoscos  no</ros  et  arhores  no«<ras  ac 
hereditamenta  no«/ra  vocata  Hallowe  felde  woode,  Shepcute  woode 
Martle  croft  woode  Nether  croft  woode  et  Cowe  woode  continen^ta  inter 
se  p«r  estimacioitem  nonaginta  et  octo  acras  cum  eorum  ps/  tinsn/iiiM 
iacen^ta  et  existen^ia  in  Sibtouia  seu  alibi  in  dtcto  Comi^a^u  SuQolciettti 
nup«r  Mouasterio  de  SibtoniV  in  eod«m  Comitatu  modo  dissoluto  dudum 
spectan/ia  et  prr  tineu^ia  ac  postea  parcellam  possessionum  et  heredita- 
men torum  dicti  Thome  nup«-  Ducis  Nor£fo/ci>n«i  existeniia.  Ac  eciam 
omnia  et  singula  messuagia  domos  edificia  horrea  stabula  Columbaria 
stagna  Vivaria  ortos  pomaria  gardina  terra*  ten*m«nta  Molendina 
Tofta  cotagia  prata  pascua  pastura*  Communias  vasta  Jampua  bruera 
M  ariscos  aquas  piscina*  |  piscacores  boscos  subbosco*  reddiius 
reuocaiiones  seruicia  decimas  oblacions*  Curiam  letum  visum  franci 
plegy  catalla  waiuata  extrahura  Catalla  felonum  et  fugitiuorum  liberas 
warrenna*  Ac  omnia  alia  iura  iurisdicciones  franchesias  libertat** 
priuilegia  proficua  commoditat**  emolumenta  et  hereditamenta  nottra 
quecumqu*  cum  eorum  \\erimentibu»  vniurrsii  situata  iacen^ia  et 
existeniia  in  Kellsall  et  Sibtonia  in  dicio  Comiia/u  Su£Poici#n«i  ac  alibi 
vbicumqus  in  eod*m  Comiiaiu  dicio  Dominio  et  Manerio  de  Kellsall 
quoque  modo  spectaniia  siue  prrtinen/ia  aut  membra  partes  vel 
parcella*  eiusd«m  Dominij  et  Manerij  antehac  liabita  cognita  accepta 
vsitata  seu  reputata  existendi  ac  nobis  pr«fati«  Domino  Qrey  et  Johanni 
Banaster  ac  heredibu*  et  assignaii*  nosiris  imporpo^uum  p«r  liirras 
Patentes  excellentissimi  principis  Domini  no«^ri  Edwardi  Sexti  dei 
gratia  Anglie  ffrancie  et  Hibernie  Begis  fidei  Defensori*  ac  in  terra 
£ccl«*ie  Anglicane  et  hibernice  Supremi  Capitis  sub  magno  sigillo  suo 
Anglie  con fecta*  gerento*  Datum  apud  Westmonaaiorium  decimo  nono 
Die  Julij  Anno  Begni  sui  tertio  inter  aliaiam  dudiim  data  et  concessa. 
Ac  eciam  reuocaiionem  et  reuocationes  quascumqus  pr#dicii  Manerij 
ac  ceterorum  omnium  et  singulorum  prrmissorum  et  cuiusliirt  inde 
parcelle  Ac  reddiius  et  annualia  proficua  quecumquo  reseruata  sup«r 
quibuscumqu*  dimissionibu*  et  Conccssionibus  de  promissis  seu  de 
aliqua  inde  parcella  quoquo  modo  facti*.  Adeo  plene  libere  et  integre 
ac  in  tarn  amplis  modo  et  forma  de  cum  omnibu*  htp'iumodi  et  consilibu* 

•  Sie.  t  The  words  “in  Kelshall”  are  interlineated  in  the  original. 

{  Only  the  letters  “  pisca  ’’  remain,  it  being  the  last  word  in  the  line,  and  the 
edge  of  the  parchment  being  decayed. 


NOTES  ANT>  QtTEHrES,  ETC. 


219 


libertat/itM  franchesijs  priuilegijs  preeminencijs  et  commoditattiiM 

frovt  dicttM  Dominiw  Rex  Edwardus  sextus  p«r  predtc/as  li^#ra8  suas 
*ateii<^«  predictuz/t  Manerium  messuagta  terra*  tenementa  reddt^us 
revLocationea  s^ruicia  [?]  ao  cetera  omnia  et  singula  prmissa  aut 
aliquam  inde  parcellam  nobis  prefatM  Domino  Grey  et  Johanni 
Baunaster  ac  herediiu*  et  assigna^i*  not^ris  inter  alia  iam  dudum 
dederit  et  concesserit.  Et  adeo  plene  libere  et  integre  ac  in  tarn 
amplis  modo  et  forma  provt  ilia  modo  habemus  et  tenemus  nobis 
heredtiu*  et  assignati*  noifris  virtute  et  vigore  dtc^arum  liteT&rum 
Paten^ium  died  Domini  Regis  aut  aliter  quocumquo  modo.  '^abenb’ 
tenendum  et  gaudendum  predte^um  Manerium  purcum  M  essuagta  terra* 
tenomrnta  prata  pasca  pastura*  reddtfus  reuoca^'ones  s*ruicta  [?] 
Curiam  letum  visum  franc*  plegy  Aduocactonom  boscos  subbosco*  ac 
cetera  omnia  et  singula  pr«mis8a  cum  eorum  ^erimentihut  vuiuorst* 
pr«fato  Willo/mo  Honnyng  heredtiu*  et  assigna^i*  suis  imp*rp*<uum  ad 
prtiprium  opus  et  vsum  ip*ius  Willofmi  Honning  heredwm  et  assigna- 
torum  suorum  impfrp^^uum.  $eneu&’  de  dic^o  Domino  Rege 
herediiu*  et  successortiu*  suis  in  Capite  por  seruicium  quadragesime 
partis  vnius  feodi  Militis.  vetiflenb’  annuatim  eidem  Domino 

Regi  beredtiu*  et  successoriftu*  suis  durante  vita  dte^i  Thome  Ducis 
Norfio/o/on*t  de  et  pro  predte^o  Manerio  de  Kellsall  et  parco  de 
Kellsall  cum  portiiirn^iiu*  quinquagiuta  sex  libras  octodecem  denarios 
vnum  obulum  et  vnum  quadrantem  ad  Curiam  suam  Augmentacionum 
et  Reueucionum  Coroue  sue  ad  festum  sancii  MichaWis  Archanjr*fi 
singulis  annis  soluendum.  reilflenb’  annuatim  eidem  Domino 

Regi  herediiu*  et  successoriiu*  suis  de  et  pro  prrdicio  Manerio  de 
Kelsall  et  parco  de  Kelsall  cum  p*rtiu*n/iiu«  post  mortem  dicii  Thome 
uup*r  Ducis  Norffo/oi>n*i  et  Domiue  Elisabeth  vxoris  eius  octo  libras 
novem  denarios  vnum  quadrantem  et  dimidium  vnius  quadrantis  ad 
Curiam  prediciam  ad  dictum  festum  sancii  Micha*iis  Arcbany*ii  singulis 
annis  soluendum  pro  omnibu*  alijs  redditiiu*  soruieijs  [?]  et  demandi* 
quibuscumqu*.  (Et  n08  vero  prefati  Domiuu*  Grey  et  Johannes 
Bannaster  ac  heredes  no*iri  pro  nobis  heredibu*  et  executoriiu*  no*^ris 
conuenimus  et  concedimus  ad  et  cum  profato  Will*/mo  Ilonnyng 
herediiu*  et  assignaii*  suis  quod  nos  dicii  Domtuus  Grey  et  Johannes 
Bannaster  et  hered**  uo*tri  predictum  Manerium  parcum  Messuagia 
terra*  ten*m*nta  reddiius  reuocaiiones  soruicia  [?J  boscos  subbosco* 
aduocacion#m  ac  cetera  omnia  et  singula  premissa  cum  eorum 
p0rtin«niiiu*  vniu*rsis  pr*fato  Will*/mo  Honnyng  herediiu*  et 
assignaii*  suis  non  solum  contra  nos  et  hered**  notiros  Warrantizabimus 
ac  im  p*r  poiuum  defendemusp*rpr0**ntes  [Here  about  one  and  two- 
thirds  lines  of  writing  have  been  erased,  the  space  being  filled  with  a 
number  of  small  technical  marks.]  insup*r  nos  prefato* 

Dominum  Grey  et  Johonnem  Bannaster  ordinasse  constituisse  deputasse 
et  p*r  prtf**ntes  in  loco  nottio  posuisse  dilecto*  nobis  in  xpo  [Christo] 
Nicliolaum  Cutler  et  Robertum  Browne  generosos  notfros  veros  et 
l*yitimos  attornato*  coniunctim  et  diuisim  ad  intrandum  et  ingrediendum 
in  predictum  Manerium  par  [Here  there  is  a  hole  in  the  parchment, 
one-and-a-half  inches  in  length,  occasioned  by  folding.  The  last 
words  are  probably  “cum  Messuagia  terra*”  as  above]  ten*m*nta  ac 


220 


THK  EAST  AWOLTAIf  ;  OK, 


cetera  omnia  et  singula  prsmissa  et  in  quamltist  inde  parcellam  ac 
plenam  et  pacificam  possessionem  Statum  et  seisinam  inde  vice  et 
nomtnibtts  no«tris  capiendum.  (gt  post  hu/Wmodi  possessionem  statum 
et  seisinam  sic  inde  capita  et  babita.  Ad  dandum  et  deliberandum 
prefato  WilI«/mo  Honn3’ng  aut  suo  in  ea  parte  Attornato  plenam  et 
pacificam  possessionem  statum  et  seisinam  inde  srcundum  vim  formam 
et  effectum  huius  presentis  Carte  nottre.  Ratum  gratnm  ac  firmum 
p«rpetue  habentes  et  habituri  Totum  et  quicquid  diet*  Attornatt  no«tri 
fecerint  seu  eorum  alter  fecerit  in  deliberacione  statu  et  seisine  predietts. 
in  (Enras  rei  testimonium  Nos  prefatt  Dominus  Grey  et  Johannes 
Bannaster  huic  present!  Carte  nottre  Indentate  sigilla  no<tra 
apposuimus.  ^at’  [After  this  word  the  ink  is  of  a  fainter  shade.] 
yicesimo  octauo  die  Julij,  Anno  Regni  Domini  Edward!  Dei  gratia 
Anglie  firancie  et  Hibernie  Regis  fidei  Defensoris  et  in  terra  E^lotie 
anglicane  et  Hibemice  Supremi  Capitis  tertio. 

The  document  is  signed  by  Wyllyam  Grey  and  John  bannaster. 
Against  the  signature  of  the  former  the  following  words  are  written  : 
“  coram  [?]  me  Jo  olyver  captum  et  recognitum  xiiij®  die  Septembni 
Anno  prod/cto  ’’ ;  and  a  seal  of  red  wax  is  attached,  displaying: — On  a 
mound  (?),  from  which  issue  stalks  and  a  flower  (.^),  a  falcon  rising 
and  belled.  To  the  signature  of  the  latter  a  seal  of  red  wax  is 
attached,  on  which  is  impressed  merely  a  plain  circle.  Against  these 
signatures,  also,  are  written,  in  a  late  hand,  the  following  words : — 
“  William  Ghrey  Lord  Grey  of  Wilton  a  g^eat  Warrior,  he  died  in 
1663”;  and  “28  July  1549,  3  E.  6.” 

The  parchment  bears  the  following  indorsement : — 

Status  possessio  et  seisina  huius  preaenttt  Carts  Delibsrata  fusrint 
psr  infranodatum  Nicho/aum  Cutler  infranodato  Wills/mo  hunnynge 
Armigsro  psr  Johannem  Gebon  Attornatum  suum  in  hac  parte  quarto 
Die  Mensis  Decembris  Anno  Tercio  Domini  Regis  nosfri  "Eidtcardi  yj** 
In  prssencia  Robsrti  Glannyyld  gent/smani,  Robsrti  pratte,  Robsrti 
Lonff,  Georgiy  Gamon,  Johaniiis  Ryott  Alias  Dygge,  Thome  Goose, 
Wills/mi  Lynde,  Jacobi  Darneforde,  Robsrti  ffuller,  Reginald!  Duxe, 
Laursnoy'  Lyngxyoode,  Trynstrani  sereby,  Willsfmi  Reye,  Thome 
huntemay  et  Aliorum. 

On  the  back  also  are  written  in  different  places: — 

K.  Kelshall  Gonyng  (f) 

Suff  Eelsall 

On  a  small  strip  of  white  paper  gummed  on  to  the  back  of  the 
parchment  the  following  words  are  printed  : — 

“  198  Grey  of  Wilton  (William,  Lord)  Signature  to  a  Deed, 
signed  also  by  John  Bannaster,  July  28,  1549,  on  parchment. 

“  This  Lord  Grey  was  an  emminent  Commander.” 

Stowmarkit,  Suffolk.  CHARLES  ParTKIDOX,  JTHIOR. 


XOTF,8  ANP  QVKRIE8.  ETC. 


221 


DEED  OF  TRANSFER  TO  THE  BUNQAT 
NUNS  OF  A  MOTHER  AND  HER  SON,  WITH  THEIR 
DWELLING-HOUSE,  Ump.  EDW.  I. 

Omib’  xpi  fidelib5  ad  q®8  p’8enB  Bc^ptu  p’ven’it  Rog  de  hunting- 
feud*  Balute.  Nou’it  vniu’sitas  nfa  me  dediese  c’ce88i88e  *1  hac 
Carta  mea  p’senti  c’  firmaeBe  deo  ecclie  8ce  crucis  de  Bung 
ecimonialib}  ibidem  deo  8eruientib5  Alueua  vxore  Rogi  Bruiillan 
Thoma  filiu  ei’  p’mogenitu  cu  toto  tenemto  buo  q’  de  me  tenuerunt  1 
Tilla  de  Medefeud  ex  p’tinenciis  de  Mendham  1  libam  pura 
p’petua  Elemoaina  p’  aalute  aie  p'ia  mei  1  m’ria  mee  an’ceasor’  et 
Bucceesor’  meor’.  Salvo  servico  dni  Regis  S.  ad  Wardam  j  deh  p’ 
annu  Ad  x"  sol.  ad  Scutagiu  dni  Regis  Ad  xx  sol  ijd  ad  plus 
plus  ad  mih  mih.  Et  ut  dona^  ista  confirnia^  stabilis  ac  Rata 
p’  maneat  p’  me  hedib3  meis  sigilli  mei  munimine  corroboraui. 
HiiB  t’  Will  de  huntingfeud,  Walt’o  Malet,  petro  Walt  Rob  de 
huntingfeud,  Will’o  de  Curtun,  Hub  Walt  Alano  de  wjresdale,  Will’o 
Cantelu,  O.  d.  Drokes,  Ada  fii  Gault,  Walt  rege,  Ada  sac,  Will’o  sac. 
Mart,  sao,  Godefrid  de  linburne. 


This  deed  was  sent  by  Mr.  W.  H.  Strickland  of  4,  Cromwell 
Place,  8.  Kensington,  4th  January,  1894,  to  Mr.  Rider  Haggard,  who 
sent  it  to  me  to  read. 

¥r$t»\nfjUld  Vieartf*,  HmrUtton.  J.  J.  Raven,  D.D. 

[The  whole  thing  may  be  a  legal  fiction,  but  Dr.  Raven  advances 
the  very  probable  theory  that  the  husband  used  to  beat  his  wife,  and 
the  transfer  was  the  most  feasible  way  of  insuring  her  well-being  and 
that  of  the  boy. — Ed.] 

CORNWALLIS  WILLS. 

The  Will  of  John  Cobnwallis,  1506. 

In  the  Name  of  God,  Amen.  I,  John  Comewaleyes  of  Brome 
in  the  Countie  of  Suffolke,  Esquyer,  being  First  I  bequeth  my  Soule 
to  Almightie  God,  our  Ladie  sent  Marie  and  to  all  the  holy  company 
of  hevyn,  my  bodie  to  be  buried  in  the  Chauncell  of  the  Church  of 

•  Roger  de  Huntingfleld  succeeded  his  father  in  1283,  oh.  1301.  William  de 
Huntingfleld  was  bom  1281.  The  document  is  probably  e.  1295.  Wyresdale  is  now 
called  Withersdale,  and  Linburne,  mentioned  in  Domeeday  Book,  is  “  Limber  ” 
Mill  in  Homersfield. 


222 


THE  EAST  AKOLIAM;  OE, 


our  Ijadie  of  Brome  next  by  in  the  said  countie  of  Su£Polke,  before 
our  Ladie  nygh  to  the  walle  of  my  Chapell  there  if  that  I  die  in  the 
said  parisshe  of  Brome  or  nygh  to  it.  And  if  I  die  ellis  where  as  it 
shall  please  Qod,  I  will  to  be  buried  where  myn  Executour  or  Assign 
shall  thinke  most  conuenient,  I  bequeth  to  the  parson  of  the  said 
Ohurche  6s.  8d.  for  my  tithes  forgotten  and  other  duties  negligentlye 
forgotten.  Item  I  bequeth  to  the  Belles  of  the  said  Churche  of 
Brome  20s.  I  bequeth  to  the  reparacions  of  the  churches  of  Okeley 
20s.,  to  the  Church  of  Scuston  20<.,  and  Thranston  20«.,  and  to  the 
Church  of  Lartyllesdon  20s.  in  Essex.  Item  I  bequeth  to  Elyn 
Barkar  my  serTaunte  6s.  8d.  Item  I  bequeth  to  my  niece  Elizabeth 
Froxmer  £10,  to  hyr  suster  Anne  £10.  6s.  8d.  and  to  my  niece 
Elizabeth  Comewaleys  £10.  6s.  8d.,  and  to  Agnes  Fastell  £10  to  hyr 
mariage.  Item  I  will  and  bequeth  that  myn  Executours  shall  leve  at 
Lyng  Hall  theire  as  now  I  dwell  to  him  that  shall  be  myn  heire  these 
parcelles  followiuge.  First  in  the  Chapell  my  greate  Masse  boke  and 
vestiraent  of  silke,  one  Chalice  and  Corporals  case  with  a  corps 
thereinne,  in  the  halle  the  table  foorings  and  all  the  brewing  vessels 
and  standnedes  in  the  brew  house  and  bake  house,  one  hole  plow  a 
cart  and  5  horse  to  go  withall,  a  gilt  goblet  with  a  cover  that  was  my 
faders  and  a  gilt  Cuppe  with  a  couer  standinge,  a  greate  potte  of 
brasse  and  a  seconde  pott  of  brasse,  ii  spittes  a  greate  and  a  lease, 
ii  coverdes  and  a  garnish  of  vesselles  in  the  chaunbyr  ovyr  the 
parlour,  the  bedde  bokkys.  teeter,  selar,  courteyings,  counterpeynt, 
fether  bedde,  bolstare,  and  ii  pelowes  and  one  layre  of  blankettes. 
Item  I  bequeth  to  the  priour  and  monkys  of  Ey  Abbey  20s.  Item  I 
bequeth  to  the  Churche  of  Ey  iiij  Combe  whete,  to  the  Churche  of 
Oxon  iiij  combe  of  whete,  to  the  Churche  of  Dysse  iiij  combe  of 
whete,  to  the  Churche  of  Palgrave  one  combe  whete,  to  the  Churche 
of  Skelle  one  combe  whete,  to  the  Church  of  Byllinkford  one  combe 
of  whete,  to  the  Church  of  Fapley  one  combe  of  whete.  The  residue 
of  my  goodea  and  come  at  Bartillisdou,  at  London  or  ellis  where  in 
the  Bealme  of  England  not  before  bequethed  my  detis  and  my 
bequests  payd  I  give  frely  vnto  Elizabeth  now  my  wif.  Item  I 
bequeth  to  a  prest  to  syng  and  pray  for  my  Soule,  my  faders  Soule, 
my  moders  soule  and  all  my  goode  frendes  soules  and  all 
Cristeyn  Soules  for  foure  yeres  twenty  foure  marcs  sterling.  Item 
I  ordeyn  and  make  to  thexecutour  of  my  testament  and  other  my  last 
wille  Elizabeth  now  my  wif  my  broder  William  Comewaleys  and 
Robert  Melton  to  whom  I  give  for  therr  labour  £9.  6s.  8d.  and  my 
broder  Robert  Comewaleys,  Theise  bering  witnesse  John  White 
Doctor  of  abyenete,  William  Singulton,  John  Constable,  Clerk,  parson 
of  Brome,  John  Clerk.  Also  I  bequeth  to  thabbote  of  Bury  myn 
ambulling  uagge  that  I  bought  of  John  Revet.  Alsi  I  bequeth  to 
John  Reve  iny  godson  20s. — Will  P.C.C.,  1 1  Pynnyng. 

The  Will  op  Sib  John  Cornwallis,  1544. 

In  the  Name  op  God,  Amen.  I,  Sir  John  Comewallys  of 
Brome  in  the  countie  of  Suffolke,  Knighte,  the  tenthe  daye  of  Aprill 


NOTKS  Ain>  Q0KRIB8,  BTC. 


223 


in  the  yere  of  our  Lorde  God  a  Thousaude  fyve  hundred  fourty  and 
foure,  and  in  the  thirty-fifth  yere  of  our  Souereigu  King  Henry  the 
aight  by  the  grace  of  God  of  England  .  .  France  .  .  and  Irelande, 
King,  defender  of  the  Fey  the  and  in  earthe  supreme  hedd  of  the 
Churche  of  England  and  Irelande,  beying  hole  of  myude  and  boddy, 
praysed  be  God,  make  ordeyn  and  dyspose  this  my  last  will  and 
testament  yn  manner  and  Foorme  folowing.  First  I  commend  my 
Soule  to  Almightie  God  and  to  the  hole  coompany  of  Heaven,  and  my 
boddy  to  be  buryed  with  Christian  burialles  where  it  shall  please  God 
to  suffer  me  to  departe  this  world.  Item  I  will  that  myu  Executuurs 
gyve  and  distribute  £5  sterling  amungstes  the  poore  people  being 
howsshoulders  within  the  parrysshes  of  Brom,  Oclej'e,  Stuston, 
Thrandeston,  Yaxley  and  ootner  townes  nyghe  thereaboutes  adioyuinge 
whereyn  anny  of  my  landes  doo  lye  equmly  to  be  dewyded  amonge 
uoomber  of  personnes  dwelling  within  any  such  poor  howssehoulde  as 
they  shall  thincke  beste  by  their  discretions  within  one  moonethe 
uexte  after  my  deceasse,  this  to  be  distributed  and  gyven  at  such 
times  within  the  said  moonethe  as  the  said  Executours  shall  thincke 
moste  meete  for  the  beste  relief  of  the  said  poore  people.  Item  I 
gyve  and  bequeth  unto  Thomas  my  sonne  all  the  stuff  and  utensilles 
of  househoulde  as  fetherbeddes,  boulsters,  sheetes,  coouerlettes, 
blankettes,  Teastours,  Seelers,  Hangings  Brasse  and  pewter  with  all 
and  other  my  stuffs  and  vtensilles  of  househoulde  both  lynnen  and 
woollen  and  oother  whatsoever  they  bee  that  is  hereafter  unbequethed 
lying  at  Brome  aforesaid  being  in  the  countie  of  Norfolke  or  elles 
where  within  the  Bealme  of  England.  Item  I  gyve  unto  the  said 
Thomas  my  sonne  all  my  cattail,  as  shepe.  Oxen,  Horses,  Callves  and 
oother  whatsoever  they  be  ...  .  hereafter  unbequethed  ....  with  all 
my  come  and  grayne  as  wheat,  rye,  messelyn,  barley  and  malte  beinge 
at  Brome  aforesaid  or  elleswhere  within  the  Bealme  of  Englande 
vppon  condition  that  he  shall  give  eyther  of  his  two  susters  Anne* 
and  Mary  f  their  duble  mariage  upparell  according  vnto  the  Degree  of 
euery  such  personiie  ....  which  either  of  them  happen  first  or  next 
to  mary  withall.  Item  I  gyve  to  the  said  Thomas  my  sonne  my  lease 
and  terms  of  the  parsonage  of  Ocley  in  Suffolk  e  with  the  lease  and 
tearme  of  the  manor  of  Brome  monachorn  in  Brome  aforesaid,  he 
levying  and  disposing  after  his  decease  if  he  dye  within  the  said 
terms  ....  of  the  Manner  of  Brome  Monachorn  or  so  muche  as  then 
shalbe  to  come  of  yt  vnto  the  next  heyre,  and  so  foorth  to  be  lefts 
and  dysposed  by  euerie  heyre  vnto  his  or  their  next  heyre  so  long  as 
the  lease  ....  continue,  vules  the  said  Thomas  or  any  oother  his 
heyre  to  whom  this  ....  come  by  this  last  will  and  testament  as  is 
aforesaid  ....  or  who  shall  purchase  the  mannor  ....  in  fee  simple 
or  fee  tails  by  exchange  for  the  mannor  of  Kilnstones  or  otherwise 
....  by  lawful  means.  Item  I  give  to  my  doughter^  his  wief  my 
wives  gowne  of  blacks  velvett.  Item  I  give  to  Henry  my  gowne  of 

*  Anne  married  Thomas  Kent  of  Suffolk. 

t  Mary  married  W.  Halse  of  Devonshire. 

X  Anne  Jemegan. 


224 


THK  F,A8T  ANOLTAJf  ;  OR. 


Tauuey  TafEata.  Item  I  bequeth  to  my  sonne  Bicliard  my  warde 
Margaret  Loathe,  which  I  bought  of  my  lorde  of  Norfolke  he  to  mary 
her  hymselfe,  yt  they  both  wilbe  so  contented,  yf  not  then  I  will  and 
give  vnto  my  said  sonne  Eichnrd  the  wardshipp  and  mariage  of  her 
with  all  thadvantage  and  profete  that  may  ....  ryse  and  growe 
by  reason  thereof  to  his  own  use  for  ever.  Item  where  Bichard 
Nix  late  Busshopp  of  Norwiche  hathe  graunted  vnto  me  and  my 
Cousyn  Edmunde  Whitt  of  Shottesham  countie  Norfolk  now  deceased 
to  thonely  use  of  me,  the  nexte  advowson  gyfte  and  presenta^n  of 
the  Archdeaconry  of  Norfolke,  I  will  myn  Executors  and  Overseers 
....  shall  have  the  said  next  advowson  to  their  use,  that  is  to  saye, 
yf  hit  happen  that  said  Archdeaconry  to  fall  voide  my  sonne  William 
then  being  a  preest  or  within  such  order  as  he  may  lawfully  by  them 
be  puted  unto  the  same,  or  elles  by  any  licence  or  dispensation  be 
obtained  before  falling  voide  of  hitt,  or  within  6  monthes  next 
following  ....  my  will  is  to  present  it  to  my  sonne  William  according 
....  law  and  yf  my  said  sonne  William  is  not  a  preest  nor  in  such 
orders  as  may  lawfully  take  yt  .  .  .  .  then  my  Executours  to  present 
the  same  to  the  person  whom  sonne  ....  William  shall  name,  which 
yf  they  refuse  to  doo  .  .  .  said  sonne  William  to  present  in  his  own 
name  ....  Give  my  daughter  Anne  my  Bynge  with  Becke  Buby  in 
yt  and  300  marcs  to  her  mariage  ....  Item  I  give  my  daughter  Mary 
300  marcs  to  her  mariage  ....  give  my  Lady  Hassett  my  guyllt  Cupp 
with  coover  that  hathe  two  eares  and  an  autyke  boye  with  childe  yn 
his  hande  vppon  the  coover.  Item  to  my  daughter  Hassett*  my 
wives  gowne  of  blacks  Batten.  Item  to  my  brother  Edward  my 
gowne  of  black  damask  wealted  withe  velvett  and  furred  with 
marterns.  Item  I  will  my  said  brother  shall  have  and  reteyne  in 
his  owne  handes  the  £30  he  oweth  me  upon  condition  he  deliver  to 
myn  Execute  ....  one  month  next  after  my  decease  ....  all  and 
singular  euch  peces  of  plate  which  I  have  before  this  lent  unto  hym 
and  his  wief,  and  yf  he  doo  not  deliver  the  said  plate  ....  to  pay 
£30  ....  Item  I  give  to  ray  brother  Francis  my  gowne  of  blacke 
satten  lyned  with  velvett.  Item  to  my  brother  William  such  of  myne 
apparell  as  myn  Execute,  thincke  most  fitte  for  hym.  Item  I  will 
Leonard  and  Thomas  Cooke  (servants)  have  eache  of  them  4  marcs 
and  their  lyveryes  besides  ....  wages  due  them  ....  time  of 
my  death,  other  servants  40«.  and  lyveries  ....  all  other  goodes,  &c., 
to  sonne  Thomas. 

This  is  the  last  Will  and  Testament  of  the  said  John 
Cornewalyes,  Ent.,  made  the  day  and  yere  first  above  written 
concerning  the  order  and  disposing  of  certain  of  my  mannors,  landes, 
&c.,  in  the  countie  of  Norff.,  Suffolke,  Middlesex  and  London  ....  in 
manner  ....  following.  First  I  will  my  Execut  ....  shall  have 
ymmediately  after  my  decease  the  reversion  of  my  mannors  of  Barnes 
in  the  Farishe  of  St.  Botolphe  nowe  Allgate  yn  London  with  the 
reversion  .  .  .  of  .  .  .  &c.  within  the  parisshe  aforesaid  or  within  the 
parishe  of  St.  Mary  Matseton,  other  Whyte  Chappell  parryshe 


*  Blennerhawett. 


>OTES  AND  QU£B1£8,  ETC. 


225 


Stebenbeeche  in  the  countie  of  Middlesex  or  elles  where  in  London 
aforesaid  ....  which  said  Manners  and  oother  the  premisses  one 
Bowland  Goodman  and  Anne  his  wief  now  have  ....  in  lease  for 
certain  number  of*yeres,  and  also  the  reversion  of  ...  .  capital 
messuage  called  the  Horssehedd  with  the  reversion  ....  of  8  other 
little  Messuages,  and  one  garden  called  the  oulde  yarde  in  the 
parisshe  of  St.  Mary  Mattselon  which  capital  Messuage  ....  Thomas 
Coplonde  and  Alice  his  wief  now  have  ....  in  lease  ....  First  I  will 
the  yearly  rents  ....  coming  of  the  Messuages  ....  be  given  to  my 
two  daughters  Anne  and  Mary  for  ....  manages  ....  300  marcs  on 
the  day  of  their  mariage  as  much  of  the  said  300  marcs  as  shall  be 
gathered  of  the  rents  ....  if  my  daughters  do  die  before  their 
mariage  the  sum  to  cease  and  be  voide  ....  sonne  Thomas  to  have 
it  or  elles  his  eldest  sonne  .  .  .  Item  I  give  to  eeche  of  .  .  .  daughters 
....  an  annuity  of  £5  out  of  my  mannor  of  Woodhaule  in 
Thrandeston  in  the  county  of  Suffolk  ....  Item  if  my  daughter  Anne 
be  not  maried  before  she  accomplish  the  age  of  40  yeres  and  at  that 
age  towardes  no  mariage  and  then  or  at  any  time  before  have 
determiped  with  herself  to  lyve  sole  and  to  refuse  the  300  marcs  then 
I  will ....  her  an  Annuity  of  £5  for  her  use.  And  that  she  shall 
then  have  the  annuity  of  20  marcs  out  of  the  landes  I  had  by 
exchange  with  Robert  Wigmore  of  Tetyshale  in  Norfolke  ....  so 
longe  as  she  shall  continue  to  live  sole  ....  I  give  my  sonne  Henry 
a  Rent  of  £10  by  yere  out  of  lands  late  of  Robert  Wigmore  of 
Tytishale  (and  Henry  to  give  the  same  to  his  wife  at  his  decease)  .  .  . 

I  give  ....  Richard  an  annuity  of  £I0  out  of  Tittishale,  Ockley, 

Borough  Shrimpling  and  Multon  ....  Norff . which  I  lately 

purchased  of  Roland  Goodman  and  Anne  his  wief,  Thomas  Reves  and 
Alice' Cobb  ....  the  remainder  of  Rent  to  Margaret  Lowthe  my 
Warde  ....  terme  of  her  life  ....  if  she  shall  marry  ....  Richard, 
or  ells  to  her  that  fhall  be  the  wife  of  Richard  at  the  time  of  his 
death  ....  Richar4>au  Annuity  of  £10  when  he  marries  ....  Item 
when  my  deed  of  fe6%neiit  be  granted  unto  Elizabeth  Lady  Clarke 
and  her  heirs  for  ever  ....  all  lands,  &c.  called  Smythes,  Thompsons, 
Thurbarnys,  Parkes  and  Goddardes  ....  within  the  parisshes  of 
Melles,  Burgate,  Ecshinghym,  Paxley,  Thorehym  magna,  Thornehym 

minor,  in  the  countie  of  8uffolke . I  purchased  of  Robert 

Whietingham  ....  all  my  other  landes  called  Clerkes,  Thompsons, 

in  Brome  and  Ocley  ....  Suffolke  ....  Fiens  and  Skole,  Norff . 

purchased  of  Alice  Thomas  Bekke,  Thomas  Sherman  ....  to  go  to  the 
wief  my  sonne  William  shall  marry  ....  after  William’s  decease  and 
his  wief  Elizabeth’s  decease  to  his  right  heirs. 

I  make  my  Ijady  Hassett  and  Thomas  my  sonne,  John  Blenner- 
hassett  my  sonne-in-law  executours  of  this  my  last  will  and  testament. 
In  witness  I  have  sett  my  Seale  ....  before  ....  'Thomas  Sidney, 
Thomas  Bill,  Edwarde  Cornewalis,  Francis  Cornewalis,  Anthony 
Otway  Preste. — See  Visitation  of  Suffolk,  1561.  Will  P.C.C. 

II  Pynnyng.  Dated  10th  April,  1544  (35  Henry  VIII.).  Proved 
9th  July,  1544,  by  the  executors  Dame  Margaret  Hassett,  John 
Blenerhassett  (his  son-in-law),  and  Thomas  Cornwallis  (his  son). 


226 


THE  EAST  AEOLIAN  ;  OB, 


CAI^NDAR  TO  THE  COUNTEEPARTS  OF  THE 
DEEDS  OF  SALE  OF  FEE-FARM  RENTS  RESERVED  UPON 
GRANTS  FROM  THE  CROWN.  NORFOLK. 


{Continued  from  p.  211).  * 


Places. 

Premises.  Grantees  of  Premises 

Pee-farm  Ren< 
Reserved. 

1  Grantees  of 
‘  the  Fee-farm 
Rent  a  No. 

Dikewood 

The  Manor  . 

Thos.,  D.  of 
Norfolk 

See  Castle-  Crossman  6 
acre 

Dunham,  Gt. 

The  adrowson  of 
the  Church 

>1  » 

»*  J> 

DownhamHall 

The  Manor,  two 
Woods,  a  Coney- 
warren,  Sheep- 
walk,  &c. 

GilbertPotter 

3  2  7 

Rushworth 
&  als.  4 

Earlham 

An  annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of 
the  Manor 

3  0  0 

” 

Fincham  St. 

The  adrowson  of 

Thos.,  D.  of 

See  Castle-  Crossman  6 

Michael, 
Foldmodes- 
tou,  &  Felt- 
well 

the  Church 

Norfolk 

acre 

Fennes . 

The  Manor  . 

SirTho.  Cleve 

See  Catts 

Legate  8 

Gjmiugham . 

The  Adrowson  of 
the  Church 

Thos.,  D.  of 
Norfolk 

See  Castle- 
acre 

Crossraan  6 

Gimmiugbam 

The  demesnes  of 

Edwd.  Ditch- 

132  5  4^ 

Fielder  /  11 

the  Manor,  also 
the  Manor  and 
sundry  other  Pre¬ 
mises  there  and 
in  Sistrond,  als. 
Sidistrond,  Trim- 
ingharo,  &  North 
Beppis 

field  &  als. 

13 
(  17 

Gaywood 

A  ^nt 

See  Lynn-Reg^ 

€>  ■ 

The  Mayor, 
&c.,of  Lyun- 
Regis  7 

Hecham 

The  Manor,  Rec¬ 
tory,  &  adrowson 
of  the  Vicarage 

Thos.,  D.  of 
Norfolk 

See  Castle- 
acre 

Crossman  6 

Heringshaw  . 

The  Manor  . 

”  . 

>♦  .  ” 

Cobbott  18 

Heighten 

The  Manor  . 

Sir  Richard 
Townsend 

See  Righ- 
borough 

Hempton 

The  Site  and  de¬ 
means  of  the  late 
Priory 

SirWm.Fermor 

2  0  8^ 

Hanworth 

An  annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of  the 
Bectory 

4  13  10^ 

JllXOU  1 

Horsey . 

Ditto  . 

. 

1  3 

$»  >> 

Hickling 

An  annual  Bent 
out  of  the  Manor 

. 

8  14  8* 

f  t  1) 

and  out  of  the 
Manor  of  Sutton 
&  Staleham 


XUM 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


227 


GniiteM  of  Premiae*. 


Bent  *  No. 


Hickling 

An  annual  Bent 

3 

0 

0 

Juzon  1 

Hardwicke  . 

out  of  part  of 
the  same  Manors 
A  Bent 

See  Lynn-Begis 

The  Mayor, 

Hockering  . 

An  annual  Bent 

6 

15 

0 

Ac.,of  Lynn- 
Begis  7 

Bush  worth 

Hallaughton . 

issuing  out  of 
the  Manor 

Ditto  . 

2 

0 

0 

A  als.  4 

Tibnam  A 

Haveringland 

An  annual  ^pt 
issuing  outViM 
the  Maanor 
Manor 

. 

1 

6 

8 

Howhall 

Sir  An  ty.  Denny 

See  Bun- 

als.  1 

Webb  3 

Inglesthorpe 

A  Bent 

SeeLynn-Begis 

well 

The  Manor, 

A  Jermans 
St. 

EempM^k  . 

The  Manor,  Bee- 

See  Castleacre 

Ac., of  Lynn 
Begis  7 

Crossman  6 

tory  and  advow* 
BODS  of  the  Vic- 


Eitteringham 

An  annual  Bent 

Bobt.Bambole 

0  10  0 

Heyening- 

issuing  out  of 
the  B^tory 

ham 

13 

Eirkelerode  * 

A  Bent 

The  Mayor, 

Toung 

4 

Aa,  of  Yar- 

Langwad 

The  Manor  . 

mouth  (v-V-) 

Sir  Thos.  Bea- 

See  Cley 

Crossman 

6 

ingfield 

Lexham.East 

. 

. 

• 

&  West 
LonneaU.  Lot- 
ton  St.  Peter's 
Lynn-Begis  . 


of 

nes 

issuing 


Thos.,  D. 
Norfolk 


of 


SeeCastle- 

acre 

13  6  S'! 


Lynn, South. 
Monkee  Man- 


out  of  the  pruBta 
of  the  ^ng’s 
Toll  booth&Court 
&  Bailiwick  of  the 
Water  holden 
within  ye  Boro’, 
&c. 

The  like  out  of  the 
Lordship,  Ac. 
Ditto  out  of  the 
lands  &  tene¬ 
ments  there  A 
divers  other  pre¬ 
mises 
A  Bent 
The  Manor  . 


The  Mayor, 
V  Ac., of  Lynn- 
Begis  7 


14  3  6 
13  16  0 


SeeLynn-Begis 

Thos.,  D.  of  See  Castle-  Grossman 
Norfolk  acre 


*  Th«  rosdaUsd  or  snebonss  off  KirUey  in  Suffolk,  Sooth  of  Lowtatoft, 


228 


THK  KA8T  ANOUAM  ;  OK. 


PlaoM. 

PremiMa.  Grantee*  of  Premiae*. 

Fee-Farm  Rent 
Reaerred. 

Grantee*  of 
the  Fea-Fann 
Rent  Sc  Mo. 

Massingham 

The  Manor  , 

Thos.,  D.  of 

t.  *.  d. 

See  Castle- 

Crossman  6 

Parva . 
Methwold 

The  Bectory  & 

Norfolk 

II  II 

acre 

» 

>9  >9 

Marton . 

Advowsou  of  ye 
Vicarage 

The  advowson  of 

»  99 

Middleton 

ye  Church 

A  Bent 

SeeLynn-Begis 

The  Mayor, 

Marsha  m 

The  Manor  . 

Jno.  Th^^er 
See  CasoKcre 

2  15  2 

&c.,ofLynn- 
Begis  7 

Pargiter  6 

Newton 

The  Bectory  & 

CrosSman  6 

Oxborowe 

Advowson  of  the 
Vicarage 

Lands  &  tene¬ 

Sir  Thos.  Bed- 

1  13  4 

Ormesby 

ments  there 

An  Annual  Bent 

ingfield 

11  16  11 

Legate  8 

issuing  out  of 
the  Lordship 

{To  be  continued).  L.  B. 


REPLIES. 

Dandy  or  Dadndy  Family  (pp.  143 — 144). — There  is  an  ex¬ 
cellent  pedigree  of  this  family  occupying  two  pages  of  Heraldic 
Insignia  of  Suffolk  Families  hy  Catherine  Jerrayn,  a  series  of  volumes 
in  the  lil)rary  of  the  Suffolk  Institute  of  Archseology,  at  Moyse’s  Hall 
Museum,  Bury  St.  Edmund’s  ;  see  also  Metcalfe’s  Visitations  of  Suffolk, 
pp.  29,  60,  95,  193;  Muskett’s  Suffolk  Manorial  Families,  vol.  i.,  pp. 
285,  370  ;  'The  East  Anglian,  new  ser  ,  vol.  i.,  pp.  8,  131,  253,  283,  346  ; 
vol.  ii.,  p.  67. 

In  7  Edw.  VI.  William  Daundye  of  Ipewieh  is  described  as 
yeoman  {The' East  Anglian,  new  ser.,  vol.  vi.,  p’.  839).  The  origin  of 
the  name  is  discussed  at  p.  328  of  vol.  i. 

William  Dawnedevyle  was  of  Mapilsted  Parva  in  24  Hen.  VI. 
{I'he  East  Anglian,  new  ser.,  vol.  v.,  p.  189). 

I  cannot  find  evidence  of  any  marriage  with  the  Carleton  or  the 
Foster  family. _ q  p 

The  Baptismal  Bason  (vol.  x.,  p.  79). — In  an  account  of  the 
recent  exhibition  of  pewter  at  Clifford’s  Inn  Hall,  it  was  remarked : — 
“It  is  surprising  what  a  large  amount  of  Church  plate  still  survives 
in  pewter,  and  there  are  in  the  exhibition  the  fonts  which  probably, 
at  one  time,  were  holy  water  bowls.  English  pewter  was  very  largely 
utilitarian,  and  was  not  especially  fine  in  form” — The  Outlook,  Feb., 
1904  (p.  115).  Charles  Partridge. 

[In  regard  to  the  pre- Reformation  baptismal  basons,  it  must  be 
borne  in  mind  that  such  examples,  used  to  receive  the  water  which  fell 
during  the  administration  of  the  rite,  are  quite  distinct  from  the 
basons  of  Puritan  days,  which  were  utilized  as  Fonts. — Ed.] 


NOTES  AND  QUEBIK8,  ETC. 


229 


WILLS  OF  THE  HUNDRED  OF  ARMINQFORD,  GAMES. 

{continued  from  p.  216). 

Bassinobourn. 

IV. — Proved  in  the  Contietory  Court  of  Ely. 


(184)  Goode  Mary  (1661-94)  258 

(185)  Mann  Henry  ,,  52 

(186)  Netlam  John  „  141 

(187)  Nickola  William 

(Kneesworth)  ,,  146 

(188)  Nicholson  John  ,,  267 

(189)  Nicholson  John  ,,  321 

(190)  Nicholson  Mary  ,,  330 

(191)  Nightingale  Gama¬ 

liel  (Kneesworth)  „  414 

1(192)  Palmer  John  ,,  30 

(193)  Smith  Robert  ,,  20 

(194)  Stanford  John  „  42 

(195)  Stamford  George  ,.  245 

(196)  Tristram  John  ,,  261 

(197)  Turpin  Edward  ,,  316 

(198)  Tristrom  Francis  ,,  350 

(199)  Tristram  John  ,,  435 

(200)  Archer  John 

xi.  (1694-1723)  422 

(201)  Amey  Robert  ,,  422 

(202)  Abbey  Henry  ,,  427 

(203)  Gibson  Thomas  (1704)  ... 

(204)  Hill  Natalis  ,,  411 

(205)  Jeeps  John  ,,  109 

(206)  Jellings  John  (1708)  ... 

(207)  Jeeps  James  ,,  372 

(208)  Law  Robert  ,,  401 

(209)  Pilkington 

Margaret  ,,  385 

(210)  Quilton  William  „  382 

(211)  Robinson  William  ,,  257 

(212)  Turpin  Eliza  „  208 

(213)  Wright  Edward  (1704)  . . . 

(214)  Wilson  Ralph 

(Kneesworth)  ,,  128 


(215)  Wenham  Thos.  (1704)  414 


(216)  Waller  Henry 

431 

(217)  Archer  Richard 

xii.  (1724-36)  304 

(218)  Archer  Thomas 

n 

450 

(219)  Brown  Elizabeth 

n 

285 

(220)  Blows  Thomas 

ij 

433 

(221)  Carter  William 

212 

(222)  Cox  Moses 

M 

403 

(223)  Docura  Abel 

M 

329 

(224)  Ellis  Alexander 

M 

84 

(225)  Hodge  Mary 

»» 

121 

(226)  Peck  John 

•  > 

245 

(227)  Shaw  William 

f  9 

45 

(228)  Sell  John 

77 

(229)  Stoaks  William 

255 

(230)  Samms  John 

363 

(23 1 )  Wilson  Mary 

(Kneesworth) 

99 

122 

(232)  Wackey  Richard 

99 

428 

(233)  Fletton  Samuel 

xiii.  (1736-66)  189 

(234)  Horseley  Thomas  „  121 

(235)  Hodge  Robert  ,,  213 

(236)  Lester  Ruth 

(Kneesworth)  ,,  157 

(237)  Pepper  Robert  ,,  56 

(238)  Russell  Richard  ,,  139 

(239)  Surplis  William  ,,  50 

(240)  Tristram  Edward  „  14 

(241)  Walker  Stephen  ,,  153 

(242)  Sell  Henry 

(xiv.  1756-68)  191 

(243)  Taylor  Susannah  ,,  14 

(244)  Waller  Elizabeth  ,,  136 

(245)  Waller  William  „  191 


»  (191)  Gamaliel  Nightingale  of  Kneesworth,  gentleman.  Dated 

16  April  1690.  To  my  brother,  Edward  Nightingale,  and  my  brother 
in  law,  Thomas  Hich,  the  £250  that  the  said  Thomas  Hitch  doth  now 
^  owe  me,  to  be  by  them  putt  forth,  and  from  time  to  time  to  be 
disposed  of  by  them,  as  they  in  their  discretion  shall  think  fitt,  to  & 
for  the  use  of  my  relations.  To  my  brother  in  law  Thomas  Hitch  £10. 

Q 


XUM 


230 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


The  aforesaid  Edward  Nightingale  residuary  legatee  and  executor.  ! 

Witnesses: — William  Gray,  Mary  Dodsworth,  Tho.  Browne.  Proved  I 

9  Nov.  1691.  [The  Nightingales  were  of  Kneesworth  Hall.  Cole,  in  , 

his  notes  on  Bassingbourn  Church,  has  .the  following: — “In  ye  j 

middle  Isle,  about  three  feet  from  y®  Threshold  of  y*  Nave  and  \ 

Chancel,  lies  a  black  marble  slab  with  these  arms  at  top — per  Pale  j 

ermine  &  gules  a  Rose  countercharged  [barbed  argent],  for  Nightin-  j 

gait,  and  under  them  is  the  inscription : — ‘  Here  lie  the  Bodies  of  | 

Geoffrey  Nightingsle  Esq.  &  Elizabeth  his  wife.  He  died  the  9'*'  of 
May  1681  in  the  64***  year  of  his  age,  she  the  24th  of  Novemb  1664.’ 
Opposite  this,  against  the  north  wall,  is  fixed  an  awkward  kind  of 
mural  monument  of  freestone  under  y*  small  window  &  near  y* 
screen,  with  the  arms  of  Nightingale  on  top  as  before ;  under  them  ' 
is  this  inscription  : — ‘  Huic  monumento  adjacet  Geffrejus  Nightingale 
de  Kneesworth,  armiger,  una  cum  Elizabetha  uxore.  Heec  23’’* 
Novembris  1664,  Hie  Maji  nono  1681"“  mortem  obiit.  Props  hoa 
dormit  Gamaliel,  Filius  suus  natu  minimus,  qui  26  Aprilis  1690  ex 
hoc  corpis  ergastulo  eiuigravit.’  In  the  south  chapel,  dedicated  to 
our  Lady  in  y*  middle,  lies  a  handsome  black  marble  slab,  with  the 
arms  of  Nightingale  as  before,  and  crest  an  unicorn  sejant;  by  the 
sides  of  it  lie  several  old  stones  w®**  Mr.  Nightingale  told  me  were 
removed  here,  when  his  father  paved  the  church,  from  various  parts 
of  it.  Under  the  aforesaid  arms  is  tiiis  inscription : — ‘  The  body  of 
Edward  Nightingale  of  Kneesworth  Esq.  is  here  committed  to  the 
g^round.  He  died  July  2:  1723.’  At  y*  bottom  of  y*  North  Isle  is  f 
fitted  up  very  handsomely  an  excellent  Library  for  the  use  of  the 
Parish ;  replenished  with  great  numbers  of  very  good  books ;  to 
which,  as  ^Ir.  Nightingale  told  me,  y®  late  Lord  Oxford  was  a 
benefactor.  But  the  Founder  of  it  was  Mr.  Nightingale’s  Father,  to 
whose  memory  was  lately  erected  a  small  monument  on  y*  Pillar  ' 
nearest  to  it,  with  his  arms  impaling  those  of  his  wife,  who  was  a  | 
81ingsby.  Under  them,  on  the  stones,  is  this  inscription : — ‘  This  i 
Library  was  founded  &  erected  by  Edward  Nightingale  of  Knees¬ 
worth  Esq.  an  Dom  1717.’  This  Church  was  entirely  paved  with 
Freestone  at  his  proper  cost  &  charge.  These,  together  with  the 
Clock  now  in  the  steeple,  and  many  other  Benefactions  to  this  Church 
and  Parish,  were  the  effects  of  his  liberality  to  them.  He  died  the  , 
second  day  of  July  1723  and  lies  interred  in  y®  east  end  of  y®  south  ; 
Isle  of  this  church,  in  that  apartment  antiently  known  by  y*  name  of  \ 
our  Lady’s  Chapel.  This  inscription  was  placed  here  to  his  memory  ' 
An  Doih  1729.”  The  Nightingales  of  Kneesworth  were  a  younger 
branch  of  the  Nightingales  of  Newport  Pond  in  Essex,  and  in  1797 
successfully  claimed  the  baronetcy,  which  in  1628  had  been  granted 
to  the  elder  line,  and  which  had  been  supposed  to  be  extinct  by  the 
death  of  Sir  Robert  Nightingale  in  1722.] 

(192)  John  Palmer,  husbandman.  Dated  14  July  1661. 
Mentions  mother,  and  brothers  Thomas,  William,  and  Robert,  and 
sister  Anne.  Proved  27  April  1663. 

(197)  Edward  Turpin,  gentleman.  Dated  6  Feb.  1682.  “In 
good  health.”  To  my  wife  Elizabeth  my  messuage  lands,  &c.,  for 


XUM 


!T0TE8  AND  QUERIES,  BTC. 


231 


life,  with  right  to  bequeath  them ;  but,  if  she  should  not  continue  a 
widow  or  should  die  intestate,  then,  I  bequeath  to  my  son  Thomas  & 
his  heirs  my  messuage  situate  in  Bassingbourn,  now  in  the  tenure  of 
Robert  Amey  and  John  Homing,  with  the  houses,  malthouses,  orchard, 
garden,  and  close  of  pasture  thereto  adjoining  and  belonging,  and  all 
that  my  close  of  pasture  and  grovage  called  Newlane  Grove,  and  a 
close  containing  two  and  a  half  acres,  and  also  my  close  called  Clark’s 
close,  containing  two  acres,  two  closes  of  pasture  and  grovage 
commonly  called  Qedges  containing  five  acres,  the  cottage  or  tenement 
with  the  close  of  pasture  thereto  belonging,  now  in  the  tenure  of 
Thomas  Gue,  and  one  other  cottage  or  tenenement  in  the  tenure  of 
John  Bates  and  Lydia  Simpson  widow,  and  85  acres  of  arable  land  to 
be  set  out  and  indifferently  appointed  by  my  good  neighbours  and 
friends  William  Amey  the  elder,  Robert  Amey,  Francis  Dockerey, 
Henry  Waller,  Thomas  Gray  and  John  Cozall  of  Bassingbourn,  out 
of  my  arable  lands.  If  my  son  John  Turpin  shall  hinder  this  setting 
out,  then  my  son  Thomas  to  choose  for  himself.  If  my  friends  shall 
not  set  out  a  portion  for  Thomas,  then  all  my  arable  lands  to  be 
equally  divided  between  Thomas  and  John.  To  my  daughter 
Elizabeth  £200.  To  my  daughter  Margaret  £100.  To  my  son 
Symon  Turpin  an  annuity  of  £6.  All  my  goods  and  chattels  to 
my  wife,  whom  I  appoint  executrix.  Witnesses: — John  Mason, 

John  Semes,  Thomas  Acars.  Whereas  the  executrix  of  my  brother 
Simon  is  indebted  to  me  in  £200,  which  said  £200  was  the  marriage 
portion  of  my  wife  Elizabeth  Turpin,  I  give  the  said  £200  to  my 
daughters  Elizabeth  and  Margaret  to  be  equally  divided.  12  May 
1683.  Witnesses: — Bridget  Tempest,  Alice  Single.  Thomas  Akers. 
Proved  19  June  1683. 

(198)  Francis  Tristrom.  Dated  8  Oct.  1682.  “The  leather  and 
all  the  other  things  belonging  to  the  trade.”  Mentions  sons  John, 
Thomas,  and  Edward ;  daughters  Elizabeth,  Anne,  and  Sarah ; 
ilary  Dates.  Witnesses: — Joshua  Peele,  John  Ostler,  John  Bates. 
Prove*!  27  Feb.  1685. 

(200)  John  Archer.  Yeoman.  Dated  22  May  1722.  All 
messuages,  lands,  &c.  (except  such  as  are  mortgaged  to  me)  to  son 
John  Archer  and  his  heirs.  To  my  daughters  Elizabeth  and  Mary 
Archer  £500  apiece  at  the  age  of  21,  the  interest  meanwhile  to  my 
wife  Elizabeth  for  their  support  and  education ;  also  the  rents  of 
lauds  bequeathed  to  son  John,  until  he  be  21.  To  my  wife  all 
mortgages,  securities,  goods,  and  personal  estate;  also  appointed 
executrix  and  guardjan  of  the  children.  Witnesses : — Thomas 
Hewardine,  John  Samms,  Tho.  Lewinton.  Proved  7  June  1722. 

(201)  Robert  Amey.  Yeoman.  Dated  14  Aug.  I7l8.  Mentions 
sons  Henry,  John,  Robert  Humphrey;  daughters  Elizabeth,  Sarah, 
Susannah.  Witnesses: — John  Samms  jun',  Mary  Samms,  Henry 
Abby.  Proved  12  Nov.  1722. 

(202)  Henry  Abbey,  weaver.  Dated  4  Jan.  1719.  “My  shop  of 
weaving  tools.”  Mentions  Richard  Sebbet;  Elizabeth,  Jane,  Anne 
Abbey,  Mary,  and  Grace  Coxall,  all  daughters  of  Joseph  Coxall 
deceased;  I^sman  Caleb  Powtrell,  Mary  his  wife,  and  Henry 

Q  2 


232  THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 

their  son.  Witnesses : — Leonard  Wright,  Henry  Sutton,  Elizabeth 
Sutton.  Proved  10  Jan.  1722. 

(204)  Noel  Hill,  dyer.  Dated  4  Jan.  1721.  To  my  brother 
John  HiU  the  messuage  where  I  now  dwell,  with  orchard  and  close 
of  3  acres  adjoining,  and  3^  acres  of  arable  land  lying  dispersed  in 
the  fields  and  bounds  of  Bassingboum.  To  sister  Elizabeth  Hill  £40, 
sister  Hannah  Hill  £40,  brother  Joseph  Hill  £30.  My  sisters  to 
have  free  use  of  the  chamber  over  the  kitchen  with  liberty  at  all 
times  to  pass  and  repass  to  and  from  the  same,  as  long  as  they 
remain  unmarried.  To  my  brother  Joseph  the  watch  which  I  now 
have.  Witnesses: — Eichard  Archer,  John  Archer,  William  Everard. 
Proved  1  June  1722. 

(205)  John  Jeppes,  miller.  Dated  10  Aug.  1704.  Messunge, 
lands,  and  tenements  in  Tharfield  [Herts]  bought  of  Tiiomas  Hankins 
and  Thomas  Bareleggs,  now  in  the  occupation  of  Thomas  Austin. 
Mentions  wife  Anne ;  sons  Thomas,  William,  and  John ;  daughter 
Anne,  wife  of  Samuel  Foster;  grand-daughter  Anne  Foster. 
Witnesses : — Eichard  Archer,  John  Amey,  John  Browne.  Proved 
22  Aug.  1704. 

(207)  James  Jeppes,  poulterer.  Dated  12  March  1720.  Furniture, 
includes  “  eight  small  pictures  in  the  best  chamber,  looking-glass, 

flinch  bowl,  and  map.”  Mentions  wife  Anne,  and  daughter  Elizabeth, 
roved  25  March  1721. 

(212)  Elizabeth  Turpin,  widow.  Dated  13  July  1714.  To  my 
son  John  Turpin  £I0.  To  my  son  Thomas  Turpin  and  his  heirs 
all  that  cottage  and  tenement  wherein  I  now  dwell,  situate  in 
Bassingbourne,  with  the  close  or  orchard  thereunto  adjoining, 
containing  one  acre  more  or  less,  with  all  the  Houses  and  purtenances 
belonging  to  it.  My  son  Thomas  Turpin  and  my  daughter  Margaret 
Turpin  executors  and  residuary  legatees.  Witnesses : — Eichard  Archer, 
Thomas  Man,  Herbert  Margott.  Proved  17  Oct.  1714. 

(216)  Henry  Waller,  gent.  Dated  20  Nov.  1722.  Messuages, 
lands,  and  tenements  freehold  and  copyhold  in  Bassingboum  or 
elsewhere  in  the  county  of  Cambridge  to  my  Kinsman  Henry  Waller 
(son  of  my  brother  Nathaniell  Waller)  charged  with  the  payment  to 
brother  Nathaniell  and  Grace  his  wife  of  £25  per  annum,  quarterly, 
and  to  Henry  Waller’s  brothers,  Andrew  and  Caleb  Waller,  and  to 
his  sister  Mary  Waller,  of  £60  apiece.  To  my  servants  Eichard 
Eobinson  and  Elizabeth  Jimpson  20*  each.  To  Mr.  William  Bedford 
of  Eoyston  £5  annually  for  life.  Eesidue  to  Kinsman,  Henry  Waller, 
executor.  Witnesses: — J^amuel  Fletton,  Abel  Docura,  Thomas 
Lewington.  Proved  20  April  1723. 

(217)  Eichard  Archer,  yeoman.  Dated  4  Feb.  1729.  ‘‘All  my 
lands,  tenements,  &c.,  in  Bassingboum.”  Mentions  grandson  John 
Archer;  grand-daughters  Elizabeth,  Docura,  and  Alary  Archer; 
friend  Mr.  Samuel  Fletton  of  Bassingboum.  Witnesses: — Sarah 
Hewardine,  Tho.  Hewardine,  Ann  Wilcock.  Proved  6  May  1731. 

(218)  Thomas  Archer,  shoemaker.  Dated  30  Jan.  1735.  Leaves 
all  goods  to  his  wife.  Witnesses : — Ann  Eoubin,  John  Harper, 
Henry  Waller.  Proved  9  Sept.  1736. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


233 


(235)  Samuel  Fletton,  yeoman.  Dated  1  March  1747.  To  my 
cousin  Sophia  llutterforth  of  Bassingbourn,  widow,  an  annuity  of  £5 
for  life.  My  messuages,  lands,  and  tenements  freehold  and  copyhold 
in  Bassingbourn  and  elsewhere  to  Elizabeth  Fletton^  widow  of  my 
late  brother,  Ralph  Fletton,  and  to  Edward  Buckmaster  of  Bassing- 
bourn,  yeoman,  in  trust  (if  personality  be  insufficient)  to  sell  the 
whole  or  part  to  pay 'my  debts  and  settle  the  rest  on  Samuel  Fletton, 
sou  of  my  late  nephew  William  Fletton,  and  his  heirs.  To  the 
trustees  £20  each.  Witnesses : — Thomas  Lewington,  jun',  Thomas 
Pearson,  John  Sigsworth.  Proved  1  Dec.  1748. 

(238)  Richard  Russell,  gardener.  Dated  2  May  1745.  Mentions 
Elizabeth,  wife  of  John  Harrison  of  Royston,  innkeeper,  and  their 
son  Bejamiu;  sons  William  and  Richard;  daughter  Mary,  wife  of 
Thomas  Shackleton ;  Richard  Sabine.  Witnesses : — Mary  Keightley, 
William  Keightley,  H.  Wortham,  jun'.  Proved  18  May,  1745. 

(240)  Edward  Tristrum,  yeoman.  Dated  3  March  1735.  Mentions 
sous  John  and  Edward ;  daughters  Mary  Tristram,  Sarah,  wife  of 
Richard  Seaby,  and  Frances,  wife  of  John  Bentham.  Witnesses: — 
John  Wiltshire,  William  Blunt,  William  Baker.  Proved  16  June  1737. 

From  Worthing^ton’s  ColleeUon  of  Church  Matter t  relating  to  the 
Dioeete  of  Ely,  part  ii.;  Baker  MSS.,  vol.  xxviii.,  p.  158,  in  the 
University  Library,  Cambridge : — 

Robt  de  Whitteby,  Rector  eccl:  paroch:  de  Bassingbourn  Elien: 
Dioc:  Imprimis,  lego  auiuiam  meam  ipsius  Creatori  et  corpus  meum 
sepelieud:  in  cancello  ecclesie  Prebendalis  de  Keton.  Item,  lego  et 
do  Deo  et  diet:  ecclise,  vicario  et  aliis  ministris  et  suis  successoribus 
ibm:  Deo  servient:  magnum  pref...-. ..  meum  ad  serviend:  in 
perpetuum.  It:,  do  et  lego  24  de  pauperibus  de  Parcchianis  meis  de 
Basingbome  12  lib:  de  argenti  de  bonis  meis  infra  Rectoriam  ibm:,  et 
fabricsB  ecclie:  ibm:  6  marc  percipiend:  de  bladis  et  fruct:  infra 
Rectoriam  ejusdem  ecclTe.  Item,  do  et  lego  20  de  pauperibus  Prebende 
mee  de  Ketoa  10  marc:  et  fabricse  ecclTse:  ibm:  40*  percipiend:  de 
bladis  et  fruct:  ibm:  Item,  do  et  lego  pauperibus  parochianis 
de  Blanford  fors  in  Com  Dorc:  20*.  Item,  pauperibus  parochianis 
omn:  Sanctorum  de  Thesilthorp  20*,  et  fabricse  ecclTe:  ibm:  20*.  It: 
fabricse  ecclTe:  Cath:  Line:  40*.  It  fabricse  ecclTe  de  Whitteby  40*. 
It:  do  et  lego  vicario  meo  de  Keton  20',  et  cuilibet  capellano  existent: 
in  exequis  meis  et  ad  miss:  de  die  1 2^.  Item,  ordini  fratrum  August: 
Stamford  2  marcas,  et  3  aliis  ordin:  fratrum  ibm:  cuilibet  ordih:  20*. 
It:  vicario  meo  de  Basingbum  2  marc,  et  cuilibet  capellano  celebrauti 
ibm:  40''.  Item,  fabricse  ecclTe:  de  Leeb  juxta  Wrangle  in  Holaud 
13*  4**.  Exec:  ordino  vc:  m“  William  Burton  Bac:  juris  Canonicii, 
Juhem  meum  capellanum,  et  Will:  Durant.  Testamentum  fuit  factum 
6  Julii  1410.  Probatum  6  Nov.  1410.  [Ex  Regfo  Repyngtou,  Line: 
Fol:  27b]. 

Thomas  Badcock.  Dated  3  Aug.  1546.  To  John,  my  son,  my 
houses  and  lands  in  Shepreth,  and  two  acres  in  Foxton.  To  Jone,  my 
daughter,  a  rood  of  Saffron,  next  Ashman  Street,  next  the  land  of 
William  Turpyn.  Furniture,  &c.,  to  Thomas  Webbe,  Isabel  Lyncoln, 
Agnes  Clements.  Residue  to  John  m}'  son.  Witnesses : — William 


2S4 


THB  BAST  ANOLIAIT;  OB, 


Tu«>yn,  gent.,  William  Oode,  Tho.  Marshall,  Francis  Mede.  Proved 
11  Dec.  1546.  [K.  195]. 

John  Coxall  of  Haslingfield.  Dated  7  Nov.  1557.  To  Alice  my 
wife  furniture,  and  my  copy  at  Bassingboum,  with  72  acres  of  arable 
land  for  life,  and  then  to  John  my  son.  My  other  copy  at  Bassing- 
bourn,  where  William  Good  dwelleth,  to  the  child  my  wife  goeth  witli. 
My  third  copy  at  Bassingboum,  where  the  chantry  priest  dwelleth,  to 
be  sold,  and  divided  between  my  daughters,  each  to  have  20  nobles. 
Other  lands,  &c.,  at  Haslingfield.  [K.  366].  Walter  Jones. 

Stofratt  Rectory,  Loughborough. 

{To  he  eontinwd). 


ILLITEEACT  OF  THE  ELIZABETHAN  OLEEQT. 

It  is  a  well-known  fact  that  the  majority  of  the  parochial  clerg}’ 
of  the  early  part  of  Elizabeth’s  reign  were  men  of  little  erudition. 
Lever  writes  to  Bullinger,  July  10th,  1560: — “Ex  illis  valde  paucis 
qui  per  magnam  hanc  regionem  sacranienta  administrant,  ne 
centesimus  quidem  verbum  Dei  preedicare  potest  el  vult ;  sed  tantum 
legere  quod  in  libris  prsescribitur  omnes  coguntur.” — Zurich  Letters, 
No.  35.  The  following  extract  from  the  “  Certificatorium  Dioces 
Eliens,”  sent  by  Bishop  Coxe  of  Ely  to  Archbishop  Parker  in  1560 
(Add.  MS.  5873),  shows  that  in  the  Deanery  of  Shingay  not  a  single 
clergyman  was  then  licensed  to  preach.  And  when  one  reads  the 
extremely  elementary  “  Interrogatory es  ministeryd  to  all  suche  as 
myndethe  to  Eeceyve  hollye  orders  ’’  in  the  Diocese  of  Ely  at  that 
time,  one  cannot  wonder  that  pulpit  ministrations  should  have  been  so 
generally  restricted  to  the  reading  of  the  Homilies.  They  were  as 
follows : — 

Syrst  what  is  his  name. 

The  second  what  age  he  is  of. 

The  Thyrd  wher  his  abydinge  is. 

The  fourth  whether  his  conversacyon  be  good  and  honest. 

The  fyfte  whether  he  cane  Rede  well  or  no. 

The  syxte  whether  he  cane  wryte. 

The  sevenths  whether  he  myndethe  to  Receyve  hollye  orders  of  a 
good  zeal  y‘  he  barythe  towardes  God’s  word. 

The  viij  whether  he  myndethe  to  procede  in  the  saide  vocacyon 
and  hollye  order  of  ministerye. 

The  ix  whether  he  be  legyttymate  or  no. 

The  X  whether  he  understandythe  the  latten  tonge  and  cane 
speke  the  same. 

The  xj  whether  he  hathe  studyed  any  things  in  the  Scryptures 
and  what  he  hathe  lernyed  therein. — Gibbon's  Ely  Episcopal 
Records,  p.  4. 

It  seems  to  have  been  difficult  to  find  candidates  who  could  pass 
the  test  of  even  this  very  simple  examination,  for  the  number  rejected 
or  respited  was  always  considerable.  A  century  later  the  clergy  of 


Ji 


NOTES  AND  QUEBIES,  ETC. 


235 


the  Diocese  had  become  all  educated  men.  Out  of  the  ninety-three 
clergymen  ordained  from  1662 — 1664  there  was  not  one  without  a 
University  degree. 


Decanattts  de  Shenoaye. 


Sacer’d.  Dio’e. 

Vicar  de  Mel  borne  .  1  — 

Vic  de  Melrethe  .  2  — 

Vic  de  Basaingbome  .  3  — 

Vic  de  St^lemordon  .  4  — 

Recdr  de  East  Hatly  .  5  — 

Vic  de  Tadlowe  6  — 

•  Rcdr  de  Clopton  .  7  — 

Vicar  de  Crawdon  8  — 


Laid.  Reae’d.  Nonrew’d.  yrad.  p*dic»  ^ 

^  *  no’  lie.  " 

—  1  —  1  —  1  1 

3 

4 

5  5 

7 

-  8 


Benehcia  vacan  infra  Decanat  de  Shenegeye.  Vicaria  de 
Whaddon.  Vic  de  Wendye.  Vic  de  Melrethe.  Vic  de  Gilden 
Mordon.  Vic  de  Lytlington. 

Walter  Jones. 

Seagrav*  Rectory,  Loiiyhborouyk. 


MONUMENT  TO  A  SUFFOLK  LADY  IN  STRATFORD- 
ON-AVON  CHURCH. 

On  a  mural  monument: — Arms — sable,  three  swords  in  pale 
barwise  argent,  hilts  and  pomels  or;  iiupaliiig,  azure,  a  chevron 
between  three  rams’  heads  erased  argent,  attired  or,  is  the 
following : — 

Elizabbtha  Rawlins,  61ia  &  coheres  Thom.c  Benoisr  de  Stowe-Makkett, 
in  Com.  Scffolcls  Arm.  ex  Eliza  Dvdlby,  filia  Edw.  Dvdley,  de  Clapton  in 
Com.  Northton  Arm. : — 

Landes  hie  nullas  vides,  lector, 
quia  minores  sunt  omnes  ; 
mag^nam  scilt.  famam  Isedunt, 
violantq.  Terbornm  pigmenta  ; 
pietatem,  famam,  candorem,  indolem, 
prseclaros  animi  corporisq.  dotes ; 
suavissimosq.  mores,  nulla 
rhetorum  sequabit  oratio, 
obduci  maluit  velum  msestissimus 
conjuz,  quam  sugillari  tantam 
virtutem  impari  penicillo. 

Terrenas  hasce  reliquiae  deposuit  circa  annu.  setatis  tricessimum,  ad  coelii. 
evecta  Sponso  fruitur  sempitemo  Dno.  Jesu,  ingens  sui  in  terris  relinqiiens 
desideriu.  Memoriaa  lectissimise  conjugis  dilectissimseq.  qualecunq.  hoc  charissimi 
amoris  pig^nus  sacravit  lugens  mariius.  THO  RWVLINS  Akm 

Below  it,  on  a  flat  stone,  with  the  arms  of  Rawlins : — 

HIC  SITA  BST  ELIZABBTHA  RAWLINS. 

Stay  youth  ;  whose  lighter  thoughts  contentments  seeke. 

With  fading  trifles  of  a  well  mixt  cheeke  ; 


236 


THB  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


And  let  thoee  looka,  who,  whilst  alire,  would  try 
To  inflame  thy  bosome,  now  dissolue  thine  eye  ; 

Stay,  grauer  age,  whose  serious  brests  doe  prize 
The  faire  and  younge,  beneath  the  good  and  wise, 

Lament  her  early  fate,  whose  actions  shew’d 
All  vertues  earth  e’er  had,  or  heaven  bestow’d  ; 

Stay  lovely  maids,  and  let  youer  eys  dispence 
"  One  teare  for  beawty,  youth,  and  innocence ; 

Stay  sober  matrons,  and  let  pitty  flnde, 

A  sigh  for  th’  chaste,  the  constant,  and  the  kinde ; 

But  we’ll  no  more  loade  her  lamented  herse. 

Which  now  expects  a  trumpet,  not  a  verse  ; 

Whose  sound  will  find  her  shape  so  exact  before, 

’TwiU  others  change,  but  only  her's  restore. 

It  will  be  noticed  that  the  date  of  decease  is  not  given.  Can 
any  reader  supply  it?  Is  anything  known  of  Thomas  Bendish  of 
Stowmarket?  The  name  does  nut  occur  in  the  index  of  names  at 
the  end  of  Metcalfe’s  Visitationt,  of  Suffolk.  The  Norfolk  Visitation 
of  1664  contains  pedigrees  of  Bendysh  of  Great  Witchinghain  and 
Bylaugh  and  Rawlyn  of  Attleborough  and  Ingoldesthorp.  It  would 
be  interesting  to  kuow  more  of  this  Suffolk  lady  buried  in 
Shakespeare’s  Church. 

I  venture  to  add  the  following  attempt  at  translating  the  above 
Latin  verses  into  English  blank  verse : — 

Xo  panegyrics  see’st  thou,  reader,  here. 

For  here  ale  panegyrics  would  fall  short ; 

Indeed,  bombastic  words  injure  true  worth. 

And  piety,  and  innocence,  and  all 
Good  qualities  that  Nature  freely  gives — 

Gifts  excellent  of  body  and  of  mind — 

And  charms  to  which  no  orator's  harangue 
Could  justice  do.  Her  husband,  overwhelm’d 
With  sorrow,  did  prefer  the  curtain  drawn, 

Than  that  such  worth  should  sully’d  be  by  pen 
Unworthy  to  record  her  excellence. 

Stowmarket,  Suffolk.  CHARLES  PARTRIDGE,  JUN. 


CALENDAR  TO  THE  COUNTERPARTS  OF  THE 
DEEDS  OF  SALE  OF  FEE-FARM  RENTS  RESERVED  UPON 
GRANTS  FROM  THE  CROWN.  NORFOLK. 

{Continued  from  p.  228). 

, Grantees  of 

Places.  Premises.  Grantees  of  Premises  the  Fee-farm 

*  Rent  ft  No. 

i.  s.  d. 

Ormeaby  .  An  Annual  Bent  Edm.,  E.  of  4  2  0  Bushworth 

issuing  out  of  Kent  &  als.  4 

the  Fee-Farm 
of  the  Town 

Prior  .  .  The  Manor  .  .  SeeCastleacre  .  .  Crossman  6 


NOTS8  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 

237 

PUtOM. 

Premises.  Orantees  of  Premises. 

Reserved.  ^ 

£. 

$. 

d. 

Pawling 

An  Annual  Bent 

5 

3 

Juxoii 

1 

issuing  out  of  the 
Manor  &  Bectory 

BudhanijWest 

The  Manor  . 

SeeCastleacre 

, 

, 

Crossman 

6 

Bighborough 

The  Manor  . 

Sir  Bichard 

1 

9 

3i  Cobbett 

18 

Parva  & 
Helghtou 

Townsend 

Beppis,  North 

Lands,  &c.,  there 

.  .  Litchfield 

See 

Gim- 

Feilder 

11 

ingham 

Bunshall,  als. 

Lands  ^Tenements 

Jno.  Carrell  . 

0 

4 

0 

Legate 

8 

Bnnham 

Shingham 

The  Advowson  of 

Bedingfield  . 

See  Clay 

Crossman 

6 

Sherforth 

Tbos.,  D.  of 

See  Cas¬ 

the  Church 

Norfolk 

tleacre 

Selford 

The  Toll  of  the 
Oreat  Bridge 

See  Thetford 

” 

99 

Sistronde,  als 

Sundry  Premises 

£dw.  Ditch- 

SeeGiming-  Feilder 

11 

Sidistroude 

field  &  als. 

ham 

Sutton  &Stale- 

A  Bent  out  of  the 

See  Hickling 

Juxon 

1 

ham 

Manors 

Smithes  & 

Manors 

SirThos.  Clere 

See  Catts 

Legate 

8 

Spencers 

Stokesby  als- 

An  Annual  Bent 

5 

0 

0 

,, 

99 

Stopeeley 

issuing  out  of  the 
Manor 

Sechehith 

A  rent 

See  Lynn-Begis 

• 

The  Mayor, 
&c.,ofLynn 

Regis 

7 

Snetisham  . 

>>  •  • 

M  »* 

ff 

Shernbum  . 

•  • 

Stratton, Long 

An  Annual  Bent 

0 

2 

0 

Tybnam  & 

issuing  out  of  the 
Lands  &  Tene¬ 
ments 

als. 

1 

Shropham 

The  Hundred,  &c. 

Sir  Qeo.  Mar¬ 

10 

0 

0 

Wilton 

7 

shall,  Bobert 
Cancefield 

Thorney  & 

The  Manor  . 

Wm.  Butts  . 

5 

0 

0 

Bacon 

14 

Beeston 

Toftres  . 

The  Bectory  and 

See  Castleacre 

Crossman 

6 

Advowson  of  ye 
Vicarage 

Tattersett 

The  Advowson  of 
ye  Church 
l^e  like 

,, 

• 

99 

Trunch . 

99  99 

99 

Thetford 

The  like 

The  Toll  of  ye 

The  Mayor,&c., 

8 

6 

8 

99 

Market  &  of 

of  Thetford 

divers  Bridges  in 
Norfolk  &  Suf¬ 
folk 

The  Free  Chapel, 

Edw.  Ferrers 

6 

3 

10 

Ac. 

Francis  Philips 

238 


Trimingham  , 
Thorpe  near 
Norwidy  * 
tTidd  St.Giles’ 
Upwell . 


West  Walton 


Walsoken 

Walpole 


Wiggenhall 
St.  Mary 
Woodriseing . 

Wheatacre  . 


Westwinch  & 
Wigenhall 

Wighton 


Wallpoole 

Wighton 

Yarmouth 


THi:  EAST  ANOLIAM;  OR, 

IT.,,,  v...Tn  Grantee*  of 

Premiees.  Grantees  of  Premises.  R^CTved™*  the  Fee-Farm 

Rent  Sc  No. 

£.  *.  d. 

Sundry  Premises  See  Qimingham  .  .  Feilder  11 

The  Manor  .  .  SirThos.  Paston  5  2  1^  Newman  15 


A  Bent . 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of 
lands  and  tene¬ 
ments  there 

The  Manor  and  See  Castleacre 
Advowsonsof  the 
Church 

The  Manor  .  .  ,, 

The  Bectory  &  ,,  ,, 

Advowson  of  the 
Vicarage 

The  like  .  .  ,, 

The  Advowson  of  ,,  ,, 

the  Church 

Au  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of 
two  inclosures 
&c.,  there 

See  Lynn-Begis  .  .  .  •  . 


0  4  0  Offley  1 

011  6  Tybnam  & 
als.  I 


Crossinan  6 


The  Free  Chapel, 
Glebe  Lands, 
Tythes,  &c. 

Tynne  Mill,  Par¬ 
cel  of  the  Manor 

The  Site  of  ye 
Manor,  the  De¬ 
mesne  Land,  &c. 

The  Chantry, 
Chapel,  &  divers 
Lands,  &c. 

The  Manor  . 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of  the 
Town 

The  like  out  of  a 
place  in  the  sea 
near  the  entry  of 
the  Town  of  Yar- 
mouth  called 
Kirkelerode 


Fras.  Morris 
Fran.  Phillips 


Edwd.  Ditch - 
field  &  als. 

Sir  Wm.  Her- 
ricke 

Arthur  Ingram 

Ed.  Ditchfield 
&  als. 


4  13  lOf  Juxon  1 


.  .  The  Mayor, 

&c.,of  Lynn 
Begis  7 
2  13  4  Marrett  & 

another  1 5 

10  0 


5 

8 

4 

” 

10 

0 

7 

Pratt  1 4 

39 

10 

5 

Taylor  12 

55 

0 

0 

The  Bailiff, 

5 

0 

0 

&c.,of  Yar¬ 
mouth  4 

L.  B. 


•  This  onusaal  way  of  spellini;  Norwich  shews  the  scribe  was  merely  an  ignorant  copyist 
who  read  as  “  dy  ”  the  final  “  ch  ”  written  with  a  flourish  [unless  the  ending  is  “  dg  ”  (Norwidg) 
a  not  infrequent  form  when  spelling  was  quite  arbitrary.— Ed.] 
t  In  Cambridgeshire. 


XUM 


NOTES  ANlf  QUERIES,  ETC. 


239 


A  CALENDAR  OF  FEET  OF  FINES  FOR  ESSEX.  No.  LXVII. 

Mich.  7  James  I. 

1.  John  Potchel  Robert  Mason Margaret  his  wife  mess,  t  land 
in  Westhorocke.  Stefford  Grayes  Thorocke. 

2.  George  Muwld  James  Jackson  messuages  in  Colchester. 

3.  Jane  Shelley  wid.  'I  Peter  Whetcombe  gent,  messuages  land 
in  Writtle. 

4.  John  Trigge  juii.  Mary  his  wife  John  Skingle  def.  of  a 
mess.  land  in  Berden  Manuden  ais  Mollendyne. 

6.  Tho.  Luckyu  Tho.  Lucas  Johane  his  wife  messuages 
land  in  Plessbey  Gt.  Waltham. 

6.  John  Newman  1  Christian  his  wife  1  Robert  Dawson 
Judith  his  wife  land  in  Westham. 

7.  W™  Cooke  1  Robert  Meade  T:  Johane  his  wife  mess.  rent 
in  Plesshie. 

8.  Alexander  Freborne  W”  Haven  Diana  his  wife,  John 
Haven  T;  Rebecca  his  wife  land  in  Whitham. 

9.  Paul  Bayniuge  sen.  arm.  Paul  Bayninge  jun.  gent  'I  Tho. 
Stone  mess.  %  land  in  Little  Bentley  'I  Gt.  Bromley, 

1 0.  Ric.  Luther  George  Street  messuage  \  land  in  Stapleford 
Abbotts. 

11.  Thomas  Tanner  John  Churche  *1  George  Hill  ^  Brigette 
his  wife  mess,  land  in  Danbury. 

12.  Gilbert  Pickett  Anthony  Leyster  Edward  Newman 
mess,  in  Witham. 

13.  Tho.  Browne  John  Boade  "X  Ann  his  wife  Manor  of  Abells 
Wick  with  mess.,  lands  rents  in  Ardeley  als  Ardley. 

14.  John  Humfrey,  John  Parker,  W“  Humfrey  'I  W”  Cracherode 
T  Mary  his  wife  land  in  Toppesfeild  Sible  Hedinham. 

15.  John  Saveli  Tho.  Sumpner  Johane  his  wife,  W“  Peade 
Rose  his  wife,  John  Stock  Elizabeth  his  wife  land  in  Harlow 

Matchinge High  Laver. 


Hily.  7  James  I. 

1 .  W”  Dawes  gent,  Henry  Pomfett  land  in  Barkeyne, 

2.  Tho.  Owen  ^  John  Nicholson  land  in  Syble  Hemyngham. 

3.  W“  Dod  gent,  George  Saris  gent.  Anne  his  wife  mess 
land  in  Peldon. 

4.  John  Glascock  'I  George  Dennison  1  Constance  hie  wife 
messuages  in  Writtle. 

5.  Ric.  Mannynge  W™  Neale  W”  Neale  elk.  mess,  land 
in  Spryngefeilde. 

6.  Dorothy  Huddilston  wid.  1  W”  Smythe  arm.  Dorcas  his 
wife  mess.  T;  land  in  Pattyswycke. 

7.  Robert  Cawston  gent,  John  Morfell  Alice  his  wife  Tho. 
Morfell  son  heir  of  said  Alice  mess.  %  land  in  Dedham  Ardley. 

8.  Thomas  Darcey  T;  John  Gosse  cottages  in  Witham. 


240 


THE  BAST  ANGLIAN;  OR. 


9.  Tho  Aylett  1  John  Darce}'  arm.  land  in  Bivenhall. 

10.  Sir  Nicholas  Cook  knt.  Anthony  Gibson  Mary  his  wife 
Manor  of  Withefelde  ats  Withfeld  ats  Wifield  ats  VVhittefeildes  with 
mess.  land  in  Ford  Barkinge  Wausted. 

11.  Nicholas  Prick  love  Samuel  Searle  elk.  'X  Francis  his  wife 
mess.  \  laud  in  Lattou. 

12.  Nicholas  Okeham  gent.  Tho.  Legatt  arm.  Martha  his 
wife  mess.  'X  lands  Upmyuster  als  Upmyster. 

13.  John  Webbe  sen*  Henry  Crackbone  Johane  his  wife 
mess,  land  in  Messinge. 

14.  John  Hunwicke  John  Mayer  mess,  land  in  Elmested. 

15.  George  Wood  t  John  Clarke  Alice  his  wife  mess  land 
in  Bocking. 

16.  Tlio.  Laugworth  John  Waters  mess,  in  Harwich. 

17.  Clement  Stener  arm.  John  Rochester  arm.  mess,  laud  in 
Tarlinge,  Laborne  Fagersteade. 

18.  Sir  Henry  Poole  knt.,  John  Bridgeman  arm.  Christopher 
Revell  arm.  1  Mary  his  wife  mess,  laud  in  Tolleshunt  Darcy  als 
Tolleshuut  Tregos  Tollesbury. 

19.  Joue  Windle  Oliver  St.  John  Elizabeth  his  wife  mess. 
’X  land  in  Ryvenhall. 

20.  Tho.  Thedham  John  Webbe  Barbate  his  wife  mess.  'X 
land  in  Messinge. 

21.  Edward  Herrys  arm.,  John  Knightbridge  gent.  1  Sir  W“ 
Herrys  of  Crisley  knt.  mess.  land  in  Leiglie  als  Lee. 

22.  John  Dane  *1:  Edward  Suliard  arm.  mess.  laud  in  South 
Hanuyngfeild,  Ronwell,  Dowuham,  Ramsden,  Belhowse. 

23.  Ric.  Archer  gent.  Tho.  Rayuoldes  Anne  his  wife  mess, 
in  Southweld. 

24.  Tho.  Fremau  'I  Robert  Coe  Mary  his  wife  mess.  laud 
in  Finchingfeild. 

25.  June  Fraunce,  Sarah  Fraunce  Robert  Sprignall  gent.  "X 
Susan  his  wife  mess.  land  in  Maldon. 

26.  Valentine  Brombey,  James  Pasey  Robert  Harrison  t 
Susan  his  wife  Francis  Richmond  messuage  ’X  land  in  Harwich. 

27.  John  Haulsley  John  Draper  gent.  'I  Anne  his  wife 
messuages  in  Brancktrye  als  Brayntree. 

28.  Edward  Littlebury  arm.  t  George  Wood  messuage  land 
in  Manyngtree  Mestleed. 

29.  Christopher  Tyll,  Helen  Fokes  Tho.  Whyte  Elizabeth 
his  wife  mess,  and  laud  in  Bilchamp  St.  Paul. 

30.  Francis  Doryngton,  Robert  Tayler  John  Tayler  mess, 
land  in  Horndon  on  the  Hill. 

31.  John  Poole  Mathew  Cosyn  Margaret  his  wife  mess, 
land  in  Writtle  *1  Roxwell. 

32.  Ric.  Stanes,  Mark  Adam  sen.  Mark  Adam  jun.  mess.  1 
land  in  Fifeild  als  Fishide. 

33.  James  Gibson,  Tho.  Theobald  gent.  John  Robarts  Susan 
his  wife  messuage  in  Bocking. 

34.  Tho.  Catchmay,  Tho.  Wood  Peter  Payne  *1  Johane  his 


NOTES  AMU  OUKK1E8,  ETC. 


241 


wife  mess.  land  in  Stansted,  Mouiitfitchett,  Birchanger,  Shwarston, 
Stratford  Leyton. 

35.  Edward  Pamphelon  Edward  Elrington  Sibell  his  wife 
mess.  *1  land  in  Widdington. 

36.  George  Harryson,  Benedict  Wright  Laurence  Povey  gent. 

Jane  his  wife  mess.  %  land  in  Harlowe  Latton. 

37.  Eic.  Bundock,  Sir  John  Petre  knt.  Lord  Petre  mess, 
land  in  Eanisden  Bellowea  Eamsden  Crayes. 

38.  John  Stephens  arm.,  Wm.  Motte  Tho.  Eiche  arm.  Anne 
his  wife  land  in  Colchester. 

39.  Samuel  Hare  W“  Hare  Johaue  his  wife  mess.  land  in 
Southchurch. 

40.  Tho.  Turner  arm.,  Eic.  Harlakenden  arm.  Margaret 
Wilkenson  wid.  Manor  of  Bartletts  with  lands  in  Eettinden 

E.  Hamingfeild. 

41.  Tho.  Jolley  elk.,  Tho.  Smythe  James  Brydge  Johane 

his  wife  John  Bundock  als  Saffulde  mess.  land  in  Standon. 

42.  Sir  Tho.  Bludder  knt.,  Julian  Bludder  gent.  John  Younge 
gent.  Elizabeth  his  wife  mess,  and  land  in  Gt.  Little  Hockley. 

43.  Eic.  Hale  t  Sir  Henry  Myldmay  knt.  Eliz.  his  wife  Manor 
of  Tolshunt  Tregose  ats  Toleshuut  Darcye  Verley  ats  Verle3's  with 
messuages  lands  in  Tolleshuut  Knights  Tolleshunt  Major  ats 
Beckingham,  Little  Totham,  Goldbanger,  Goldingham,  Sacotts, 
Wigborough  8.  Laurence,  Tysterye,  Inford  ats  Inworth  Messinge 

Witham,  the  advowdson  of  Tolleshunt  Darcye. 

44.  Emanuel  Eendhed  elk.  John  Ewers  Eachel  his  wife 
Eic.  Cocke  Margaret  his  wife  mess,  land  in  Shalforde  'I 

Wethersfyelde. 

45.  W“  Austen  arm.,  Tho.  Wylding  *1  John  Eochester  arm.  t 
Francis  his  wife  Clement  Stoner  arm.,  Manor  of  West  Newland 
with  messuages  lands  in  8.  Laurence  Steeple. 

46.  Eic.  Swale  gent.,  Eoger  Stackhouse  gent.  "I  Johane  Brockett 
wid.  John  Brockett  gent..  Manor  of  Wardens  Hale  ats  Willingdale 
Doe  with  mess,  lands  in  Spayne,  Fifell,  Shellowe  Bowells  1 
advowdson  of  Willingale  Doe. 

47.  W“  Wiseman  arm.,  Eic.  Munden,  Tho.  Darcey  gent.  John 
Darcey  arm.,  mess,  lands  in  Tolshunt  Darcey  Tolshunt  Major. 

48.  Tho.  Bancroft  1  Geo.  Hothe  Katlierine  his  wife  John 
Hegiubotham  Margaret  his  wife  Tho.  Walker  jun.  land  in  Leyton 
T;  Walthamstowe. 

49.  John  Huckells  W“  Eeawse  Euth  his  wife  *1  Henry 

Wall  Agues  his  wife  land  in  Hornechurch. 

50.  Edmund  Bowker,  Ealph  Heard,  Edward  Saltonstall  arm. 
Sir  Eic.  Saltonstall  knt.,  mess.  land  in  Stifford,  Alverley,  Graj’es, 
Ursett  advowdson  of  Stifford. 

51.  John  Beritf  gent.,  W“  Butter  'I  John  Butter  1  Margaret  his 
wife  land  in  Thorington. 

52.  Simon  Bowtell  Eic.  Onyon  Johane  his  wife  Eic. 

Slograve  'I  Johane  his  wife  Tho.  Trundley  mess.  land  in  Thaxted 

little  Sampford. 


242 


THE  EAET  ANGLIAN;  OB, 


53.  Reginald  Toshe,  Robert  Adams,  Ric.  Weaner,  W™  Francis, 
George  Glascock,  Edward  Hamond  Elizabeth  his  wife  Edward 
Sempner  Anne  his  wife  Laurence  Wyberd  Helen  his  wife 
John  King  Mary  his  wife  1  Catherine  Linsell  Clement  Linsell 
messuages  land  in  Matchinge. 

54.  Hamuel  Thawites  als  Thwaites  gent.  'l.Tbo.  Stokes  ‘V  Eliz. 
his  wife  'I  W“  Durden  elk.  &  Margaret  his  wife  &  Tho.  Lukyn  & 
Johane  his  wife  Manor  of  Wares  with  mess.  &  lands  in  Good  Easter, 
Roxwell  &  Newland. 

55.  Philip  Eden  gent.,  John  Cannon  gent.  &  Thomas  Steward 
arm.  &  Mary  his  wife  Manors  of  Flemmings,  Claydons,  Barnehall  als 
Barron  Hall  with  mess.  &  lands  in  Sandon,  Easthanuyngfeild,  S. 
Hannyngfeild,  Pettendon,  Runwell,  Downham  &  Ramsden  Belhowse. 

End  of  Hily.  7  James  I. 


Fairies  in  East  Anglia. — These  ancient  inhabitants  of  our 
homes  and  meadows  are  now  all  but  forgotten.  Forby,  in  his’essay 
On  the  poptdar  Superstitions  of  East  Anglia,  tells  us  that  “  We  might 

look” . “for  the  house- wifely  fairy,  that  rewards  the  cleanliness 

of  the  dairy  maid  with  a  ‘  silver  sixpence  ’  ”  (p.  386)  ;  and,  on  the  next 
page,  says  “  The  very  fairies  would  be  forgotten  but  for  the  rings  in 
the  meadows  that  bear  their  name.”  At  p.  1 10  of  vol.  i.  he  explains 
fairy-butter  and  fairy-rings.* 

The  story  of  the  little  green  f  people  of  Woolpit,  recorded  by  one 
of  the  old  chroniclers,  has  been  reprinted  several  times.  The  best 
accounts  of  Suffolk  fairies  that  have  yet  appeared  are  in  Hollings¬ 
worth’s  History  of  Stowmarket  (1844),  pp.  247,  248.  In  Glyde’s  New 
Suffolk  Garland  (1866),  p.  179,  it  is  stated  that  “A  belief  in  the 
existence  of  ‘  Pharisees,’  or  ‘  Fairies,’  prevails;  they  ride  young  horses 
about  in  the  night,  so  that  the  grooms  on  going  into  the  stables  in  the 
morning  find  the  horses  all  of  a  foam.  But  a  hag  stone,  with  a  hole 
through,  tied  to  the  key  of  the  stable  door,  protects  the  horses.”  J 

The  etymology  of  Elveden  may  perhaps  be  elves'  or  fairies’  den 
or  cave,  and  there  is  Pixey  Green  in  the  parish  of  Stradbroke.  At 
Southwold,  “on  a  hill  called  Eye  Cliff,  and  several  others  situated 
near  it,  are  vestiges  of  an  ancient  encampment,  supposed  to  have  been 
occupied  by  the  Danes ;  and,  where  the  ground  has  not  been  broken 
up,  are  tokens  of  circular  tents,  vulgarly  denominated  fairy  hills." — 
White’s  Suffolk  Directory,  1844,  p.  392. 

•  Frequently  alluded  to  by  the  old  dramatiHts —Shakespeare,  Ben  .Tonson,  etc. 

t  In  *’  Sir  Gawayne  and  the  Green  Knight  ”  the  giant  was  enker  (bright)  grene 
— line  150. 

^  Compare  Scott’s  Marmion,  canto  iv.,  stanza  1  : — 

“  Young  Blount,  Ixird  Marmion’s  second  squire, 

Found  his  steed  wet  with  sweat  and  mire’’ ; 
and  ibid,  canto  iv.,  stanza  3  : 

“  ‘  Dost  see,  thou  knave,  my  horse’s  plight. 

Fairies  have  ridden  him  all  the  night. 

And  left  him  in  a  foam  !  ’  ” 

See  also  Scott’s  Minttrelsy  of  the  Seottish  Bordtr,  vol.  i.,  foot-note  at  p.  101  ; 
and  vol.  ii.,  p.  164. 


MOTES  AMD  QUERIES,  ETC. 


243 


Fairy-loaf  is  explained  in  The  Eaet  Anglian,  old  series,  toI.  iii., 
p.  45. 

Also  there  is  “Tom  Tit  Tot,”  the  Suffolk  version  of  Qrimm’s 
“Humpelstiltskin,”  charmingly  told  in  Miss  Lois  Fison’s  Merry  Suffolk 
(Laadon :  Jarrold  4  Soas).  PaaTamoa,  ,oa. 

Slowmarket,  Suffolk. 


REPLIES. 

Fernham  Epitaph  im  Stowmarket  Church  (pp.  195,  196). — I  am 
indebted  to  Canon  Raven  of  Fressingfield  for  the  following  suggestions 
as  to  the  gaps  in  this  much-worn  inscription : — 

(Lines  1 — 4). 

Thus  tyme  and  death  doe  earth  to  earth  restore 
The  Bonne  who'e  loving  mother  firet  reposeth. 

And  he  that  liv’d  a  grave  divine  before 
Lyes  here  interr’d,  a  grave  a  grave  incloseth. 

As  to  line  1 0,  Canon  Raven  suggests  that  its  syllables  correspond¬ 
ing  with  those  of  line  9,  it  is  perhaps  complete  as  it  appears  at  p.  195. 

C.  P. 


The  Mistress  of  Queem  Charlotte’s  Dairy  (pp.  211,  212). — 
Mr.  Fred.  Chancellor  of  Chelmsford  has  kindly  pointed  out  to  me  that 
the  epitaph  on  Mary  Sanderson’s  headstone,  in  Acton  churchyard, 
was  evidently  copied  from  that  on  a  monument  in  Abbot’s  Roothing 
Church,  Essex,  for  Mildred,  Lady  Luckyn,  daughter  of  Sir  Gamaliel 
Capell,  who  died  23  August,  1633.  The  monument  is  illustrated  in 
I^Ir.  Chancellor’s  Eeeex  Sepulchral  Monumente.  It  will  be  seen  that  the 
Acton  copy  differs  slightly  from  the  original,  which  runs  as  follows : — 
We  bragge  noe  virtves  and  we  begge  no  teares 
0  reader  if  thov  hast  bvt  eyes  and  eares 
It  is  enovgh,  bvt  tell  me  why_ 

Thov  comst  to  gaze.  Is  it  to  pry 
Into  ovr  cost  or  borrowe 
A  copie  of  ovr  sorrowe 
Or  dost  thov  come 
To  learne  to  dye 
Not  knowing  whome 
To  practice  by 
If  this  be  thy  desire 
Remove  thee  one  step  nigher 
Here  lies  a  President  a  rarer 
Earth  never  showd  nor  heaven  a  fayrer 
She  was  bvt  room  denyes  to  tell  thee  what 
Svm  all  perfection  up  and  she  was  that. 

In  the  third  line  of  Mrs.  Sanderson’s  inscription,  “  Queen  House” 
is  a  misprint  for  “  Queen’s  House.”  Does  this  house  still  exist  ?  If 
so,  what  is  it  now  called  ?  CP 


244 


THB  EAST  ANQUAN;  OB, 


QUERIES. 

Sir  Charles  Witham  of  Hioham  and  the  Hoy  Family. — White’s 
Suffolk,  1st  ed.  (1844),  p.  258,  states  that  “Sir  Charles  Witham  of 
Higham  Cottage  was  knighted  by  the  Lord-Lieutenant  of  Ireland  in 
1830.”  He  was  third  son  of  William  Witham,  Esq.,  by  Dorothy, 
daughter  of  Thomas  Langdale,  Esq.  (Witham  of  Lartington  Hall,  co. 
York,  in  Burke’s  Landed  Gentry).  He  married  Mies  Jane  Hoy,  by 
whom  he  had  a  daughter,  Constantia. 

In  Higham  churchyard  (next  Stratford  S.  Mary)  there  is  a 
tomb  commemorating  the  Hoy  family : — Robert,  eon  of  Robert  and 
Marianne  Hoy  of  Higham  Lodge,  19  May,  1811,  aged  10  years,  3 
months,  and  19  days;  Marianne  Helen  Maria,  19  Sept.  1818,  aged  11 
years;  William  Hoy,  25  Nov.,  1830,  aged  22  years.  In  White’s 
Suffolk  oi  1844,  under  Stoke-by-Nayland,  appear: — Isaac  Hoy,  Esq., 
Stoke  Priory,  and  William  Hoy  of  Ijower  House,  farmer ;  and  also : 
“  part  of  the  soil  belongs  to  several  smaller  proprietors,  the  largest  of 
whom  is  Isaac  Hoy,  Esq.,  of  Stoke  Priory,  a  handsome  mansion.  1 
mile  W.  of  the  church,  erected  in  1829,  and  so  called  from  a  monas¬ 
tery  which  existed  here  before  the  Conquest.”  The  same  Directory 
states  that  the  Hoy  family  owned  land  at  Qt.  Waldingfield,  and  that 
Miss  Ann  Hoy  was  a  landowner  at  Hadleigh  Hamlet. 

Lady  Witham  {nie  Hoy)  was  a  Catholic,  and  was  related  to  the 
Lewis  family  of  Stoke,  Polstead,  and  Higham.  Can  any  reader  tell 
me  the  exact  relationship  ? 

Lady  Mary  Gertrude  Lescher,  eighteenth  Abbess  of  S.  Mary’s 
Abbey,  East  Bergholt,  who  was  born  in  1835,  and  died  in  May,  1904, 
was  a  daughter  of  William  Joseph  Lescher  of  London  by  Mary  Hoy 
of  Stoke.  T  X, 


Townsend  of  Essex. — I  should  be  glad  to  receive  any  information, 
of  the  period  1750 — 1795,  of  a  yeoman  family  of  this  name,  then 
living  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Little  Waltham. 

I  have  the  following  notes: — In  his  will,  dated  29  Aug.  1766, 
and  proved  4  March,  1767,  William  Townsend  of  Tolleshunt  d’Arcy, 
farmer,  mentions  his  wife  Hannah,  and  his  children,  John,  Sarah,  and 
James  Townsend.  There  are  two  headstones  in  West  Bergholt 
churchyard:  (1)  Sarah,  wife  of  Will.  Townshend,  25  Sept.  1782, 
aged  33 ;  William,  their  only  son,  2  Sept.  1778,  aged  9  ;  and  William 
Townshend,  26  May,  1809,  aged  70  (born  1738-39).  (2)  Ruth,  wife 
of  Will.  T.,  12  Sept.  1826,  aged  65.  A  headstone  in  Great  Waltham 
churchyard  is  for  Myra,  widow  of  Will.  Townsend,  late  of  this  parish, 
20  Ap.  1863,  aged  77  (born  1785-86);  Will.  T.,  son  of  above,  7  Jan. 
1868,  aged  61  ;  and  Sarah  Jane  Whimper,  his  widow,  16  Nov.  1872, 
aged  67.  This  last  William  Townsend  was  of  Wall  Farm,  Great 
Waltham,  and  died  without  issue.  (Several  generations  of  his  ancestors 
are  said  to  have  been  buried  at  High  Easter.  Are  there  any  Townsend 
inscriptions  in  High  Easter  churchyard  ? 

Between  24  Dec.  1756,  and  12  July,  1775,  Mary,  widow  of  Henry 
Simons  of  Fingringhoe,  married  a  Mr.  Townsend.  Can  any  reader 
give  me  further  particulars  ?  EM 


XOTES  AND  qUEBIES,  BTC. 


245 


TITHE-CUSTOMS  OF  MONK  80HAM,  SUFFOLK,  IN  1617. 

The  manuscript  from  which  the  following  extracts  are  taken  is 
in  the  possession  of  William  Wollaston  Qroome,  Esq.,  M.D.,  late  of 
Stowiuarket,  but  now  of  Suffolk  House,  Surbiton,  son  of  the  late 
Venerable  Robert  Hindes  Qroome,  Archdeacon  of  Suffolk,  and  Rector 
of  Monk-Soham.  These  extracts  are  published  with  Dr.  Groome’s 
kind  permission. 

Some  of  the  tithe-customs  are  curious,  and  one  of  the  most 
interesting  items  is  that  the  Parson  was  to  have  “two  Pence  for 
every  one  that  receiveth  the  Communion  at  Easter,  if  he  have  dwelt 
in  the  Town  a  Year.” 

Students  of  local  and  obsolete  words  will  be  interested  in  the 
first  extract,  and  in  several  words  that  occur  in  the  “  Testimony  ” 
crtncerning  tithes — (lamb)  lained  or  fallen  ;  (fleece  of  wool)  renned  or 
clipped ;  sh'*fe  of  wheat ;  swayth  or  shoaf  of  barley ;  stetch,  swathe 
or  heap  of  pease ;  glean  of  hemp ;  banes ;  rawes ;  etc. 

The  “  Chas.  Garneys  ”  whose  signature  appears  at  the  end  of  the 
manuscript  was  probably  Charles  Garneys  of  Kenton,  gent.,  under 
age  at  the  death  of  his  father  (Wentworth  John  Garneys  of  Kenton) 
in  1728,  died  without  issue  in  1778,  and  was  buried  in  the  chancel  at 
Kenton. — Muskett’s  Suffolk  Manorial  Familiet,  vol.  i.,  p.  192. 

1617. 

. . .  And  also  one  other  piece  of  Land  &  Pasture,  divided  with 
diverse  Meares,  with  three  cross-pieces  or  wents  at  the  Head  (in  the 
parish  of  Kenton)  . . .  the  Town  Mere  or  Procession  way  (parish  of 
Monk-Soham). 

«  •  «  « 

A  True  Note,  &  Testimony  of  the  Inhabitants  of  Monksoham, 
aforesaid,  and  others,  whose  names  are  hereunder  written  of  all  the 
Portions  of  Tythes  that  are  Yearly  to  bo  paid  unto  the  Parson, 
according  to  the  Antient  Custom  or  Customs  of  the  said  Town. 

Imprimis,  the  Parson  is  to  have  but  Fifteen  Cheeses  in  one  Year 
•  of  every  Inhabitant  and  Householder  Dwelling  within  the  Town  that 
keepeth  Mylche-kyne  or  Neate,  &  maketh  Cheese,  how  many  Cheeses 
soever  the  said  Householder  maketh  on  a  Day,  and  the  said  Tyth- 
Cheese  to  be  made  in  so  great  a  Vat,  as  the  owner  do  usually  make  a 
Cheese  in,  for  himself,  the  day  before  the  Tything  day  of  the  Milk  of 
two  Meals,  or  part  thereof ;  The  first  Cheese  whereof,  is  to  be  made 
the  second  or  third  day  of  the  Month  of  May,  and  so  every  Tenth  day 
after  a  Cheese,  until  the  said  Fifteen  Cheeses  be  made; — The  first 
Five  Cheeses  to  be  delivered  at  or  upon  the  Feast  day  of  Saint  John 
the  Baptist,  called  Midsummer  day.  And  the  next  five  Cheeses  upon 
Lammas-day,  And  the  last  five  Cheeses  (of  the  said  Fifteen)  upon  the 
Feast  day  of  Saint  Michael  the  Archangel;  in  or  at  the  Church  or 
Chancel,  of  ’Soham  aforesaid. 


246 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OK, 


Tyth-  Item  the  Parson  is  to  have  a  Tyth  Calf  of  every  Inhabitant  and 

Calves.  Householder,  that  hath  Seven  or  Ten  Calves,  which  shall  be  Calved 
or  fallen  within  the  Town  aforesaid  in  one  Year  (if  there  live  Seven 
or  Ten  to  be  Tythable) — And  if  there  be  under  the  Number  of  Seven, 
then  the  Parishioner  is  to  pay  unto  the  Parson,  but  Two  Pence  for 
every  Calf,  And  if  there  be  Seven  then  the  Parson  is  to  have  a  Tyth 
Calf,  and  to  pay  or  allow  unto  the  said  Parishioner  for  ever}'  Calf, 
wanting  of  Ten,  Two  Pence ;  Also,  the  Parson  is  t<)  have  the  Tenth 
or  Seventh  Calf,  or  one  betwixt  Ten  and  Seven  ;  but  the  Tenth  is  his 
due,  if  that  live  to  be  Tythable,  and  if  there  be  above  the  Number 
of  Ten,  and  under  Seven,  that  then  the  Parson  is  to  have  for  every  of 
those  Calves  two  Pence.  And  if  the  said  Householder  or  Parishioner, 
do  Weane  any  of  the  aforesaid  Calves,  then  the  Tyth  aforesaid  is  in 
Lieu  and  full  Satisfaction  of  those  Cattle  so  Weaned,  until  they  come 
to  give  Milk ;  and  that  hath  been  our  usual  Custom,  that  if  the  Cow 
give  more  Milk,  then  the  Tyth  Calf  will  Suck,  to  Milk  some  away; 
Also  the  said  Tyth  Calf  at  the  Age  of  Five  Weeks  is  to  be  delivered 
unto  the  Parson,  or  to  his  Use,  at  the  House  or  Houses  of  the  said 
Parishioner  or  owner,  or  into  the  next  Highway  there  unto  adjoining. 
And  if  the  Parson  will  not  send  for  his  said  Tyth  Calf,  upon  know¬ 
ledge  given  to  him  thereof  by  the  said  Parishioner  or  owner,  that 
then  the  said  Tyth  Calf  is  to  be  delivered  into  the  Church  Yard,  or 
into  the  next  way  aforesaid. 

Tyth-  Item  the  Parson  is  to  have  a  Tyth  Lamb  of  every  Inhabitant  or 

Lamb.  Parishioner  that  hath  Seven  or  Ten  Lambs,  lained  or  fallen  within 
the  Town  in  one  Year,  (if  there  live  Seven  or  Ten  to  be  Tythable)  at 
Lammas  day,  And  if  there  be  uuder  the  Number  of  Seven,  then  the 
Parishioner  is  to  pay  unto  the  Parson  for  every  Lamb  a  half  Penny ; 
and  if  there  be  Seven  then  the  Parson  is  to  have  a  Tyth  Lamb, 
allowing  unto  the  Parishioner  a  half  Penny  for  every  Lamb,  wanting 
of  Ten ;  Also  the  Parson  is  to  have  the  Tenth  or  Seventh  Lamb,  or 
one  betwixt  Ten  &  Seven,  but  the  Tenth  is  his  due,  (if  that  live  to 
be  Tythable)  And  if  there  be  above  the  Number  of  Ten,  or  under 
Seven,  that  then  the  Parson  is  to  have  for  every  of  those  Lambs  a 
half  Penny,  And  the  said  Tyth  Lamb  to  be  delivered  upon  Lammas 
day  unto  the  Parson  or  to  his  Use,  as  is  aforesaid.  And  if  the  Parson 
shall  refuse  or  will  not  send  for  his  said  Tyth  Lamb,  knowledge 
thereof  being  given  to  him  by  the  said  Parishioner  or  owner,  that 
then  the  said  Tyth  Lamb  to  be  delivered  into  the  Church  Yard,  or 
into  the  next  Highway  adjoining  to  the  House  of  the  said  Parishioner, 
to  his  Use  as  aforesaid. 

Tyth  Item  the  Parson  is  to  have  the  Tenth  Fleece  of  Wool,  which 

Wool,  shall  be  renned  or  Clipped  within  the  Town  (except  Lambs  Wool) 
and  the  said  Tyth  Wool  to  be  delivered  unto  the  Parson,  or  to  his 
Use  at  Clipping  time,  at  the  House  of  the  said  Parishioner. 

Tyth  Item  the  Parson  is  to  have  but  the  Thirty  Shofe  of  Wheat  for 

Com.  Tyth,  for  the  Land  belonging  to  the  Manner  House  of  Monksoham 
Hall,  or  of  any  Lands  sold  or  Leased  from  the  said  Mannor  House, 
And  also  the  Thirty  Swayth  or  Shoaf  of  Barley  &  Oats,  And  also  the 
Thirtieth  Stetch  Swathe  or  Heap  of  Pease ;  which  said  Tyth  is  to  be 


NOTES  ANO  QUERIES,  BTC. 


247 


left  for  him  in  the  Field  or  Fields,  belonging  to  the  Manor  House 
aforesaid;  And  also  the  Parson  is  to  have  the  Thirtieth  Glean  of 
Hemp,  growing  upon  any  of  the  said  Lands  which  were,  or  be  now 
belonging  to  the  said  Manor  House,  and  the  said  Tyth  to  be  left  upon 
the  Hemp  Ground. 

Item  of  all  other  Lands  within  the  Town  aforesaid  (except  the 
Lauds  before  named,  the  Parson  is  to  have  the  Tenth  Shofe  of  Wheat 
next  as  that  cometh  to  the  Fork,  as  the  Sheves  be  laid  together  on 
heaps,  and  the  Tenth  Shofe  or  Swathe  of  Barley  &  Oats,  And  also  the 
Tenth  Stetch,  Swathe  or  Heap  or  Pease,  which  said  Tyth  is  to  be  left 
for  him  in  the  Field,  as  aforesaid.  And  also  the  Tenth  Glean  of 
Hemp,  to  be  left  upon  the  Hemp  Ground,  Also  Eye,  Tares,  &  Banes 
in  Fields  or  Closes  is  to  be  Tythed  as  other  Corn  aforesaid. 

Item  the  Parson  is  to  have  but  Four  Pence,  for  every  Acre  of 
Bottom  Meadow  which  is  Mowed  within  the  Town  for  the  whole 
Year’s  profit  of  the  same.  And  two  Pence  for  every  Acre  of  Hard 
Land  Ground  Mowed  for  the  whole  Year’s  Profit  of  the  same,  where¬ 
soever  he  Dwelleth,  that  Occupieth  any  of  the  said  Mowne  Grounds 
(Except  the  Borders,  Meres,  Eawes  of  such  Lands  &  Grounds  as  be 
with  Corn  or  Tilled  for  Corn). 

Item  the  Parson  is  to  have  but  Four  Pence  for  every  Orchard 
within  the  Town  for  his  Tithe,  for  the  Profit  of  Fruit  thereupon 
growing.  And  all  such  Money  for  Herbage,  or  any  other  Duties  for 
Tithes,  are  to  be  paid  and  tendered  to  the  said  Parson,  or  to  his  Use, 
every  Year  upon  Lammas  day,  or  betwixt  that  day  and  the  Feast  day 
of  8‘  Michael  the  Archangel. 

Item,  the  Parson  is  to  have  the  Tenth  Pigg,  to  be  delivered  to 
the  Parson,  or  to  his  Use,  at  the  Age  of  three  Weeks,  or  a  Month, 
at  the  House  of  the  Parishioner  or  owner, — (knowledge  being  given) 
other  Customs  we  know  not — but  the  Parson  is  to  have  the  Tenth 
Pigg,  that  live  to  be  Tithable. 

Item  the  Parson  is  to  have  a  Tithe  Goose  of  every  one  that 
reneweth  Ten  Geese  within  the  Town,  that  live  to  be  Tithable  at 
Lammas  day,  and  the  said  Tith  Goose  to  be  delivered  at  the  House 
of  the  said  Parishioner  upon  Lammas  day  (being  then  Demanded). 

Item  the  Parson  is  to  have  Eggs,  the  Week  before  Easter,  of 
every  one  that  keepeth  Fowls,  being  then  Demanded  at  the  Houses 
of  the  said  Parishioner’s;  Which  Eggs  are  paid  to  the  Parson  in 
Lieu  of  Tithe,  for  all  Fowls  (Except  Geese  aforesaid). 

Item,  We  have  our  Horses,  Mares,  and  Colts,  Tithe  Free,  in 
regard  of  their  Labour,  that  being  as  well  for  the  Benefit  &  Profit 
of  the  Parson,  as  for  ourselves  (Except  the  fall  of  a  Colt,  which  is 
a  Penny). 

Item,  for  the  Tithe  of  Wood,  we  never  paid  any,  because  all 
these  Tithes  cannot  be  made  &  Labour’d  for,  without  the  Use  of 
Wood — That  being  also  a  Benefit  to  the  Parson  as  well  as  ours. 

Item,  the  Parson  is  to  have  but  Six  Pence,  for  every  Couple 
that  he  Marrieth  within  the  Town,  and  two  Pence  for  every  one  that 
receiveth  the  Commuuiou  at  Easter,  if  he  have  dwelt  iu  the  Town 
a  Year. 


2^8  THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR. 

For  fat  Item,  if  we  Fat  any  of  our  Milcli,  Neat,  or  other  Cattle,  which 
Cattle,  the  Parson  hath  had  Tithe  for,  wether  Calf,  or  for  the  fall  of  a  Calf ; 
or  Tithe  Cheese,  that  then  he  is  to  have  no  more,  or  other  Tithe  for 
those  Cattle  so  Fatted,  but  the  Tithe  aforesaid. 

For  As  for  them  that  Use  &  Occupy  Farms  or  Grounds  only  with 

Grazing  Grazing  and  Fatting  of  Cattle,  what  Composition  or  Agreement  they 
°  make  with  the  Parson  for  the  Tithes  thereof ;  We  know  not. 

«  «  « 

Taken  from  the  Original,  in  Dec'  1763 — 

Which  is  in  the  Hands  of 
me 

Cha*  Garneys 

I  paid  for  this  10:6 

to  the  above 

K:  Marsh 

Slowmarket,  Suffolk.  CHARLES  PaRTKIDOE,  JCN. 


INDEX  TO  MONUMENTAL  INSCRIPTIONS  IN  SUFFOLK 
CHURCHYARDS.*  No.  LXVI. 


(Those  in  brackets  are  Christian  names). 


Bishop 

Broadish  of  Bucklesham 
Chamberlain  of  Wash- 
brook  of  Copdock  of 
Ramsey  in  Essex 
Cole  of  Washbrook 
Cousins 
Cullington 

Baking  of  Washbrook 
Daldry,  gunner,  r.a. 
Edwards  of  Washbrook 
Freeman 

Gentry  of  Washbrook 

Goudy 

Grimes 

Grimsey 

Stotvmarket,  Suffolk. 


Samford  Hundred. 

Waihhrook.  f 
Grimwood 

Hales-Tooke  (Tooke)  of 
Copdock  and  Wash¬ 
brook 
Hills 

Josselyn  of  Copdock 
Kemball  of  Hitcham 
Ijott  of  The  Rookery 
[Washbrook] 
Mumford 
Parker 
Porter 

Roberts  of  Copdock 
Sharman  of  Washbrook 
Shulver 


Steward 

Suckling 

Taylor 

Thorpe 

Tooke,  Hales  (Tooke)  of 
Copdock  and  Wash¬ 
brook 

Tooke  {see  Hales-Tooke 
and  Tooke,  Hales) 
Trent  of  Washbrook 
Turner,  blacksmith 
Ward 
Wilson 
Woodcock 
Woods 


Charles  Partridge,  jun. 

+  A  stone  is  inscribed  |  j  ^  ^  " 


*  Continued  from  vol  ix,  p.  157  (Oct.  1901). 


■ 


XUM 


NOTES  AMD  QUERIES,  ETC. 


249 


INDEX  TO  THE  PARTICULAES  OF  FEE-FARM  RENTS 
RESERVED  UPON  GRANTS  FROM  THE  CROWN  AND 
REMAINING  IN  THE  AUGMENTATION  OFFICE 
{continued  from  p.  238). 

SUFFOLK. 


Places. 

Premises  charged. 

Grantees. 

Rolls  No. 

Aldborough 

The  Rectory  &  sun- 
drys 

Edmd.  Downing  &  I 
al.  1 

i  200,  485 

1  210,  494 

Ashe 

See  Parham  . 

Thos.  Sackford 

225,  512 

Aldringham 

See  Layston  . 

Qeo.,  E.  of  Bucking¬ 
ham 

226,  513 

Amptou  . 

The  Chantry  . 

. 

49,  113 

Bynge 

The  Manor 

Anthony  Wingfield 

198,  482 

201,  485 

202,  486 

203,  487 

204,  488 

Bury  St.  Edmund’s . 

Divers  Premises 

Various  Grantees  .  • 

205,  489 

206,  490 

222,  507 

223,  508 
227,  514 

Barton,  Great  . 

See  Risby 

Sir  Thos.  Eytson  .  j 

[  207,  491 

1  245,  541 

Baughton  als.  Bacton 

A  castle  ward  rent 

sees 

1,  1 

Brandenferry  . 

See  Wangford 

Richd.  Taverner  &  | 
als.  { 

[  208.  492 
[  219,  504 

Barrow  Baveusholt . 

Sundry  Premises  . 

Edwd.  North,  kt.  . 

5,  30 

Barneham 

See  Wangford 

Rich.  Taverner  &  als. 

208,  492 

Belings  . 

See  Thetford  . 

.... 

55,  132 

Barkings . 

A  water  mill  & 
suudrys 

The  Rectory  . 

Edwd.  Ferrers  &  als. 

209,  493 

Blyforth  . 

Sir  Henry  Spiller  .  j 

f  45,  111 

1  46 

Bures  S.  Mary,  Essex 

The  Rectory  &  Church 

Frans.  Walsingham  i 

215,  499 

&  Suff. 

&  Suudrys 

&  als.  I 

216 

Bucklowe  * 

See  Layston  . 

Geo.,  E.  of  Bucking-  i 
ham  1 

226,  513 
242,  538 

Bressett  f 

See  Thetford  . 

.  .  . 

55,  132 

Brundish 

See  Wilbie 

Edwd.  Ditchfield  & 
als. 

233,  526 

Blacksale  | 

See  Thetford  which 
refers  to  Wangford 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk  | 

55,  132 

Bernham  Broome  §  . 

Richard  Taverner  .  1 

208,  492 

Beccles  Fenn  . 

The  Marsh 

Wm.  Read 

249,  549 

Bishopwik  || 

The  Manor 

Sir  John  Jermy 

258,  562 

Battisford 

M 

Rir  Richd.  Gresham 

258,  563 

Boytou  . 

l»  •  • 

Robt.  Forth  . 

264,  575 

Chellesworth  . 

. 

199,  483 

(?)  Buxhall.  i  (!)  Bricett.  t  (?)  BlaxIiaU.  I  This  should  appear  under  Norfolk. 
H  Hamlet  in  Ipswich. 


250 


TH£  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


Places. 

Ghepingball 

Chevynton 
Goddenham 
Gretyng  . 

Gombusta  * 
Gaptouhall 

Gampeey  . 

Gorton  . 

Gayenham 

Goldhall  . 

Gulford  . 

Gockfield . 

Gowston  . 

Gheyenhall  alias 

Ghepinghall 

Ghesilford 

Dunwithe 

Downham 

Darsham  . 
Dennington 

Darnefordhall  . 
Dermondeston, 

Downeham  f 
Elveden  . 

Eye 

Elmeset  . 

Eastfleete 

Elmeswell 

Eye 


Premises  chained. 

The  Manor 

See  Bisby 
The  Manor 


The  Manor  &  Suu- 
drys 

See  Parham  . 

See  Laystou  . 

The  Manor,  Eectory, 
&  Suudrys 
The  Beotory  &  Sun¬ 
dry  s 

The  Manor 
The  Manor 


See  Thetford  . 

See  Wangford 

See  Thetford  . 

A  Bent  of  Assize  out 
of  the  Manor  &  of 
the  Tenants 

The  Manor 

See  Thetford  . 

See  Wangford 

The  Bectory,  Park, 
&  Sundrys 

A  portion  of  Tithes 
&  Land 

The  Manor 

Sundry  L-inds 


Grantees. 

Sir  Humy.  Wyng- 
field 

Sir  Thos.  Eytson  . 

Sir  Thos.  Pope 

Sir  Bichd.  Gavendish 

Various  Grantees  .  | 

Thos.  Sackford 

Qeo.,E.  of  Bucking¬ 
ham 

Various  Grantees  •  ( 

John  Bussell  . 

Ghristopher  Gooke 
&  Wife 

John  Spring  . 

Sir  Francis  Loyell 
&  Wife 

Sir  Anthony  Bowse 


Bichd.  Taverner  & 
als. 


Sir  Bichd.  Gavendish 


Bichd.  Taverner  &  ( 
als.  ( 

Various  Grantees  .  | 

Frans.  Morrice  &  als. 

Edwd.  Jernegan 
Thos.  Lord  Darcey  . 
Edwd.  Litchfield  &( 
als.  I 

Henry,  E.  of  Surry  . 

Sir  Thos.  Eytson  . 
>»  •*  • 
»>  »>  • 

The  Mayor,  Gom- 
monalty,  &  Giti- 
zens  of  London 
Sir  Thos.  Pope 


Elvenden  .  .  The  Manor 

Eresham  als.  Eshamat  See  Istede 
Fornham  All  Saints  See  Bisby 
Fornham,  Genevive  See  Bisby 
Fomham,  Saint  Mar-  , , 

tins 

Felizstow  .  .  See  Walton 


Foxhall  .  .  .  The  Manor 


RolUNo. 
23,  81 

207,  491 
224,  510 
224,  510 
224,  511 

224,  511 
254,  557 

225,  512 

226,  513 

239,  535 

240,  536 

247,  545 

248,  546 

249,  548 
251,  553 

261,  569 

264,  573 
56,  132 

208,  492 
254,  556 

55,  132 

217,  600 
501,  502 

224,  511 
55,  132 

208,  492 
261,  568 
211,  495 
233,  527 
229,  522 

231,  524 
246,  544 
47,  112 
48 

256,  559 
30,  68 
207,  491 
207,  491 
207,  491 

220,  505 


224,  510 


(t)  Bndfleld. 


f  Norfolk. 


NOTES  AND  QT7EBIE8,  ETC. 


PUcea. 

Framliogham  Castle 
Oilham  *  .  . 

Qillingham  f  . 
Olemham 
Qlemsforth 

Qipwick  ^ 

Qarleston 

Qlemsford 

Qoddlesford 

Heringfleets  . 

Hargrave 

Heiigrave 

Hempton 

Hadleigh 


Premises  charged. 
See  Parham  . 

The  Mauor 
See  Wangford 
See  Thetford  . 

The  Manor,  Bents  of 
Assize  &  Sundrjs 
The  Manor 
The  Manor 
A  Water  Mill  & 
Sundrys 
The  Manor 
The  Mauor,  &c. 

See  Bisby 

See  Wangford 
The  Corporation 


HechamalaHitcham  The  Manor  &  Sun- 


Hatcheston 

Hinderley 

Hermingsherth,  Little 

Heringswell 

Hoo 

lUingham  § 


drys 

See  Parham 
The  Mauor 


See  Oldhall 
See  Wangford 


Istede  als.  Isteden-  The  Manor  &  Sun- 


hall  als.  Weybred 
Ixworth  . 
llketteshall 
Ingham  . 
Knoddeshall  . 

Eelsale  . 

Eiugshall 
Eettleberstone  || 
Eedington  als.Kelston 

Eessingland 

Eessingham 
Lakingheath  . 
Layston  51 

Lowstofte  als.  Leis- 
tofte 

Livermere 
liothiugland 
Leigham  . 

Marlesford 

Middleton 


drys 

See  Wangford 
Sundry  demises 
The  Manor 
See  Layston  . 

See  Layston  . 
The  Manor 


Thos.  Sackford 
Anty.  Wingfield 
Bich.  Taverner  &  als. 
Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 
Edwd.  Litchfield  & 
als. 

Sir  Thos.  Pope 
Edwd.  Jemegan 
Edw.  Ferrers  &  als. 

Sir  John  Baynsford 
Sir  Hen.  Jerniugham 
Sir  Thos.  Eytson  . 
>>  •»  • 
Bich.  Taverner  &  als. 
Mayor,  Aldermen, 

&  Burgs. 

Ed.  DitcMeld  &  als.  | 

Thos.  Sackford 
Thos.  Bacon  . 

Thos.,  Lord  Darcey . 
Thos.,  Lord  Awdley 
Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 
Bichd.  Taverner  & 
als. 

Jas.  Hussey  &  als. 


BolUNo. 
225,  512 
198,  482 
208,  492 
55,  132 
218,  503 

224,  510 

231,  524 

232,  525 

262,  570 
39,  106 
207,  491 

207,  491 

208,  492 
213,  497 

221,  506 

225,  512 

226,  518 
245,  540 
250,  550 
252,  554 
208,  492 


Mittingham ' 


The  Bectory  . 

The  Mauor 
See  Wangford 
The  Manor  &  Sun¬ 
dry  Bents  of  Assize 
The  Manor 

See  Thetford  . 

The  Hundred . 

The  Manor 
See  Parham  . 

See  Layston  . 

The  Manor  &  Lands 


Moyle  Finch 
Nics.  Bacon 
Geo.,K  of  Bucking¬ 
ham 

Bichd.  Freeston 
Walter  Clark  &  als. 
Sir  Thos.  Bamardiston 

Frans.  Phelips  &  als,  | 

Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse 
Bich. Taverner  &  als. 
Qeo.,  E.  of  Bucking¬ 
ham 

Edwd.  Jernigan 


Edwd.  Jernigan 
John  Clarke  . 
Thos.  Sackford 

Bich.Taverner  &  als. 
Sir  Anty.  Denny  . 


208,  492 

252,  555 
226,  513 

226,  513 

230,  523 
238,  534 
260,  567 

51,  116 
52 

263,  572 
208,  492 
226,  513 

231,  524 

55,  132 
231,  524 
257,  560 

225,  512 

226,  513 
241,  537 
228,  519 


(t)  Qialeham.  t  (!)  Oislmgham.  t  Ipswich.  {  Ichlingham. 
n  KetUebaston.  II  Leuton.  **  Mettingham. 


XUM 


252 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


Place*. 

Premiaea  chained. 

Grantees. 

Rolls  No. 

Mendham 

The  Site  of  the  late 

Bichd.  Freeston 

230,  523 

Mutford  . 

Priory  &  Suudrys 

The  Manor 

Edwd.  Jernegan 

231,  524 

Mells 

See  Thetford  . 

55,  132 

Moulton  . 

See  Westcotts 

S  *  e  • 

26,  44 

Monk  Melford 

The  Manor  &  Sun* 
drys 

See  Thetford  . 

Wm.  Glopton  &Wife 

247,  546 

Mynnesmere  . 

. 

55,  132 

Northleete 

The  Manor 

Edwd.  Jernegan 

231,  524 

Needham 

See  Istede 

30,  68 

Netherhall 

The  Manor 

Sir  Hum.  Wyngfield 

33,  81 

Norton  . 

>»  •  • 

Thos.,  Ld.  Darcey  . 
Henry  Peyton 

244,  539 

Nawton  * 

,,  ,  , 

246,  543 

Orford 

See  Vawdye  . 

34,  870 

Oldhall  . 

The  Manor 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

252,  554 

Overhall  . 

•  • 

Sir  Hum.  Wyngfield 

33,  81 

Ockhold  . 

Beuiugham  Manor  . 

John  Eene 

259,  564 

Orford 

Sundry  Premises  . 

.  .  .  .j 

50,  114 
115 

Parham  . 

TheManor&Sundrys  Thos.  Sackford  .  j 

225,  512 
235,  530 

Petistree  . 

See  Parham  . 

. 

225,  512 
250,  552 

Pakeuham 

The  Mauor&  Sundry 8  Various  Grantees  .  < 

262,  571 

551 

Preston  . 

The  Manor  of  Moisters  Andrew  Judd  . 

255,  558 

Bushworth 

See  Thetford  . 

e  *  *  * 

55,  132 

Beyden  . 

Bisby  Saxtons . 

The  Manor  &  Sun- 

Sir  Thos.  Eytson  . 

55,  132 
207,  491 

drys 

Bedgrave 

The  Manor 

Nichs.  Bacon  . 

228,  515 

Bic^nghall  als. 

>>  •  • 

228,  517 

Westhall 

245,  542 
252,  554 

Bougham 

The  Manor 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

Bothiiigland  . 

See  Thetford  . 

Sir  Wm.  Woodhouse 

263,  572 

Sileham  f 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Stoveu 

»  •  • 

}>  ))  >9  * 

55,  132 

Southwald 

yy  •  • 

yy  yy  99  * 

55,  132 

Sibiton  . 

M  >1  •  • 

55,  132 

Sudbury  . 

Thos.  Eden 

198,  481 

Saxham  . 

The  Manor  &  Bents 

John  Nicholas  &  als. 

212,  496 

of  Assise 

Stower^  . 

The  Biver  from  Sud¬ 

Arnold  Spencer 

214,  498 

bury  in  Suffolk  to 
Mauningtree  in 
Essex 

Somet 

The  Manor 

Clement  Higham  . 

224,  509 

Stoneham  . 

See  Layston  . 

Sir  Thos.  Pope 

224,  510 

Sisewell  . 

Qeo.,  E.  of  Bucking¬ 
ham 

Edwd.  Jernegan 

226,  513 

Southleete 

The  Manor 

231,  524 

Shelley  . 

The  Bectory  &  Lands  .... 

(  234,  528 
i  529 

*  (T)  Nowton.  f  Syleham.  t  Stour. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


253 


Places. 

Premises  charged. 

Grantees. 

Bolls  No. 

Southbolte 

The  Manor 

Sir  Auty.  Rowse  . 

259,  565 

Thurston . 

The  Manor,  &c. 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Thetford  (Norfolk)  . 

See  Wangford 

Richd.  Taverner 

208,  492 

Various  Lands,  &c. 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Tbeberton 

See  Layston  . 

Qeo.,  £.  of  Buckiug- 
ham 

Edwd.  Ditchfield  & 
als. 

226,  513 

Thorpe  . 

See  Wilbie 

226,  513 

Tadiugton  * 

233,  526 

Taugham 

The  Manor 

Wm.  Forth  . 

264,  574 

Weybred 

See  Istede 

Jas.  Hussey  &  als.  . 

30,  68 

Wilbeigh  f 

Sundry  Premises, 
part  of  Butley, 
late  Monastery 

'  '1 

41,  109 
42 

Wangord 

See  Thetford  . 

Thos.,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

Wikewest 

The  Mauor 

Anthony  Wingfield 

55,  132 

Wickham 

198,  482 

Westley  . 

See  Risby 

Sir  Thos.  Kytsou  . 

207,  491 

Wangford 

Livermore  Manor  or 
Orange  &  Suudrys 

Richd.  Taverner  & 
als. 

208,  492 

Waltou  . 

The  Mauor  &  Sun> 
drys 

The  Mayor,  Com¬ 
monality,  &  Citi¬ 
zens  of  Loudon 

220,  505 

Weuham,  Combust  . 

The  Mauor 

Sir  Rich.  Cavendish 

224,  511 

Westbardolph  . 

„ 

,,  ,, 

224,  511 

Wortham 

n  •  • 

Nichs.  Baoon  . 

228,  516 

Westleete 

The  Seits  of  the 
Mauor  &  Suudrys 

Edwd.  Jernegau 

231,  524 

Wilbie 

Edwd.  Ditchfield  & 
als. 

233,  526 

Waldriiigfield,  Little 

The  Rectory  . 

Francis  Phelips  &  als. 

237,  633 

Woolpit  . 

The  Mauor 

Thos.  Ld.  Darcey  . 

246,  544 

Whatfield 

,, 

Sir  Ambrose  Jermyn 
Thos.  Barnadiston  . 

249,  547 

Wratting 

tf  •  • 

257,  561 

Wikehain  Skyl 

*»  •  • 

Sir  Richd.  Freestou 

260,  566 

Yxford  als.  Yoxford 

See  Thetford  . 

Thoa,  D.  of  Norfolk 

55,  132 

(Tb  he  continued).  L.  M.  B. 


SOME  FOURTEENTH  CENTURY  DOCUMENTS 
RELATING  TO  HERRINQ8WELL,  CO.  SUFFOLK.  No.  II. 
{continued  from  p.  124). 

The  second  of  the  series,  a  court  roll  of  the  year  1318,  is  written 
on  a  single  skin  of  parchment,  19^  by  8}  inches,  and  is  in  an 
extremely  good  state  of  preservation. 

’  fsc-  <  Hering’  ann’  E.  xj®. 

at  ,  I  Heringwell  11  Edw.  II.  1318.  No.  2. 

Hering  welt.  Cur’  ibid  tent’  die  M’cur’  px’  p®t  ffh  Sti  Qregorii 
Anno  rr’  E.  fil  r’  E.  Undeci6.§ 

*  Tannington.  f  Elsewhere  spelt  Wilbie.  X  Wickham  Skeitb. 
f  March  16^,  13i;. 


254 


THE  EAST  AEOLIAN;  OB, 


Fia  Tj*’ 

Fia  xii**’ 

Fia  vj-*’ 

Fia  vj**’ 


Fia  vj-*’ 


Fia  Tj*' 


Fia  Tj^’ 

m  iij*’ 
p’est 

Fin  vj'*' 


m  iij**’ 

m  iij'*’ 

p’est 

E9 

in  iij**’ 
in  Iij"*' 

Fia  xy**’ 


m  vj'*’ 
in  iij'*’ 
in  iij'*’ 


D’  Roy’s  que  fuit  ux  Petr’  de  Mellis  de  fine  p  sect’  us<j  £m  Sti 
MichTs  px’  ventur’  ptg. 

D’  Alicia  le  fFeuere  de  fine  p  t’i5  suo  Undo  in  una  ac  t^rr  iacent’  sr’ 
Ouerecroft  a  fto  Sti  Michis  ufti*  elaps’  p  qtuor  annos  px’  futos  ex 
dimission  Rid  Spkf  pig  Ric’s  Spkf. 

D’  Cat’ina  Douue  de  fine  p  t’i5  suo  lindo  in  dim  ac  terr’  iacent’ 
apud  Radm’e  a  fto  Sti  Miciiis  ulti”  elaps’  p  duos  annos  pxi5  futos  ex 
dimission  p’dti  RicT  Spkf  pig  idm  Ricus. 

D’  Matild’  Skot  de  fine  p  ti5  suo  Kudo  in  dia  ac  terr’  iacent’  in 
Estfeld  a  fto  Sti  Miciiis  ulti”  elaps’  p  qtuor  annos  pxio  futos  ex 
dimission  p’dti  RicT  Sparkf  pig  jdm  Rics. 

D’  Matild’  Skot  de  fine  p  t’io  suo  Undo  in  dia  ac  terr  jacent’  apud 
Litlehowe  a  fto  Sti  Miciiis  ulti*  elaps’  p  q’nq,  annos  pxio  futos  ex 
dimission  Walt’i  Buningf  pig  Walt’s  Buningf. 

D’  Rolito  Caumbrey  de  fine  p  t’id  suo  lindo  in  dia  ac  terr  jacent’ 
in  Estfeld  a  fto  Sti  Miciiis  ulti°  elaps’  p  q’nc^  annos  pxio  futos  ex 
dimission  Rid  Sparkf  pig  idin  Ricus. 

D’  Rico  de  Boylound  de  fine  p  tio  suo  lindo  in  trib}  rod’  terr 
jacent’  apud  le  molneweye  a  fto  Sti  Miciiis  ulti®  elaps’  p  [tres]* 
quatuor  annos  pxio  futos  ex  dimission  Rici  Spkf  pig  idm  Ricus. 

D’  Rico  Chapeleyn  p  ini®ta  det’  ixd’  u’  Matild’  Skot  p  eo  qd  no 
potuit  dedic’e.i  tJnd’  damp  tax  ad  iijd’.  Et  p’est  leuar’  pig  Johes 
Aleyn. 

D’  Ada  Araz  de  fine  p  t'lo  suo  lindo  in  trib3  rodis  terr’  jacent’  in 
Middelfeld  a  fto  Sti  MicMs  ulti®  elaps’  p  tres  annos  pxio  futos  ex 
dimissione  Willi  Sparkf  pig  jdm  Wills. 

D’  Rico  le  Bekf  p  ini®ta  det’  xiiijd’  u’  Simon’  le  Hyne.  Un  damp’ 
remittut'  [Et  p’  e’  leuar’].* 

D’  Jobne  Skot  p  ini®ta  det’  xiiijd’  u’  Ricm  le  Bekf  p  eo  qd  no 
potuit  dedic’e.  Et  remittit  damp’.  Et  p'est  leuar’  pig  Rics  le  Bekf. 

Dat®  est  dies  p’ce  pciu  *  Johi  Branuche  de  Sto  Edmo  quer’  Rico 
le  Brouster’  def’  de  plTto  deb!  vsq,  ad  pxm  Cur’  veniend’  sn  esson. 

D’  Thom’  Dykoun  p  lie'  con’  ®  cu  Henr’  le  Chapman  de  plTto 
[debi]  *  tns  pig  p’ptus.* 

I)’  Johne  Skot  p  lie’  con’  cu  Thom’  Bunyngf  de  plTto  tns  pig 
p’pts. 

D’  Cat’iua  Douue  p  t’io  suo  lindo  in  dia  ac  terr  jacent’  in  middel¬ 
feld  a  fto  Sti  Miciiis  ulti®  elaps’  p  sex  anno  pxio  futos  ex  dimission 
Thom  [Thom’]*  Bunyngf. 

D’  Alicia  le  fieuer’  p  ceruis’  vend’  cont  ass’,  m’  iij**’.  D’  Isabel! 
Caneuaz  p  Gannoker’  ®  c’uis’. 

D’  M^atild’  Skot  p  Gannoker’  ceruis’.  m’  iij^’.  D’  ux  RicT  Darnel 
p  eod’. 

D’  Albr’  ®  Horn  p  eodm’.  m’  iij'*’.  D’  Ismayna?  NoSe  p  eod’. 

*  dedicere. 

*  prece  parcium  =  at  the  request  of  the  parties. 

*  concordandi. 

*  praepositus  =  the  reeve. 

*  Gannoker  =  alehouse  keeper  (Murray  gives  Oanneker), 

*  Alhrea  or  Albreda  =  Auhrey. 

''  ef.  the  brass  to  Ittnay  de  Winston,  at  Necton,  Norfolk. 


NOTBS  AND  QUBKIK8,  STC. 


255 


D’  Wilio  Kykes  de  fine  p  t’io  suo  Kudo  in  j  acr  terr’  jacent’  in 
Nethercroft  a  fto  8ti  Micliis  ulti**  elaps’  p  duos  annos  pxio  futos  ex 
dimission  Thom’  Roberd  pig. 

D’  Reyner’  ad  Cruce  p  defaltf. 

D’  Henrico  le  Chapman  p  fals’  clam’  u’  Gundr’  le  Daye  de  plTto 
tns  pig  Ric’  Sabyn’. 

D’  Agnet’  Skylemau  p  sbtract’  cons’  vocat’  Cornbote  *  in  autpno 
pig  Ad’  p’pts. 

D’  Johne  Skot  p  eod’  pig  Walt’  Bunyngf. 

D’  ^ico]  Wiilo  Spark  f  p  eod’  pig  Ric’  Spkf. 

D’  Rico  Spkf  p  eod’  pig  Willo  Spkf. 

D’  Walt’o  Bunyngf  p  eod’  pig  Thom’  Bunyngf. 

D’  [Rico  ChapeleynJ*  q  vendidit  arbor’  crescent'  in  bondag’  fini 
sn  lie. 

Adam  Arraz  Johes  Aleyn  hnt  die  Uflq5  ad  pxm  Cur’  ad  certifi- 
cand’  Cur’  de  hiis  que  fecer’  vastu  ul  district’  in  ten  que  teneiit  in 
bondag’  de  dno  amputand’  arbores  ad  vendend’  aut  pstrand’  dom  *  *10. 

D’  Simon’  le  Brouster’  p  ij  b3  ordi  leuand’  de  Rico  Spke  pig 
p’pts  Et  p’  e’  leuar’  de  p’dto  Rico  p’d’  ord’  “^c. 

Pr’  est  atth  Rog’m  de  Courebehinden  ad  P”  Rico  le  Broust’e  de 
plito  det’  j  b5  blad’  mulfe.^® 

Sm  xj  s. 

litUourru,  Camit.  R.  G.  C.  LiVETT. 


Monumental  Inscrirtion  to  Orlando  Whistlecratt,  “  The 
Weather  Prophet.” — In  January,  1893,  an  appeal  was  made  in  The 
Eatt  Anglian  to  raise  a  small  fund  to  enable  this  Suffolk  worthy — the 
originator  and  writer,  during  many  years,  of  Whietleeraft' »  Almanac, 
and  the  author  of  a  work  on  meteorology  entitled  The  Climate  of  England 
(1840) — to  pass  his  declining  }’ears  in  a  greater  degree  of  comfort  than 
his  needy  circumstances  would  permit.  Mr.  Whistlecraft,  however, 
died  on  February  27th,  1893,  but  the  money  thus  collected  was  given 
to  his  widow. 

In  Thwaite  churchj'ard,  Suffolk,  just  east  of  the  chancel,  stands 
a  small  ornamental  iron  cross  bearing  the  following  inscription : — 

ORLANDO 
WHISTLECRAFT 
WEATHER  PROPHET  &  POET 
BORN  1810 
DIED  1893. 

Stovmarket,  Suffolk.  CHARLES  PARTRIDGE,  JUN. 

*  Cornbote  =  the  right  of  the  lord  to  take  the  best  sheaf  cut  in  the  harvest. 

*  “  For  the  purpose  of  selling  them  or  (?)  for  flooring  the  house.” 

i**  Com  that  has  been  ground  =  flour. 

*  Words  shewn  in  square  brackets  are  erased  in  the  original. 


XUM 


THS  SA8T  ANGLIAN  ;  OE, 


'  256 

WILLS  OF  THE  HUNDEED  OF  AEMINQFORD,  GAMES. 
{continued  from  p.  234). 

Ckoydon-cum-Clopton. 

IV. — Proved  in  the  Contittory  Court  of  Ely. 

(a)  Dale  Margaret,  Liber  Z  97  |  {h)  Hornsby  John  287  Walter 

V. — Proved  in  the  Court  of  the  Archdeacon  of  Ely. 

(1)  Pearce  John  iii.  90  (8)  Ralford  Mabel  v.  182 

(2)  Cooper  Clement  ,,  219  (9)  Dale  John  vi.  260 

(3)  Dali  William  ,,  228  (10)  Oodfreye  William  „  273 

(4)  Qodfreye  William  ,,  296  ( 1 1 )  Dale  William  vii.  215 

(5)  Qodfreye  Luke  ,,  297  (12)  Godfrey  Walter  „  203 

(6)  Stacy  Richard  v.  54  (13)  Godfrey  Katherine  „  238 

(7)  Hayward  Laurence  ,,  91  (14)  Pry nne  Joan  ,,  2 

(a)  Margaret  Dale,  widow.  Dated  20  Jan.  1615.  Mentions  son 
William  Dale ;  grandchildren  John  and  Elizabeth,  children  of  Walter 
Dale;  John  Dale,  son  of  John  Dale.  Witnesses:— Henry  Lillie, 
Water  Dale,  and  others.  Proved  11  April  1615. 

(5)  John  Hornsby,  husbandman.  Dated  2.3  Oct.  1697.  Mentions 
wife  Elizabeth ;  sons  Stephen  and  Edmund  ;  daughters  Jane  Law  and 
Elizabeth  Wilcox.  Witnesses: — Richard  Feazer,  Susanna  Wiggs. 
Proved  30  July  1698. 

(1)  John  Pearce  of  Craudon,  husbandman.  Dated  20  April  1569. 
To  son  John  20  nobles.  “My  wife  to  have  the  occupyinge  of  all 
suche  howsings  and  lands  as  was  myne  in  my  leese,  toward  the 
bryngyng  up  of  the  resydew  of  my  children,  she  to  keep  the  house  in 
good  reparations  and  tenant  like  without  wastrye.”  Mentions  wife 
and'  daughters  Ales,  Agnes,  and  Sewsan.  Copy  to  son  John. 
Executors: — Wife  and  William  Addams.  Witnesses: — James 
Marshall,  William  Ambrye,  Thomas  Perce.  Proved  30  April  1569. 

(2)  Clement  Cooper,  of  Crawdon,  husbandman.  Dated  15  May 
1575.  To  the  poore  of  Croydon  “to  euye  howsse  of  them  xij^.”  To 
daughters  Jane  and  Agnes  Cooper  £20  each.  Mentions  wife  Vastye ; 
brother  William  Adams;  sisters  Parnell  and  Mary  Adams;  wife’s 
brothers  Richard,  Jhon,  and  Henry  Lillye ;  cousin  John  Coper ; 
Maid  servant  France  ;  father  in  law  William  Adams.  Witnesses: — 
William  Amerre,  Gilbert  haywarde,  William  Adams,  and  Henrye 
Gower,  Curate  de  Crawden.  Proved  2  July  1575. 

(3)  William  Dali  of  Croyden,  husbandman.  Dated  28  Oct.  1575. 
To  Nicholas  Raper  4'*.  To  Richard  Killit  4"*.  To  John  Lillie  4^.  To 
Anne  Tichmas,  my  mayde  servant,  4  bushels  of  barley.  To  henry 
Skampyne,  my  cosyn,  4  bushels  of  barley.  To  John  Tennwith,  my 
servant,  a  lambe.  To  Jone  hardye  a  lambe.  To  Luce  Dalle,  my 
wyeff,  my  ij  best  mylch  beasts,  also  x  good  woll  shepe,  j  aker  of 
wheatt,  &  that  shalbe  the  best  saving  one  that  shalbe  sowne  of  my 


N0TK8  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


257 


ferine  land,  yearlye  so  longe  as  she  shall  Ijrre,  also  j  half  aker  of 
barly  yearlie.  John  Dali,  my  sunne,  shall  euye  yeare  reepe  &  mowe 
downe  ye  said  wheatt  &  barly,  &  brynge  yt  home  into  his  barne  for 
the  use  &  profitt  of  his  mother.  To  my  wife  also,  j  great  brass  panne, 
ye  greatest  of  all,  a  kettle  of  brasse  of  the  middle  sort,  j  brass  pott, 
&  a  chaffing  dish  of  latten,  j  candlestick  of  latten,  &  a  salte  of 
tynne,  six  pewder  platters ;  also  for  her  chamber  furniture  j  playne 
bedsted  with  the  best  mattrasse  that  I  have  to  yt,  a  bolster  with  ij 
pillowes,  ij  of  the  best  coverletts,  with  j  blankett  to  her  bedde,  ij  of 
my  best  coffers,  &  viij  paire  of  the  best  sheets,  with  j  table  clothe,  & 
all  the  hangings  that  be  about  her  bedde.  My  wyeff  shall  have  an 
honest  chamber  within  the  ferme  that  I  doe  nowe  dwell  in,  for  the 
terme  of  her  liffe  tyme  ;  also  shall  have  her  meatt  &  her  drynke,  with 
clothe  to  her  backe,  bothe  lynnynge  &  wollynge,  &  fyre,  at  the  cost 
and  charge  of  John  Dali,  my  Sunne.  If  they  cannot  agree  to  live 
together,  then  my  son  shall  honestlye  use  &  intreatt  his  mother,  &  give 
her  some  honest  portion  for  to  mantayne  her  w*''all.  John  Semer, 
supervisor,  with  iiij  bushels  of  barly  for  his  pains.  Witnesses: — 
Luke  Godfrie,  William  Godfreye,  Robert  Bamarde,  William  Payne. 
Proved  26  Nov.  1575. 

(4)  William  Godfreye  of  Croyden,  husbandman.  Dated  23  Jan. 
1576-7.  To  the  poor,  everie  house  4^,  The  stuSe  I  leave  behind  in 
the  house,  &  wode  in  the  yard,  &  all  the  haye  in  the  yard,  to  Margaret 
my  wife ;  also  ij  milch  beasts,  &  xx“  that  I  lent  to  Mr.  Williamson, 
the  which  is  in  the  hands  of  John  Warde,  my  wife’s  brother.  Son 
John  Godfrey,  residuary  legatee  &  executor.  Witnesses : — Luke 
Godfrey  my  brother,  Robert  Barnard,  Gilbard  hayward,  William 
Pynne,  &  Henrie  Gower,  clarke.  Proved.  23  Feb  1576. 

(5)  Luke  Godfreye  of  Croydon,  yeman.  Dated  11  Jan.  1577. 
To  the  poor  of  Croyden  xx',  to  be  distributed  at  the  time  of  my 
burial.  To  the  reparacion  of  the  highways  between  porters  & 
Picchers  comer  xx*.  To  Richard  Godfrie,  my  son  and  lawful  heir, 
all  my  lands  and  appurtenances  in  Croyden,  also  £20  at  the  age  of  21. 
To  Margaret  Godfrey,  my  eldest  daughter,  £40,  £20  to  be  paid  on 
the  day  of  her  marriage,  and  £20  2  years  after,  on  condition  that  she 
be  bound  in  £300  not  to  molest  my  eyres  or  executors  for  land  or 
goods.  To  Elizabeth  Godfrey,  my  daughter,  £40,  on  same  terms. 
To  Marian  Godfreye,  my  youngest  daughter,  £40,  at  the  age  of  21  or 
marriage.  Wife  Gillion,  residuary  legatee.  Executrix  and  “  gardiner  ” 
{$ic)  to  children.  Witnesses : — Henrie  Gower,  clarke  of  the  parish  of 
Croyden.  Proved  20  Jan. 

(6)  Richard  Stacy  of  Clopton.  To  be  buried  in  Croyden  Church¬ 
yard.  Mentions  wife  Johane;  sons  Thomas,  William,  John; 
daughters  Elizabeth  and  Margery.  Witnesses: — William  Tresse, 
Richard  Godfrey,  Thomas  Russell,  John  Hawton.  Proved  17  March 
1592. 

(7)  Lawrence  Haywarde  of  Crawden.  “  By  reason  that  I  am  to 
serve  my  prince  in  her  maiesties  affaires  and  warres,  and  therefore 
uncertaine  of  my  returue,”  &c.  All  my  goods  to  my  brother 
Edmunde  hayward,  on  condition  that  he  keep  my  mother,  as  becometh 


258 


TUK  EAST  AKOLIAN;  0&, 


a  good  child,  and  pay  my  debts.  I  owe  £10  to  John  Netherwodde  of 
Wimple,  to  Gilbert  Wiggs  of  Arrington  £5,  to  Stephen  Atropp  of 
Waristen  £5  for  one  yoke  of  oxen,  to  William  Adam  of  Croyden 
fower  nobles,  to  Nicholas  Johnson  als.  Butler  of  Orwell  24*,  to  Walter 
Pilgrim  of  Wendy  14*,  to  Lawrence  Key  ford  of  Arrington  10*,  to  John 
Bell  of  Littleington  10*,  to  John  Cooke  of  Stowe  10*.  To  my  brother 
John  Haywarde,  3  half  acres  of  grain,  1  of  wheat,  and  2  of  barley. 
To  my  sister  Margaret  1  half  acre  of  wheat  and  1  acre  of  barley. 
To  my  brother  Gilbert  Hayward  1  acre  of  wheat.  Witnesses : — 
William  Tresse,  clerke,  William  pym,  Gilbert  Wiggs,  William 
Hayward.  Proved  6  March  1592. 

(8)  Mabelle  Ratford  of  Clopton,  widow.  Dated  2  Sept.  1591. 
To  be  buried  in  the  Churchyard  of  Gamlingaye.  To  the  poore  of 
Gamlingay  40*.  Mentions  Richard  Stacy,  husband  of  my  daughter 
Joan,  Thomas  Stacy  his  son,  and  the  other  four  of  his  children ;  daughter 
Bridgett  Chessam’s  four  children ;  daughter  Alice  Newman’s  eight 
children;  daughter  Awdre  Symer’s  three  daughters,  Mary,  Ellen,  and 
Dorothie.  To  the  said  Mary  one  redd  pettycoate,  and  one  russett 
petticoate.  George  Newman,  son  in  law,  executor.  Witnesses:  — 
William  Tresse,  minister  of  Crawdon,  John  Hawton  of  Clopton. 
Proved  17  Oct.  1595. 

(9)  John  Dale  of  Crawdon.  Dated  9  Oct.  1608.  Mentions  wife 
Margaret;  sons  William,  Walter,  Thomas,  Henrie,  John.  To  the 
poore  of  Crawdon  3*  4“*,  to  be  distributed  at  the  time  of  my  buriall. 
Witnesses: — Henry  Lillie,  John  Morris,  Thomas  Perrie.  Proved 
22  Oct.  1608. 

(10)  William  Godfrey  of  Crawden,  thelder,  husbandman.  Dated 
25  Jan.  1608.  Mentions  daughter  Margerie  Roger  of  Harlton  and 
her  four  children,  Susan,  Robert,  Marie,  and  Thomas  ;  daughter  Susan 
Payne  of  Newnam  in  Hartfordshire  and  her  two  children  Thomas 
and  Francis;  Annis  Godfrie,  daughter  of  son  Water.  To  the  poorer 
sort  of  the  towne  of  Crawden  3*  4'*,  to  be  distributed  on  the  day  of 
my  burial.  To  my  son  Water  Godfrie  all  my  houses,  lands,  and 
closes  in  the  parish  of  Croyden,  with  all  cattell,  &c.  Witnesses: — 
Henrie  Lillie,  John  Pearse.  Proved  6  March  1608. 

(11)  William  Dale  of  Croyden,  husbandman.  Dated  2  March 
1617.  Mentions  wife  Susan;  daughter  Mary  Dale;  wife’s  brother 
Henry  Howton  of  Clopton.  Witnesses: — Henry  Lillye,  Elizabeth 
Lillie.  Proved  18  April  1618. 

(12)  Walter  Godfrey  of  Croyden,  yeoman.  Dated  31  Jan.  1617. 
To  my  son  William  Godfrey  10’.  To  my  son  William  Godfrey  a  cart 
and  cartgeares  for  4  horses ;  also  a  plow  with  plowgeares  fitt  for  4 
horses ;  also  my  greatest  brass  pott,  my  greatest  chist  in  the  parlor ; 
also  the  joyned  bed  that  standeth  in  the  parlor.  To  my  daughter 
Agnes  Godfrey  20*  at  22.  To  my  daughter  Katherine  Godfrey  £10 
at  24.  To  the  poor  of  the  town  of  Croyden  3*  4'*,  to  be  distributed  at 
my  burial.  To  my  mother,  widow,  Jde  Sheapheard  of  Gilden 
Morden,  2  bushels  of  wheat  and  4  bushels  of  barley.  Wife  Katherine, 
residuary  legatee  and  executrix.  My  coson  William  King  of  little 
Gransden,  supervisor,  and  I  give  him  20“*  for  a  pair  of  gloves.  All  my 


^OTES  AJfU  QUE&IES,  ETC. 


259 


howsea,  lands,  &c.,  to  my  son  William  at  21.  Witnesses: — Henry 
Lillie,  Edward  Hawar,  William  JafEerie.  Proved  14  March  1617. 

(13)  Katherine  Godfrey  of  Croyden,  widow.  Dated  30  May  1619. 
To  Agnes  my  eldest  daughter  £  1 0,  to  make  the  portion  given  her  by 
her  grandfather  and  father  £20.  To  Katherine  my  younger  daughter 
£10.  Also  to  each  six  pairs  of  sheets,  to  Agnes  the  green  coverlet 
with  birds  on  it,  my  great  spitt,  six  pieces  of  pewter  of  the  middle 
sort,  and  my  biggest  hrasse  panne.  To  Katherine  two  blankets,  my 
second  best  panne,  and  six  pieces  of  pewter  of  the  next  sort  to 
Agnes  her  pieces.  To  Agnes  the  presse  cubbord  in  my  parler.  To 
Katherine  my  best  huch  in  the  chamber  I  lye  in.  To  each  a  paire  of 
flaxen  pillowbeares,  and  a  flaxen  tablecloth.  To  Agnes  the  great 
new  tub,  to  Katherine  two  other  tubs.  To  my  son  William  two  tables, 
one  in  the  hall  and  one  in  the  parlor,  also  a  chayer  standing  over  the 
buttery,  my  muskett  with  all  other  furniture  belonging  to  it,  and  a 
horse  of  £3.  My  cosin,  Edmund  Hayward  shall  be  gardiner  (sie) 
to  my  son  till  21,  and  to  keep  him  at  school  until  he  be  fit  to  be 
a  gentleman’s  or  lawyer’s  clerk,  if  he  be  apt  to  learn.  To  my  mother 
a  bushel  of  wheat  and  a  bushel  of  barley,  yearly,  for  life ;  also  my 
coloured  gowne.  To  Jone,  my  maid,  my  two  working  day  pettycotes 
and  a  wastecoate.  To  Elizabeth  Dobs,  my  brother’s  daughter,  40*. 
To  Henry  Parker,  my  servant,  12^.  To  Nathanael  Byrde,  my  man,  12'*. 
Edmunde  Hayward,  executor.  Robert  Smith,  clerke,  parson  of 
Hungry  Hatley,  supervisor,  and  I  give  him  2*  6“*.  Witnesses: — 

Robert  Smith,  Katherin  Godfrey  her  marke .  Sheppard, 

Nathanael  Byrde.  Proved  10  July  1619. 

(14)  Joan  Pynne  of  Croyden,  widow.  Dated  2  July  1611. 
Mentions  daughters  Elizabeth  dears  and  Bridget  Hills  ;  son  William ; 
grandchild  William  Pynne.  To  my  grandchild  Anne  deacon  one 
joyned  bedstead  that  I  lye  on,  one  mattrice,  one  boulster,  one  pillow, 
two  pairs  of  sheets,  one  flaxon  the  other  towen,  one  coverlet,  one  pair 
of  russett  blankets,  one  holland  pillowbeare,  one  hemp  teare  table- 
clothe,  one  hemp  teare  towell,  one  table  at  Richard  Jefferyes  of 
hodsden,  one  broad  brasse  panne,  the  trevett  belonging  to  it,  one  little 
brass  pott,  a  skummer,  a  gridyron,  a  chafing  dish,  a  little  spitt,  the 
best  latten  candlestick,  a  basen,  a  sake  seller,  two  great  platters,  two 
sawcers,  half  a  dosen  of  pewter  spones,  a  dosen  of  drench”;  all  to 
he  delivered  to  Ann  Dears  at  22  or  marriage.  To  Henrie  Lillie  of 
Crawden  5*.  To  the  poor  of  Crawden  3*  6“*  at  my  buriall.  Daughter 
Eliner  Morris,  executor  and  residuary  legatee.  Witnesses  : — Henry 
Lillie,  Margery  Pearse,  Ellin  Killet.  Proved  3  Oct.  1611. 

Seagrave  Rector j),  Loughborough.  WALTER  JoNES. 

{To  be  continued). 


Heraldry  at  Stoke-by-Nayland  Vicarage. — The  following  notes 
were  made  by  me  in  1 896.  In  the  spandrels  of  an  ancient  piece  of  wood¬ 
work,  now  over  the  fireplace  in  the  dining-room  at  Stoke-by-Nayland 


260 


Tn*  HAST  AITOIJAN  ;  OR. 


Vicarage,  but  formerly  in  another  house  in  that  parish,  are  these 
shields : — 

,  (1)  Between  two  cotises  three  pairs  of  wings  conjoined  in  lure 

'(Arg.  on  a  bend  gu.  cotised  sa.  three  pairs  of  wings  conjoined  in  lure 
of  the  field,  Wingfield). 

(2)  A  chevron  ermine  between  three  crenels,  in  fees  point  a  mullet 
for  difference  (Sa.  a  chevron  ermine  between  three  crenels,  arg., 
Wiseman). 

These  shields  represent  Sir  Humphrey  Wingfield  of  Brantham 
Hall,  and  Ann  his  wife,  daughter  of  Simon  Wiseman,  Esq.  He  was 
twelfth  son  of  Sir  John  Wingfield  of  Letheringham,  who  died  1481, 
by  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Sir  John  Fitz  Lewes  and  Anne  his  wife, 
daughter  of  John  Montagu,  Earl  of  Salisbury.  Ann  Wiseman’s  first 
husband  was  Sergeant  Gregory  Edgar,  who  was  knighted  by 
Henry  VII.,  and,  dying  in  1506,  was  buried  in  Brantham  Church 
(see  Metcalfe’s  Visitations  of  Suffolk,  pp.  80,  176;  and  Page’s  Suffolk, 
p.  10).  These  shields  were  carved  probably  soon  after  1506. 

In  Wetherden  Church  there  is  a  brass  with  four  heraldic  shields 
for  John  Daniell  of  Messing,  Essex,  who  died  1584.  One  of  the 
shields  is  Wiseman  impaling  Daniell,  his  younger  daughter,  Ursula, 
having  married  William  Wiseman  of  Essex,  Esq. 

Stoiomarktt,  Suffolk.  ChaRLRS  PARTRroOE,  JUN. 


QUERY. 

William  Hoare,  a  Suffolk  Artist  of  the  Eighteenth  Century. 
— He  was  born  at  Eye  in  1706,  and  was  one  of  the  original  Boyal 
Academicians.  See  Brock-Arnold’s  Gainshorotigh  in  “The  Great 
Artists”  series,  note  at  p.  32.  Was  Hoare  a  portrait  painter?  Any 
information  respecting  his  family  or  connection  with  Suffolk  would  be 
acceptable.  g 


REPLY. 

Thornborough  Family  (vol.  i.,  p.  196). — The  wives  of  John 
Thornborough,  Bishop  of  Worcester,  were — (1)  a  daughter  of  Sir 
Frances  Gifford  of  AVilts.,  who  leaves  in  his  will  the  care  of  his  young 
kinsman.  Lord  Dacres,  which  the  Bishop  accepts.  Lord  Dacres  was 
a  kinsman  of  the  then  Earl  of  Pembroke,  who  was  the  Bishop’s 
patron.  This  lady  was  the  mother  of  the  Bishop’s  son,  Jolin  William  ; 
also  of  Sir  Thomas,  Mrs.  Finch,  and  Mrs.  Smith.  (2)  Elizabeth  Bayles, 
heiress  to  estates  iu  Suffolk  and  Kent,  and  the  mother  of  Dr.  Edward 
Thornborough,  Sir  Benjamin  Thornborough,  and  the  wife  of  Sir 
Robert  Willoughby.  (3)  a  Mrs.  Offley,  whose  husband  had  been  a 
merchant  of  the  Staple,  and  Lord  Mayor  of  London  at  the  time  of  his 
decease.  She  afterwards  married  Sir  Henry  Bromley  of  Worcester¬ 
shire,  who  died  in  1615  ;  she  married  the  Bishop  the  following  year, 
being  then  sixty-nine  years  of  age.  J  N  R 

[This  information  is  at  variance  with  that  previously  mven  in 
regard  to  the  children  of  the  first  and  second  marriages. — Ed^ 


NOTES  AN1>  QUEHIS8,  BTC. 


261 


SOME  LETTERS  OF  CAPTAIN  JOHN  LAWRENCE, 

A  QUAKER  WORTHY  OF  WRAMPLINGHAM,  NORFOLK, 
16...— 1685. 

The  earliest  known  mention  of  John  Lawrence  is  in  Whitehead’s 
Chrittian  Progrett.  George  Whitehead  had  a  meeting  at  Wymond- 
ham,  at  the  house  of  Robert  Harvey,  a  glover,  to  which  meeting  he 
says  "  came  Captain  Lawrence,  Ac.,  who  being  then  tenderly  afiected 
with  Truth,  was  desirous  I  should  have  a  Meeting  at  his  House  at 
Wramplingham,  which  I  was  very  willing  to,  and  glad  of.” 

The  result  of  this  meeting  [1654]  appears  to  have  been  that 
“  The  said  John  Lawrence  received  the  Truth,  and  me  [George 
Whitehead]  and  others  of  the  Lord’s  messengers  in  great  Love  and 
Tenderness,  and  gave  up  freely  in  Obedience  thereunto ;  When  he 
knew  a  Beginning  in  the  Spirit,  he  turned  not  back,  but  did  persevere, 
and  bore  a  faithful  Testimony  in  suffering  for  the  Truth,  both  in  his 
Person  and  Goods.”  This  is  borne  out  by  Joseph  Besse  in  his  CoUeetion 
of  Suffering!,  vol.  i.,  where  he  says  that  John  Lawrence  was  six  times 
imprisoned,  and  many  times  had  his  goods  taken  by  distress. 

He  was  evidently  a  man  of  importance  in  the  count}'.  George 
Whitehead,  writing  from  Norwich  Castle  in  1660,  says  of  John 
I  Lawrence  and  William  Barber,  they  had  ‘‘been  Men  of  Note,  and 
!  Captains  in  the  Common  Wealth’s  Day.”  Besse,  in  his  CoUeetion  of 
Suffering!,  vol.  i.,  says  he  had  goods  taken  to  the  value  of  £40,  which 
shows  he  was  by  no  means  a  poor  man  ;  he  also  had  local  influence. 
George  Whitehead  says,  “His  and  Family’s  turning  to  Truth,  and 
Friends,  was  a  means  to  induce  and  draw  many  after  them.” 

George  Fox,  in  his  Journal,  says,  “Then  we  passed  to  a  meeting 
at  Captain  Lawrence’s  in  Norfolk  [1655],  where  it  was  supposed  were 
above  a  thousand  people ;  and  all  was  quiet.  Many  persons  of  note 
were  present,  and  a  great  convincement  there  was.”  In  1660  he  was 
imprisoned  in  Norwich  Castle  with  his  brother  Joseph  and  George 
Whitehead  for  attending  a  meeting.  They  were  confined  in  a  small 
naiTow  hole  called  the  ice ;  the  winter  was  cold,  and  they  must  have 
suffered  great  hardship.  George  Whitehead  says,  “  We  burnt  a  little 
Charcole  in  Evenings,  which  we  found  somewhat  injurious  and  suffo¬ 
cating,  having  no  Chimney  to  vent  the  Smoke  or  Steam  thereof.” 
Whitehead  also  says,  “I  remember  one  morning,  Joseph  Lawrence, 
after  his  pleasant  manner,  said  to  his  brother  John,  ‘0,  Captain 
Lawrence,  I  have  seen  the  day  thou  would’st  not  have  lain  here !  ’  ” 
From  the  same  account  we  learn  that  Elizabeth  was  the  name  of  John 
^  Lawrence's  wife ;  she  visited  and  tended  George  Whitehead  when 

,  I  “Sick  of  an  Ague  and  Fever,”  in  1661. 

I  As  a  note  to  a  MS.  account  of  Norwich  Sufferings,  1683,  we  have 

r  “  Jn*  Lawrence,  an  Antient  man  &  Able  phisitian.”  Was  he  possibly 
’  f  an  army  surgeon  ?  Note  also  in  letter  dated  17th  of  5th  month,  1682, 

i  his  anxiety  about  George  Whitehead’s  collar  bone,  that  “it  was  right 

»  sett  &  carefully  boimd  vp.” 

I  He  died  at  Wramphngham,  1685.8.31. 


262 


THE  EAST  AEOLIAN;  OR, 
(1). 


Dear  G.  W. 

I  haue  thought  ezceedinge  longe  to  hear  from  thee,  &  the  more 
by  reason  of  a  letter  w’ch  Anth:  Alexsaiider  *  did  shew  me  lately,  by  w’ch  j 
understood  thou  hadst  a  fall  of  thy  horse  &  broke  thy  coller  Imone,  j  was 
much  concerned  for  thee,  and  did  wish  j  had  ben  neer  thee  or  thee  w’th  me, 
and  j  would  haue  taken  the  best  care  I  could  of  thee  ;  but  j  hope  before 
this  thou  art  gott  well  of  it,  if  it  was  right  sett  A  carefully  bound  vp :  I 
desire  j  may  rec’  a  few  lynes  from  thee  that  j  may  know  how  thou  art  as 
allsoe  how  it  is  wth  filinends  ju  that  Citty :  jn  this  County  &  at  Norwich 
especially  ffriends  are  in  great  sufferinge.  I  bear  their  is  28  men  in  prisson 
at  Norwch  &  the  magestrats  are  in  a  great  rag;e  &  thretten  to  imprison  all 
both  men  &  women,  and  haue  (as  I  hear)  prepared  their  bridwell  to  send  the 
women  two :  &  haue  taken  goods  from  seurall :  and  in  the  Cuntrey  we  are 
Jnditted  or  p'sented  at  eury  Assizes  &  sescions:  j  gave  thee  an  account 
how  j  was  fined  30"  15*  and  the  Constables  tooke  my  Cowes  &  droue  them 
to  a  layer  but  could  not  sell  them  the  next  day  after  the  Justice  had  sent 
his  warrant  for  the  Constables,  &  when  they  appeared  before  him  he  sent 
them  both  to  prison,  &  before  he  would  let  them  haue  their  liberty  they 
weir  forst  by  him  to  prcure  two  sufficient  men  to  be  bound  in  a  160“  for  ther 
appearance  at  last  sescions  :  and  before  last  sescions  they  droue  my  3  Cowes 
to  Norwch  Market  &  sould  one  of  them  for  40*,  the  other  they  could  not 
sell,  for  y*  Constables  appeered  at  sescions  and  y*  Justice  whose  name  is 
Houlton  Jnditted  them  for  not  executting  their  Warant  &  they  stand  bound 
over  vntill  next  sescions  :  what  further  will  be  done  ag*  them  &  me  j  know 
not :  the  Lord  j  beleue  will  in  his  owne  time  make  a  way  for  his  people 
that  fear  him  &  trust  in  his  holy  name :  i  rec^  a  letter  this  day  directed  to 
me  from  Benj.  Antrobusf  wth  an  epistle  from  G.  ft.,  w’ch  j  shall  take  care 
to  gitt  Coppyed  over  &  dispearsed  accordiuge  to  aduice :  wth  dear  Loue  to 
thee  &  thy  wife  and  ffriends  their  j  remay ne 

Thy  reall  ffiiend  and  Brother 

Wramplingham  9*“:  10*“  mo:  82.  Jo:  Laurence, 

My  wife  &  dafter  &  seuall  ffriends  dear  Loue  is  to  thee  :  my  Lov.  to  G: 
ff:  A  Benj.  Antrobus. 

*  Anthony  Alexander  was  a  tanner  of  Norwich.  He  met  with  much  violence 
from  the  officers  of  that  city  ;  at  one  time  the  officer  said  to  Anthony  Alexander’s 
wife  “that  he  was  come  to  seize  all  they  had,  and  would  not  leave  them  a  bed  to  lie 
on.  They  brake  the  Doors  with  a  Pickax,  and  behaved  so  desperately,  that  some 
Neighbours  wept  at  the  Sight  of  it.” — Besse’s  Sufferiugt,  vol.  i. 

t  Benjamin  Antrobus  was  one  of  the  early  Ix>ndon  Friends.  He  was  a  linen 
draper  “  Att  the  Plow  A  harrow  in  Cheapsyde.”  His  preaching  seems  to  have  been 
chiefly  confined  to  London.  He  suffered  imprisonment  and  distress  of  goods  many 
times.  Besse’s  Colleetion  of  Sufferingt,  vol.  i.,  tells  us  that  in  1685  he  was  set  at 
liberty  after  an  imprisonment  of  2  years,  6  months,  1  week,  and  5  days. 

He  appears  to  have  acted  as  Ijondon  agent  for  Friends  in  the  country.  In  a 
letter  to  him  from  Lancashire,  dated  23.  9  mo.  1684,  we  read — “To  whom 
[Benjamin  Antrobus]  we  Alwayes  make  knowne  or  buissiness  (nut  knowing  whoe  is 
Appoynted)  for  our  County,  soe  desire  thy  excuse  A  Caro  for  vs.” 

His  name  appears  several  times  in  George  Fox’s  will,  1697  ;  sometimes  in  con¬ 
junction  with  “Mary,”  who  we  may  assume  was  his  wife.  From  the  following 
extracts  from  George  Fox’s  will  we  may  conclude  that  Benjamin  set  aside  a  room  in 
his  house  for  George  Fox — and  possibly  other  friends  visiting  London — to  store 
their  belongings : — “  And  my  Ham’ock  I  do  give  to  Tho.  Lower  that  is  at  Beinamin 
Antrobus  his  closett” . “And  my  other  little  Trunck  that  standeth  in  Benja¬ 

min  Antrobus  his  closett  with  the  outlandish  things  Thomas  Lower  shall  have  ” ; 


XUM 


50TB8  AND  QUKUIKS,  STC. 


26S 


(2)  Wramplingham, 

17‘»‘d“*mo:  1682. 

Dear  Geo: 

Iti  y*  lone  wch  can  neuer  wax  old  but  shall  abide  &  remayne  for 
euver  doe  I  most  dearly  salute  thee.  And  jn  rememberance  of  thy  antient 
Bernice  &  ffaythfullness  amongst  ts,  j  cannot  bnt  have  dear  &  trne  lone 
Yiito  thee,  And  mnst  gine  this  testimony  for  thee,  that  the  Lord  made  thee 
an  jnstrnement  in  his  hand  to  turne  me  &  many  more  in  this  Connty  from 
darkness  to  Jiight  &  from  the  power  of  eaten  to  god.  And  y*  any  shonld  be 
Boe  wicked  (y^  bane  com  amongst  vs  &  made  a  proffescion  of  y*  same  trnth 
wth  vs)  to  turne  their  backes  ypon  trnth  &  villifie  &  write  ag*  the  faythfnll 
antient  fhiends  &  Laborers  amongst  vs,  is  cause  of  greefe  to  me,  for  here  is 
a  books,  &  a  wicked  one  two,  set  to  sale  at  a  books  sellers  shop  in  Norwch,  of 
one  ffra:  Buggs,*  &  he  hane  sent  some  to  some  ffriends  in  the  County,  as  one  to 
Jo:  Browne  &  one  to  Jo:  ffidiman  :  I  have  spoke  to  them  both  to  returns  an 
aiisw’r  to  Bugg,  A  to  bare  their  testemony  ag’t  him  A  his  books  two,  w’ch  is  a 
wicked  iiialitious  one  &  the  Anther  w’thout  repentance  shall  neuer  have  true 
)H‘aoe.  ffriends  in  this  County  are  gennerally  well  A  free  from  j  *  sp*,  j  hope,  A 
our  ineettings  mostly  quite,  only  at  a  meetting  w’ch  was  at  my  house  last  S'* 
day  was  a  weeks,  w’ch  meettinge  was  appointed  by  Eliz.  Crosby,  one  woman 
from  lletherset  beings  their  went  home,  A  spake  in  Commendation  of  what 
she  had  heard,  A  the  priest  heard  of  itj  A  the  Justices  had  a  sittinge  in  the 
Towns  two  dayes  after,  A  y*  Priest  jnsenst  the  Justices,  soe  y*  y*  woman 
was  sent  for,  &  they  forst  her  to  sware  who  she  did  see  at  y*  meettinge  y* 
she  knew,  A  she  tould  them  of  seurall  A  they  sent  their  warrant  for  seurall 
poors  weake  women  &  forst  them  by  threttneing  words  to  sware  &  to  jnforme, 
soe  y*  seurall  are  informed  ag’t,  &  what  wil  be  done  j  know  not:  but  seurall 
of  the  Justices  are  very  high,  &  many  ffriends  stand  jiiditted  at  sizes  & 
sescions,  I  thinks  moste  of  y*  fhriends  in  the  County :  old  Edw.  Miles  f  & 
his  kinsman  weir  both  jmprisoued  this  last  sescions,  w’ch  was  last  weeke, 
&  some  other  ffriends :  soe  y*  we  are  like  to  meets  w’th  sufferings  in  this 
County.  1  intend  to  speake  to  Edm.  Bedwell  againe,  for  j  haue  spoken  to 
him  often  to  make  his  acknolegm’ts  to  Jam.  Wass,  for  j  doe  not  like  ffriends 
should  be  vngratfull  as  I  fear  he  haue  benn :  he  is  well  of  his  leg  and  haue 
ben  for  a  long  time.  My  Dear  &  vnfayned  Lone  is  to  our  Dear  ffriends,  A 
faythfull  seruant  of  the  Jjord,  Q.  ffox,  w’th  my  Dear  Loue  againe  &  againe 
to  thee  &  to  thy  Dear  wife  I  rest. 

Thy  reall  &  true  ffriend, 

Jo:  Laurence. 

My  wifes  &  daughters  Dear  Loue  is  to  thee  &  to  thy  wife  &  to  G:  ff: 


and  again,  “And  my  chest  in  Benmmin  Antrobus  his  Chambre  there  is  a  little 
guilt  box  with  some  Gold  in  it.”  He  died  the  6th  of  6th  month,  1715,  in  the 
parish  of  St.  James,  Clerkenwell,  aged  70  years. 

*  Francis  Bugg  of  Mildenhall  in  Suffolk  joined  the  Society  about  1659,  and 
Buffered  imprisonment  in  Ely  gaol.  In  1680  he  separated  himself  from  Friends  and 
became  their  bitter  opponent.  He  wrote  many  controversial  books.  The  last  book 
he  published  was  in  1724  ;  in  it  he  records  that  he  was  in  the  eighty>lourth  year  of 
his  age.  Nothing  is  known  of  him  after  that  time. 

t  Edward  Miles  was  a  farmer  of  Thazton.  He  had  his  horses  and  farm 
produce  seized  several  times,  once  to  the  value  of  £116. 

8  2 


264 


l-HE  east  ANOI.IAM;  OR, 


(3).  Wramplingham, 

20  8“*  mo:  1682. 

Dear  G.  W. 

In  that  Loue  w’ch  waxeth  not  old  doe  j  dearly  salute  thee  &  thy 
wife  &  ffriends  their,  as  thou  hast  fredome  to  mention  my  name.  I  had 
thoughts  before  this  to  haue  writt  to  thee,  but  j  still  wayted  j*  j  might  giue 
thee  a  fuller  account  how  things  are  in  this  County  as  conserninge  fiends, 
whose  sufferings  are  (and  its  like  wilbe)  very  great,  seurall  ffriends  beinge 
prscecutted  vpon  y«  Act  for  20“  a  month  :  the  Bayles  haue  lately  taken  from 
the  wid:  Mo’ny  of  Tiuitshall  4  Cowes,  &  ceased  her  hay,  &  from  Bobt: 
Bransby  of  y®  same  Towne  they  haue  his  Cowes,  &  from  Tho:  True  of 
Dearhaiu  they  tooke  allmost  all  he  had  except  his  Loome  to  worke  in  & 
Likewise  from  seurall  others.  Some  ffriends  are  prisoners,  as  Edw:  Mills  & 
his  kinsman  &  others.  And  heere  is  one  Justice  Houlton,  who  rage  & 
storme  ag‘  ffriends,  &  force  constables  to  p'sent  all  y*  come  not  to  their  p'ish 
church,  &  giue  to  some  an  oath  as  they  report  to  answer  to  such  questions 
as  he  shall  demand  &  then  aske  insnareinge  questions.  The  Justices  had  a 
Meettiuge  last  weeke  at  Hetherset,  &  this  Justice  Houlton  forst  y*  constable 
to  p'sent  me  &  my  wife  for  a  month’s  absence,  as  I  here,  allthough  y® 
constable  tould  him  y*  my  wife  was  in  such  a  weake  condition  y^  she  was  not 
able  to  goe.  I  gaue  y®  an  account  in  my  last  how  he  had  forst  two  women 
to  be  jnforiners  ag‘  me  for  haueing  a  meettinge  at  my  house,  &  granted  his 
warants  to  haue  distresses  taken  of  my  goods,  &  neuer  sent  fur  me  to  shew 
cause  why  j  should  not  be  fined. 

And  he,  y®  8“  Houlton,  haue  acted  very  highly  ag‘  the  Constables, 
although  they  did  exsecute  his  warants,  for  they  tooke  two  Cowes  of  myne 
&  drone  them  to  Wimondham  fayer,  but  they  could  not  sell  them,  &  my 
Cowes  cum  home :  next  day  after  they  went  to  Justice  Houlton  to  giue  him 
an  account  of  what  they  bad  done.  And  he  sent  both  y®  constables  to  the 
jayle,  wheir  they  continowed  that  day,  but  at  night  hee  let  them  be  bayled 
out  till  next  sescions,  &  to  be  of  y®  goo<l  behaiuour  vntill  then.  And  vpon 
y®  7“*  day  last,  being  the  30*“  of  y*  7*“  month,  the  oflBcers  came  &  tooke  3 
Cowes  of  myne  (all  j  had)  &  droue  them  to  Norwch,  &  sould  one  of  them, 
the  other  they  could  not  sell,  &  they  cum  home  agaiue.  And  what  he  will 
do  ag*  y®  Constables  at  y®  sescions  j  know  not,  but  such  a  violent  man  I 
haue  not  knowne,  he  rages  &  storms  at  such  a  rate  as  the  poore  officers  are 
affrayed  of  him,  but  y®  Lord  can  put  a  stop  to  bis  furie,  soe  its  good  for 
ffriends  patiently  to  wayt  upon  the  Lord  &  nut  to  fear  what  man  can  doe  to 
vs.  And  soe  in  dear  loue  &  w’th  hart  resined  into  y®  hands  of  y*  Lord,  j 
remayne. 

Thy  reall  ffriend  &  Bro. 

Jo:  I..aurence. 

My  wifes  &  daughers  dear  loue  is  to  thee  &  thy  wife. 


(4).  Wramplingham, 

28*“  11*“  mo:  82. 

Dear  G.  W. 

In  the  truth  w’ch  is  vnchangable  doe  I  most  dearly  salute  thee, 
my  dear  &  faythfull  ffriend,  who  art  often  in  my  remembrance,  and  should 
oftner  write  to  thee  but  only  loth  to  be  two  much  troublsome  to  thee.  I 
know  thou  hast  letters  often  from  Norwch,  &  soe  haue  an  account  how 
Creuelly  the  maiestrats  deale  by  our  poore  ffriends  who  are  thronged  vp  in 
prison  w’thout  any  mercy  or  Compassion,  &  y*  maiestrats  breath  out  their 
tbrettenings  ag*  them,  sayinge,  they  will  shew  noe  mercy  but  proceed  ag* 


NOTES  AND  QDERIK8.  BTC. 


265 


them  to  the  ytmost,  especially  one  of  y*  sh’refes,  whose  name  is  Stebing,  is 
very  violent,  but  I  hope  y*  lord  will  make  a  way  for  his  poore  sufferings 
people,  they  are  hethertoo  borne  vp  w“*  cheerfullness  although  their  tryalls 
be  great.  The  maiestrats  many  of  them  are  very  violent  in  this  County,  & 
pretend  they  haue  order  from  the  King  to  put  the  lawes  in  execution  ag*  all 
desenters,  but  surly  if  the  King  did  rightly  vnderstand  y*’  junocency  of  y‘ 
sufferers,  &  y*  cruelty  of  y*  prsecutors,  he  would  put  some  stop  to  them  & 
not  suffer  his  poore  subiects  to  he  in  this  manner  tironised  over.  Well,  y^ 
will  of  y*  lord  be  done,  they  haue  only  taken  away  my  Cowes  from  me  at 
prsent,  for  I  haue  kept  them  out  of  my  house,  but  Justice  Houlton  (who  is 
y*  man  y*  forst  an  jnformation  ag‘  me)  doe  thretten  me  (as  j  hear)  to  lay  me 
in  the  jayle,  &  will  tender  the  oth  of  Allegience,  he  is  one  of  y*  most  violent 
men  in  the  County.  He  forcd  the  Constables  to  prsent  ffriends  euery 
sescions:  And  sent  the  Constables  of  Wramplingham  to  y”  jayle,  as  j  for¬ 
merly  gaue  y*  an  account,  And  haue  lately  sent  another  waraut  to  the 
constables  to  levie  the  remaynder  of  y*  distress,  w’ch  in  all  was  30“  15*,  y® 
mony  for  y®  Cowes  he  haue  rec“.  Seurall  ffriends  desire  to  haue  their  deur 
loues  remembred  to  thee,  w’th  my  dear  loue  to  thee  &  thy  wife  &  Q.  ff.,  1 
remayne. 

Thy  reall  ffriend, 

Jo:  Laurence. 

DeV0H$hir$  Home,  E.C.  NoRMAN  PenNET. 


THREE  SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY  SERMON 
PAMPHLETS. 

A  small  quarto  volume  of  sixteen  seventeenth-century  sermons, 
etc.,  formerly  possessed  by  the  late  J.  Copeman  of  Loddon  and  the 
Rev.  Edward  Postle  of  Yelverton,  contains : —  |  The  Magistrate’s 
Authority  asserted  j  in  a  Sermon  |  preached  at  the  Cathedral  | 
Norwich  |  by  James  Paston,  M.A.,  Rector  of  |  Tinningham  {tie)  in 
Suffolk.  Loudon  |  printed  by  J.  D.,  are  to  be  sold  by  William  |  Oliver, 
Bookseller  in  Norwich,  1673.  |  It  is  dedicated  to  Robert  Bendish, 
Esq.,  Mayor  of  the  City  of  Norwich,  at  whose  importunity,  it  is  stated, 
the  sermon  was  printed  ;  and  it  must  be  acknowledged  it  merited  the 
approval  thus  accorded.  It  emphasizes  the  truth  that  “  no  worship 
can  be  without  some  Ceremonies,  and  no  peace,  order,  or  decency 
without  unity  in  those  ceremonies.” 

Another  discourse  is  entitled  |  David’s  Recognition  |  with  |  a 
Parallel  betwixt  his  and  our  |  present  Soveraig^n’s  Sufferings  and 
Deleverances  1  set  forth  in  a  |  fSermou  I  preach^  |  at  Grymston  in 
Norfolk  before  the  |  Right  Worshipsful  Captain  Roger  Spelman  |  and 
his  foot  company  there  celebrating  the  30th  anniversary  of  his 
Majestie’s  Nativity  1  May  29,  1660  |  by  R.  Feltwell,  Vicar  of  East 
Walton  I  London,  1660.  |  It  is  dedicated  to  Sir  Edward  Barkham, 
”  by  whose  goodness  I  was  taken  as  a  brand  out  of  the  flames  of 
persecution  and  set  in  a  secure  place.”  In  a  further  address  or 
dedication  to  Colonel  Richard  Whitley  of  ”  this  Panegyrick  (preached 
at  our  gracious  Soveraign  his  return  to  his  Kingdom,  whose  eyes 


266 


THS  SAST  ANGLIAN;  ON, 


witnessed  how  far  I  adventured  in  the  cause  of  his  Majestie’s  llojal 
Father,  even  when  the  Ignominous  Tree  was  fixed  and  the  grave  was 
ready  for  me,”  he  asks  the  acceptance  of  ”  this  handful  of  goat’s  hair, 
which  as  cordially  dedicated  to  the  Altar  of  Loyalty  as  any  others, 
gold,  silver,  blew  silk  or  purple  whatsoever.” 

A  third  pamphlet  is  entitled  “  Votiva  Tabula  ;  |  or  A  Solemn 
Thanksgiving  offered  up  to  God  |  the  mighty  Protector  of  Kings,  for 
the  wonderful  protection  and  happy  Restauration  of  our  |  Gracious 
Sovereign  |  Chakles  the  II..  *  *  *  delivered  in  |  Two  Sermons  | 
Preached  in  the  Two  dayes  of  Publick  Thanksgiving  appointed  |  to 
Praise  God  for  these  Wonderful  and  Gracious  Mercies  [  By  Jahks 
Warmsll,  Rector  of  Boxford  in  Suffolk.  London  :  printed  for  R. 
Royston,  and  are  to  be  sold  by  William  Frankling,  Bookseller  in 
Norwich,  1660.” 


WILLS  OF  THE  HUNDRED  OF  ARMINGFORD,  CAMBS. 
{continued  from  p.  259). 
Ckoydon-cum-Clopton. 

(15)  Perry  Thomas  vii.  236  (25)  Custason  Robert  xi.  244 

(16)  Holton  Barbara  viii.  8  (26)  Dear  Thomas  ,,  198 

(17)  Hayward  John  „  49  (27)  Dear  Elizabeth  ,,  385 

( 1 8)  Gad  Abraham  ix.  77  (28)  Shelf ord  Thomas  ,,  62 

( 1 9)  Butler  Thomas  x.  339  (29)  ShelfordTho8.(1697) ,, 

(20)  Hall  Simon  „  308  (30)  ShelfordTho8.(1700) ,, 

(21)  Paine  William  ,,  179  (31)  Shelf  ord  Elizabeth  ,,  84 

(22)  Parish  Leonard  „  441  (32)  Porter  Samuel  xii.  126 

(23)  Stoakes  Thomas  ,,  337  (33)  Adams' Thomas  xiv.  214 

(24)  Bates  John  „  431 

(15)  Thomas  Perry  of  Croyden,  husbandman.  Dated  24  Feb. 
1618.  To  each  of  my  children  John,  Elizabeth,  Susan,  Thomas, 
Anne,  Mary,  Joan,  Eleuer,  and  Barbara  Perry,  to  each  40*.  All 
goods  to  wife  Elizabeth.  Witnesses  : — Thomas  Stacey,  John  Stacey. 
Proved  13  March  1618. 

(16)  Barbara  Holton,  widdowe.  By  word  of  mouth.  Dated 
3  Jan.  1623.  William  Stacy,  executor,  to  bring  up  her  five  children, 
Thomas,  Henry,  John,  Alice,  and  Mary  Holton.  ”  All  the  householde 
stuffe,  together  with  the  compass  wo^  and  Bacon  to  be  sold  ”  and 
employed  for  the  benefit  of  her  children.  Witnesses: — John 
FoUervey,  Tho.  Pix,  Alexander  Fairchilde.  Proved  28  Feb.  1623. 

(17)  John  Hayward  of  Clopton.  Dated  15  July  1625.  To  my 
sen  John  Hayward  10*,  my  best  doublett,  breeches,  and  jerkyn.  To 
my  daughter  Elizabeth  Hayward  20*,  a  pair  of  sheets  of  flaxen,  one 
a  curten  sheet,  the  other  a  seamed  sheete ;  also  a  smocke,  a  face  clothe, 
a  cubbord  clothe,  and  pillowe  beere.  To  my  daughter  Joan  Haywarde 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


267 


20*,  a  pairs  of  flaxen  seamed  sheetes,  a  pillow,  a  seamed  pillow  bears, 
iij  pieces  of  pewter,  and  a  little  kettle.  To  my  daughter  Elizabeth 
Hayward  iij  pieces  of  pewter  and  a  great  brasen  bason.  To  my  son 
William  Hayward  30»,  to  bynde  him  apprentice,  a  pairs  of  old 
breches,  and  a  jerkyn.  To  my  daughter  Elizabeth  a  coffer.  To  my 
daughter  Joam^.  my  beet  cloaks  and  a  coffer.  To  my  son  Alexander 
Hayward  40*  and  a  boulster.  'I’o  my  son  Stephen  Hayward  40*.  To 
my  son  Edward  Hayward  40*.  Rest  to  wife  Mary.  Witnesses : — 
Henry  Lillie  and  Richard  Adams  of  Arrington.  Proved  5  Nov.  1625. 

(18)  Abraham  Gad  of  Croyden  cum  Clopton.  Dated  9  May  1645. 
By  word  of  mouth.  To  my  son  John  Gad  £12.  To  my  daughter 
Elizabeth  £10.  If  my  wife  be  with  child,  it  shall  have  equal  with 
the  rest.  To  Elizabeth  Stiles  a  bullock.  To  my  mother  10*.  To  my 
nephew  Henry  Gad  5*.  Witnesses: — Henry  Little,  Elizabeth  Cam¬ 
bridge.  Proved  19  Jan.  1646. 

(19)  Thomas  Butler  of  Croyden,  husbandman.  Dated  26  April 
1675.  To  my  daughter  Elizabeth  Butler  £100  at  20.  John  Sams  of 
Clopton  and  William  Butler  of  Barrington,  trustees  for  her.  “So 
lung  as  the  now  wife  of  Thomas  Butler  shall  keep  herself  single  she 
shall  have  the  use  of  it  for  the  bringing  up  of  Elizabeth,  but  if  the 
widow  Butler  do  marry  again,  then  her  husband  shall  hand  over  the 
money  to  the  trustees.”  To  my  mother  Butler  two  acres  of  free  land 
in  Barrington  fields.  Mentions  brother  William  Butler ;  sisters 
Naomi  Cambridge  and  Alice  Stevens ;  wife  Anne.  Witnesses : — 
William  Butler,  John  Sams,  John  Pain,  John  Bate.  Proved  18  May 
1685. 

(20)  Simon  Hall  of  Croyden,  yeoman.  Mentions  son  Henry ; 
daughter  Amey  Smith,  wife  of  Robert  Smith,  and  their  children, 
Elizabeth  and  Anne  Smith.  To  my  wife  Jane  all  my  goods  aud 
catell  on  my  farm  at  Croyden.  Witnesses: — Samuel  Gatward,  John 
Gocke,  Tho.  Ricket,  Edward  Thurley.  No  probate. 

(22)  Leonard  Parish,  yeoman.  Dated  8  July  1694.  To  my  son 
Leonard  Parish  all  my  copyhold  lands  in  the  field  of  Fowlmore  and 
all  the  rest,  both  copy  aud  free,  after  my  wife’s  death.  My  son 
Leonard  to  pay  to  my  son  Thomas  £50.  If  he  do  not  pay,  Thomas  to 
have  the  nine  acres  of  copyhold  land  now  in  my  wife’s  possession 
after  her  decease,  and  also  the  two  acres  of  free  laud  which  I  give 
to  my  wife.  'To  my  son  William  Parish  £70.  To  my  wife  Mary 
Parish  £5  a  year  for  life  and  two  acres  of  free  land  in  the  field  of 
Fowlmeire.  To  my  wife  Mary  one  feather  bed  and  bedstead  and  all 
things  belonging,  one  livery  Couboard,  eight  pairs  of  sheets,  six  pillow 
beires,  one  box,  one  table,  four  stools,  one  trunk  standing  in  the 
chamber  over  the  kitchen.  To  my  son  Thomas  Parish  40*  a  year, 
till  16,  if  my  son  Robert  and  he  do  not  no  agree  to  live  together. 
Son  Bobert.  executor  and  residuary  legatee.  Witnesses: — Robert 
Custersun,  William  Lunis.  John  Samms.  Proved  14  July  1694. 

(24)  John  Bats  of  Clapton,  yeoman.  Dated  9  March  1692.  To 
my  daughter  Anne  Bats  £50,  one  bedstead  and  featherbed  and 
curtains,  &c.,  one  little  table,  six  chairs,  now  all  standing  in  the 
parlour,  one  dozen  plates,  three  pewter  dishes,  and  her  owne  mother’s 


268 


the  east  aholiak;  ob, 


truncke,  and  one  chest  of  drawers,  now  standing  in  the  parlour.  To 
my  son  John  Bats  £30.  If  my  wife  marry  again  or  waste  the  goods, 
John  Samms  of  Clopton  and  Robert  Hulben  of  Croyden  shall  take  my 
daughter’s  portion  into  their  hands.  Witnesses: — John  Samms, 
Robert  Holben,  John  Williamson.  Proved  17  April  1693. 

(25)  Robert  Custason  of  Oroyden  Wild,  in  the  parish  of  Croyden. 
Dated  8  April  1714.  Mentions  sons  John  (eldest),  Joseph,  and 
Benjamin ;  daughter  Sarah  Gailer,  wife  of  Thomas  Gailer.  Wit¬ 
nesses: — John  Wallis,  Mary  Dea,  Benjamin  Dawson.  Proved  30 
Jan.  1716. 

(26)  Thomas  Deer  of  Croyden.  Dated  20  Aug.  1713.  Mentions 
wife  Elizabeth ;  sons  Richard,  Thomas,  Samuel,  John ;  daughters 
Elizabeth,  wife  of  John  Williamson  of  Roystou,  raaulster,  Anue  Deer. 
Witnesses : — Richard  Conder,  Robert  Holben,  Cle.  Kinnersley. 
Proved  17  April  1714. 

(27)  Elizabeth  Deer  of  Croyden,  widdow.  Dated  23  Feb.  1715-6. 
Mentions  same  children  as  No.  26.  “My  son  Richard  to  give  each  of 
his  fellows  the  several  parcels  of  goods  as  they  are  set  apart  by  me, 
and  each  one’s  name  set  on  their  parcel.’’  Mentions  brother  William 
Mayes.  Witnesses : — Richard  Conder,  Mary  Lunnis,  Cle.  Kinnersley. 
Proved  24  Oct.  1721. 

(28)  Thomas  Shelford  of  Clapton,  yeoman.  Dated  18  June  1700. 
“  My  house  and  land  lying  in  Melbourn  and  Meldreth.”  Mentions 
wife  Mary  ;  her  child,  if  she  do  not  miscarry;  cousins  John  Shelford, 
Richard  Allen,  and  Sarah  Whitby ;  mother.  Witnesses  : — John  Pain, 
William  Lunnis,  John  Samms.  Proved  29  June  1700. 

(31)  Elizabeth  Shelford  of  Clopton,  widow.  Dated  3  Aug.  1700. 
Mentions  cousins  Joan,  Richard,  Elizabeth,  and  Edward  Single, 
Mary  Manthroup,  John  and  Oliver  Johnson,  Allen,  Richard,  and 
Margaret  Whitby  ;  daughter  Mary  Shelford  ;  John  George.  Elizabeth, 
and  Mary,  children  of  John  Samms  of  Clapton ;  William  Luniss. 
Witnesses: — Susan  Pamplin,  Ann  Stacey,  John  Deere.  Proved 
18  March  1702. 

(32)  Samuel  Porter,  dareyman.  Dated  28  March  1728. 
Mentions  wife  Roda;  sons  Joseph,  Caleb,  and  Samuel;  daughters 
Lydia,  Susanna,  and  Hannah  Porter.  Witnesses: — Joshua  Conder, 
Isaac  Cozull,  William  Green.  Proved  20  April  1728. 

(33)  Thomas  Adams,  yeoman.  Dated  10  April  1754.  My 
messuages,  cottages,  lands,  tenements,  &c.,  in  freehold  and  copy- 
hold,  in  Orwell  and  elsewhere,  to  my  son  William  Adams  and  his 
heirs,  subject  to  a  life  annuity  of  £7  to  my  wife  Mary  Adams.  To 
my  daughter  Mary  Marshall,  wife  of  John  Marshall  of  Orwell, 
yeoman,  £100.  Witnesses: — Thomas  Lewington,  jun',  Joseph 
Norman,  Aleph  Palmer.  Proved  24  June  1767.  Inventory 
£206.  19«.  6d. 

Stagrav*  Rectory,  Loughborough.  WalTBR  Jones. 


{To  he  continued). 


N0TB8  AND  QUERIB8,  BTC. 


269 


MY  GREAT-QRANDFATHEE’8  PAPERS. 

The  following  letters  and  papers  were  found  among  manj  old 
family  deeds  and  writings  belonging  to  the  late  Robert  Partridge  of 
Shelley  Hall,  near  Hadleigh,  Suffolk,  wbo  was  born  there  in  1773, 
lived  there  all  his  life,  and  died  there  in  1854,  aged  81. 

No.  1  and  No.  2  are  gossipy  letters,  written  at  the  end  of 
George  II.’s  reign,  from  Canterbury  by  Mary  Tanner,  daughter  of 
Archbishop  Potter,  and  wife  of  Thomas  Tanner,  D.D.,  Rector  of 
Hadleigh  from  1745 — 1786.  A  marble  tablet,  surmounted  by  an  um, 
on  the  south  wall  of  the  north  chapel  in  Hadleigh  Church,  bears  the 
following  inscription : — 

SACRED  TO  THE  MEMORY  OF  THOMAS  TANNER,  D:D: 

RECTOR  OF  THIS  PARISH,  AND  PREBENDARY  OF 
CANTERBURY,  WHO  DEPARTED  THIS  LIFE,  MARCH  11'*'“: 

1786,  AGED  SIXTY  EIGHT  ;  AND  ALSO  TO  THE 
MEMORY  OF  MARY  TANNER,  HIS  WIFE  WHO  DYED 
THE  30'*":  OF  APRIL  1779,  AGED  FIFTY  SIX. 

IN  FILUL  AFFECTION  AND  GRATITVDE 
(as  A  SMALL  TRIBVTE  TO  THE  EXEMPLARY 
OONDVCT  AND  MANY  EXCFJXENT  VIRTVES  OF 
TWO  MOST  INDVLGENT  AND  KINT)  PARENTS,) 

THIS  MONVMENT  IS  ERECTED. 

Mrs.  Tanner  was  aged  about  33  and  about  36  respectively  when 
these  two  letters  were  written.  She  wrote  a  beautiful  hand  on  small 
quarto  sheets. 

The  second  letter  is  addressed  to  Lady  Martin,  who  was  probably 
the  “  Dear  Madam  ”  to  whom  No.  1  is  addressed.  She  was  probably 
Martha,  wife  of  Sir  Roger  Martin  of  Long  Melford,  third  baronet, 
but  1  cannot  give  her  maiden  name.  Sir  Roger  died  in  1762,  and  was 
succeeded  by  his  son,  Sir  Mordaunt.  Papers  Nos.  3  and  4  relate  to 
Sir  Roger’s  widow,  the  said  Dame  Martha  Martin,  who  in  1774  was 
living  at  Higham.  In  1772  she  was  mentioned  in  the  will  of  Eliza¬ 
beth  Stubbin  of  Higham,  spinster,  eldest  daughter  of  John  Stubbin 
of  Sulley’s  in  Raydon,  by  Elizabeth  his  wife,  daughter  and  heiress  of 
Richard  Partridge  of  Holton  St.  Mary.  The  testatrix  bequeathed  to 
Dame  Martha  Martin,  widow  of  Sir  Roger  Martin  of  Melford,  ten 
guineas  for  mourning,  “  and  it  is  my  Will  and  Desire  that  the  said 
Dame  Martha  Martin  may  have  the  liberty  of  breaking  up  and  taking 
away  such  fflowers.  Shrubs,  and  Plants  which  at  the  Time  of  my 
Decease  shall  belong  to  her.” 

Mrs.  Tanner’s  most  intimate  friends  in  Suffolk  seem  to  have  been 
Lady  Martin,  the  Mannock’s  of  Gifford’s  Hall  in  Stoke-by-Nayland, 
and  the  Rowleys,  who  had  then  lately  purchased  the  estate  of 
Tendring  Hall  in  Stoke. 

The  Mannocks,  “  whose  ancestors  long  since  derived  from 
Denmark,”  *  had  been  seated  at  Gifford’s  Hall  since  the  early  part  of 

*  Su  monument  in  Stoke  Church  to  Sir  Francis  Mannock,  first  baronet,  who 
died  in  1634. 


270 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR, 


Henry  YI.’s  reign.  They  were  staunch  Catholics,  and  from  time  to 
time  suffered  severely  for  adherence  to  their  faith.  Their  last  male  heir 
of  the  name,  Sir  George  Maunock,  ninth  haronet,  died  14  June,  1786, 
“  being  overturned  in  the  mail  coach,  about  nineteen  miles  from 
London,  on  his  way  to  the  continent.”  I  have  somewhere  heard  or 
read  that  when  he  succeeded  to  the  title  and  estates,  he  was  a  Priest  in 
Holy  Orders,  and  was  killed  while  on  his  way  to  Rome  to  be 
“unfrocked."  On  7  Nov.,  1788,  two  years  after  Sir  George’s  death, 
the  will  of  my  great-great-grandfather,  Arthur  Partridge  of  Shelley 
Hall  (whose  lands  adjoins  the  Mannock  estate),  was  witnessed  by 
“  Thompson  the  Priest  at  Gifford’s  Hall.”  Arthur  Partridge  died  in 
1789,  and  tradition  relates  that  his  death  was  due  to  a  fall  which  he 
had  when  returning  home  one  day  after  calling  at  Gifford’s  Hall.  He 
was  remotely  connected  with  the  Mannocks.  his  great-grandfather, 
Daniel  Partridge  of  Holton  St.  Mary,  “generosus,”  having  married 
in  167^,  Mary,  daughter  of  Edward  Mann,  Esq.,  of  Ipswich,  whose 
second  wife  w'as  Dorothy,*  daughter  of  Anthony  Mannock  of  Stoke- 
by-Nayland. 

In  1789  William  Comyns,  Esq.,  came  into  possession  of  the 
Gifford’s  Hall  estate,  and  took  the  name  of  Mannock.  Among  my 
great-grandfather  Robert  Partridge’s  papers  are  letters  written  to  him 
by  “  W“  Mannock"  in  the  years  1811  and  1818.  Mr.  Mannock  died 
without  issue  in  1819,  when  the  property  devolved  upon  Patrick 
Power,  Esq.,  who  a.ssumed  the  name  of  Mannock,  being  descended 
from  them  through  the  Strickland  family.  He  died  in  1874.  His 
eldest  son,  Walter  Mannock  Strickland  Mannock  died  in  1898,  aged 
seventy-two,  and  the  latter’s  brother,  Lieut.-Col.  Francis  Anthony 
Strickland  Mannock,  died  in  1902,  at  Hastings,  aged  sixty-seven. 


No.  1. 

Canterburv, 

Nov'  26,  1756. 

Dear  Madam, 

I  take  the  first  Post  to  acquaint  you  that  we  arrived  safe  here 
last  Wednesday,  had  a  very  fine  day,  but  found  the  Roads  as  we  expected, 
very  Slippery  and  Dangerous,  and  extremely  Cold  indeed.  We  left  London 
last  Saturday,  went  to  Farningham,*  to  return  M"  and  M'  Lempriere’s  visit, 
who  you  may  remember  with  us  the  Summer  before  last ;  they  have  a  sweet 
pretty  place,  and  we  passed  our  time  as  agreeably  as  the  Season  woiid 
permit.  Stayed  with  them  till  Wednesday,  they  are  about  five  miles  out  of 
the  Great  Road.  We  got  here  about  five  o’clock  on  Wednesday,  found  M™ 
Milles  with  a  very  bad  Cold,  the  little  Girls  very  well,  and  all  not  a  little 
glad  to  see  us.  The  youngs  one  [*k]  play  all  day  long,  and  how  they  will 
do  to  part  when  our  time  is  out  I  cannot  tell.  M”  Milles  enquired  very 
much  after  you,  and  your  good  Family,  and  returns  all  your  Comp‘*  with 
Interest.  1  shoud  have  wrote  to  you  while  I  was  in  Town,  but  being  pretty 
much  hurried,  as  I  always  am  when  1  stay  so  short  a  time  there,  desired 
M'*  Hossack  to  let  you  know  we  got  safe  there,  she  and  the  Captain  were 

•  Her  monumental  inscription,  copied  from  St.  Mary-at-8toke  Church,  Ipswich 
is  printed  in  The  East  Anglian,  third  series,  vul.  ix.,  p.  3.'i7. 

^  A  village  on  the  river  Darent  in  Kent,  4^  miles  south  of  Dartford. 


y 

I 


KOTE8  AND  Q0XRIR8,  ETC. 


271 


very  well,  dined  with  us  one  day,  and  Charlotte  Hossack  with  them,  have 
g^t  a  pretty  little  snug  house,  in  a  much  better  situation  than  their  last, 
have  promised  we  will  dine  with  them  one  day  as  we  go  back  again.  We 
had  the  pleasure  of  meeting  M'  Frank  Mannock  *  and  his  Lady  at  S'  William 
Eowley’s*  the  day  before  we  left  Town,  and  very  merry  we  all  were,  our 
good  Friends  at  Gifford’s  Hall  went  round  in  a  Bumper.  S'  William’s  Family 
seeme<l  in  high  Spirits,  shoud  rather  have  imagined  they  were  great  gainers 
rather  [last  word  struck  out]  than  loosers  by  this  Change  in  the  Ministry  ;  * 
I  told  them  if  they  were  not  sorry,  we  had  no  reason,  as  we  shoud  have 
more  of  their  Company  for  the  time  to  come,  that  1  was  sure  it  woud  be  the 
most  agreeable  news  we  could  send  into  the  Country,  that  you  woud  all 
rejoyce  with  us  very  Sincerely  upon  the  Occasion,  and  indeed  they  all 
expressed  much  pleasure  in  the  thoughts  of  passing  more  of  their  time  at 
Tendring  Hall.  M'*  Doughty  and  M'*  Mannock  her  Daughter*  were  so  kind 
as  to  call  at  our  Lodgings  one  Evening,  I  was  not  at  home,  which  I  was 
very  sorry  for,  when  I  go  to  Town  again,  I  intend  to  try  if  1  can  be  so 
lucky  as  to  find  them  at  home.  Captain  and  M'*  Donkley  came  to  S'  W. 
Rowley’s  just  as  we  had  dined,  in  vast  high  Spirits,  S' W.  was  so  lucky  as  to 
get  him  a  very  good  Ship  (I  forget  the  name)  before  he  was  dismissed,  which 
they  seemed  vastly  pleased  with,  they  came  unexpected,  and  thought 
[erased]  thought  themselves  lucky  to  meet  so  many  of  their  Suffolk  Friends. 
I  hope  you  have  escaped  Colds,  I  have  scarce  met  with  any  body  that  has, 
we  have  all  had  very  bad  ones,  but  thank  God  we  are  pretty  well  now. 
Long  to  be  Playing  a  Game  at  Cards  with  good  S'  Frances  and  Lady 
Mannock,*  which  we  hope  to  do  at  X™*.  Our  kindest  and  best  Respects 
attend  them,  and  y'self,  with  comp^  to  M'  Porter,  and  believe  me  Dear 
Madam,  y'  very  affectionate  Friend, 

M.  Tanner. 


It  would  be  interesting  to  gather  further  information  about  Mrs. 
and  Mr.  Lempriere  of  Farningham  ;  Mrs.  ^lilies  of  Canterbury  and 
her  little  girls ;  Captain,  Mrs.,  and  Charlotte  Hossack ;  Captain  and 
Mrs.  Donkley ;  and  Mr.  Porter. 

If  letter  No.  1  was  not  written  to  Lady  Martin,  it  may  have  been 
written  to  the  wife  of  this  “  Mr.  Porter.”  I  do  not,  however,  know  of 
anybody  of  that  name  living  near  Hadleigh  in  the  middle  of  the 
eighteenth  century. 

No.  2. 


During  the  three  years  that  elapsed  between  letters  No.  1  and 
No.  2,  Sir  Francis  Mannock,  fourth  baronet,  had  died  and  been 
succeeded  by  his  eldest  sou,  Sir  William. 


*  Probably  Francis,  second  son  of  Sir  Francis  Mannock,  fourth  baronet.  He 
married  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Thomas  Stonor  of  Watling  Park,  Oxfordshire. 
Succeeded  his  nephew  as  seventh  baronet,  and  oh.  s.p.  in  1778. 

*  Sir  \V.  Rowley,  K.K.,  Admiral  of  the  Fleet,  who  purchased  of  Sir  John 
Williams  the  estate  of  Tendring  Hall  in  the  parish  of  Stoke-by-Nayland,  and  died 
in  1768. 

*  From  Newcastle  to  Pitt. 

*  Thomas  Mannock,  third  son  of  Sir  Francis,  fourth  baronet,  married,  as  first 
wife,  Mary,  daughter  of  Qeorge  Brownlow  Doughty  of  Snarford  Hall,  Lincolnshire. 
He  succeeded  his  brother  Sir  Francis  (tee  note  2)  as  eighth  baronet,  and  ob.  s.p.  in 
1781. 

*  Sir  Francis  Mannock,  fourth  baronet,  married  Frances,  daughter  and  heiress 
of  George  Yates,  Esq.,  of  North  Waltham,  Hampshire.  He  died  in  1758,  and  she 
in  1761. 


272 


THE  EAST  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


Canterbury, 

Dec'  7“'  1759. 

Dear  I^ady  Martin, 

Your  kind  Letter  dated  Nov'  the  16“*,  I  reC*  in  due  time,  and 
thank  you  very  much  for  it.  It  was  so  long  after  I  wrote  to  you  before  I 
heard  from  you,  that  I  began  to  fear  you  had  not  rec**  one  from  me,  as  my 
Letters  were  so  tossed  about  last  Winter,  and  that  made  me  desire  M"  Ottey 
woud  send  to  enquire  about  it ;  and  I  was  very  glad  to  hear  you  were  all 
well,  and  being  engaged  in  so  much  good  Company  is  a  very  good  reason 
for  your  Silence.  I  shoud  have  acknowledged  the  receipt  of  yours  sooner  but 
stayed  on  purpose  to  tell  you  that  we  hope  to  be  at  Hadleigh  on  Saturday 
the  22‘*  Instant ;  I  believe  we  shall  go  through  Colchester,  which  I  mention 
only  that  you  may  not  be  looking  out  for  us  all  day  and  be  disappointed  in 
not  seeing  us  pass  by,  but  we  shall  hope  for  the  pleasure  of  seeing  you  and 
Lady  Mannock'',  as  soon  after  as  you  please.  I  dare  say  you  find  it  very 
dull  since  the  Bowley  Family  went  to  Town,  and  you  must  have  a  great 
Loss  in  M'*  Crooke.  I  shall  call  upon  M'  and  M"  Manuock^,  and  all  my 
other  Friends  as  I  pass  through  Town,  and  if  I  can  do  any  thing  while  I  am 
there  for  good  Lady  Maunock^  or  yourself,  pray  Command  me.  we  leave 
this  place  the  15“*,  and  shall  be  at  M**  Leverlands  in  Southampton  Street 
Covent  Garden  till  the  Friday  following.  I  am  much  in  fear  that  our  good 
Friend  M”  Hossack  is  still  in  expectation  of  seeing  her  good  Man,  I  have 
had  but  one  Letter  from  her  since  I  came  here,  and  then  she  did  not  know 
when  he  woud  get  home,  but  promised  to  let  me  know,  and  as  I  have  not 
heard  I  am  afraid  he  is  not  yet  arrived  at  his  own  House ;  I  am  sure  I  pity 
her  extremely,  for  she  has  Suffered  a  great  deal ;  she  talkd  of  going  to 
him,  but  whether  she  did  or  not  I  cannot  tell,  1  am  very  glad  to  hear 
S'  William  and  Lady  Mannock*  are  well,  and  their  young  Governor*®  also, 
for  I  suppose  he  may  be  called  so  by  this  time.  I  fear  Lady  Haukey**  was 
greatly  shocked  at  the  Misfortune  which  happened  to  her  Maid,  it  must  be 
very  shocking  to  all  the  Family,  I  want  to  know  what  became  of  the  poor 
Creature.  I  am  very  sorry  poor  M™  Paul  was  so  ill,  when  you  wrote,  I 
wish  much  to  know  how  she  does.  I  am  desired  by  M”  Milles  to  present 
her  best  Comp**  to  you  and  Lady  Mannock,  D'  Tanner  also  joyns  with  me 
in  Sincere  good  wishes  to  Lady  Mannock  and  yourself,  I  am 

Dear  Madam, 

My  little  Girl  and  y'  very  Sincere  Friend 

Miss  Milles’s,  desire  M.  Tanner, 

comp** 

Who  were  Mrs  Ottey,  Mrs.  Crooke,  Mrs.  Paul,  and  Mr. 
Leverland  of  Southampton  Street,  Covent  Garden? 

*  Perhaps  this  reference  is  to  Frances,  widow  of  Sir  Francis  Mannock,  fourth 
baronet  {tee  note  6).  She  died  in  1761. 

®  Perhaps  the  “Mr.  Frank  Mannock  and  his  Lady’'  of  Letter  No.  1  {see  also 
note  2). 

•  Sir  William,  fifth  baronet,  and  his  second  wife,  Elizabeth,  daughter  and  co¬ 
heiress  of  Robert  Allwyn  of  Treford,  Sussex. 

*®  William  Anthony,  only  son  of  Sir  William  Mannock,  was  born  28th  May, 
1759,  succeeded  his  father  as  sixth  baronet  in  1764,  and  died  unmarried  in  1776, 
being  succeeded  by  his  uncle  Francis.  At  the  date  of  this  letter  he  was  just  over 
six  months  old. 

*'  Sir  Henry  Hankey,  an  eminent  citizen  and  alderman  of  London,  married  in 
1794  Anne,  daughter  of  Joseph  Chaplin,  Esq.,  of  East  Bergholt,  High  Sheriff  of 
Suffolk.  Their  two  sons.  Sir  Joseph  and  Sir  Thomas,  were  knights  and  aldermen, 
and  the  former  was  father  of  Joseph  Chaplin  Hankey  of  East  Bergholt  {tee  Hankey 
of  Fetcham  Park  in  Burke’s  Landed  Gentry). 


MOTBS  AND  QUKHIBS,  ETC. 


273 


No.  3. 

This  paper  is  interesting  chiefly  on  account  of  the  endorsement. 
What  would  people  think  and  say  nowadays  if  such  a  document  as 
this  were  to  be  read  in  Church  immediately  after  Divine  Service  ? 

The  Manor  of  \  Warn  the  Court  Leet  and  General  Court  Baron  of  Dame 
Smeeton  Hall  >  Martha  Martin  Widow  Lady  of  the  said  Manor  to  be  holden 
in  Bulmer^*  1  for  the  said  Manor  at  the  place  accustomed  on  Thursday  the 
third  day  of  June  next  at  eleven  of  the  Clock  in  the  Forenoon  of  the 
same  day  when  and  where  all  the  Freehold  and  Copyhold  Tenants  of 
the  said  Manor  and  also  all  the  Resients  [«tc]  dwelling  within  the 
Precincts  of  the  said  Leet  are  required  to  appear  and  to  do  their  Suits 
and  Services. 

Let  Notice  be  given  that  all  the  Tenants  of  the  said  Manor  are 
then  and  there  required  to  pay  their  Quit-rents  due  and  in  arrear  to 
the  Lady  of  the  said  Manor. 

Let  the  Constables  of  Bulmer  know  that  by  virtue  of  their  Office 
they  are  to  attend  at  the  said  Leet  and  to  bring  in  fairly  written  names 
of  all  the  Men  as  well  Householders  as  their  Sons  and  Servants  who 
are  sixteen  years  old  and  upwards  and  have  lived  within  the  Precincts 
of  the  said  Leet  by  the  space  of  one  full  year. 

And  You  are  to  return  me  this  Precept  at  the  said  Court.  Given 
under  my  hand  and  seal  this  fifteenth  day  of  May  1773. 

1,  ,,  ,  (  Steward  of  the 
®"'l‘»‘=*^jsaid  Manor. 


To  Robert  Felton  Bailiff  \ 
of  the  said  Manor  or  his  >  W. 
Deputy.  ) 


[Endorsed.] 

June  S-*  1773. 

The  Within  Precept  was  twice  publicly  read  in  Bulmer  Church  immedi¬ 
ately  after  Divine  Service  on  the  16**“  and  23"*  days  of  May  last  by  me, 

Robert  Felton. 

No.  4. 


Lady  Martin  of  Higham  by  S'  Roger  Martin’s  Settlement  on  her  holds 
an  Estate  called  Smitten  Hall  in  y'  Parishs  of  Bulmer,  &c.,  a  considerable 
barn  whereof  was  burned  down  by  lightning.  Q'  is  Her  Ladyship  obliged 
to  build  it  up  and  if  her  tenant  does  not  require  it  of  her  can  S'  Maudant 
Martin  come  upon  her,  her  heirs,  executors,  or  assigns  to  build  up  y*  same 
now  or  after  her  decease— the  above  estate  is  settled  upon  her  without 
impeachment  of  Waete. 

In  y*  above  settlement  no  mention  is  made  of  her  being  obliged  to  [do] 
any  repairs.  Q'  who  is  to  furnish  out  Timber  for  y*  above  repairs. 


[In  another  handwriting.] 

I  am  of  Opinion  Lady  Martin  is  not  obliged  in  Law  to  rebuild  the  Barn 
burnt  down  by  Lightning ;  this  Estate  being  part  of  Ladyship’s  Jointure, 
she  is  only  Tenant  for  Life,  and  as  such,  cannot  be  answerable  for  any 
accidental  Waste  or  prejudice  to  the  Freehold;  and  therefore  S' Maudant 
(who  I  take  for  granted  has  the  immediate  Estate  of  Inheritance)  Cannot 
oblige  her  Ladyship  or  her  Exors  &c  to  rebuild  it. 

As  to  the  second  Question,  If  this  Estate  is  settled  upon  Lady  Martin 
{without  Impeachment  of  Waite)  the  Law  gives  her,  tho’  only  Tenant  for 

An  Essex  parish,  seven  miles  north  of  Halstead.  In  1866  George  Coote, 
farmer,  was  living  at  Smeeton  Hall. 


274 


THE  BAST  ANGLIAN;  OR, 


Life,  as  great  a  power  as  if  she  had  been  Tenant  in  Fee,  and  she  will  have  a 
Eiglit  to  out  down  any  Timber  Trees  growing  upon  the  Estate  which  are 
not  ornamental,  as  Trees  planted  for  Eidings“  or  Avenues  &o,  or  for  Shelter 
to  any  House.  If  it  is  not  settled  upon  her  without  Impeachment  of 
Waste,  her  Ladyship  will  in  that  Case,  have  a  Bight  to  cut  down  Trees  for 
necessary  Reparations,  without  being  obliged  to  make  application  to  any 
person  for  that  purpose;  but  in  this  latter  Case,  it  will  be  advisable  for 
Lady  Martin,  not  to  cut  any  more  than  sho**  be  necessary,  or  to  convert  the 
Timber  to  any  other  purpose  but  Repairs,  either  by  selling  it,  or  changing 
it  for  any  other  matenals. 

John  Round 


Slotcmarket,  Suffolk. 


Col'  23<‘  July  1774. 
Charles  Partridge,  jun. 

{To  be  continued). 


CALENDAR  TO  THE  COUNTERPARTS  OF  THE 
DEEDS  OF  SALE  OF  THE  MONASTIC  FEE-FARM  RENTS. 


{continued  from  p.  253). 
SUFFOLK. 


Places. 

Premises.  Grantees  of  Premises. 

»»•  arpSri 

Ash 

An  Annual  Rent 

See  Parham  . 

£. 

«.  d. 

Bowtoll  2 

Aspill-Stone- 

issuing  out  of 
lands  there 

An  Annual  Rent 

0 

2  0 

Sefton  7 

ham  als. 
Stone- Aspile 

issuing  out  of  the 
Township 

Do.  out  of  the 

0 

4  0 

9t  >1 

Manor 

Do.  out  of  Uston- 

0 

1  0 

Ash  . 

Hale 

Do.  out  of  the 

See  Hempstone 

9>  1) 

Bardewell 

Township 

A  Rent  there 

See  Wenham 

Combusta 

Gurdon  5 

BraudouFerry  A  Rent 

See  Lynn  Regis  in  Norfolk 

The  Mayor, 

Bradford  and 

An  Annual  Rent 

3 

2  4 

&c.,  of  Lynn 
Regis  7 

Sparrow  and 

Ufford  issuing  out  of  the 

Manor 

BuresSt.  Mary  The  Rectory, Lands,  Fras.Walsing- 

14 

10  0 

als.  5 

Sparrow  and 

Bosmere 

Tythes,advowson 
of  the  Vicarage, 
&c. 

The  Hundred  & 

ham 

Frans.  Mills 

als.  6 

Sefton  7 

also  the  Hun¬ 
dreds  of  Cleydon 
&  Sampford  & 
divers  ^nts 

**  What  is  a  riding  P  Is  it  the  same  as  a  ride  (in  a  wood)  f 


NOTB8  AND  QUKBIBS,  KTC. 


275 


PlmoM. 

FTemiaes.  Oranteea  of  Premiae*. 

Fee-farm  Bent 
Reserved. 

Orantees  of 
the  Fee-farm 
Kent  tc  No. 

£. 

Bosmere 

A  Bent  reserved 
upon  a  Lease  of 
the  said  Hun> 
dreds 

3 

0  0  Sefton  7 

Budley  • 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of 
the  Tow  11  ship 

• 

0 

2  0 

.. 

Baylam 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of 
the  Township 

0 

2  0 

>»  >* 

Do.  for  Julian’s 

0 

0  8 

>•  >> 

Do.  for  Spordens 

0 

0  9 

M  »» 

Brissett  t 

Great 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of 
the  Township 

•  •  . 

0 

2  0 

>>  II 

Ditto  out  of  the 
Manor 

• 

0 

4  0 

I. 

Bradford  ale. 
Brain  ford 
with  Burstal 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of 
the  Township 

0 

2  0 

M  1. 

Bingham  aU. 

Ditto  . 

0 

6  0 

>♦ 

Hebingham 

Barham 

Ditto  out  of  the 
Manor  of  Shore- 
land 

0 

6  8 

M  M 

Ditto  out  of  Bar- 
'ham  Hale 

. 

0 

0  10 

II  II 

Baylham 

Ditto  out  of  Lands 
there 

. 

0 

0  6 

II  11 

Badley  . 

Ditto  out  of  the 
Hall 

0 

5  1 

II  II 

Broughton 

Hall 
Blakenham 
ala.  Blank- 
ham  upon  ye 

Ditto  . 

See  Stoneham 

• 

II 

Ditto  out  of  ye 
Manor  of  Creetou 
als.  Greeting 

. 

1 

0  7 

II  II 

Water 

Bentley  aU. 
Betley 

Ditto  out  of  ye 
Township 

• 

0 

1  0 

II  II 

Ditto  out  of  the 
Priory 

• 

0 

1  6 

” 

Ditto  . 

.  .  . 

0 

2  5 

•  I  II 

Brantham 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of  ye 
Township 

.  . 

0 

2  0 

1* 

Buratiill  ala. 
Bursal  1 

An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of  the 
Township 

.  •  . 

0 

1  6 

I.  1. 

Do.  out  of  Lands 
there 

• 

0 

0  9^ 

II  II 

Do.  out  of  a  Tene¬ 
ment 

. 

0 

4  0 

II  II 

■  Badley. 

t  Biioett  Magna. 

276 


TUB  EAST  AMOLIAN  ;  OK, 


FUoes. 

Btirstall  als. 
Bursall 


Blobalds  als. 
Bloband 
Barking  or 
Newham 
Bury  St. 
Edmunds 


Bynge  . 
Chelleswortb 


Champsey  •  & 
Castle  Hat- 
cheston 
Coddenham  . 
Creting 
Clapton  Hall 
Carnoe  in 
Mendesham 

Chelmton  als. 
Chempton 

Creeting  St. 
OlaTes 


Codenham  als. 
Codingham 


Cleydon  t 


Crowfield  als. 
Cromfield 


Premiaea. 


Oranteaa  of  Premiaea 


Fee-farm  Rent 
Beaerred. 


An  Annual  Bent 
issuing  out  of 
Land  there 
Do.  out  of  a  Tene¬ 
ment  there 
Divers  Annual 
Bents  issuing  out 
of  other  Lands  & 
Tenemeats  there 
A  Bent 

A  Water  Mill  with 
the  appurts. 

The  Manor  or 
Orange  of  Bury 
alias  Eastgate 
Barus,  Parcel  of 
the  Lordship  & 
sundry  other  Pre¬ 
mises 


Oranteeaof 
the  Fee-farm 
Bent  a  No. 

t.  t.  d. 

0  0  6^  Sefton  7 


Edw.  Ferrers 
Fras.  Philips 
Ed.  Ditchheld 
&  als. 


0  0  2| 
0  1  1 


0  0  5  „ 

3  0  0  Theobald  16 
27  4  4}  Valence  6 


The  Manor  . 

See  Wickham 

Welch 

5 

An  Annual  Bent 

Countess  of 

26 

0 

’  0 

Burr  &  als.  7 

issuing  out  of  ye 

Oxford 

Manor 

Bents  there . 

See  Parham  . 

Bowtoll 

2 

A  Bent 

See  Gipwic  . 

Gurdun 

5 

Ditto  . 

)»  • 

, 

Ditto  . 

See  Wenham 

Combusta 

Bents  issuing  out  j 
of  the  Manor  & 
Lands  there  ' 

L'  ;  ; 

11 

10 

0 

0 

9 

Sparrow  and 
als.  6 

An  Annual  Bent 

4 

6 

10^ 

>> 

>9 

issuing  out  of  ye 
Town 

An  Annual  Bent 

0 

4 

0 

Sefton 

7 

issuing  out  of  ye 
Township,  &c. 

Ditto  out  of  the 
Manor 

Ditto  out  of  the 
Township 

Ditto  . 

Ditto  . 

Ditto  . 

Ditto  out  of 
Manor 

Ditto  out  of 
Manor 


See  Blakenham 


0  5  0 


the 


ye 


0  13  4 


To  he  continued. 


L.  M.  B. 


•  Campaer. 


i  Clajdon. 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


277 


CHURCH  DISCIPLINE  IN  THE  DIOCESE  OP  ELY 
DURING  THE  SIXTEENTH  CENTURY. 

In  a  recent  London  bookseller’s  catalogue,  fourteen  original 
documents  (folio  and  quarto)  of  singular  interest  were  offered  for  sale. 
These  were  referred  to  as  “  Church  Penances  under  Elizabeth,”  a.d. 
1586 — 1596.  A  hasty  glance  at  these  MSS.  reminded  us  at  once  of 
similar  penitential  forms  given  in  the  appendix  of  papers  (copied  from 
the  originals,  formerly  of  Dr.  Nalson,  afterwards  in  the  custody  of 
Dr.  Philip  Williams,  President  of  St.  John’s  College,  Cambridge) 
comprised  in  Dr.  Zachary  Grey’s  “Impartial  Examination  of  Vol.  IV. 
of  Neal’s  Hittory  of  the  Puritant.”*  Curiously  enough,  all  these 
documents  relate  to  parishes  in  the  Ely  Diocese,  both  the  MS., 
originals,  and  those  printed  by  Grey  having  in  all  probability  formed 
one  and  the  same  collection.  How  they  became  disconnected,  and 
through  what  hands  they  may  subsequently  have  passed,  we  cannot 
conjecture,  but  from  the  uniform  style,  neatness  of  handwriting,  and 
clean  condition  of  the  MSS.,  it  would  seem  likely  that  they  may  have 
strayed  from  some  diocesan  or  archidiaconal  record  room.  At  all 
events  they  have  at  least  been  preserved. 

The  bookseller’s  catalogue  states  that  the  documents  contain 
“  full  details  of  the  penances  imposed  on  certain  persons  for  various 
offences  against  the  Commandments  of  God  and  the  Church,  all 
signed  by  the  several  ecclesiastical  authorities,  and  addressed  to  the 
vicar  concerned.” 

All  who  are  familiar  with  the  conditions  of  Church  life  prevalent 
at  the  period  named,  will  know  the  nature  of  these  documents,  while 
the  precise  terms  employed  will  be  specially  interesting. 

One  of  these  papers,  termed  “  A  Confession  to  be  made  by . 

of  . ”  is  prefaced  by  a  statement  to  the  effect  that  “  the  said 

. shall  upon  Sunday . immediately  after  the  reading  of 

the  Gospell  come  forth  of  his  seate  in  the  Church  of . unto  the 

middle  Ailye  there  to  the  place  where  the  Minister  reads  the  said 
Gospell,  and  there  standing  he  shall  with  a  loud  voice  say  and  con- 
fesse  as  followeth  : — 

“Good  Neighbours,  I  acknowledge  and  confesse  that  I  have 
offended  Almighty  God,  and  by  my  evil  example  you  all,  for  that, 
&c.,  &c.,  and  I  humbly  beseech  God  and  earnestly  desire  you  all  to 
pray  to  God  for  me,  and  to  forgive  me,  promising  by  God’s  grace 
never  to  offend  hereafter  in  the  like  again. 

“  And  of  the  doing  hereof . he  shall  personally  certifye 

together  with  these  presents  at  Great  St.  Marie’s  Church  in  Cambridge 

upon . and  there  receive  such  further  order  signed  by  either 

Ric.  Bridgwater,  Bennet  Thorowgood,  or  Thomas  Amy.”  f 

Then  follows  a  certificate,  signed  by  vicar  and  churchwardens, 
that  the  confession  was  duly  made  and  the  penance  performed. 


*  Dr.  Orey  affizM  the  note  penet  me. 
t  Presumably  officers  of  the  archdeacon. 


278 


THK  EAST  AHOLIAW  ;  OB, 


In  one  case  the  late  churchwardens,  for  neglect  in  their  office 
(inasmuch  as  tiiey  did  not  present  a  parishioner  fur  iucontinency),  are 
brought  under  precisely  similar  discipline. 

The  ofiFences  alleged  include: — “Not  coming  to  Church  in  due 
time  upon  the  Sabbath  daye,”  “  not  going  in  an  orderly  manner  to 
the  Parish  Church  (and  presumably  not  leaving  in  an  orderly  manner) 
upon  Sundays  and  Holidays,”  *  “  being  absent  from  the  Parish 
Church,”  “sitting  and  drinking  in  the  house  during  Evening  Prayer 
time  on  the  Sabbath  daye,”  “  sleeping  in  Church,”  “  working  a  horse 
and  cart  on  an  Easter  Monday  morning  during  service,”  “adultery,” 
“harbouring  a  woman  during  conhnement,”  “playing  Cards  on  a 
Sunday,”  “allowing  a  Servant  to  carry  a  sheep  rack  to  the  pasture  ou 
Sunday,”  “making  discord  between  neighbours,”  for  being  “a  prat- 
linge  gossip,”  “  a  scoulder  and  a  slaiiderouse  person,”  “  a  sower  of 
strife  amongest  neighbours,”  for  “  mowing  on  a  Sunday  after  Evening 
Prayer,”  &c.,  &c. 

The  parishes  mentioned  include  Waterbeach,  Ickleton,  Harston, 
Bottisham,  Great  Wilbraham,  Witcham,  Cotteuham,  Stapleford, 
Sutton,  Ely,  &c.,  &c. 

It  would  appear  that  the  inevitable  fees  were  expected,  for  in  the 
case  of  Ickleton  is  a  curious  endorsement  addressed  to  the  man  in 
authority: — “  Syr,  I  know  not  what  was  rated  to  be  payd  upon  his 

doing  of  the  Penance,  but  ye  shall  have  it .  and  somewhat 

towards  the  Collection  for  the  Minister’s  wyfe  also,”  &c.,  &c. 

While  the  abject  confession  includes  an  earnest  expression  of 
sorrow  and  amendment,  and  the  craving  of  God’s  forgiveness,  no  kind 
of  absolution  appears  to  have  been  pronounced,  or  at  anyrate  certified. 

It  was  in  the  church  of  the  Holy  Trinity  in  Ely  (for  the  Isle  of 
Ely)  that  these  certificates  of  performance  were  presented ;  in  other 
cases,  in  Great  St.  Mary’s,  Cambridge. 


THE  CAELTON  COLVILLE  EMIGRANTS. 

In  the  year  1836  a  large  number  of  the  inhabitants  of  the  parish 
of  Carlton  Colville,  Suffolk,  decided  to  seek  fairer  fortunes  in  another 
land,  and  some  particulars  of  this  emigration  may  be  of  interest. 

Owing  to  its  proximity  to  the  town  of  Lowestoft,  and  to  the 
well-known  Oulton  Broad,  this  parish  increased  in  population  very 
rapidly  during  recent  years.  It  has  now  been  divided  for  Local 
Government  purposes,  and  a  portion  is  included  in  the  newly-formed 
Oulton  Broad  Urban  District.  At  the  date  mentioned,  however,  the 
parish  was  chiefly  a  rural  one. 

It  should  be  stated  that  the  parishioners  had  power  to  borrow 
any  sum  of  money,  not  exceeding  half  the  average  yearly  Poor  Rate 

•  “  Does  any  parishioner,”  inquires  Bishop  Montague  in  his  Visitation  Articles 
for  the  Diocese  of  Norwich  (1638),  “  come  into  the  Church  •  •  •  to  the  disturb¬ 
ance  of  the  auditors,  profanation  of  the  Church,  contempt  of  God  and  His  Service  ; 
a  course  never  practised  among  Fagans." 


NOTBS  ANP  qUKRIBB,  BTC. 


279 


for  three  years,  for  the  purpose  of  assisting  the  emigration  of  poor 
persons  settled  in  the  parish,  and  to  charge  the  repayment  of  the  sum 
on  the  Poor  Rates. 

At  a  meeting  of  the  ratepayers  and  owners  of  property  held  at 
the  Church,  on  Thursday  the  14th  April,  1836,  it  was  resolved: — 
“  That  the  sum  of  £150  be  forthwith  borrowed  by  the  Churchwardens 
and  Overseers,  as  a  fund  or  contribution  for  defraying  the  expenses  of 
the  emigration  of  poor  persons  having  settlements  in  this  parish,  & 
being  willing  to  emigrate,  to  be  charged  upon  the  rates  to  be  raised 
fur  the  relief  of  the  poor  in  this  parish,  &  to  be  applied  under  such 
rates,  orders,  and  regulations  as  the  Poor  Law  Commissioners  in 
England  and  Wales  shall  in  that  behalf  direct,  and  the  said  Church* 
wardens  &  Overseers  were  directed  by  the  said  meeting  to  borrow 
such  sum  of  £150  accordingly,  to  be  repaid  by  five  equal  annual 
instalments  of  Thirty  pounds  each,  with  interest  not  exceeding  £5  per 
cent,  per  annum.” 

The  minutes  of  this  meeting  were  signed  by  Edward  Jermyn, 
Rector;  John  Durrant,  Vestry  “Clarke”;  and  the  Churchwardens 
and  Overseers. 

The  foregoing  resolution  was  communicated  to  the  Poor  Law 
Commissioners  for  England  and  Wales,  who  were  the  forerunners  of 
the  present  Local  Government  Board.  On  the  28th  April  the  Com¬ 
missioners  granted  the  necessary  Authority  for  borrowing  the  money, 
subject  to  the  following  conditions,  viz. : — 

(1)  The  parties  emigrating  shall  go  to  some  British  Colony. 

(2)  A  contract  shall  be  entered  into  for  conveying  them  to  such 
place  on  the  way  to  their  destination  as  the  Poor  Ijaw  Commissioners 
for  England  and  Wales  or  the  Agent-General  for  Emigration  shall 
approve. 

(3)  Such  contract  shall  be  sanctioned  by  the  Agent-General  for 
Emigration,  or  by  one  of  the  Government  Emigration  Agents  at  the 
outports,  and  shedl  include  the  maintenance  and  medical  attendance  of 
the  emigrants  during  the  passage ;  and  also  a  provision  that,  on 
arrival  at  the  place  to  which  the  parties  are  contracted  to  be  conveyed, 
the  sum  of  £2  at  least  shall  be  paid  to  each  head  of  a  family  emigrat¬ 
ing,  and  £1  at  least  to  each  single  man  or  woman,  not  being  part  of 
a  family. 

This  authority  was  dated  the  28th  April,  1836. 

It  can  be  imagined  that  a  good  deal  remained  to  be  done  before 
the  arrangements  for  the  voyage  were  complete.  There  were  journeys 
by  the  Overseer  to  the  port  of  Yarmouth  ;  there  was  the  getting 
together  of  the  provisions  and  other  things  granted  to  each  family, 
and  no  doubt  many  other  matters  to  be  attended  to.  There  would  not 
be  much  time  for  sad  thoughts,  but  the  adult  members  of  the  family 
must  have  realised  that,  with  the  depressed  state  of  the  old  country, 
there  was  little  chance  of  their  returning  to  the  familiar  Suffolk 
village. 

However,  the  day  of  departure  arrived,  and  the  little  flock  set 
sail  in  the  brig  “Carron” — Captain  William  Elliot.  One  family, 
however,  sailed  in  the  brig  “Morning  Star” — Captain  Davidson. 

T  2 


280 


THK  BAST  ANGLIAN  ;  OR. 


During  April  and  May,  107  Carlton  Colville  men,  women,  and 
children  departed  for  Canada.  The  majority  were  labourers  with 
their  families,  but  one  emigrant  was  described  as  a  carpenter. 

The  £150  borrowed  by  the  Churchwardens  was  expended  in  the 
passage  monies,  and  in  the  grants  given  each  family,  as  required  by 
the  Commissioners.  In  addition  to  this,  each  family  was  provided 
with  a  stock  of  provisions,  and  the  particulars  of  the  goods  supplied 
to  one  of  the  families  are  as  follows : — 


Name. 

Age. 

lbs. 

bread. 

lbs. 

floor 

lbs.  lbs.  lbs. 

cheese,  batter,  bacon. 

prioe 
per  cwt. 

£. 

•  s 

d. 

P . .  Jonas 

38 

182 

— 

—  —  — 

17s. 

1 

7 

7 

Amy,  his  wife  . . 

32 

— 

84 

-  -  - 

16s.  8d. 

0 

12 

6 

Hannah,  their  daur.  . . 

12 

— 

— 

31  —  — 

56s. 

0 

15 

6 

Marian,  their  daur.  . . 

9 

— 

— 

—  8  — 

112s. 

0 

8 

0 

Chas.,  their  eon 

6 

— 

— 

—  —  24i 

56s. 

0 

12 

3 

Jonas,  their  eon 

5 

— 

— 

—  Passage  . . 

12 

0 

0 

Lewis,  their  son 
William,  infant. 

3 

— 

— 

—  Allowance 

money 

2 

0 

0 

sack  potatoes 

4s.,  suet  3s.,  6  stone  fiour 

at  2s.  2d.,  expenses  7s.  l^d. 

.  .  • 

1 

7 

H 

Letter 

0 

0 

A 

Totel 

£19 

3 

3i 

It  is  safe  to  assert  that  these  stores  would  be  increased  by  many 
small  gifts  of  home  comforts  from  friendly  neighbours. 

The  spectacle  of  a  small  rural  parish  voluntarily  taxing  itself  for 
five  years  in  order  to  give  a  fresh  start  in  life  to  some  of  its  poorer 
inhabitants  is  certainly  an  instructive  one.  The  population  of  Carlton 
Colville  at  this  time  was  probably  about  500  or  600.  Another  family 
was  sent  in  1837,  sailing  in  the  same  brig,  the  “  Carron.” 

In  addition  to  the  articles  mentioned,  one  family  was  supplied 
with  shoes  and  a  blanket,  another  with  sugar,  tea,  groats,  &c.  The 
cost  of  the  tea  was  At.  a  lb.  Other  expenses  included  the  Overseers’ 
payments  for  beer,  horses,  tolls,  &c.,  at  Yarmouth  and  Gorleston. 
The  charge  of  Ad.  for  a  letter  gives  the  rate  in  operation  previous  to 
the  introduction  of  the  penny  post  in  1 840. 

It  is  unnecessary  to  seek  far  for  the  reason  for  this  almost  whole¬ 
sale  emigration,  for  we  can  safely  assume  that  Carlton  Colville  was 
not  the  only  parish  to  exercise  its  power  in  this  respect.  To  look 
back  a  few  years,  there  was  the  panic  and  crash  of  1825-6,  the  cause  of 
fearful  misery  and  distress  to  the  poor  and  labouring  classes.  At  the 
time  of  Qeorge  lY.’s  death  there  was  general  want  throughout  the 
country.  The  spirit  of  dissatisfaction  was  growing  stronger  and 
stronger.  Machinery  was  everywhere  smashed,  factories  were  burned 
down,  and  starving  gangs  went  about  the  land.  Although  corn  was 
so  scarce  and  dear,  a  very  large  quantity  of  this  valuable  commodity 
was  wilfully  burned.  The  year  1831  was  one  of  agitation  and  riot. 
The  following  year  saw  the  passing  of  the  Reform  Bill,  and  the  same 
year  the  country  was  devastated  by  cholera.  It  must  also  be 
remembered  that  the  old  Poor  Laws  existed  until  1834,  and  that  they 


NOTES  AND  QUERIES,  ETC. 


281 


have  been  described  as  placing  a  premium  upon  vice  and  immorality, 
and  as  operating  most  powerfully  in  degrading  and  debasing  the 
labouring  classes.  The  year  immediately  preceding  the  emigration, 
1835,  was  again  marked  by  serious  agricultural  depression,  and 
distress  amongst  the  poor  was  universal. 

So  much  for  the  past.  Let  us  hope  that  the  Carlton  Colville 
emigrants  found  good  recompense  for  their  labour  in  the  new  land. 
It  would  be  interesting  to  learn  something  of  their  subsequent 
fortunes,  and  also  to  have  particulars  of  similar  emigrations  from 
other  East  AngUan  parishes.  Charles  Chambers. 

Lowutoft. 


WILLS  OF  RICHARD  PAETRICHE  OF  KERSEY  AND 
BROMESWELL,!  1610. 

(Archdeaconry  of  Sudbury,  vol.  xliii.,  “Rogen,”  to.  212b). 

In  the  name  of  god  Amen,  The  eight  daye  of  August  Anno  dni 
1610  and  in  the  eight  yere  of  the  reigue  of  our  Sovereigne  Lord 
James  by  the  grace  of  god  Kinge  of  England  ffraunce  and  [fo.  213a1 
Ireland  Defender  of  the  fiaithe  &c.  and  of  Skottland  the  lowre  and 
fiorteithe,  I  Richard  Partriche  of  Bromswall  [Bromeswell,  2  miles 
N.E.  of  Woodbridge]  in  the  Countie  of  SufE.  yeoma  being  sicke  of 
bodye  but  of  whole  mynde  and  pfect  remembrance  laud  and  praise  be 
geuen  to  Almightie  god ;  Doe  constitute  ordeine  and  make  this  my 
Testm*  conteyninge  herein  my  laste  will,  ffirst  I  Comytt  my  soule  into 
the  hands  of  Almightie  god  my  onlye  saviour  and  redemer  and  my 
bodye  to  the  earthe  from  whence  it  came  hoping  thoroughe  the 
merites  of  Christe  J esus  as  the  same  diethe  in  corruption  soe  it  shall 
rise  againe  in  in  [o'c]  corruption  and  be  vnited  to  the  same  soule  in 
ioye  everlastinge  felicitye  in  the  kingdome  of  heaven  and  as  towchinge 
the  disposicSn  of  all  my  lands  goods  and  Chattells  I  leave  them  to 
be  ordered  and  disposed  of  in  sorte  fiollowinge,  ffirst  I  giue  and 
bequeathe  vnto  Elizabeth  Sare  the  wife  of  Willm  Sare  of  Carsey 
[Kersey]  in  the  Couutie  aforesaid  and  to  the  heires  of  her  bodye 
lawfully  begotten  my  house  w'*'  all  and  singular  thappurtenncs  ther 
vnto  belouginge  scituate  and  beinge  in  Carsey  in  the  Countye  of  Su£f. 
and  if  it  shall  fortune  that  the  said  Elizabeth  my  dawghter  doe 
departe  this  mortall  life  with  out  heires  of  her  bodye  lawfullye 
begotten  then  I  will  that  my  said  house  w^  thapptenhcs  shall  be 
Bould  by  myne  Executors  and  the  monie  theirof  comynge  to  be 
equallie  devided  betwene  Richard  Partrich  my  sonne  and  Marye  my 
dawghter  the  wife  of  Steven  Amys  and  the  beires  of  their  bodyes 
lawfully  begotten.  Item  I  will  that  Edward  Bendall  my  ffarmore* 

‘  In  the  manuscript  calendar  or  index  this  will  is  described  as  that  of  Richard 
Partrich  of  Kersey.  The  parish  register  of  Bromeswell  does  nut  begin  till  1634. 

*  In  the  nave  of  Gazeley  Church  there  is  a  brass  inscription,  dated  1686,  for 
Robert  Tailour,  “  sometymes  farmour  of  Desninge  Hall.” — Farrer’s  Lift  of  Suffolk 
Monumtntal  Bra$*$t,  p.  26. 


382 


THE  EAST  ▲MOUAN  ;  OE, 


[*.«.,  the  tenant  of  my  farm]  shall  have  his  dwellings  in  my  said 
house  for  the  terms  of  three  yeres  from  y^  feast  of  saint  Michell 
tharchaungell  next  after  my  decease  yealding  and  payenge  yerelye 
and  everye  yere  duringe  the  said  Terms  vnto  Elizabeth  Sare  my 
dawghter  the  yerely  rent  or  ferme  of  Twentye  shillinges  of  Lawful! 
monie  of  England  at  the  Seast  of  thanuciaSn  of  blessed  Marie  the 
virgin  and  saint  [fo.  213b]  Michael  tharchaungell  by  eren  poroSns, 
Item  I  g^ue  and  bequeath  vnto  Steven  Amys  the  sonne  of  Steven 
Amys  and  Mary  my  dawghter  the  som’  of  fowre  poundes  of  lawfull 
monie  of  England  to  be  paid  vnto  him  by  myne  Executo's  when  he 
shall  accomplishe  his  age  of  eighteene  yeres,  Item  I  g^ue  and 
bequeath  unto  ffaithe  Amys  my  grandchild  the  som’  of  Tenne  pounds 
of  lawfull  monye  of  England  to  be  paid  vnto  her  by  myne  Executors 
when  she  shall  accompUshe  her  age  of  eighteen  yeres,  Item  I  giue 
and  bequeathe  vnto  Suzan  Fartriche  my  grandchild  the  dawghter  of 
Richard  Fartriche  my  sonne  the  some  of  five  pounds  of  lawfull 
monye  of  England  to  be  paid  vnto  her  by  my  Executors  when  she 
shall  accomplishe  her  age  of  eighteene  yeres.  Item  I  giue  and 
bequeath  vnto  Elizabeth  Farteriche  the  second  dawghter  of  the  said 
Richard  Fartriche  my  sonne  y*  som’  of  five  pounds  to  be  paid  vnto 
her  by  myne  Executors  when  she  shall  accomplish  her  age  of 
eighteene  yeres.  Item  I  giue  and  bequeath  vnto  Richard  Fartriche 
my  sonne  the  som’  of  ffive  pounds  to  be  paid  vnto  him  by  myne 
Executors  within  one  yere  nexte  after  my  decease.  Item  I  giue  and 
bequeath  vnto  Anne  Fartriche  my  sister  the  som’  of  Twentie  shillings 
to  be  paid  vnto  her  by  myne  Ikecutors  within  three  monethes  next 
my  decease,  Item  I  giue  and  bequeathe  vnto  Elizabeth  &  Marye  my 
twoe  dawghters  all  my  howshould  stuff  to  be  equally  deuided  between 
them,  And  I  ordeine  and  make  Elizabeth  my  dawghter  and  Marie  my 
dawghter  Executors  of  this  my  laste  will  and  Testament,  And  likewise 
I  ordeine  and  make  my  lovinge  freind  Richard  Sugg  of  Carsey 
supvisor  of  this  my  laste  will  and  Testament  vnto  whom  I  giue  xx*  for 
his  paines  therin  to  be  taken.  In  wyttnes  wherof  I  have  to  this  my 
last  will  and  Testament  put  my  hand  and  Seale  the  daye  and  yere 
first  above  wrytten,  sign  dcu  Richd  Fartriche,  wyttnesss  herevnto 
Thoms  Wright,  Steven  Amys,  Thoms  Stannard  &  Richard  Harrison. 

[Froved  at  Bury  S.  Round’s,  22  Aug.  1610,  by  Elizabeth,  one 
of  the  two  executrixes;  the  other,  Mary,  reserving  her  right.] 

Extract*  from  the  Parith  Regitter  of  Kertey. 

Baptisms  begin  in  156^,  marriages  in  156},  burials  in  1563;  all 
three  parts  examined  to  the  end  of  1620. 

1677.  Bichard  Fartriche  [baptised]  the  16  of  December. 

167fl.  Marie  Fartriche  [mptised]  the  first  of  ffebroary. 

168|.  Elizabeth  Fattriche  [baptised]  the  6  of  Marche. 

168}.  Sara  Pattriche  [baptised]  the  24  of  Marche. 

1683.  Sara  Pattriche  juried]  the  24  of  June. 

,,  Elizabeth  Pattriche  [buried]  the  6  of  December. 

16M.  the  wife  of  Bichard  Par[P  trichl  Januarie  3  [buried]. 

1600.  Audrye  Pattriche  buried  the  2  oay  of  August. 


I 


N0TB8  AND  QTTBRISS,  STC. 


283 


1602.  The  Widdowe  Patrike  was  buried  the  26  day  of  June. 

1605.  Wittm  Sare  k  Elizabeth  Partridge  [were  married]  the  8  of  December. 
[1610.  Will  of  Bichard  Partriche  the  elder  dated  8  August  and  proved  22  August.] 

1612.  Marye  Patridge  y'  daught'  of  Richard  Patridge  buryed  y*  30  of  August. 

1613.  Jonathan  Partridge  the  sonne  of  Richard  Patridg  was  bapt.  21  of  Uctober. 

PEDIGREE. 


Partriche  ^ 

_ i_ 


Richard  *  Partriche  of  Bromeswell,  yeoman,  formerly=p 
of  Kersey;  bis  children  bapt.  and  bur.  1677>83  at 
Kersey;  his  dau.  Eliz.  mar.  there  in  1605;  will  (of 
Bromeswell,  yeoman)  dated  8  Aug.  1610,  in  which 
he  mentioned  his  house  at  Kersey,  then  let  to  a 
“ffarmore”  (tenant),  and  appointed  as  supervisor  of 
will  “my  lovinge  freind,’’  Rich.  Sugg  of  Kersey; 
wUl  proved  22  Aug.  1610,  at  Bury. 

Aich.  Par-  = 
triche; 
bapt.  16 
Doc.  1677, 
at  Kersey ; 
devisee  in 
his  father’s 
wiU,  1610; 
his  children 
bur.  k  bapt. 

1612-13  at 
Kersey. 


Anne  Par¬ 
triche  ; 
devisee  as 
“my  sister” 
in  Rich.  Par¬ 
tridge’s  will, 
1610. 


Mary  Par- 

r  Stephen 

Eliz.  Pat-  = 

=  William 

Sarah  Pat- 

triche ; 

Amys ; 

triche ; 

Sare; 

triche ; 

bapt.  1  Feb. 

named  in 

bapt. 

named 

bapt. 

1678  at 

his  father- 

6  March, 

in  his 

24  March, 

Kersey ; 

in-law’s 

158i  at 

father- 

1588 

devisee  in 

will,  and 

Kersey ; 

in-law’s 

Kersey  ; 

and  CO- 

perhaps  the 

mar.  there 

will  as  of 

bur.  there 

executrix 

same  as  the 

8  Dec.  1606; 

Kersey. 

24  June, 

of  her 

father’s 

will. 

1 

“  Steven 
Amys,” 
who  was  a 
witness 
thereto. 

devisee  in 
and  co- 
executrix 
of  her 
father's 
will,  which 
she  proved 
22  Aug. 
1610. 

1683. 

1 

1 

1 

t 

I 

Stephen 

Amys ;  born 

Faith  Amys ; 
devisee,  under 

Susan  Par¬ 

Eliz.  Par- 

1 

Mary 

Jonathan 

triche  ; 

tericke. 

Patridge  ; 

Patridge ; 

after  8  Aug. 

18,  in  her 
grandfather 

born  after 

2nd  dau. ; 

bur. 

bapt. 

1692  ; 

8  Aug. 

devisee. 

30  Aug. 

21  Oct. 

devisee. 

Partriche’s 

1692; 

under  18, 

1612  at 

1613  at 

under  18,  in 

will. 

devisee, 
under  18, 
in  her 
grand¬ 
father’s 
will. 

in  her 
grand¬ 
father’ B 
will. 

Kersey. 

Kersey. 

his  g;rand- 
father 
Partriche’ B 
will. 

*  A  Rich.  Partryche,  son  of  John  and  Bridget,  was  bapt.  18th  November, 
1661,  at  Bradfield  St.  Clare,  and  he  had  a  sister  “  Annas  ”  (Anne  or  Agnes)  bapt. 
there  3rd  February,  looj  {Proceedings  of  the  Suffolk  Institute  of  Arehceology  for  1897, 
vol.  ix.,  part  iii.,  p.  316  ;  and  The  East  Anglian,  third  series,  vol.  viii.,  p.  190).  In 
his  will,  dated  10  61ay,  1586,  and  proved  in  1686  at  Bury,  William  Partrich  the 
elder  of  Great  Welue^m,  husbandman,  made  a  bequest  to  a  “  Kicharde  Partridge  ” 
{see  Partridge  of  Great  Welnetham,  etc.,  in  The  East  Anglian,  third  series,  Tol.  viii., 
pp.  190,  191). 

Stovmarket,  Suffolk.  ChAKLSS  PartkiDOK,  JTTNIOR. 


284 


THE  BAST  ANOLIAN  ;  OB, 


WILLS  OF  THE  HUNDRED  OF  ARMINQFORD,  GAMES. 
{continued  from  p.  268). 

Ckotdon-cum-Cloptoh. 

Richard  Conder  the  elder  of  Croyden,  yeoman.  Dated  22  Feb. 
1667.  Mentions  son  Richard;  daughters  Anne,  wife  of  John  Day; 
Mary,  wife  of  Robert  Day  ;  Sarah,  wife  of  Peter  Brimley ;  grandsons 
John  and  Robert  Conder.  Proved  9  Feb.  1693. 

Richard  Conder  of  Clapton,  yeoman.  Dated  17  March  1717-8. 
In  indifferent  health.  To  my  son  Jacob  £20  within  a  year,  also  £20 
in  three  years,  on  condition  that  'the  said  Jacob  is  compot  mentit,  and 
if  he  is  not,  or  is  dead,  the  £20  to  remain  in  the  hands  of  Jabez  and 
Joshua  Conder,  hereby  appointed  trustees  of  the  £20,  to  be  disposed, 
either  for  his  maintenance  if  non  compot  mentit.  or,  if  deceased,  to  be 
distributed  between  his  children.  To  my  daughter  Rhoda  Porter  £20, 
also  a  joyn  bed,  bolster  and  pillows,  with  a  blanket,  and  a  coverlet, 
and  a  pair  of  pillow  bieres,  to  choose  which  she  likes,  and  also  a  pair 
of  sheets  which  she  likes  best,  and  the  curtains  belonging  to  the  said 
bed.  To  my  son  Jabez  Conder  and  his  heirs  the  messuage  or 
tenement  in  the  parish  of  Bassingborne,  freehold,  with  the  orchards, 
barns,  outhouses  and  appurtenances,  on  condition  of  paying  the  above 
legacies.  Son  Josua,  executor  and  residuary  legatee.  Witnesses : — 
Thomas  Qeeve,  John  Field,  Clement  Kinnersley.  Proved  24  June 
1718.  [Richard  Conder  was  the  founder  of  Nonconformity  in 
Croyden.  His  house  there  was  licensed  as  a  Congregational  meeting 
place  9  Dec.  1672.  In  1686  he  was  presented  for  absenting  himself 
wholly  from  Divine  service  and  sermon  for  six  months.  Though  he 
laboured  for  some  years  without  a  single  convert,  he  lived  long 
enough  to  see  the  present  Chapel  built  and  its  congregation 
flourishing.  A  rector  of  Croyden-cum-Clopton  was  deprived  for 
simony  in  1695,  and  his  successor  (1697 — 1731)  was  non-resident,  the 
single  Sunday  service  being  taken  by  the  Vicar  of  Arrington,  who 
received  the  stipend  of  6*  8^  per  Sunday  for  his  pains.  A  grandson 
of  this  Richard  Conder,  John  Conder,  D.D.,  born  at  Wimpole  in  1714, 
attained  considerable  eminence  as  a  dissenting  minister  and  theologian, 
and  was  Principal  of  the  Homerton  Academy,  where  he  died  in  1781.] 

Sir  John  Thorney,  chantry  priest  of  Clopton.  Dated  10  Jan. 

-  1524.  My  body  to  be  buried  in  the  chapel  of  Clopton,  as  nigh  my 
brother  Sir  Robert  as  may  be.  To  the  high  altar  of  Clopton  3'  4'*. 
To  the  torches  of  the  same  3*  4^.  To  the  bells  of  the  same  3*  4^.  To 
great  Shelford  Church  for  a  vestment  20*.  To  the  high  altar  there 
3*  4**.  To  the  bridge  there  6*  S'*.  To  Thomas  Dalyson,  steward  of 
Shingay  10*  and  a  pair  of  Fustian  Blankets.  To